Page 1

ISSUE 006 - AUGUST 2016

BRAZIL

|

MEXICO

|

THAILAND

|

ROME

|

U RUG UAY

+

MORE

22 | CAPTURING THE MOMENT

60 | A LEADER IN ART AND DESIGN

What I find about photography, as a medium, extraordinary is how you can take something ordinary and make it beautiful. You can capture a moment that only happens once and save it forever. You’re able to photograph things that the naked eye can’t see,” says Caitlin Collins

Andile Dyalyane’s first solo exhibition of approximately 30 large clay sculptures is on display at the Friedman Benda Gallery in New York City. It is entitled “Camagu” which is a Xhosa word which loosely translates to “I am grateful.”


FO U N D E R SUMMER JOHNSON

SENIOR EDITOR DAKOTA ARKIN

O P E R AT I O N S D I R E C T O R SANDY ANDERSON

C OV E R D E S I G N IKER FERNANDEZ

DESIGN JESSICA BAILEY & IKER FERNANDEZ

E D I T O R I AL SUMMER JOHNSON, ANNE FOONG, NICOLE STANTON BRITTANY TEMPLETON, DAKOTA ARKIN ASHLEY PUCKETT, EMMA CUNNINGHAM JESSICA NABONGO, NATALIE HOLLOWAY

WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT KAWSAR SIDDIK, ROCKY ATHWANI

M AR K E T I N G ILKA PANDILOVSKA

CONTACT

UPWARDMAGAZINE.COM

UPWARDMAGAZINE

HELLO@UPWARDMAGAZINE.COM

UPWARDMAGAZINE

UPWARDMAGAZINE

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 2


U P WAR D S TAF F

FOUNDER’S LETTER

- SU M M ER J OHN SON

elcome Readers, I sit approximately 15 kilometers from Brazil which has the world’s attention with the Olympic games underway this summer. As our minds and hearts are with the athletes this month, we are taking you to South America, a place enticing us with curiosity and discovery. We’re taking you to the ethereal Bahia region of Brazil. We’ll travel south to discover coastal Uruguay. Of course, our unconventional travelers take us all of the globe this month from Accra to Roma. We hope that you are inspired to explore, to see the unseen and to experience the unknown.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 3


CONTENTS WORLD S TORIE S Uruguay: An Escape to a South American Jewel - Jessica Nabongo

ENTREPRENEUR

DEST I NAT ION FO C U S Brazil’s Intoxicating Bahia - Ashley Puckett

P.6

Capturing the Moment With Caitlin Collins - Nicole Stanton

P.22

Capturing Adventures Around the World Brittany Templeton

P.54

P.30

E AT & DR I N K Mescal: A Taste of Mexico - Nicole Stanton Katie Parla: The New Roman Holiday Summer Johnson

PHOTOG RAPHY S POTL IG HT

P.36 P.38

Photography That Inspires: Delia Baum - Brittany Templeton

ART Andile Dyalyane: A Leader in Art and Design - Summer Johnson

P.60

Into the Woods - Summer Johnson

P.62

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 4

P.42


CONTENTS

Issue 006

DESIGNER ON A MISSION A A K S

FA S HION Designer On a Mission: A A K S - Summer Johnson

POSTC ARD P.16

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 5

Going the Distance - Natalie Holloway

P.64


NO.1 World Stories

Uruguay: An Escape to a South American Jewel PHOTOS AND TEXT:

JESSICA NABONGO

As the gaze of the world turns towards Brazil for the 2016 summer Olympics, many will flock to the region’s most visited country and for good reason, but just south of the beautiful mammoth is Uruguay, one of the least visited countries on the South American continent.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 6


AN ESCAPE TO A SOUTH AMERICAN JEWEL

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 7


U RUG UAY

In fact, in Uruguay cattle outnumber people four to one, placing this small nation among the world’s leaders in cattle production.

Surrounded by tourism meccas Brazil and Argentina, and flanked on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, the small country of 3.4 million boasts beautiful beach towns, UNESCO heritage status, and mouthwatering beef. In fact, in Uruguay cattle outnumber people four to one, placing this small nation among the world’s leaders in cattle production.

