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a summary 11.2006

belleview station purpose framework concepts objectives development program

on behalf of Continuum Partners


Introduction The purpose of this Summary document is to provide a basis for coordinated and phased development of approximately 17.5 acres of land adjoining and west of Belleview Station, near the intersection of Belleview Avenue and I-25 in southeast Denver. This summary follows detailed planning by the seller that describes the approximate development capacity of the land and the character and alignment of streets that are to provide access to it. Continuum has developed its assessment of the specific development program for this property that will address the market. Concepts presented in this document apply that development program through definition of the land uses, building massing, quality of architecture and open spaces as well as other characteristics that will distinguish Belleview Station. It is the precursor to the construction of infrastructure, architectural design, and phased development of the whole, and will be used to guide the creation of site plans for individual city blocks.

Belleview Station a summary




Preface Belleview Station is the product of extensive planning and cooperation between the land owners (the Bansbachs), the developer (Continuum), and their respective design teams (Civitas and Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership). This relationship has produced the vision that will be realized with the creation of a mixed-use, transit-oriented development. That vision has been developed and refined in a series of documents that articulate the interests and goals of the members of the development team. The General Development Plan (GDP) was the foundation for future planning as well as an agreement with the City of Denver that helped to secure several critical zoning waivers and conditions that tailor the T-MU-30 district to the unique opportunities of this site. Further, the GDP established a preliminary development concept and street system that continues to inform site planning and development programming. Following the GDP, Civitas produced a Streetscape Master Plan to define the character of streets and pedestrian environments, and Urban Design Guidelines that will inform the character of buildings and public spaces throughout the site. Subsequently, Civitas and ZGF have produced Plans that are informed by, and operate in concert with the previous documents and one another. This summary document illustrates how Continuum will implement its development program and design elements on the portion of the site that it will develop.

Belleview Station a summary




table of contents

Introduction Preface Opportunity for a new regional town center

1 2 4

framework

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Streets Open Spaces Connections The Public Realm as a Network Buildings and Their Active Edges Walking Distances

8 9 10 11 12 13

concept changes & elaborations

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views

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Layton Avenue & the Transit Plaza Circulation Block and Street Dimensions Indoor & Outdoor Environments Parking and Service Access

16 17 17 18 19

environment & sustainability

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development program

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Site Water Energy Materials Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) Innovation Solar Modeling Land Use Phasing Open Space Parking Retail Apartment Condominium Townhouse Hotel Office April 2006 Parking Study

24 25 26 28 28 30 31 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55

Belleview Station a summary




Opportunity for a new regional town center The Belleview Station plan is driven by a critical opportunity; 17.5 acres with excellent access to the Denver region via public transportation and freeways. The site is tucked into the successful and growing Denver Tech Center, Denver’s second largest business district after the Central Business District. Together, Denver Tech Center and Belleview Station will form a center for commerce and community in south Denver. With careful and deliberate planning, the concept and form established today will serve as a framework for growth and evolution for the next century. Seizing this opportunity requires the implementation of urban design strategies that promote activity and interaction between people and their environment at an urban and pedestrian scale that is decidedly different from surrounding developments. As a regional town center, most of the workers and consumers will come from off-site. In response, this plan suggests a circulation system with a human-scale street system prioritized for pedestrians with efficient auto access from the perimeter of the site and parking at the core of each block. Belleview Station benefits from high visibility and excellent regional and local access.

justification and characteristics of a new center Belleview Station a summary




The Center of an Existing Community

An infrastructure that will remain valid through decades of change and development

An Evolving focus of mixed uses and services justification and characteristics of a new center Belleview Station a summary




framework Belleview Station a summary




framework The framework plan outlines the basic elements that constitute a vital community. Each element is described separately and then overlaid on the next in a manner that expresses the importance of their interdependence. A complex and inviting public realm comprises three types of space: streets open spaces connections Buildings define the streets, plazas and other public spaces which make up the interconnected framework of a vital and inviting public realm Ground floor uses are to be those that will address the public realm and support pedestrian activity.

framework Belleview Station a summary




Streets In order to address the dual goals of efficient auto and pedestrian circulation, this plan calls for quartered blocks with a subnetwork of paseos that superimpose a pedestrian-scaled circulation system over the larger grid of conventional streets.

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The paseos will subdivide each city block. The design of these predominately pedestrian streets will respond to the qualities of adjacent development.

framework Belleview Station a summary




Open Spaces The connectivity of open space provides a continuous experience of quality places that change in scale, material and activity. This open space network connects plazas, parks, courtyards, streets, shops, restaurants, and building lobbies as an extended public realm. union

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Layton Avenue looking east from Layton Park towards the Transit Plaza beyond.

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Parks that offer solitude, roof top gardens that provide a green sanctuary during the course of a work day and an amphitheater that invites activity reflect the diversity of spaces and behaviors that will be supported at Belleview Station.

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Connections A fine grain of pedestrian circulation routes will be created by the intersection of streets and paseos at safe crossing places. Many buildings will have secondary entrances off the paseos.

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The view east from the Courtyard on Block A illustrates the potential for wrap around retail and secondary access to the buildings that front it.

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The Public Realm as a Network Together with the public and private open spaces, and retail promenades, the paseos will help to establish an expansive view and design of the “public realm.� The public realm is a network; its structure is the grid of streets and paseos, and its nodes are open spaces that serve small residential spaces, larger public community spaces, and active retail frontages. Collectively, these elements define the character of the development.

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The active nature of the Transit Plaza and retail activity along Newport Street will contrast with the calm of paseos, courtyards and private terraces. This public gesture will weave a continuous fabric and create dynamic environments for residents, visitors, and those who work here.

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Buildings and Their Active Edges The most active and attractive street frontages are those lined with restaurants and retail. At Belleview Station, these uses will be concentrated along the edges of Newport Street, Layton Avenue and the Transit Plaza. At the intersection of Newport Street and Layton Avenue retail and a major public open space will merge in an active westward extension of the Transit Plaza..

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Newport Street looking south from the intersection of Layton and Newport is the main retail and shopping street.

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retail studios/live-work units

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Retail provides a theater of activity and showmanship that colors the places in which it resides and draws active participation among those who inhabit the neighborhood.


Walking Distances The map, at left, showing how far one can walk from the transit station in increments of 2.5 minutes demonstrates the advantage of keeping most vehicular traffic to the perimeter streets. The 2.5 minute isochron assumes a pace of 3 miles per hour with fluid crossings at intersections. In nearby districts, crossings at major arterials entail lengthy delays and deter circulation on foot. Parking will be accommodated in the core of each block, and service access will generally be accommodated without disrupting primary pedestrian routes and retail frontages. The streets and mid-block paseos will make circulation on foot quick and convenient, and the physical design of streets and open spaces will make them congenial places to be.

