Page 1

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF USA

GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY

GYM OWNERS:

HOW TO TALK ABOUT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE PREVENTION

YUL MOLDAUER & MORGAN HURD 2018 AMERICAN CUP CHAMPIONS

WORK-LIFE BALANCE FOR COACHES

SPRING 2018 — VOL. 38 – #2

THE BENEFITS OF POSITIVE COACHING

ENERGY ZAPPERS: HOW TO STAY HAPPY

...AND MORE!


EVENTS E V E N T S

S C H E D U L E

APRIL

2018

7

World Cup (M/W). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tokyo, Japan

10–16

World Championships (A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antwerp, Belgium

13–15

World Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pesaro, Italy

14–15

City of Jesolo Trophy (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jesolo, Italy

20–21

Men’s NCAA Championships (M). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chicago, IL

20–21

Women’s NCAA Championships (W). . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Louis, MO

20–22

World Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tashkent, Uzbekistan

26–29

Pacific Rim Championships (M/R/TT/W) . . . . . . . Medellin, Colombia

27–28

Word Cup (TT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brescia, Italy

27–29

World Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baku, Azerbaijan

JULY 3–8    

USA Gymnastics Championships (A/R/TT) . . . . . . . . Greensboro, NC

7       

Hopes Classic (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD

8       

American Classic (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD

27–28

U.S. Classic/Hopes Championships (W). . . . . . . . . . . Columbus, OH

AUGUST 4–5    

World Cup (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maebashi, Japan

16–19

2018 U.S. Gymnastics Championships (M/W). . . . . . . . . Boston, MA

24–26

World Challenge Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kazan, Russia

SEPTEMBER 10–16

World Championships (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sofia, Bulgaria   

OCTOBER

MAY

4–6

Junior Olympic Eastern Championships (W). . . . . . . . .Rochester, NY

5–7    

World Cup (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loule, Portugal

4–6

Junior Olympic Western Championships (W) . . . . . . Salt Lake City, UT

6–18  

Youth Olympic Games (M/R/TT) . . . . . . . . . Buenos Aires, Argentina

4–6    

World Challenge Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guadalajara, Spain

25–Nov. 3        World Championships (M/W). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doha, Qatar

9–13  

Junior Olympic National Championships . . . . . . . . Oklahoma City, OK

10–13

Junior Olympic National Championships (W) . . . . . . . . Cincinnati, OH

NOVEMBER

11–13               World Challenge Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portimao, Portugal 16–20

Rhythmic National Qualifier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lake Placid, NY

18–20

Elite Challenge (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado Springs, CO

7–10  

World Championships (TT). . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Petersburg, Russia

22–25

World Cup (M) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cottbus, Germany

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GFA = Gymnastics for All, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling NOTE: Dates and events are subject to change or cancellation.

2

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF USA

GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 • V O L U M E 3 8 • #2

39

PUBLISHER

Kerry J. Perry EDITOR

Scott Bregman GRAPHIC DESIGNER

USA GYMNASTICS INTERIM BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GYM OWNERS: HOW TO TALK ABOUT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE PREVENTION By Toby Stark

CHALK IT UP TO SAFETY By Steve Cook

18

CHAIR Karen Golz MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORS Kittia Carpenter, women’s gymnastics Randy Jepson, men’s gymnastics Stefanie Korepin, rhythmic gymnastics Claudia Kretschmer, women’s gymnastics Scott Lineberry, trampoline and tumbling Bob Meier, acrobatic gymnastics Justin Spring, men’s gymnastics

22

WORK-LIFE BALANCE FOR COACHES By Shari Medini

30

THE BENEFITS OF POSITIVE COACHING By Lainy Carslaw

ADVISORY COUNCIL DIRECTORS Cindy Bickman Bobbie Cesarek Evelyn Chandler

39

ENERGY ZAPPERS: HOW TO REMAIN HAPPY By John Hayes

ATHLETE DIRECTORS Ivana Hong, women’s gymnastics Dylan Maurer, acrobatic gymnastics Ava Gehringer, rhythmic gymnastics Steven Legendre, men’s gymnastics TBD, trampoline and tumbling

DEPARTMENTS

2

EVENT SCHEDULE

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 .

4

TECHNIQUE is now published quarterly by USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-237-5050) or visit online at www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.—$25 per year; Canada/Mexico—$48 per year; all other foreign countries—$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2017 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. ­All rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719.

26

FREE WEBINARS

34

WHAT’S NEW: 2018 WOMEN’S PROGRAM UPDATES

45

MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE

Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author, and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

14 ST. VINCENT SPORTS PERFORMANCE: A LITTLE BIT SOFTER NOW: A GUIDE TO LANDING CORRECTLY By Brandon Johnson

10

Jeannie Shaw

INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS Lois Elizabeth Bingham James Crawford-Jakubiak David Rudd Julie Springwater

FEATURES

INSIDE USA GYMNASTICS: MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

5 WHAT’S NEW —BANNED MEMBERS LIST UPDATE

47 CLASSIFIEDS

30

COVER: Photos by John Cheng SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

3


A

M E S S A G E

s this issue goes to press, thousands of gymnasts across the country have either competed in their final meet of the 201718 season or focused their training for the culmination of the men’s and women’s Junior Olympic season. This year, the accomplishments of our hardworking athletes and coaches, along with their parents, gym club owners and judges, mean just a little bit more. I want to commend each and every one of you for continuing the hard, but rewarding, work of helping young men and women achieve their goals while continuing to focus on creating an empowered culture. In February, USA Gymnastics collaborated with the U.S. Olympic Committee to identify an Interim Board of Directors to meet the requirements of the USOC. Karen Golz is the chair of the Interim Board, which includes six independent directors with business and child advocacy backgrounds.  The Interim Board is charged with several tasks, including revamping the board make-up, and is holding its first meeting around press time.    I have spent much of my first few months listening to so many incredible athletes, professionals and groups that represent our gymnastics community. Listening to the powerful voices of the courageous women who shared their experiences at the recent Larry Nassar  hearings will  stay with me for the rest of my life.  I will keep their words at the core of every deci4