Montevideo is the little known capital of this South American jewel and just a ferry and bus ride away from Buenos Aires, it is quite accessible. In fact, my journey to Uruguay started in Buenos Aires at the shores of the Rio de la Plata, the massive river that separates the two countries.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 8


AN ESCAPE TO A SOUTH AMERICAN JEWEL

On Brava Beach in Punta del Este you will find one of Uruguay’s most recognizable landmarks, Mano de Punta del Este (hand of Punta del Este)

When crossing Rio de la Plata to get to Uruguay I arrived in Colonia del Sacramento, a one hour ferry from Buenos Aires. Upon arrival I hopped on a bus for the two-hour drive to the capital. Montevideo is the largest city in Uruguay and sits on Montevideo Bay. The architecture throughout the city afirms its Spanish colonial roots. One full day is sufficient to

explore the small capital, but then you must rent a car to traverse the beautiful Uruguayan countryside and visit coastal towns. With 410 miles of coastline, the appeal of Uruguay is in the beach towns scattered along its Atlantic coast. Of all of them, Punta del Este is the

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 9


U RUG UAY

biggest and most well known. It is often likened to be to the Bonaerense what the Hamptons is to New Yorkers. With pristine beaches, plenty of sun, and succulent seafood, it is no wonder that this is the go-to beach town of South America’s glitterati. With 410 miles of coastline, the appeal of Uruguay is in the beach towns scattered along its Atlantic coast. Of all of them, Punta del Este is the biggest and most well known. It is often likened to be to the Bonaerense what the Hamptons is to New Yorkers. With pristine beaches, plenty of sun, and succulent seafood, it is no wonder that this is the go-to beach town of South America’s glitterati. On Brava Beach in Punta del Este you will find one of Uruguay’s most recognizable landmarks, Mano de Punta del Este (hand of Punta del Este). The sculpture, also known as Los Dedos, was created by Chilean artist Mario Irarrázabal, and features five fingers partially above the sand.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 10


AN ESCAPE TO A SOUTH AMERICAN JEWEL

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 11


U RUG UAY

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 12


AN ESCAPE TO A SOUTH AMERICAN JEWEL

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 13


U RUG UAY

Punta del Diablo, a quaint fishing town north of Punta del Este, has a permanent population of about 400, though during the high season it swells to 25,000. Arrival in Punta del Diablo is like stepping into a hippie’s paradise — from dreadlocked men clad in colorful pants lounging about to the faint smell of cannabis — the carefree energy engulfs you. Punta del Diablo does not attract the same crowds as the upscale Punta del Este, but with extensive beaches, great seafood and a relaxed atmosphere, one can understand why young Brazilians and Argentines flock to its coast. South of Punta del Diablo is Barra de Valizas, another small, charming beach town. Valizes is surrounded by large sand dunes which are perfect for sandboarding if you are brave enough. Upon driving into the town, you are met by people selling crafts on the side of the road, sometimes for money, sometimes for beer. In this town bartering is common.

skateboarding and snowboarding though safer with soft, beautiful sand to cushion your fall, sandboarding is a thrilling, unique experience. The last stop on our traverse along Uruguay’s coast was Cabo Polonio. The town is well maintained largely because there are no motor vehicles allowed in the town. Cabo Polonio, with a population just shy of 100 residents, has no electricity or running water, though there are a few generators that power some stores. Cabo Polonio, though small, is quite beautiful and unique, and the beaches of this sleepy town are the perfect backdrop for a relaxing few days sans wi-fi.

The lighthouse is the pinnacle of the town and seals and walruses rest on the rocks below. I enjoyed lunch at a restaurant called Mariemar that had a great view of the crystal clear waters of the South Atlantic Ocean, delicious Before hitting the beach I enjoyed paella and ice cold Cokes. Unfortunately, a delicious lunch of fresh fish and shrimp I only spent a few hours in this quiet paired with cold beer and sangria. From haven. the beach you can witness fisherman searching for the day’s catch, either served There is something peaceful and for dinner or put on ice for the next day. magical about the small beach towns in Uruguay, unlike anything that I have Following lunch I laid on the ever experienced before. None of these beach and soaked up the Uruguayan sun towns are upscale, save for Punta del Este, before boarding a small boat to cross the but they all were simple, beautiful, and a inlet for sandboarding. A cross between welcome departure from the beaten path.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 14