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The view looking east along Chenango illustrates the mixed-use nature of the street lined with housing, retail and mid-block crossings into the paseos.

View Key Map

2.5 minutes (1/8 mi.) 5 minutes (1/4 mi.) 7.5 minutes (3/8 mi.)

Most of the district can be reached in a five minute walk from the light rail station. Minimal delays at street crossings will result from routing most vehicular traffic via perimeter streets.

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concept changes & elaborations Concept changes and elaborations bring an increased focus on particular issues that are important to creating a vital public realm. The public realm will be most successful as a collection of private and public elements that serve to enrich the street experience. Some spaces, such as parks and the transit plaza, will be truly public. Others, such as open storefronts and restaurants, will contribute to the public realm by interacting and inviting participation. Parking is to be convenient yet inconspicuous in the public realm, and is to be efficiently shared by different users at different times.

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Layton Avenue & the Transit Plaza As the area matures, increasing numbers of people can be expected to use public transit: both light rail and buses stopping near the station on Union Avenue. Some people will transfer from one mode to another at Belleview Station, others will live or work in the district, while some will come here for business or social reasons. All will pass through the Transit Plaza, conceived as three linked open spaces: the plaza itself, Layton Avenue, and the intersection of Layton with Newport Street. Adjacent to the plaza, and defining its space will be a major hotel, an office building, apartments, condominiums and various retail and entertainment venues. The Transit Plaza will be designed to adapt to the varying demands made upon it at different times of the day and in different seasons. It will have both hard and soft landscaped areas, and will be the visual focus of the north part of the district.

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The plaza will be surrounded by a condominiums, apartments, offices, a hotel, and various retail and entertainment venues. As the district matures, more people will use transit and the significance of the plaza will grow.

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The Transit Plaza is conceived as three linked open spaces: the plaza, Layton Avenue, and the intersection of Newport Street with Layton Avenue.

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The experience of arrival from transit into Belleview is enhanced by a thorough integration of adjacent buildings with a vibrant and active public realm.

View Key Map

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Circulation Primary automobile access to the district will be from Niagara Parkway and the other perimeter streets. Parking will be accessible directly from these streets, limiting the number of automobiles that will need to circulate in the core of the district. This will enhance the safety and freedom of pedestrian movement in the primary retail streets and open spaces. Those arriving by transit will find a safe and accommodating environment. Most buses will stop on Union Avenue for transfers to and from light rail, although some buses will access the station area streets directly.

Block and Street Dimensions The Belleview Station district is to be distinguished from nearby developments as an urban, mixed use district with streets and open spaces lively with pedestrian activity and amenities. To achieve this, the place must be inviting to people on foot as well as accommodating vehicular access. The function and scale of different streets should vary to accommodate different purposes. Blocks should be permeable to pedestrians, with a fine scale of frontages, entries, corners, natural light, street furnishings, plantings and activities making streets varied and interesting to those who use them. The variable topography of the site also adds the possibility of changing perspectives along certain streets. With these objectives in mind, the width and alignment of each street was examined and adjusted, and an important decision to quarter each block with paseos or internal mews was made.

Conceptual overlay of early street concepts on Belleview Station T.O.D. Conceptual Master Plan [Civitas, April 2005]

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Indoor & Outdoor Environments An opportunity in the district, especially in streets and open spaces where retail is prevalent, is to enable activities to spill out of doors onto the sidewalk. This is valuable for restaurants, cafĂŠs and for some stores, creating a relaxed and embracing atmosphere. In the extremes of Denver climate, this can only be accomplished if the microclimate of the outdoor spaces is suitable: shaded and naturally ventilated in the summer. The complex of streets and paseos combined with carefully controlled solar access, wide sidewalks, street trees and furniture can create such an environment. The development plan provides building massing, street widths and other elements that can accommodate this. Detailed design of storefronts will necessarily continue the theme, with continuity of materials between indoor and outdoor environments, and the ability to connect or separate the two as season and circumstance demand.

Opportunities to engage indoor activities with the public realm vary with the design, orientation and other characteristics of each building and adjacent public spaces.

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Parking and Service Access The public realm is enhanced by the inconspicuous placement and design of parking and service access. Principles governing parking throughout Belleview Station are that it should be sufficient, convenient, and inconspicuous. Accordingly, parking is generally confined to the core of city blocks and beneath them. Access to parking is generally from perimeter streets, so that vehicle circulation at the core of the district is kept to a minimum. Economy requires that parking spaces should be shared as much as possible, and that they should demand a relatively small proportion of the development cost in each block. The parking plan that has been developed takes advantage of topography in locating some parking underground, making it efficient by avoiding building cores and using sloping streets for multi-level access. Below-grade parking reduces the proportion of each city block core that must be filled with parking, thus admitting more light and air to inward-facing spaces and enabling green landscaping of paseos and mews. Where parking is above-grade, it should be located and scaled to protect pedestrian circulation, views and natural light.

Parking cores that are entered from Niagara, Olive and the paseos contribute to the quality of Newport Street by minimizing automobile traffic.

Service and pick-up functions can be discreetly placed along the streets with time constrained loading zones.

Parking garage entrances and loading docks become less conspicuous when they are not isolated and become part of the active street.

Service access is generally provided from non-retail streets using mid-block access to each block core. In some cases, sloping terrain facilitates service access at two levels. The principle is to provide convenient access to service areas that are functionally efficient yet sheltered from the view of customers and residents. Service traffic is routed to minimize conflicts with those on foot, with few service access points, if any, off Newport Street.