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018

F R O M

T H E

sion I make, every day, as the leader of this organization. I believe the best way to honor all of our athletes, past, present and future, is to ensure that we do everything we can to prevent this from happening again by making bold decisions and holding ourselves to the highest standards of care.    Since December, here are a few of the bold decisions and actions we have taken. • Supporting the creation of the National Gymnastics Foundation’s Athlete Assistance Fund, which provides our athletes who are survivors of sexual abuse the financial resources for counseling services. • Building an Athlete Task Force where our athletes will help shape our organization’s future strategic and operating decisions. • Visiting and listening to athletes and member clubs about their perspectives and ideas through our Listening Forums and Outreach to help reinforce USA Gymnastics

P R E S I D E N T policies and strategies. • Continuing to implement the Deborah Daniels recommendations stemming from an independent evaluation of USA Gymnastics’ safety policies, 80 percent of which already are being implemented as of today. • Strongly enforcing the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy that: • requires mandatory reporting; • defines six types of misconduct; • sets standards to prohibit grooming behavior and prevent inappropriate interaction; • establishes greater accountability. • Providing easier methods to report abuse with a dedicated toll-free number (833-844-SAFE), email address  (safesport@ usagym.org) and online reporting. • Incorporating expert’s ideas and strategies in the enhance-


WHAT’S NEW

WHAT’S NEW

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The following Membership Statement has been adopted by the Board of Directors of USA Gymnastics: Membership in USA Gymnastics is a privilege granted by USA

Gymnastics. That privilege can be withdrawn by USA Gymnastics at any time where a member’s conduct is determined to be inconsistent with the best interest of the sport of gymnastics and of the athletes we are servicing.

Name

Ray Adams

State Violation Name

FL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nicholas Aliucci

GA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Julian Amaro

CA

Kenneth "Andy" Arnold

IN

Lyndsey Wesley Cox James Craig III

The following former members are permanently ineligible for membership within USA Gymnastics. Based on an amendment of Article 10.16 to the USA Gymnastics Bylaws, effective January 1, 2012, any individual who is declared ineligible will have the USA Gymnastics’ Bylaw, rule, regulation or policy that was violated and resulted in his/her expulsion listed next to his/her name.

State Violation Name

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

CO

State Violation Name

Patrick Okopinski

WI

Brian Townsend

LA

FL

Marian Penev

NY

Brent Trottier

WA

Frank Hohman, Jr.

PA

William M. Permenter

FL

Bruce Unger

TX

Milos Hroch

CA

Don Peters

CA

Jon Valdez

IL

Timothy Picquelle

CA

Dwight Van Dale

WI

Cynthia Posmoga

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Vincent Pozzuoli

CT

Bylaw 9.2 (a)

Anthony Van Kirk

CA

David Pyles

AZ

Joel Velasquez

OR

Sandro Ramos

OK

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Jose Vilchis

Il

David Reiakvam

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

David Paul Waage

OR

Jeffrey Richards

FL

Chris Wagoner

TX

Rudy Rodriguez

CA

Jeremy Waldridge

OR

Russell Wallace

CT

Brooklyn Walters

IN

Robert Hoefer

MI

Vannie Edwards

AR

Steven Elliott

TX

Steven L. Infante

CT

Charles Theodore Bates MN

Anthony Engelke

PA

James Bell

WA

Alexander Katchalov

FL

Daniel Erb

PA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Morgan Bennett

TX

PA

Matthew H. Erichsen

WA

Code of Ethical Conduct II.D./II.F.

Kristopher Berry

SC

James Kivisto

Wi

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Jeffrey Bettman

OR

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nolan Knuckles

AZ

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

LA

Code of Ethical Conduct II.F./II.H.

Dana Koppendrayer

FL

Zac Lawson

IL

Steve Biondo Phillip Bishop

MD

Douglas Boger

CA MD

Joseph Bowers

OH

Shawn Bowlden

IL

Matthew Brinker

OH

Vince Brown

SC

Bryan Brown Christopher A. Brown

Rick Feuerstein

MI

Patrick Bogan

Paul Bollinger

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H, and II.I

Bylaw 9.1 (c)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

CA NE/KS

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Christopher Ford

VA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Foster

AL

Joseph Fountain

MD

Neil Frederick

MD

Roy Larry Gallagher

PA

Todd Gardiner

IL

Robert Allen (Bob) Garner

TN

Sean Gilham

CA

James Fogg

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Russell "Rusty" Glanton

IL/CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Timothy Glas

NY

NM NE

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H, and II.I

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Thomas Burdash

KY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Ricardo “Chico” Goddard

Keith Callen

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nathaniel Goodale

VT

Jesus "Jesse" Camargo TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Marcelo Guimaraes

TX

Michael Cardamone

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Vernor Gumila

IL

NJ

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.2.

Richard Gustafson

OR

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Johnny Gutierrez

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Paul Hagan

MI

Joseph Hannon

IL

Joseph Catrambone Darin Caviness

OH

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Ronald Charles

NJ

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Charity Christensen

UT

Code of Ethical Conduct II.D.

Kendale Coats

IL

Edward Trey Coniff

TX

William Copp

FL

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Ronald Hartsfield

FL

Robert Dean Head

KY

Ted Hicks

TN

Michael Hinton

TN

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b) SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

State Violation

MI

Nicholas Hitchcock

Thad Cypher

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

State Violation Name

Faye Lorraine aka Heather Kristian King

Jeffrey LeFevre

MI

Ronnie Lewis

AR

Jung Min Lim

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii) Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Johnathan Mackie

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Parker Madison

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William McCabe

GA

Dean McCollum

CO

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii) Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

Joel Mertes

TX

Jason Miguel Mesa

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Troy Miller

PA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Robert Mollock

OR

John S. Moore

WV SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Jorge Rodriguez

NJ/MA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Miguel Rosario

NY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

John H. Rowaka John Howardaka

Steve Waples

TX

DE

Derek Waskowski

OH

Gabriel Salazar

TX

Donald Watts

KY

Adam Savignano

NJ

Patrick Wehrung

CA

Mark Schiefelbein

TN

Mike West

WA

Jonathan White

CA

Lyf Christian Wildenberg

MN

Keith Willette

CA

gymnasticszone.com Row

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

David Schneider

MO

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Jason Scofield

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.2.