AN ESCAPE TO A SOUTH AMERICAN JEWEL

There is something peaceful and magical about the small beach towns in Uruguay

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 15


NO.2 Fashion

Designer On a Mission AAKS

TEXT: SUMMER JOHNSON / PHOTOS: CARA JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY

Designer Akosua Afriyie-Kumi is behind the high-end sustainable accessory company, A A K S. Her company creates jobs in Ghana — from the farmers who produce the textiles to the weavers of her lovely designs. Afriyie-Kumi’s Ghanaianinspired weave designs come to life in

rich colors that reflect her drive and enthusiasm. Her line of purses have us at Upward swooning to take along on our next trip or wear over our beach wear. A A K S products are supplied to specialty stores worldwide, including Anthropologie and Urban Outfitters.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 16


A A K S

FEATURED PLACES

AAKSONLINE.COM

GHANA, AFRICA

A.A.K.S

“Afriyie-Kumi’s Ghanaian-inspired weave designs come to life in rich colors that reflect her drive and enthusiasm. ”

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 17


A A K S

ANINYA WEAVING PHOTO AKOSUA AFRIYIE-KUMI

COMMUNITY - PHOTO KWABENA OSEI-KUMI

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 18


A A K S

“I take my design sheets with spec measurements, color selections and finishes to my weavers, where I brief them about my inspirations and ideas for the season. ”

UM: How did you start designing bags? AAK: For a very long time I wanted to work on something which would explore different areas of art and design, and ultimately break the mold of locally sourcing textiles and skills by creating a luxury product in Africa. On my return from London after my studies, I tried to find a place to make my hand-woven bags. After getting the idea while on my travels through Ghana, I stumbled across a small community with a tranquil setting and skilled weavers. I began working and experimenting, making my ideas come to life. It was a tough journey, as the weavers had never used raffia — a material that has great ethical value which I wanted to use in my brand. I started from scratch and spent a year teaching weavers how to bring our products to a luxury standard of quality, and after much trial and error, A A K S handcrafted was finally born!

fits with my clientele’s lifestyle and my design aesthetic. I seek inspiration by visiting my favorite places and exploring new environments through travel. I am an avid sunset photographer so I’ll pick beautiful hues from pictures that I have taken from my travels. These form part of my color palette. I draw my designs from photography, fine art, architecture and fashion which resonate with me.

I take my design sheets with spec measurements, color selections and finishes to my weavers, where I brief them about my inspirations and ideas for the season. It’s a 12-hour drive from the weaving community to my studio, but it is well worth the trip. These women bring their expert skills on board with my favorite weaving techniques to construct the bags that are exactly as I hoped. We begin by twisting the raffia and dying the strands with organic dyes. Preparation normally takes three to four weeks before the actual UM: Describe the perfect day on the job. weaving can even begin. What is your design process and how do you find inspiration? Weavers start making three dimensional shapes of my designs and I bring the AAK: In the mornings, I usually to samples to my studio to start putting listen to a lot of relaxing music in the finishing touches such as linings, trims, studio. It helps calm me down for the labels, leather handles and buckles on the day’s work ahead. My design process is bags. I go through each piece to approve slightly complex, but simple at the same quality and select the pieces for my final time. I start by establishing a mood that collection for our customers and stores. UPWARD MAGAZINE - 19


A A K S

UM: What are you dreaming of for your next line of bags? AAK: We are hoping to go bolder this season. I want to incorporate more geometric patterns in this year’s collection. We have a lot of exciting ideas and cannot wait to share. UM: What do you love most about working in Ghana? In Ghana, I can fulfill my passion for doing what I love, while creating jobs in the local community.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 20


A A K S

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 21


NO.3 Entrepreneur

Capturing the Moment With Caitlin Collins TEXT: NICOLE STANTON / PHOTOS: CAITLIN COLLINS

“What I find about photography, as a medium, extraordinary is how you can take something ordinary and make it beautiful. You can capture a moment that only happens once and save it forever. You’re able to photograph things that the naked eye can’t see,” says Caitlin Collins. It is difficult to separate the work from the woman when discussing what motivates photographer and traveler, Caitlin Collins. She says, “Personal interest typically motivates my travel.” She describes Berlin as the perfect home base to find cheap flights to anywhere in Europe. “While I’m here [Berlin] I’m trying to knock a bunch of places on my list, but the more I see the longer it gets.”