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views buildings are to be oriented to respect the public realm and to optimize views, especially in the sweep from Pikes Peak in the southwest to Longs Peak in the northwest

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views Mountain views from Belleview Station fill the horizon from southwest to northwest. These views are considered particularly valuable to future condominiums in the district. Because of the wide sweep of the mountain range, windows facing north and south will also benefit from the views. Massing of taller buildings was configured to maintain good views from buildings in the eastern half of the district as well as those in the west. Accordingly, buildings West of Newport tend to lie on an East-West orientation, creating view corridors across the site, and buildings east of Newport are aligned North-South, to maximize favored views. Taller buildings on Olive Street will enjoy the full sweep of view to the west. views west from the first row of buildings

views west from east of site [lower levels]

Quantitative studies evaluated potential benefits of rotating buildings on plan to optimize views. Interestingly, benefits from rotation were small, while structural complexity and expense in such rotations would be substantial. The left column of diagrams shows how the proposed massing would affect views for future development east of the site. Building orientation in this space is hypothetical and intended to give a general sense of available views at three height intervals.

views west from the second row of buildings

views west from east of site [mid-levels]

views west from the easternmost buildings

views west from east of site [high levels]

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environment & sustainability Belleview Station a summary

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environment & sustainability In an ecologically sustainable human habitat, the framework is grounded in the natural environment. Urban design is responsive to environmental impact inspiring innovation and creating long-term development value. As a transit-oriented development, mass transit and pedestrian accessibility are core values. Add habitat, energy, and water and sustainability becomes a culture. All surfaces are evaluated for their ability to minimize site impact. The ecological history of the place informs design. Living walls purify air and provide sun screens while green roofs minimize heat island effect and create native habitat. Bioswales filter stormwater and pervious surfaces recharge local aquifers. Building orientation uses natural ventilation of prevailing winds. Facades with southern exposure and effective shading devices minimize energy demands. Harvested solar and wind energy is captured for local power. Materials will be conserved with structures that tread lightly on the land and with sensitivity to preserve air quality.

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Site impact on existing environment and ecology Bicycles

Native Vegetation

Motor vehicle transportation accounted for more than two-thirds of U.S. petroleum use in 2005. Every gallon of gas burned by a vehicle releases 20 pounds of CO2 to the atmosphere. Vehicles are major contributors to urban air pollution.

Development creates impervious surfaces that reduce precipitation infiltration into groundwater, dissect habitats, and disturb local ecosystems. Native vegetation requires less irrigation and attracts local wildlife. Native species require no fertilizer or pesticides because they are already adapted to the climate and environment, and are naturally resistant to bugs. Therefore, native plants have fewer impacts on the quality of local water.

Bicycles are a healthy, economical, and ecologically efficient way to travel. Many cities around the world rely on bicycle travel. In Copenhagen, 53% of commuters either walk or bike to work. Bicycles can be encouraged and incorporated into urban planning and building design by designating safe and accessible bike routes and by providing bicycle storage and changing rooms for commuters.

Photo by Jan Willemse: Copenhagen daily commuters

Designing a landscape with native species integrates the building into its environment and minimizes development impacts.

Pacific Lutheran University, Morken Center for Learning and Technology, ZGF

Porous Paving

Green Roofs

Paved surfaces have major impacts on stormwater. Impervious surfaces prevent water from infiltrating into soil subsurface and increase runoff into local watersheds. Stormwater flows across paved surfaces, like roadways and parking lots where it picks up dirt, oils, and heavy metals, and rushes these pollutants into the nearest waterway.

Green roofs are vegetative covers that replace traditional roofing. They provide wildlife habitat, filter stormwater, and return a portion of it back to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration, which cools the surrounding area. Green roofs also minimize ultraviolet degradation of the roof membrane and extend roof life. The basic layering of a green roof includes waterproofing, drainage system, growing media, and plants. Special attention must be paid to roof loads, drainage flows, plant nourishment and wind resistance. Initial costs are higher than traditional roofing materials, but some green roofs require minimal maintenance and last longer.

Porous (or pervious) pavement allows rainwater and snow melt to pass through openings and percolate into the ground, reducing runoff and filtering water into the subsurface to recharge groundwater. These permeable surfaces look and function the same as standard paving but may require some additional maintenance to avoid potential clogging.

Duke University Campus, ZGF

There are two types of green roofs: intensive and extensive. Intensive green roofs are characterized by deep soil depths (between 8 inches and 4 feet) and can support a range of plantings, including trees. Sometimes they merge into plazas that incorporate furniture, promenades, or lawns. They work best on flat surfaces.

There are two primary types of porous pavement: porous asphalt and pervious concrete. Porous asphalt is a coarse, open-graded aggregate bonded with voids to make it permeable. Pervious concrete is a specially mixed Portland cement with open-graded, coarse aggregate.

In order to meet weight requirements, this type of green roof is primarily installed over concrete decks. Intensive green roofs are effective at or above grade. Depending on plant selection, they may require ongoing maintenance and irrigation.

Bioswales A bioswale is a planted drainage channel that filters water through plants and soil microbes. By slowly guiding stormwater across a gentle incline, water percolates into the ground and pollutants are absorbed and filtered by the soil and vegetation. At the lowest point of the swale, a raised drain inlet empties any overflow into the nearest waterway. The most polluted, “first flush� pollutants are retained in the bioswale and filtered water passes into the water table. Bioswales function well in parking lots and along roadways which generate polluted runoff from cars that collects on the surface.

Oregon Convention Center Expansion, ZGF

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Conference Center, ZGF

Extensive green roofs have shallow soil depths (between 3 and 7 inches) and may be modular or continuous to work with a range of roof decks and slopes. This type of system can often be installed directly over a conventional membrane roofing system and may be a viable option for existing buildings depending on load capacity. Plantings for this system are generally low growing ground covers that are tolerant of intense sun. Sedums, grasses, mosses and meadow flowers work well because they require little irrigation, fertilization or maintenance. With careful plant specification, this type of system may be designed to exist without the need for a permanent irrigation system.

Jim Mueller, JC Mueller


Water efficiency of water systems in the building and on the site Living Walls

Irrigation

A living wall is essentially a vertical garden. The plantings improve air quality and in some cases may provide insulation against heat and cold.

Landscape irrigation significantly drains potable water supplies. Efficient irrigation reduces these demands and also saves on operating costs. At the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 121,000 gallons of rainwater are captured each year and used to meet 100% of the irrigation demands of a 23,000 SF landscaped area.

While similar to a greenscreen in its trellis-like system, a living wall is much more. Plants are actually rooted to a fibrous material that slowly drains water to the roots of mosses, vines, and other species growing on the wall. Bacteria in the roots metabolize impurities in the air such as volatile organic compounds.

Potential solutions include harvested rainwater, graywater, and highly efficient irrigation systems. Native vegetation landscapes also minimize irrigation demands.

The structure includes a metal framework, mesh backing, a water distribution system, moisture retention fabric, and vegetation. The walls may be freestanding or attached to a building. Each wall orientation demands a different plant regime in response to the different microclimates.