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Robert Shawler

CA

Steve Shirley

MO

Bill Witthar

MO

Steven Todd Siegel

CO

Joel Woodruff

TX

Ronald Smith

TX

James Woollums

AZ

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Blake Steven Starr

UT

Daniel Zera

NY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Paul Summers

OK

Daniel Zmrzel

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Mark Swift

FL

Freddie Eugene Tafoya, Jr.

CA

Thomas Tellez

NY VA LA NC

Kristoffer Morton

CA

Gregory Muller

ID

William Munsinger

MN

Larry Nassar

MI

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Newcom

GA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Brian Nguyen

VA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Jeena Nilson

UT

Jon Oliver Kenneth Thomas Jay Thomas

Paul O’Neill

CA

Phillip Thompson

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

5


FEATURE . . . M E S S A G E

F R O M

T H E

P R E S I D E N T . . .

C O N T I N U E D

ments of Safe Sport education and curriculum to create a best-in-class curriculum customized to support the varying member groups. • Educating and training our staff and members on the new Safe Sport Policy, and our staff is 100 percent safe sport compliant. • Amending the bylaws to support the cultural commitment to athlete safety and provide a basis for further developing our safe sport programs and governance. • Closing the National Team Training Center at the Karolyi Ranch. • Publishing the list of members whose memberships are suspended and continuing to add to the Permanently Ineligible for Membership List, including via our new Safe Sport Twitter account, @USAGymSafeSport.    We are at an important crossroads in our sport, and by working together and creating a highly empowered culture wherever our athletes train and compete, we can provide a positive platform for the young men and women who are pursuing their gymnastics dreams today and honor those who have gone before.   Thank you,   Kerry Perry USA Gymnastics President and CEO

6

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


APRIL IS

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH

TOGETHER WE CAN!

usagym.org/safesport


8

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

9


GYM UPDATE

GYM OWNERS:

B Y

T O B Y

S T A R K ,

U S A

G Y M N A S T I C S

D I R E C T O R

O F

S A F E

S P O R T

HOW TO TALK ABOUT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE PREVENTION

10

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


C

hild sexual abuse prevention. It’s one of the most important topics you can talk about. And possibly one of the most uncomfortable. Many of us don’t know where to start. What words do I use? Will I scare the gymnasts? Will I offend my coaches and trainers? Will parents of my athletes think I have a problem if I talk about it? Child sexual abuse prevention does not start and stop at your gym’s doorstep. This is a societal issue that needs to be addressed in all families and all youth-serving organizations, and USA Gymnastics and its members are stepping up to lead that conversation. SOME TROUBLING, BUT VERY TRUE, STATISTICS FOR YOU TO CONSIDER: 1 in 10 children are sexually abused by their 18th birthday. 90 percent of those children are abused by someone they know, love and trust. If you were doubting, for even a minute, how important it is for you to talk about child sexual abuse prevention, those statistics should have convinced you. Who do you need to talk to? –Your staff and volunteers –Your gym parents –Your gymnasts You have gym rules, expectations and prohibited conduct that you communicate to your staff, volunteers, gym

parents and gymnasts on a regular basis. Child sexual abuse prevention is absolutely no different and shouldn’t be treated as such. Hopefully, this article will help remove some of the discomfort and stigma related to these conversations. STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS: It’s likely you have informed your staff and volunteers of your expectations and requirements for their job responsibilities and behavior. You need to be sure to include “appropriate behavior with gymnasts” to your list of expectations and requirements. And then, you walk through your “prohibited behaviors” and/or “code of conduct,” that must include all the Proactive Policies outlined in USA Gymnastics’ Safe Sport Policy. As a membership requirement, you must have a Safe Sport Policy, Athlete Protection Policy or Code of Conduct for your gym that incorporates USA Gymnastics’ Safe Sport Policy (www.usagym.org/safesport). USA Gymnastics has given you the framework you need for talking about prohibited behaviors with your staff. What to say to staff: – You have “zero tolerance” for inappropriate behavior with athletes (as detailed in your gym’s policies); – Outline exactly what staff can expect if they break any of those policies; and – Explain that the mandatory safe sport training required by USA Gymnastics helps make your gym a safer environment because now all of you have been educated on the prohib-

ited categories of misconduct and received instruction on how to recognize warning signs. And then, act accordingly. Act consistently. Keep talking about it. Silence is a perpetrator’s best weapon. GYM PARENTS: Parents want to know and need to know that they are dropping off their child at a facility that makes their child’s safety a top priority. You should be bragging to parents about your policies, how they are strictly and consistently enforced, and your staff’s training. You should highlight this in parent meetings, on registration papers, on your website (with a link to www.usagym.org/safesport), and on gym signage. Parents will not think your gym has a problem with child sexual abuse if you are talking about it. You will find the exact opposite. You will find parents more engaged with you and that trust is strengthened once you show them how you are being proactive in protecting their children. Language to use with parents: “Your child’s safety is our highest priority, and we do many things to protect your children.” You can then go on to address how you keep your equipment safe, how you work to protect your gymnasts from injury (proper warmup, stretching, nutrition resources), safe sport (athlete protection) policies & procedures, and others. You should also provide each of your parents a copy of your athlete protection policies/procedures and USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy. Don’t be afraid to do that. We need to encour-

SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

11


GYM UPDATE . . . A B U S E

P R E V E N T I O N . . . C O N T I N U E D

age knowledge and empowerment if we truly want to protect our gymnasts. GYMNASTS: It’s important for your gymnasts — in an age-appropriate manner — to know how people in your gym are/ are not allowed to treat them, and how they are/are not allowed to treat others. It’s likely you don’t hesitate to talk to them about bullying behavior, unsportsmanlike conduct or being aware of their gym surroundings so they don’t walk into someone else using the equipment. Athlete protection is just an extension of those conversations. For your gymnasts under 8 years old, you can simply tell them that you want to keep them safe when

12

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018

they are at your gym, and that means talking about things like following the coach’s instructions and watching before they cross the vault runway, as well as that no gym staff is allowed to be alone with them. Then, give them examples of when they shouldn’t be alone with an adult, such as in the bathroom, while traveling, getting a medical treatment, trying on attire, etc. (These are outlined in the Oneon-One Proactive Policy from the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy.) Then, give them a couple of people within the gym they can talk to if they ever don’t feel safe, and encourage them to always talk to their parents if they ever don’t feel safe. For kids 9 and older, you can actually tell them about your athlete

protection policies/procedures, and you can talk specifically (but briefly) about the eight Proactive Policies. And, as you did with the younger kids, give them a couple of people within the gym they can talk to if they ever don’t feel safe, and encourage them to always talk to their parents if they ever don’t feel safe.