FEATUR ED PLACES

THEGLASSPASSAGE.COM

NORWAY, MEXICO & PERU

AUGUSTALEIGHPHOTO

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 22


CAITLIN COLLINS

“While I’m here I’m trying to knock a bunch of places on my list, but the more I see the longer it gets.”

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 23


CAITLIN COLLINS

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 24


CAITLIN COLLINS

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 25


CAITLIN COLLINS

The overwhelming newness of a place, also known as the honeymoon phase, is a photographer’s dream. For Caitlin, she couldn’t say which subject— food, people, landscapes, art, etc.—holds most importance. “I love photographing all of it! I’m always trying to learn new techniques and editing skills. I find food to be more challenging to find the perfect light but it’s fun to find new colorful produce to play with. One of my favorite things to photograph is the Milky Way. The conditions have to be perfect. Photographing people always makes me a tad nervous so I’m trying to overcome those fears.”

MACHU PICCHU - PHOTO TAYLOR MADISON

“I get very awkward in front of the camera so I’ve mastered the tripod selfie since sometimes when I’m traveling there’s no one to photograph me,” she explains.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 26


CAITLIN COLLINS

“Traveling has changed my life and been the best source of education I’ve ever had.”

Go on any Instagram page and you will find no shortage of “selfie” shots, but Caitlin has skilled clever ways of capturing herself. “I get very awkward in front of the camera so I’ve mastered the tripod selfie since sometimes when I’m traveling there’s no one to photograph me,” she explains. It’s not all picture perfect—it can be tough to meet a deadline when weather or events don’t come together. “One of my most challenging shoots was at a ranch in Texas when I was taking bridal photos,” says Caitlin. “We were out in a field trying to get a camel and zebra in the background and suddenly a family of buffalo started charging us. We had to jump on the golf cart and speed off! The shots actually came out great and the bride was a trooper.” For Caitlin, Iceland has been her favorite country to photograph thus far. “I’ve never seen so many rainbows and waterfalls, gentle Icelandic horses and jagged unusual mountains. It was incredibly green and the landscape changed drastically around every bend. The weather was violent and unpredictable but made it even more exciting.” When Caitlin first went backpacking several years ago after college, she wanted to share the beauty of the places she went with everyone back home. “I love documenting different cultures and strive to convince others to want to travel,” she says. “Traveling has changed my life and been the best source of education I’ve ever had. I hope to persuade others to broaden their horizons and get out of their comfort zones through my photographs.”

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 27


CAITLIN COLLINS

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 28


CAITLIN COLLINS

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 29


NO.4 Destination Focus

Brazil’s Intoxicating Bahia

TEXT: ASHLEY PUCKETT / PHOTOS: AYMERIC TCHOUNGUI

Brazil — the first thoughts that often come to mind are the girl from Ipanema, samba, football, favelas, the Christ Redeemer statue towering over Rio and these days the Summer Olympics Games. As the fifth largest country in the world there is so much more left to discover. And so, I headed for Bahia — the place where Brazilians go on holiday.

FEATURED P LACES

LUNAGUIDETOTRAVEL.COM

BRAZIL

LUNAGUIDETOTRAVEL

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 30


I N T OX IC AT I NG BAH I A

Bahia, in the northeast region of Brazil, I was immediately welcomed by its candy-colored Portuguese colonial architecture and rainforests full of life. It was February, Brazil’s summertime, and the first stop in Bahia was Santo André. It’s a sleepy fishing village only accessible by ferry boat and nestled between Rio João de Tiba and the Atlantic Ocean. We were surrounded by wild empty bays, mangroves and beaches walkable for hours, never crossing another person. It’s almost a mystical place where horses run wild, indigenous tribes emerge from the rainforest to fish along the golden coast and bright-eyed marmosets steal bananas off your plate if you’re not looking. It was a perfect place to make friends with nature, get lost in a book on the deserted beaches or indulge on Brazil’s national cocktail — the caipirinha — paired with some pastéis to fill your day. I most fondly recall sailing through the mangroves down the João de Tiba River, grilling off the back of the boat, birdwatching and swimming between the maze of trees and sinking our feet beneath the shallow waters into the smooth clay river bottom. It was like being lost in paradise, yet we found a piece of ourselves in this striking, raw nature. Our journey continued southward to Trancoso, the jet-set destination of Bahia. The drive here was a bit of a rollercoaster ride along unpaved roads until we finally found the isolated cliff top village. Trancoso is set in a dense rainforest overlooking golden beaches and protected by mangroves. I heard Trancoso described as the Saint-Tropez of Brazil, but there is nothing pretentious here. Locals and tourists, rich and poor, are equals here. We settled into our new destination with tapioca in the Quadrado square, located inthe heart of the village. When the sun is blazing, it’s abandoned save for a few wild horses. At the cliff’s edge, we discovered the entire village relaxing by the South Atlantic, some playing football,, horse drawn carriages selling oysters and even a family of humpback whales in the distance.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 31