Efficient irrigation systems include drip irrigation or an in-ground system that targets the roots. Some species require temporary irrigation for one to three years, at which point the plants are adapted to the environment and can access ground waters to meet their needs. zgf: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE BUILDING

Portland International Airport, ZGF

Heat Island Effect

Graywater

The heat island effect describes the impact of solar radiation on typical construction materials that warm urban areas more than adjacent rural ones by absorbing and re-emitting solar radiation. Constructed surfaces like streets, sidewalks, parking lots, and buildings contribute significantly to this effect. Highly reflective materials (those with a high albedo) act to reduce this effect as they bounce heat away from the development instead of retaining it.

Graywater describes the non-potable wastewater generated from sources such as washing machines, showers and sinks. Graywater can be reused for irrigation and other purposes such as toilet flushing. The use of graywater reduces fresh water demands and minimizes water treatment requirements. Graywater reuse may be regulated by local water rights law, public health officials, and building inspection jurisdictions.

Greenroofs, Energy Star Roofing, Portland gray cement, and limiting paved areas all help reduce the urban heat island effect.

Solar Reflectance Index

Living Machine

Solar Reflectance Index (SRI), or albedo, is a measure of a constructed surface’s ability to reflect solar heat as shown by a small temperature rise. It is defined so that a standard black is 0 and a standard white is 100. The lower the SRI, the more energy and heat is absorbed by a surface. Snow has a very high SRI and conventional blacktop has a low one. LEED© requires an SRI of at least 29 for credit compliance.

A living machine essentially replicates nature’s process of treating wastewater. The goal is to create a zero discharge system by reusing process wastewater for on-site irrigation and reusing all treated sludge for composting. Through a bioremediation process of microbes, algae, aquatic vegetation and solar energy, a living machine can filter and breakdown nutrients, solids, and bacteria in wastewater. The system operates in a greenhouse where bacteria filter water by binding to aquatic plants. Wastewater is directed through biological cells in individual tanks that are proven to treat water more effectively than conventional treatment methods.

Urban areas have a low SRI because typical construction materials tend to absorb and then re-emit heat, thus contributing to the heat island effect. Los Angeles was once primarily orchards and had an average high temperature of 97˚F. After years of dense development, the average temperature has reached 105˚F. Source: LEED NC 2.2, SSc7.1 and Heat Island Group

Oregon Health & Science University Biomedical Research Building, ZGF

Clatsop Community College, Living Machine

Living machines are most effective in large applications for scale and cost effectiveness. They are generally site-specific and the design depends on climate and temperature. In addition to their service as a wastewater management system, a Living Machine can provide a lush amenity in the form of a tropical greenhouse.

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Water

efficiency of water systems in the building and on the site

Energy energy consumption and environmental impact

Water Efficient Plumbing Fixtures

Building Commission as Standard Procedure

Potable water is one of our most precious resources. Particularly in Colorado, where water is scarce and its use is strictly regulated by state law, water usage needs to be carefully designed. Low flow plumbing fixtures can have a significant impact on water usage over the building lifetime. The use of dual-mode flush toilets and waterless urinals are becoming widespread, and there is precedent for their use within the City and County of Denver.

The cost of commissioning varies with the size and complexity of the building, and the extent of commissioning specified, but a general rule of thumb: •

The whole building process from design through acceptance equals 0.5-1.5% of total construction cost

The HVAC and automated control system commissioning equals 1.5-2.5% of mechanical system cost

The electrical system commissioning equals 1.5-2.5% of electrical system cost

Source: GSA/FEMP “Building Commissioning Guide” v 2.1

Energy Use in a Building Energy demands in a building depend on four primary factors: the climate where the building is located; how and when the building is used; the loads created by the building’s siting, form, and orientation; and the type, size, and efficiency of the building’s MEP systems. Architectural design is largely affected by program, site, form, and orientation, while engineering mainly considers climate analysis and systems design. Sustainable innovations mean considering solar orientation and finding synergies where the building form can elegantly reduce the requirements of the mechanical and electrical systems. If these requirements are downsized, environmental impacts are minimized and money is saved.

Passive Solar Design “Passive solar” describes the broad category of solar power strategies used to heat or cool a building and to minimize energy demands. The goal is to increase occupant comfort and building efficiency while reducing operating costs and dependence on outside energy sources for heating, cooling and lighting. Effective passive solar design relies primarily on building orientation, window placement, and exposing thermal mass. Successful integration of passive solar strategies begins by placement and design, and by engaging the team early in conceptual conversations.

University of Oregon Living Learning Center, ZGF

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Glazing

Building Integrated Photovoltaics

Glazing is key to the energy performance of a building and should be considered holistically. The optimum high performance glazing options depend on location, building type, climate, and orientation.

Photovoltaics (PVs) are materials made from silicon-based crystals that convert sunlight into renewable electrical power. PVs come in a variety of types in both wafer and film form that can be laminated between layers of glass or polymer film and integrated into building components like spandrel panels, windows, and shading devices as building-integrated photovoltaics (or BIPVs).

Glazing performance can be altered by surface coats such as low emmissivity or ceramic frit, which is baked onto the surface in a particular pattern. The degree of tint in the glass also has an effect on performance.

With effective design, BIPVs can produce mechanical energy, lower overall building energy consumption, prevent solar heat gain, and help capitalize on daylighting and optimized orientation.

These performance features are characterized by several parameters: U-Value is a measure of energy efficiency that describes the rate of heat flow through a product with combined materials, like a window. A low U-Value will reduce heating energy requirements. The Eliot Tower, ZGF

The capital cost of PVs does not provide a reasonable payback period at this point, however, PVs are becoming more affordable with increased demand and may qualify for tax credits to offset initial costs.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) describes the amount of the solar energy transmitted through the window as heat. The lower the SHGC, the better the solar control properties and the less cooling required.

Ground Source Heat Pump Ground source heat pumps are systems that use the stored energy of the earth to provide hot water, heating and cooling to buildings. There are two types of systems: closed loop and open loop.

Visible Light Transmittance (VLT) describes the percentage of light that passes through the glazing system. A low VLT rating improves glare while a higher rating favors natural light.

Closed loop systems circulate fluid through plastic pipes buried underground. In the winter, the fluid gathers heat from the ground which is used to heat the building. In the summer, the system reverses to cool itself by pulling heat from the building and placing it in the ground. The warmth can also be used to pre-heat water in the summer.

Night Ventilation Night Ventilation of Mass is a passive cooling strategy that uses thermal mass, such as concrete and masonry, to regulate temperature shift. By drawing cool nighttime air over the mass during unoccupied hours, the accumulated heat is flushed out of the mass, leaving it cool and ready to absorb the internal heat load of the following day.