P

lease, start these conversations if you haven’t yet. Continue and strengthen these conversations if you’ve already started. And help each other. We, as the USA Gymnastics community, can and should support each other in these new ways of doing things or as we strengthen what we’ve already been doing.


SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

13


FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE B Y

B R A N D O N

S T .

V I N C E N T

J O H N S O N , S P O R T S

C S C S ,

U S A W ,

P E S

P E R F O R M A N C E

A LITTLE BIT SOFTER NOW: A

A LITTLE BIT SOFTER NOW: A

G

ymnasts spend countless hours twisting and turning their bodies, all culminating with some type of landing. With the hours gymnasts spend training for com-

petition, it is important that they learn to land correctly. If athletes are allowed to land incorrectly over a period of time, they are at greater risk for lower extremity injuries, such as ankle sprains and fractures as well as knee tendonitis and

issues all lead to improper landing mechanics, which can

result in a greater risk of injury. Allowing the posterior chain (hamstrings, glutes, and hips) to take the majority of the load can reduce the likelihood of injury and keep your athletes in the gym. Following are some exercises that can be incorporated

ACL tears. In order to remain healthy, the athlete must be

into gymnastics training that will allow gymnasts to land

able to absorb force in the correct fashion.

with correct mechanics. Remember: think about the body

The goal is to teach the gymnast to correctly absorb the force as they land. One issue includes front side load-

from a holistic mind-frame. It is important that to continue to stress the importance of correct landing. The following

ing-landing with knees coming out over the toes. Another

exercises will aid in making sure athletes are landing with

concern is poor backside hip strength, as well as hip mobili-

correct form. The hips can handle much more repetitive load

ty and stability, all leading to poor landing mechanics. These

than the knees and ankles.

1. LANDING MECHANICS To execute this exercise, have the athlete reach up towards the ceiling and come up on his or her toes. On coaches cue, the athlete will drop back and down into an athletic position. Back flat, arms back, quarter-squat position and weight distributed evenly over the feet. Abdominals are braced and glutes activated so they can hold perfect posture. Make sure that the

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athletes knees are not caving in and shoulder blades are pulled back and down. It is paramount to stress back-side loading in order to take the stress off the front side. See Figures 1–4. Exercises 2–7 will help gymnasts obtain the correct landing mechanics that can prevent injury.

FIG. 1

FIG. 2

FIG. 3

FIG. 4

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


A GUIDE TO LANDING CORRECTLY

A GUIDE TO LANDING CORRECTLY 2. FRONT PLANK/RIGHT SIDE/LEFT SIDE These exercises will help create pillar (shoulder/core/hips) stability and strength, which is essential in holding total body posture upon landing. Depending on the strength of the athlete, these positions can be held for 10-30 seconds. See Figures 5–6. FIG. 5

FIG. 6

3. HIP EXTENSION OFF 18” BOX This is great for activating and developing the backside firing patterns of the glutes. It is essential to teach the gymnast how to turn on these muscles. The athlete will begin by lying on his or her back, the knees are bent at 90 degrees and the feet are on top of the 18” box. Next, the athlete will press his or her hips toward the ceiling by firing the glutes. The key is to ensure the athlete is gaining extension via the hips and not the lumbar spine. This exercise should not be felt in the lower back. See Figures 7–8. FIG. 7

FIG. 8

Continued... SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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4. QUADRUPED HIP CIRCLES To execute this pattern, the athlete will have his or her hands on the ground placed right underneath the shoulders and his or her knees directly under the hips. While maintaining a flat back and with abdominals braced, the athlete will lift his or her leg to the side. From there, the athlete will circle forward and backward for the prescribed number of reps; 15–20 reps per side are sufficient. The objective of this exercise is to stabilize the torso and create mobility and strength in the hips. See Figures 9–10. FIG. 9

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FIG. 11

FIG. 12

FIG. 10

6. ANKLE MOBILITY This exercise will help with the mobility and flexibility of the ankle and surrounding musculature. Additional dorsi-flexion gives the athlete a better chance at a mechanically correct landing. To execute this movement, have the athlete find a place against the wall. The front foot will be flat on the ground with the toe against the wall. The back foot will be directly behind the front foot with the toes touching the front heel. Next, the athlete will sit down into the hips of the lead leg. They should feel the exercise in the calf muscles of the back leg. See Figures 13–14.

FIG. 13

5. SIDE-LYING LEG CIRCLES These aid in activation and stabilization of the hip. The athlete lies on his or her side while resting his or her head in their hand. While maintaining proper posture, the athlete will lift his or her leg upwards and circle forward and backward for the prescribed number of reps; feeling it in the hips. This will help recruit the hips so the athlete can use the backside to absorb the force upon landing. See Figures 11–12.

FIG. 14

7. FORWARD LUNGE WITH REACH The forward lunge with reach improves the flexibility of the hips, hamstrings, lats, lower back, and the hip flexors (which are often tight). The athlete will begin in a standing position. And then will take a lunge step forward with the left leg while the right leg remains back. The athlete will reach over the left leg with both arms. Repeat this exercise with the right leg. This is a great exercise for the hip-flexor. See Figure 15–16.

FIG. 15

FIG. 16

Remember, athletes should use the posterior chain to absorb the force from landing. It is paramount to the health and well-being of the athletes. Time spent in the training room is time away from training.