Portland State University, Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology, ZGF

With most of the accumulated heat removed during the previous night, the mass can absorb a large portion of the heat in the space throughout the following day, reducing or eliminating the need for mechanical cooling. This strategy is most effective in climates with large temperature shifts between day and night. These also tend to be climates with low humidity levels. In some climates, night ventilation of mass can provide all of a building’s cooling needs. Initial integration of this strategy is essential to provide properly sized openings sufficient for flushing.

An open loop system draws water, and associated heating or cooling temperatures, from one subterranean source, and then re-injects it into a second subterranean source. Geothermal wells, aquifers, and even large bodies of surface water (lakes, rivers, oceans) can provide relatively constant temperatures required for the system. Pacific Lutheran University, Morken Center for Learning and Technology, ZGF

Radiant Conditioning Radiation is the direct exchange of thermal energy between solid objects. Radiant conditioning directly heats or cools surfaces for occupant comfort in contrast to the convection of supply air in conventional HVAC systems.

Daylighting

The temperatures of surfaces surrounding occupants play a large role in determining comfort, so it makes sense to control those surfaces. Common examples of radiant conditioning include floor slabs, walls, and chilled beams or coils recessed into or suspended below the ceiling. Typically water flowing through the tubing radiantly conditions the space.

Daylighting is more than just windows. It means orienting the building to draw in diffused light through windows, and switching off electric lights. Proper daylighting economizes mechanical systems, reduces heat gain from electric light and minimizes solar heat gain while saving operating costs. It also promotes happy, healthy occupants with improved productivity.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, FDA at Irvine, Pacific Region Laboratory, ZGF

The key to effective daylighting is collaboration and integration. Adjacent site features, latitude, and site orientation may affect design opportunities. Design team members must work together to maximize daylighting potential and analyze the distribution of sunlight and its interaction with building systems.

Radiant systems provide higher occupant com-fort, minimal air flow rates to save fan power, and space and duct savings because water is a more efficient carrier of heat than air. Radiant systems have a slower response time than air based systems and must be monitored to remain above dewpoint temperature to avoid condensation. George Fox University, Le Shana Hall, ZGF

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Materials product sustainability and life cycle assessments

Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) quality of building interior and occupant health

Life Cycle Assessment

Natural Ventilation

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool used to understand the environmental performance and potential impacts associated with a product.

Natural ventilation is the use of a building’s form, organization, and openings to minimize mechanical loads. It uses naturally occurring phenomena, such as wind and warm air buoyancy, to supply air to building occupants and remove heat.

It follows a product, process, or system throughout the course of its life and is used to understand long term costs, benefits, and environmental implications. By including impacts throughout a product’s life, LCA provides a more accurate indication of environmental impact. LCA identifies the potential environmental effects associated with identified inputs and releases and interprets results to help users make more informed decisions. Generally, the products under assessment are cradle-to-grave materials, meaning they begin with the raw material extraction and end with the final disposal. CRADLE to GRAVE

Credit: Natural Ventilation in Northwest Buildings by GZ Brown et al, June 2004

Portland State University, Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology, ZGF

production

raw materials

Natural ventilation can reduce construction cost by minimizing (or eliminating) mechanical ventilation and cooling equipment, which reduces operating costs and environmental impacts of the building. Natural ventilation can supply fresh outside air for the occupants’ comfort, reduce odors, remove heat from the space, and (at night) cool the building mass to condition the space the following day.

Cradle to Cradle

Displacement Ventilation

Cradle-to-cradle refers to a materials usage strategy that considers the full life cycle of a substance, from the source of its raw materials to their reuse in another application after completion of their service life. Instead of designing cradle-to-grave products that end up in landfills at the end of their life, some manufacturers design products with life cycles whose materials always exist in a closed loop.

Displacement ventilation is a passive strategy for the conditioning and ventilation of buildings that is generally more energy efficient and provides better air quality than conventional systems. Such a system takes advantage of the simple fact that warm air rises. Supply air is introduced near the floor, at a low velocity and at a temperature slightly cooler than desired room temperature. As air in the room warms and rises, the cooler supply air replaces it, providing fresh air at occupant level. Heat and contaminants produced by activities in the space rise to the ceiling where they are exhausted.

HUMAN NEEDS MET WORLD WIDE

recycled, reused or disassembled

Unlike conventional systems which condition air in the entire space, displacement ventilation conditions air only at occupant level, providing higher quality indoor air. The strategy is particularly effective in tall spaces like atriums where a large percentage of vertical height is unoccupied.

product

University of California - San Diego, Leichtag Biomedical Research Building, ZGF

Recycled Content Products

Stack Effect

Recycled building products are recovered from consumer or industrial waste streams. These materials minimize environmental effects associated with manufacturing and extraction of raw materials and reduce landfill waste.

The stack (or chimney) effect describes the fact that warm air rises, creating higher temperatures at the top of a tall space than at the bottom. By creating and controlling openings at the top and bottom of such a space, the air can be forced to move through the stack without the assistance of fans or other mechanical equipment. A passive system operates as warm air moves to the top of a volume creating a vacuum at the lower level which draws cool air from open windows and vents. The process passively supplies and removes air without mechanical ductwork or fans.

Post-Consumer describes recycled materials made of consumer waste of another product. The waste comes from products that have already been used by a consumer and are thus more resource efficient by eliminating the demand for virgin materials.

To function effectively, the stack effect requires a certain height difference between inlets at the lower level, and openings for release at the upper level. The system can be combined with other strategies for effective cooling.

Pre-Consumer (or Post-Industrial) refers to material output from an industrial process that would otherwise be disposed in landfills. When cycled back into the production process, this minimizes demand for raw materials.

Credit: Natural Ventilation in Northwest Buildings by GZ Brown et al, June 2004.

The LEED© rating system values post-consumer over pre-consumer materials. Portland State University, Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology ZGF

environment & sustainability Belleview Station a summary

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Cross Ventilation

VOCs

Cross ventilation uses high and low pressure zones created by wind flowing around a building to direct fresh air through a building and flush out stale air. Moving air through a space in this way can remove accumulating heat and increase the rates of convection and evaporation from the occupants’ skin, making them feel more comfortable. This passive process reduces the need for mechanical ductwork and equipment.

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are gases emitted from certain solids or liquids. As chemicals, they can vaporize and enter the atmosphere under normal conditions. Typical sources include paint thinners, varnishes, dry cleaning solvents, and some petroleum fuels. In buildings, the most likely sources of VOCs are carpets, paints, adhesives, and vinyl. Environmental problems arise when these compounds are released into the environment contaminating soil or groundwater and emitting vapors that contribute to air pollution. Human health problems can arise from breathing VOCs emitted by these materials.