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CHALK IT UP TO SAFETY

B Y

S T E V E

C O O K K

C

halk has been around almost as long as modern gymnastics. It has the dual purpose of absorbing perspiration and reducing friction. It’s technically Magnesium Carbonate, and in the earlier days of gymnastics, it was referred to as mag. It also provides some corollary benefit. Applying chalk provides a calming effect to the pre-performance nerves of the gymnast. There is no other explanation for the multiple times we chalk up for a single routine. Chalking up to a gymnast is similar to the baseball player’s habits of adjusting helmet and batting gloves over and over. Chalk also has a social benefit. Standing at the chalk bowl is the gymnasts equivalent of the office water cooler. As gymnasts gather, they get to share everything from difficult tricks to their after-practice plans. Sometimes, chalk is even applied directly to the equipment either as surface prep or to provide markings for skill positions. The correct amount of chalk can be disputed, but in reality, a good portion of what is applied is lost in the air, on the surrounding mats or back in the chalk bowl. What’s ironic is the fact that the very product that was discovered and used for the safety of the gymnast can in certain conditions be harmful. We breathe in the chalk in the air, which is not good for our respiratory systems. The chalk on the mats, while it does absorb moisture, actually causes the mats to be more slippery and require more frequent cleaning. Chalk caked on bars, rails,

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TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018

and pommels can cause uneven surfaces and create more friction and stress on the hands. Ok, so what’s the point? Chalk has a great purpose and gymnasts need to use it and probably always will. As in many substances, moderation is always good. Careful application is essential. And regular cleanup is imperative. There are some key take-aways in chalk use, and there are ways to keep it clean and safe. Here are a few: • Always apply chalk with hands in or over a chalk bowl so the extra ends up back in the bowl not on the floor. • There are devices that help keep the air clean. One is called a chalk eater, and it takes particles out of the air. Clean your air filters regularly and keep the gym properly ventilated. • Clean your mats, pits, and carpets regularly. The vacuum is a wonderful invention. AAI is committed to fostering a safe, fun and healthy environment for the sport of gymnastics. For every case of chalk purchased online, AAI will donate 10% of sales to the Safe Sport initiative. Give back to the sport we love, and order your chalk at www.AAIgymstore.com! Steve Cook, AAI National Sales Director Steve.Cook@fotlinc.com


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S H A R I

M E D I N I ,

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G Y M N A S T

M I N D S E T


COMMITMENT. DEDICATION. SACRIFICE. TOUGHNESS. STRENGTH.

As coaches, you expect the same things out of yourself that you expect out of your gymnasts. You dedicate yourself to long hours, evenings, and weekends to be there for your athletes. Your world revolves around gymnastics, and it doesn’t feel like there’s room for anything else. This type of commitment has become common within the sport of gymnastics, but it is taking its toll on coaches throughout the country.

CONSEQUENCES OF NOT ESTABLISHING WORK-LIFE BALANCE

Every coach deserves a fulfilling life, in and out of the gym. Not only do they deserve it, but the alternative has significant consequences. Coaches go above and beyond for their gymnasts, which is a wonderful thing. They are passionate, they are driven, and they want the best for their athletes. But many times, it is these very things that can drive a coach to feeling completely burnt out. Without any semblance of worklife balance coaches begin to struggle with various difficulties like health issues, strained relationships, feeling ineffective, fatigue, anger, cynicism, poor performance, isolation, and more. The effects of these difficulties do not only make your day-to-day life less enjoyable, but they also impact those around you. Stress and negativity is very contagious, which means that your family, your gymnasts, and your fellow coaches may also be struggling. It is your responsibility to take the lead and make gradual changes.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR WORK-LIFE BALANCE REFLECT AND ASSESS

You will not be able to work on improving your work-life balance until you take the time to reflect on your current struggles. Carve out a little bit of time, take a step back, and objectively evaluate the situation that you’re in. Write down on paper the amount of hours that you spend in the gym and the hours that you spend focused on gymnastics-related work. Then, write down how many hours you spend focused on your personal life — family, hobbies, or simply watching TV. Write down which areas of your job are causing the most stress, and write down which aspects you enjoy the most. You can also ask for feedback from those around you who are not involved in the sport. Ask them how many hours they work on a weekly basis. Ask them about what they do in their free time. Ask them their thoughts on work-life balance. Once you look at the black and white time commitment aspect of your job, it is also important to reflect on the emotional and physical tolls that it may be taking on you. Are you nursing an injury that occurred while spotting? Are you looking forward to practices, or do you dread them? Are you feeling inspired with new ideas and strategies to help your gymnasts, or do you feel like you’re stuck in a hamster wheel? Gymnastics can be an all-consuming sport, so it is important to separate every once in a while and gain some perspective on how much and how hard you are truly working.

GAIN PERSPECTIVE

The sport of gymnastics requires dedication from everyone involved — gymnasts, parents, and, of course, coaches. The demands of the sport make it easy to get sucked into the daily grind and lose sight of the bigger picture. The reality is that you are only human, and as a human, it is important to take the time to care for ourselves physically and mentally so that we can continue to do what we love.

THINK LONG-TERM.

It is important to take that long-term view to prevent yourself from reaching the point of burn out. Gymnasts’ careers are relatively short. They train hard for 10-15 years, and then, they move on; but coaches dedicate their lives to this sport! Coaches see gymnasts come and go every single year, but their own workload stays the same. And if they are not managing that long-term reality, burn out becomes a very real setback.

SEEK OUT NEW EXPERIENCES.

Perspective is also key to be able to continue moving forward and growing as a coach. Artists and innovators gain inspiration from the world around them. New ideas are formed with exposure to a variety of experiences. Industry advancements occur when businesses and individuals step outside of their comfort zones and gain insight from other industries. Inspiration, ideas, and excitement can come from unexpected places; and it can often renew passion for your work. This is another reason why it is so important for coaches to work on their own work-life balance. They may gain insight or ideas for new coaching techniques or drills in unexpected places. They may reSPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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F O R

new their love for the sport by seeing it through a different lens. They may learn from others both within the sport of gymnastics and outside of it. Challenge yourself to experience the world outside of your gym on a regular basis.

DON’T FORGET THE POSITIVES!

Coaching gymnastics can be an incredible experience, and it’s important that we don’t lose sight of what makes this job so amazing. What do you love the most about the sport itself? What do you love most about coaching? What are the benefits of coaching rather than working at a traditional 9–5 job? Take the time to write down a list of all of the positive things about being a gymnastics coach, and be sure to pull it out as a reminder whenever you are having a tough day.

MAKE SMALL CHANGES

Work-life balance doesn’t have to mean taking fancy vacations or letting go of everything that has gotten you to this point. Small changes

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C O A C H E S . . . C O N T I N U E D

in your daily and weekly routines can have a surprisingly positive impact on your overall experience. Start small and build from there — just like you create a strong base of fundamentals for your gymnasts.

START ESTABLISHING SMALL BOUNDARIES.

Make your own time a priority and have dedicated hours where you are truly off the clock. If you have children, you will be able to truly connect with them when they can trust to have your full attention at certain times throughout the week. It doesn’t have to be anything crazy, but even carving out 30 minutes to do a fun activity with your kids each day can make a world of difference.

DELEGATE WHEN YOU CAN.

It is a common problem for gymnasts to struggle when faced with a new coach. They head off to college or go to a summer camp and panic when their coach isn’t available to spot them. By being there

for your gymnasts every single time without change, you are actually hindering them. It is important to delegate responsibilities and share the weight of coaching. Creating a team atmosphere is not only important for your gymnasts, but for the coaches as well.

BE PURPOSEFUL ABOUT MAKING THESE SMALL CHANGES HAPPEN. I think you will be surprised to find that things keep functioning just fine (if not better) when you take small, gradual steps back. You will need to gradually train those around you into realizing that you are not a machine who is available 24/7.

POSITIVE IMPACTS ON YOURSELF AND OTHERS As you work on improving your own work-life balance, you will begin to see a ripple effect in those around you…


FRIENDS AND FAMILY Relationships with friends and family will feel less strained. You will have more time to reconnect with them, and they will become more supportive when they feel like they are being seen and heard.

GYMNASTS

You will feel less frustrated with your gymnasts, and your gymnasts will respond positively to this change. The goal as a coach should be to form successful, yet well-rounded gymnasts that will go on to lead successful lives, and your efforts towards a better work-life balance will serve as a great example for them.

What coach doesn’t want a more relaxed, more fulfilling worklife balance? Of course, there is no such thing as perfect work-life balance. There will be times where your personal life takes a backseat to the rigors of competition season. It is, then, your responsibility to make up for that deficit over the summer. And regardless of how demanding your job becomes, you can still make a purposeful effort to make those small changes towards improving your work-life balance.

COACHES

While you may receive some pushback and hear frustration from fellow coaches initially, there is a good chance that they will follow in your footsteps.

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MONTHLY YLHTNOMMONTHLY

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THE BENEFITS OF

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


T

ake a look around your gym. Do you notice how the environment changes as the post-season meets begin to approach? Tension, nerves, and stress are high. Coaches are exhausted from travelling four, five, even six weekends in-a-row. Add to this the fact the kids may not be performing the way you want, and we have formed a deadly combination for “positive coaching.” As coaches, we all feel the pressure to come out on top. To produce a winner. To qualify kids to Nationals. But at what price? In times of high stress, it is always helpful to look back at your mission statement, to remind yourself why you are doing this. Most likely, your mission says nothing about “winning” other than helping to create “winning attitudes.”

itive advantage in your community. Positivity is something many parents/customers will value in the service you are providing.

RETENTION

If your athletes have come to love and respect their coaches over time, they are more likely to stick with the sport when things get tough, and we all know, at some point, CLUB TEAMS they will. Only strong proCAN LEARN grams that treat their kids with care and positivity will SOMETHING keep graduating gymnasts FROM THE from the sport year after POSITIVE, year.

TEAM VIBE THAT COLLEGES BRING TO COMPETITION...

Ask yourself, "what kind of coach do you want to be? What do you want your gymnasts to remember about you?" and think about the many benefits of positive coaching. Here are just a few:

DEVELOPING TRUST Coaching with positivity will help you to develop a healthy relationship of trust with your athlete. If your gymnasts can communicate openly with you, it will help you assist them through fears, hard times, injuries, and reaching their goals.

A STRONG REPUTATION Once you have developed a reputation for treating kids in a caring and positive way, you will have a compet-

SUCCESS

Take a look at college teams. They are filled with team spirit, enthusiasm, and positivity. They know they are prepared, and they can enjoy the moment together. Club teams can learn something from the positive, team vibe that colleges bring to competition and the amount of success positivity brings with it.

FUTURE LEADERS What kind of leaders are we sending out into the world? Those who will lead by enthusiasm and motivation or those who will lead by creating fear or punishment? We should be leading by example. Pittsburgh is doing a great thing by recognizing the most positive athletes in sports around its community. Each positive athlete recipient receives an award directly from Steeler legend Hines Ward. During the ceremony, Ward reminds the au-

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dience that positive people go on to do great things. People with the right attitude and the right outlook will become our future leaders.

NO REGRETS There is no doubt that you will regret if a gymnast leaves your program because of your negativity. There is no doubt you will regret it if you have to answer emails or phone calls from upset parents. Don’t lie awake at night wondering if you pushed a kid too hard. Rest easy knowing every kid in your gym left that night with a smile on their face. And if you catch yourself being swept into negativity, don’t hesitate to start the next practice with an apology. There is no shame in saying “I’m sorry,” to a child. It will give you more respect in your gymnasts eyes if they know you, too, are not always perfect— that you, too, sometimes need corrected. Greatness is inspired, not forced. If a gymnast has been brought up with the strong values of hard-work, discipline, and pride that you instill in your program and they have been trained in proper progressions and technique, there is never an excuse to be negative. When coaches find themselves slipping into negativity, perhaps it is because they have not done their job. Perhaps it is time to get more organized. Perhaps they need to develop a more achievable lesson plan. And just like we tell our gymnasts, if we are feeling overwhelmed or stressed, take a step back. Go back to basics. Go back to the low beam.

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Go get a massage. But don’t take it out on your gymnasts.

S

o what exactly is considered, negative coaching? It consists of the “big four:” embarrassing, belittling, berating and intimidating. None of these are useful or productive teaching methods, and none are in the benefit of a young gymnast. There is no problem with tough love. Pushing is sometimes necessary. So is discipline. But if you are using these negative tactics, it says way more about you as a professional than it does about your athletes. These are children. They are fragile. Underneath those rock hard calluses are life lines often exposed and vulnerable due to the demands of our difficult sport. Sports psychologist Alison Arnold has great things to say about the way we coach our gymnasts. One of her most powerful seminars delves into Masaru Emoto’s theories about water. In Emoto’s book, Messages from Water, he shows pictures of water molecules taken from different environments. When water is found in clean, positive, thriving environments, the water molecules will look like beautiful snowflakes, bright and glowing. When water molecules are put in a negative environment, they lose their shape and become formless blobs—ugly and polluted. Arnold, then, makes the connection by telling us that children are made up of a large percentage of water in their bodies. Imagine the power that you possess: you have the ability to fill your

gymnasts bodies with crystals, with light. But you can just as easily pollute that water by shouting, with negativity, by using the “big four.” There are many things that can be done to create positivity in your gym: end practice with a positive team cheer or a fun game. Play their favorite playlists once or twice a week. Use a reward system, not a punishment one. Write your gymnasts inspirational cards before the big meet reminding them how proud you are of their efforts. Get the parents on board with your positive philosophies so they are reinforced at home. And you can reinforce the positive message with your coaches by hanging reminders about your values and your mission around the gym and rewarding them for using positive coaching methods. Are these simple ideas the complete answer to keeping positivity in the gym? Probably not. As with anything, being positive is something you have to want and the change has to come from within. There are countless benefits to positive coaching for our athletes, and for ourselves. After all, we, too, are made of water.