Cross ventilation air absorbs heat from people, equipment, and lighting as it moves through a space and exhausts it to the exterior. If the space is well ventilated, the air temperature decrease can be as much as 3ºF. University of California Santa Barbara, Marine Science Research Building, ZGF

An EPA Total Exposure Assessment Methodology study found these chemicals to be more than twice as concentrated inside buildings as outside. Care should be taken in specifying materials and processes that minimize or eliminate VOCs in construction projects.

Credit: Natural Ventilation in Northwest Buildings by GZ Brown et al, June 2004.

Passive Direct Evaporative Cooling

Exterior Shading

Ancient Egyptians naturally air conditioned their buildings by hanging wet mats in doors and windows, and by allowing the wind to blow through the openings and evaporate the water.

External shading devices are an important element of energy efficient building design. They decrease the thermal load on glazing, reduce glare, and help redirect daylight onto surfaces in the building.

Evaporative cooling towers use climate, building form, and orientation to cool building occupants. Passive down-draught evaporative cooling, or PDEC systems, use tall towers to catch dry, hot air outside a building that will evaporate water at the top of the tower. This evaporation decreases the temperature of the air and increases humidity, forcing the cool, dense air down through the tower where it exits at the base and cools the space by as much as 30ºF.

University of California - Davis, Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, ZGF

Traditional shading devices include awnings, overhangs, and trellises. Often horizontal sunshades are used for south facing walls and vertical louvers are used for east and west facing windows. They can be adjusted to optimize benefit depending on the sun’s position. When incorporated into the building facade, these elements become design opportunities. Effective design exterior shading devices can increase thermal comfort, minimize glare, and reduce cooling loads without additional demand on the mechanical system. Recent innovations in high performance glazing and coatings may reduce the benefit provided by these shading devices.

In arid climates, cooling towers reduce energy costs and emissions while providing fresh, clean air to occupants. Challenges to use of a cooling tower include proper arid climates, humidity and temperature control, and distribution. More than one tower may be preferable for large buildings.

Under Floor Air Distribution

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, FDA at Irvine, Pacific Region Laboratory, ZGF

Under floor air distribution, sometimes called UFAD or raised access flooring, is a form of displacement ventilation. As a technology for conditioning and ventilation, this technique delivers cool supply air through an under floor plenum. The plenum is created between the slab and a raised floor panel system mounted on pedestals. Air is supplied to the floor plenum and then delivered into the occupied space through diffusers in the raised floor. Delivering air through adjustable floor-mounted registers allows air to be stratified with lower temperatures at occupant level and high temperatures towards the ceiling. This system provides a high degree of individual comfort and control. This strategy also allows for lower fan energy usage, even distribution of air through a space, and flexibility for re-configuration with local access to cabling. Bonneville Power Administration Headquarters, ZGF

environment & sustainability Belleview Station a summary

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Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) quality of bulding interior and occupant health

Innovation

integrated design, high performance strategies

Interior Shading

High Performance Buildings

Interior shading devices are a passive strategy for high performance building design that are a means to provide better visual comfort in a building.

High performance buildings exceed standard practice in environmental and economic performance. High performance buildings have increased asset value because they have lower operating costs and attract tenants faster than conventional buildings.

Often they take the simple form of horizontal or vertical blinds attached to windows on the interior which allow occupants to regulate the amount of light entering their space to limit glare and improve visual comfort.

Willamette University, Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center, ZGF

Internal light shelves are ideally located between view glazing and daylight glazing. They prevent glare near the window wall and bounce light onto the ceiling, directing it deeper into the space. This increases the perceived brightness in the space and minimizes electric lighting needs.

High performance goals can be met through a whole-building design process that integrates all building components throughout the design phase to ensure all aspects work in synergy. Effective performance demands a clear definition of goals at the beginning of the design process that sets benchmarks based on clear criteria reflecting the environment and economics.

Ideally, internal devices will complement external shading techniques and create design opportunities. Light-colored devices are preferable because they minimize glare and reduce heat gain.

Sometimes termed green, sustainable, or high performance, the benefits are clear: superior energy, economic, and environmental performance for occupants, owners, and the earth.

EPA Region 8 Headquarters, ZGF

Views

Ecotect

Accessible views to the outside provide numerous benefits for building occupants. Studies show that a connection to nature and the outdoors increases worker productivity, reduces absenteeism, and improves workplace morale.

Ecotect is a modeling and analysis software tool used to visualize environmental effects, such as direct/indirect daylighting, solar heat gain/loss, acoustic performance, and wind direction on a building design. A model can be rendered using Ecotect’s 3D interface or imported from SketchUp or AutoCAD. Material properties can be assigned to surfaces that affect thermal, daylighting, or acoustic performance. Weather data can be imported for a particular location in which the building will be constructed.

Views are determined by direct line of sight to the outdoors. Vision glazing describes the mid-level windows within human eye sight.

Using Ecotect (especially in close collaboration with the design team), a design can be tested, understood and further developed to optimize the use of available solar, light, and wind resources. Ecotect is most helpful during early design stages where building orientation and facade design can be easily manipulated to take advantage of the site.

Oregon Health & Science University, Biomedical Research Building, ZGF Solar radiation within proposed roof gardens – Belleview Station

environment & sustainability Belleview Station a summary

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Comprehensive Sustainable Design In an effort to understand the site as an integrated, holistic development, a series of studies has been done using simple energy and daylight simulation tools. These studies further our understanding, both qualitatively and quantitatively, of how the conceptual development massing is impacted by seasonal solar movements, incident solar radiation and daylight, and other climatic variations. This information will serve as a basis for the design of each individual parcel within the development, serving as a starting point for a design that harnesses these climatic forces to produce the most high performance and sustainable buildings possible.

Initial Studies of Seasonal Cumulative Solar Radiation — Potential for Daylighting, Power Generation and Passive Operation

environment & sustainability Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program The following site plans reflect Continuum Partners development program dated August 2006. A series of plans were developed in a similar framework that reflected a prior plan document, the “Belleview Station T.O.D.� by Civitas dated April 2005. This comparison elucidates the similarities and differences between the two programs. In the following pages, the original Belleview Station T.O.D. plan is referenced on the pages opposite the Continuum Partners August 2006 Development Plan.

*massing and figures based on development program as of 8/30/2006

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

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Land Use The central concept in the proposed development of Belleview Station is ‘urbs in suburbis’: a place with a distinctly downtown character amid the suburban neighborhoods of Southeast Denver. Land uses and densities reflect this with a mix of urban housing, employment, retail and entertainment. Uses are balanced between blocks and frontages to create a visibly active community that invites participation.