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WHAT’S NEW

WO WOMEN

WHAT’S NEW

2018 WOMEN’S PROGRAM UPDATES ADMINISTRATIVE, JUNIOR OLYMPIC, TECHNICAL, AND XCEL COMMITTEES Cori Rizzo, Tom Koll, Cheryl Hamilton, Claudia Kretschmer

2018 is shaping up to be quite a busy year for the Women’s Program. Both the Junior Olympic, Technical and Xcel Committees are currently working on creating the materials needed for the next four-year cycle in order to provide

PROJECT/EVENT 2018-2022 Junior Olympic Code of Points

great educational experiences for our professional members. Below is a timeline, as well as preliminary cost information for these future projects for our Junior Olympic and Xcel programs.

DATE OF RELEASE/EVENT Orders accepted: April 1, 2018 Orders released: mid-April 2018

COST $60 + shipping

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$49.99

Available in summer prior to August 1, 2018

$25 + shipping

DIGITAL 2018-2022 Junior Olympic Code of Points FLIP BOOK

2018-2022 Xcel

Orders accepted: May 1, 2018

Code of Points

Orders released: late May

$60 + shipping

2018-2022 Xcel Code of Points

Available for order at Apple store late May

$49.99

Available in summer prior to August 1, 2018

$20 + shipping

DIGITAL 2018-2022 Xcel Code of Points FLIP BOOK Continued on page 36...

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FEATURE TURE

WO WOMEN

FEA TURE 2 0 1 8

W O M E N ’ S

P R O G R A M

PROJECT/EVENT

2018 USA Brevet/National Judges’ Course

U P D A T E S . . . C O N T I N U E D

DATE OF RELEASE/EVENT June 9-10

Winston-Salem, NC

June 16-17

St. Louis, MO

June 16-17

Dallas, TX

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Edison/Iselin, NJ

June 30-July 1

Beaverton/Tigard, OR

July 12-13

Burlington, VT

August 11-12

Providence, RI

August 24-26

San Jose, CA

September 15-16

Louisville, KY

COST

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Refer to the links below for Congress prices

2018 Regional Congresses usagymRC.com

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usagymrc.com/region3

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August 24-26

R. 1—San Jose, CA

usagymrc.com/region1

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R. 5—Louisville, KY

usagymrc.com/region5

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usagymcongress.com/registration

usagym.com/w300 2018 Women’s Coaches Courses: W300/400

August 23-26

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usagym.com/w400 $475 Coaches w/ athletes $550 Coaches without athletes $550 Athletes (must have coach to attend)

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H A Y E S

ENERGY ZAPPERS: HOW TO REMAIN HAPPY FIVE TIPS THAT WILL HELP YOU

We all have them in our days. If we let it, negative people around us could dictate our day. Energy zappers are at the grocery store, mall, or gas station. They are mostly in our gym. As gym owners, managers, coaches and office staff, we must stay happy and resilient in our gyms. You deserve to be happy. So how do you stay happy in most situations? Below are five tips to keep your positive energy up and how to avoid being zapped.

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Z A P P E R S . . . C O N T I N U E D

1. WILL YOURSELF TO FEEL HOW YOU WANT TO FEEL. Just like you want to read a book or start an exercise program, you have to instill self will to get started. Tell yourself to get off the couch and get busy. Make it a priority to do what you made up your mind to do. Talk yourself into it. Don’t allow yourself to say no. When you have to teach that gymnastics class that is very hard, stay positive. Set up success by telling your gymnast that they are going to do great in class. Get them excited about coming to class and pump them up by being happy. Point out the fun skills you will be working on that day. Pump them up for future classes by telling them what is coming next week.

2. THEIR ENERGY IS NOT YOUR ENERGY.

Just because a person is negative does not mean you have to share in their misery. Allow yourself to be content with being happy. Whistle a motivating tune. Think about a great moment that has happened to you yesterday. Smile. Give your gymnasts a high five with a smile. When a gymnast does not do a skill properly, it’s OK. Talk to your gymnasts. Figure out what is going on. Gymnasts never want to purposely disappoint their coaches, so if they are having a bad day, pick them up with a great enthusiastic attitude.

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3. TELL YOURSELF BEFORE ENTERING THROUGH ANY DOOR WAY THAT YOU WILL REMAIN HAPPY. Take a deep breath and simply give yourself affirmation that today is going to be great. Remain steadfast in your convictions. Place your problems on the “problem tree” outside of your gym. You may pick them up on the way out, if you choose to.

4. LEARN TO UNDERSTAND YOUR NEGATIVE TRIGGERS. Triggers tell people to “do it now.” Without a trigger, the target behavior will not happen. Sometimes, a trigger can be external, like an alarm sounding. Other times, the trigger can come from our daily routine: Walking through the kitchen may trigger us to open the fridge. The concept of trigger has different names: cue, prompt, call to action, request, and so on. Maybe you get upset when loud people are around. You may hate when it rains outside. You may dislike your Thursday class at 4. Either avoid your triggers, or if you cannot avoid them, learn to deal with them. Deep controlled breathing works extremely well. So does a smile.