** gsf

**

*

** *

retail [retail plan follows on p.43] apartments condominiums townhouses hotels office planned but not in current program: * future [by continuum]

**

** future [ by others]

retail a b d e f g

47,500 40,000 31,600 40,000 32,600 49,000

apartments a d g

113,647 238,235 225,000

condominiums b d e f g

236,472 240,000 201,176 242,647 49,412

townhouses a hotels d g office d e g

237,500

463,235

1,109,824 17,500 17,500 121,154 125,000 246,154 100,000 110,000 200,000 410,000

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

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Phasing Building a truly urban place on a bare site demands careful phasing. The first blocks built will establish expectations for all that follows. Precedents for the uses and quality of development will either invite or discourage potential investors and occupants. A further complication is that early phases will be primarily dependent on automobile access. Only as transit use becomes established and widely used can the benefits of Transit Oriented Development be engaged fully.

**

Phasing of development must accommodate these factors as well as functional necessities such as an orderly sequence of infrastructure construction. The phasing plan embodies all of these things, and yields the sequence and anticipated year in which each phase of development might be undertaken.

** estimated close date

** (future)

2007 2008 2010 2011 2012-2013 planned but not in current program: * future [by continuum]

**

** future [ by others]

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

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Open Space In a lively and compact urban environment, demands on public open space can be substantial. At Belleview Station, parks, plazas, streets, paseos and mews are treated as complementary parts of a public realm that is dedicated to the enjoyment and social interchange of those who live and work in the district, and of those who visit. In some cases, the boundaries between public and private open space will be clearly stated; in others, they will dissolve. Public open spaces invite gregarious behavior by their design, including exposures to sun and shade, views and breezes, and in their physical design.

space

acreage

rooftop deck courtyard park

.55 .58

BLOCK D private apt. gardens public park rooftop deck

.46 .25 .69

BLOCK F private condo gardens rooftop deck layton linear park

.36 .35 1.2

BLOCK A

active public spaces passive public spaces roof decks [opportunity for additional green] niagara connections private open space

BLOCK G

central plaza intersection plaza block G park

1.1 1.05 .95

development program *block D public space arrangement assumes no parking below

Belleview Station a summary

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3 Levels of 132 Spaces Above Grade 3 Levels of 182 Spaces Above Grade

development program Belleview Station a summary

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Parking Early phases of development will be heavily dependent on automobile access, and thus on convenient parking. Later phases will occur as increasing numbers of residents, workers and visitors come and go from Belleview Station by transit. Parking ratios reflect this change and the disposition of parking at each phase of development anticipates subsequent diminutions in demand, and efficiencies that can be achieved through shared use of parking by uses with complementary hours of operation. Parking should be convenient, yet inconspicuous so that the needs of the district are fully met, yet the character of streets and open spaces is devoted to human activity, not transportation.

BLOCK A

above grade below grade basements

BLOCK B

vehicular access service access

BLOCK D

*block D parking arrangement assumes no park space above ** see p.55 for April 2006 Parking Study

BLOCK E BLOCK F BLOCK G

spaces

gsf

411

143,763

215

75,075

867

303,306

542

189,656

315

110,206

844

295,531

3,193

1,117,537

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

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Retail Retail spaces must be adaptable to different types of merchandise and to use as cafĂŠs and restaurants. Consequently, spaces for retail must be flexible in size, variable in location and character, and highly visible. Visibility is addressed primarily by locating most retail on Newport Street and around the transit plaza, and by creating multiple corners with mid-block paseo. Some retail will address the service needs of those who live and work at Belleview Station, but most will depend on visitors drawn to this unique and bustling area from Denver Tech Center and other nearby neighborhoods. For many visitors, parking will continue to be the primary means of access, so retail parking allocations have been sized accordingly.

BLOCK A

BLOCK B

BLOCK D

BLOCK E

BLOCK F

BLOCK G

building

floors

gsf

A-3 N A-4 S A-2 S

1 1 1

20,000 20,000 12,000

B-1 N B-2 S

1 1

12,600 11,700

D-3 N D-1 E D-2 W D-2 E

1 1 1 1

19,500 7,800 10,800 7,800

E-1 N E-2 S

1 1

20,900 11,400

F-3 N F-4 S

1 1

18,200 12,600

G West G North G East G Pavilion

1 1 1 1

18,000 12,000 14,000 5,000 237,500

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

44


Apartments The majority of housing planned for Belleview Station is in condominiums, yet a substantial proportion of residents will prefer to rent rather than buy accommodation. Many apartment dwellers will choose to use transit, so all are near the LRT station. The apartment tower planned for Block G will be highly visible from I-25, demonstrating its convenient location.

** BLOCK A

**

**

building

floors

gsf

TBD

TBD

TBD

9 5 4 6

94,235 49,000 50,400 54,600

16

225,000

BLOCK D

D-3 East D-3 West D-4 West D-4 East

BLOCK G

G North 463,235

**

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

46


Condominiums Condominium housing will be directed at different segments of the market with new units added in each phase of development. Towers will be oriented to take full advantage of views toward the Front Range, and will be designed with generous access to natural light while excluding heat and glare from the summer sun. Most condominium towers will have service and retail uses at the sidewalk level, integrating them into the active life of urban streets.

**

**

building BLOCK B

*

BLOCK D

BLOCK E

BLOCK F

BLOCK G

floors

gsf

8 5 4

86,471 85,200 64,800

D-3 N D-4 S

11 11

105,882 134,118

E-1 N E-2 S E-3 E

9 6 TBD

123,529 77,647 TBD

13 7 7 6

155,294 87,353 107,100 84,000

3

49,412

B-1 N (High) B-1 (Mid) B-2 S

F-3 NE F-4 SE F-1 NW (Future) F-2 SW (Future) G West

1,109,824

development program Belleview Station a summary

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Program for Towhhomes did not exist in the Belleview Station T.O.D. April 2005

development program Belleview Station a summary

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Townhouses Only in the first phase of development will densities be low enough to enable the inclusion of townhouses. They provide variety in housing choice for a few early residents.

units BLOCK A

7

floors

gsf

3

17,500 17,500

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

50


Hotels Two hotels are planned for Belleview Station, adding richness to the range of social and commercial resources. Differing in style, each will serve nearby neighborhoods, fulfilling the expectations of sophisticated downtown hospitality.

floors

gsf

D-4 S

9

121,154

D-1 NE

8

125,000

building BLOCK D BLOCK G

246,154

development program Belleview Station a summary

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development program Belleview Station a summary

52


Offices At the time of preparing the development program for Belleview Station, the potential of the office market at this location remains unclear. However, some demand for office space will inevitably come with the facilities and ambiance of this downtown-style center. Three office towers are planned, the largest of them sited directly adjacent to the light rail station, providing immediate and convenient access to transit riders. Provision has been made for two additional office buildings, should the market justify their construction. Otherwise, these sites will be used for other improvements as Belleview Station matures.

*

floors

gsf

6

100,000

E-1 NW E-3 NE (Future)

6 TBD

110.000 TBD

G SE

TBD

200,000

building BLOCK D BLOCK E

BLOCK G

D-1 NE

410,000

development program Belleview Station a summary

53


Continuum Belleview Station TOD

Development Program August 2006

BLOCK

A

Est. Close

April, 07

BLOCK AREA PHASE

1

Block Total:

B-1/B-2

April, 07

1

Block Total: April, 08 Oct. 08 D-1/D-2/D-3/D- April, 08 April, 08 4 April, 08 April, 08

2

Block Total:

E-1/E-2

Jan, 2011

3

Block Total:

F-3/F-4

Jan. 2012 Jan, 2013 Jan. 2012

4

Block Total:

G

Jan., 2010

5

(30 mo.) Block Total:

Site SF B Parking Retail Office Condo Affordable Townhomes Parking Pad Site

Condo-Mid Condo-High Retail Parking Retail Apartments Condo Condo-Hotel Hotel Office Parking Retail Office Condo Condo Tower Parking Retail Condo North Condo South Parking Hotel Retail Condos Apartments Office Parking

Totals (SF) % of total FAR 2,313,036 939 3.15 3.15 6.30

153,500

153,500

54,014 54,014

100,317

100,317

104,849 104,849

81,799 81,799

239,596

ACRES

Total SF

3.52

3.52

205,118

1.24 1.24

276,471

2.30

2.30

501,154

2.41 2.41

351,176

1.88 1.88

EFFICIENCY

262,647

Gross 92% 96% 85% 85% 100% 350 100%

0

OFFICE

Usable

0

units

0

Gross

0

RETAIL

Rentable

92% 85% 85% 85% 65% 96% 350 92% 96% 85% 85% 350 92% 85% 85% 350

Gross

Usable

40,000

36,800

7,500 47,500

0

85% 85% 92% 350

60% 87% 85%

5.50

HOTEL

40,000 40,000

121,154

78,750

225

121,154

78,750

225

-

-

-

100,000

96,000

100,000

96,000

110,000

105,600

110,000

105,600

125,000

75,000

-

-

-

200

36,800 36,800

40,000

36,800

40,000

36,800

40,000

40,000

20,000 50,000

36,800 18,400

18,400 43,500

239,596

5.50

716,471

734,075

16.85

2,313,036

Total Square Feet of Development (does not included parking) Total Dwelling Units Gross FAR (assuming 16.85 acres of land) Net FAR (development SF/block area) Gross FAR with parking

0 2,311,100

200,000

192,000

200 138 25 14

0% 0% 100%

138 25 14

96,600 22,500 17,500

1,050 900 2,500

92 25 7

157,618

136,600

1,775

124

5/1000 2.00

38 415

10% 1%

34 411

150000 86471

127500 73500

1500 2100

85 35

1.7/unit 2/unit 5/1000

145 70 200

0% 0% 35%

145 70 0

1,800

120

0.78

415

48%

215

5/1000 1.5/unit 2/unit 1.8/unit .63/unit 4/1000

200 0 120 108 142 400

35% 30% 35% 35% 35% 35%

130 0 78 70 92 260

236,471

201,000

0 105,882 134,118

0 90,000 114,000

0 1,500 1,900

0 60 60

240,000

204,000

1,133

120

1.26

970

35%

630

30 100

5/1000 4/1000 1.75/unit 1.75/unit

200 440 53 175

45% 45% 5% 20%

110 242 50 140

130

1.54

868

38%

542

120 45

5/1000 1.75/unit 1.75/unit

100 210 79

45% 10% 10%

55 189 71

165

1.20

389

19%

315

200 250 96

50% 45% 50%

100 138 48

201,176 155,294 87,353 242,647

66,000 105,000 171,000 132,000 74,250 206,250

2,200 1,050 1,625 1,100 1,650 2,750

116,471

99,000

1,800

55

1/unit 5/1000 1.75/unit

225,000

191,250

850

225

1.25/unit

281

50%

141

4/1000

800

45%

440

1.21

1,628

47%

866

1.29 25.00% 50.00%

4,683 3,512 2,341

36%

2,979

125,000

75,000

200

200,000

192,000

50,000

43,500

341,471

290,250

246,154 10.64%

153,750 6.65%

425

410,000 17.73%

393,600 17.02%

237,500 10.27%

216,000 9.34%

1,419,382 61.36%

1,209,100 52.27%

Civitas

Total Spaces

113,647 26,471 17,500

36,800

85% 96% 350

# of Units

Parking FAR Spaces Parking Parking SF by Reduction Provided block 100 0 35% 50% 100

Parking Ratio 5/1000 4/1000 1.5/unit 1.0/unit 2/unit

77,647 123,529

20,000

-

6,900 43,700

Gross

RESIDENTIAL Avg. SF Saleable per unit 0 0

2,650

280

11,733 939 Total # reduced by Total # reduced by

Parking for B Retail

Parks 2 per unit

143,763 143,763

Comments

1.34

7,500 sf retail pad site

Dedicated Parking Dedicated Parking Provided on A

75,075 75,075

5.12

220,618 220,618

5.00

189,656 189,656 3.35

110,206 110,206 3.21

303,188 303,188 1,042,506 45.07%

2.99 3.15

development program Belleview Station a summary

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080206 Development Program.xls

8/6/2006


BASEMENT

MEZZANINE

GRADE

ABOVE GRADE

development program Belleview Station a summary

55

190

102

90

102

90

322

328

296

322

305 (405) 265

288

256

102

78

329

72

1 / 72

2 / 126

C CONNECTED

220

102

102

72

78

1 / 72

3 / 189

3 / 132

B WITH BANSBACH

78

BELEVIEW MASTERPLAN PARKING STUDIES APRIL 2006

72

2 / 144

4 / 252

5 / 220

A FREESTANDING

0'

200'

400'

Bellview Station Framework and Development Plan  

(Belleview, CO w/ZGF) The Belleview Station plan is driven by a critical opportunity, 17.5 acres with excellent acces to the Denver Region...

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