5. MAKE SOMEONE ELSE SMILE.

Consider another person’s joy, and it will help us to understand the enormous effect that our mentality and expression has

on the people around us, like our employees and young gymnasts. Positivity spreads like wildfire. Just talk with people and try to make their day better. Send a compliment their way. “I love your shirt.” “Your glasses are cool.” “You new hair style looks fantastic.” “I love the effort while performing that cartwheel.” “You have been a great listener today.” A “thank you” for coming to class goes a long way. The many people you come in contact with today will think of you in one or two ways: they will either be excited to talk about you to everyone they come in contact with, or they will complain about you. You have a choice to either make someone’s day or ruin it. It should be our goal as a gymnastics community to help build our communities in the most positive, enthusiastic, and motivating ways possible. Smile and get excited when your gymnasts shows up for class. Keep that positive energy flowing through out your day and you may just leave with a smile as well.


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REGISTER TODAY FOR YOUR REGIONAL CONGRESS!

REGION 1 San Jose, CA Double Tree by Hilton San Jose August 24–26 REGION 2 Beaverton, OR Omega Gymnastics June 30–July 1  

REGION 3 Dallas, TX Double Tree by Hilton Hotel Dallas near the Galleria June 16–17 REGION 4 St. Louis, MO Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark June 15–17

REGION 5 Louisville, KY Galt House September 14–16   REGION 8 Winston-Salem, NC Benton Convention Center June 8–10

To register, visit usagymrc.org.

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MEMBER SERVICES ON LINKEDIN!

Follow the company page "USA Gymnastics” on LinkedIn for weekly information for member club businesses, coaches, and parents.

@USAGYMSAFESPORT ON TWITTER

Follow @USAGymSafeSport on Twitter for updates to the suspended and permanently ineligible members lists, as well as education content, safe sport policy updates and more.

U110: SAFE SPORT

All Professional and Instructor members 18 years of age and older are required to have this course completed no later than July 31, 2018. The course is free and is comprised of three separate 30-minute segments. Please allow approximately 90 minutes to complete all

cation. To complete the course today, visit usagym.org/memberservices. click on the My Profile link and then the U110 button.

MISSING REQUIREMENTS? Visit usagym.org/memberservices to complete requirements online.

MEET DIRECTORS & U100 VERIFICATION

Professional members who have obtained the U100 certification will appear with a “yes” in the U100 column when verifying membership for sanctioned competitions. If a “no” appears, the individual has not yet completed the certification.

• Professional

members will not appear as “pending” if they are missing the U100 certification. Therefore, it is important to check for the “yes” or “no” statement when verifying.

• Professional

members with U100 certification will also have the certification appear on their professional membership cards.

For additional questions, please contact Member Services Department at 800.345.4719 or membership@usagym.org. SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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USA Gymnastics

National Congress Trade Show

Providence, Rhode Island

usagymcongress.org

REGISTRATION IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR THE 2018 NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW!

RHODE ISLAND CONVENTION CENTER & OMNI PROVIDENCE HOTEL

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

THURSDAY, AUG. 9 – SATURDAY, AUG. 11 WHAT TO EXPECT • Congress lectures will take place Thursday, Aug. 9 — Saturday, Aug. 11. • National Business Forum will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 8 — offered complimentary to National Congress registrants. • Additional add-on courses will be offered on Wednesday, Aug. 8.

• Each day will feature 15 full tracks of education from all six disciplines, and coaching, judging, business, preschool, school age/recreational, sports science, fitness, and more! • Designated Hands-On Spotting Lectures • National Trade Show Hall

Visit usagymcongress.org for registration information and more! 46

TECHNIQUE • SPRING 2018


CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS FOR SALE

GK RISK FREE PROGRAM: NOW offering FREE outbound  shipping, plus new styles, fabrics and colors to give your pro shop the largest assortment of the best fitting gymnastics apparel. In addition, GK now offers free scrunchies with each leotard, price coded merchandise and an online order form to make it even easier to sell GK in your pro shop. There is nothing to lose, you only pay for what you sell. Sign up today! Call Risk-Free Customer Service 1-800-345-4087 for more information. Email: ProShopPros@gkelite.com

GYMNASTICS; YOUR BEST MEET EVER! (LATEST BOOK) Gymnastics; Your Best Meet Ever! was written to help Beginning & Intermediate level gymnasts focus on making each competition the BEST possible. Great book as a reference for all gymnasts. Fears are a major cause of poor performance. If the gymnast is able to face each fear or worry & take specific action to minimize its effect on her performance, she will take a giant step toward winning in both gymnastics & life! Preparation is the base that supports the ability to adapt to new & changing competition scenarios! Find the Secrets to a Successful Competition! Author, Rita Brown; two-time Olympic coach. Available @ www.amazon.com.

EDUCATION

CHECK THIS OUT! WHAT’S NEW

TAKE THE USA GYMNASTICS TRAMPOLINE & TUMBLING CODE OF POINTS WHEREVER YOU GO — now available for Apple iBooks and Amazon Kindle!

GYMCERT COACHES TRAINING PROGRAM:

GymCert’s Online Courses & Training manuals for sale, Safety Awareness posters, FREE article downloads & Online Certification for Recreational & Competitive Gymnastics Instructors Levels 1 through Level 5. Now offering Boys level 1 & Girls Spanish Level 1. GymCert is a MUST for staff training; cuts lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions & skill training methods; quick & easy reference guide including Lesson Planning & Class Evaluation Forms. Includes updated “Skills & Drills” for 2013–2021 Compulsory Routines! The GymCert manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, & several coaching, spotting & safety tips. Group discounts!  Order Now:  www.gymcert.com or direct by calling 407444-5669EST.

FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to www.usagym.org/publications

or call Scott Bregman at 317-829-5650.

SPRING 2018 • TECHNIQUE

47


USA Gymnastics 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 7867

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Event Schedule Thursday, August 16

1:30 pm .....Junior Men’s Competition – Day 1 7:30 pm .....Senior Men’s Competition – Day 1

Friday, August 17

1:30 pm .....Junior Women’s Competition – Day 1 7:30 pm .....Senior Women’s Competition – Day 1

Saturday, August 18

10:30 am ...Junior Men’s Competition – Final Day 3:30 pm .....Senior Men’s Competition – Final Day

Sunday, August 19

1:30 pm .....Junior Women’s Competition – Final Day 7:30 pm .....Senior Women’s Competition – Final Day

Schedule subject to change. All times are eastern. Past champions are not confirmed to compete in 2018. Field will be announced at a later date.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Groups: 617.624.1805

• USAGymChampionships.com •

Technique Magazine - Spring 2018  
Technique Magazine - Spring 2018