I N T OX IC AT I NG BAH I A

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 32


I N T OX IC AT I NG BAH I A

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 33


I N T OX IC AT I NG BAH I A

“I most fondly recall sailing through the mangroves down the João de Tiba River...”

As the sun set, we headed to our pousada to freshen up for an evening of shopping and socializing as the Quadrado comes alive. The bright pastel painted houses swung their doors and windows open, tables were set with white linens and paper lanterns were strung to decorate the square. As the evening markets opened, bossa nova echoed out of

the cafes. The second oldest church in Brazil, the São João Batista, stood chalk-white in the center of it all. Somehow we couldn’t decide if we’d been here before in a dream or if this is what heaven would really look like. The fresh breeze, live music, smells of fresh lobster on the grill and tropical flowers intoxicated us.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 34


I N T OX IC AT I NG BAH I A

“I still refuse to clean the few remaining remnants of sand and shells from my suitcase.�

I still refuse to clean the few remaining remnants of sand and shells from my suitcase. The day we were leaving my daughter told me her goodbyes because she decided she would be staying in Trancoso. As it would be irresponsible to leave a five year-old behind, we both felt like we found a piece

of ourselves in this raw paradise. For two weeks, emails, television, traffic, shoes, were nothing but a faint memory of a life we had once lived. If you want to really discover Brazil, do as the Brazilians do, and get lost in intoxicating Bahia.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 35


NO.5 Eat + Drink

Mescal: A Taste of Mexico TEXT: NICOLE STANTON

The first time I heard about mescal was in the context of studying Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano in a Modernism and Mythology class. Specifically, we were discussing the downward spiral the alcoholic protagonist had taken and mescal was demonized as the substance that could only lead to his demise. Like absinthe, mescal had adopted a position of taboo, so years later when it was offered to me as a replacement for tequila, I was hesitant. Low and behold, it is now my favorite spirit — a word that properly describes this smoky agave liquor found in the heart of Oaxaca, Mexico.

My palate for mescal, as well as my understanding, has developed immensely since traveling to Oaxaca

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 36


MESCAL: A TASTE OF MEXICO

My palate for mescal, as well as my understanding, has developed immensely since traveling to Oaxaca. I am a firm believer that to properly understand something you must go to the birth of its origin: food, art, wine, alcohol… they all are explained in the land in which they are born. Oaxaca is semi-desert land. It was an 18-hour bus ride from Ciudad del Carmen, in the Yucatan coast, to Oaxaca, and for 12 of those hours, the bus wound its way through dramatic mountains covered in dry shrubs and fields of cactus for as far as the eye could see. It was only in the last two hours of the ride and nearing Oaxaca’s city center did I begin to see the rows of maguey, the espadin agave. It’s a beautiful silvery, light-green cactus with thick leaves and threatening large needle points at their ends. I later learned that it takes between seven and 15 years for the plant to mature, therefore large fields of agave are common throughout Oaxaca. The easiest way to understand the relationship between tequila and mescal is this: all tequila is mescal, not all mescal is tequila. Any spirit made from agave falls under the category of mescal. Tequila is 100 percent blue agave and hails from the region of Jalisco, Mexico. In small towns around Oaxaca, like Matatlan, their daily existence is centered on producing Mescal. There, mescal can be made from over 30 varieties. Rare to find outside of Mexico is Silvestre, or wild — this is not to say you will go wild if you drink it, but rather that it’s sourced in the wild — this agave is foraged, not farmed. Despite the recent spike in popularity, a majority of the mescalerías found in Oaxaca are small mom-and-pop style fabricas in which they slowly roast the heart of the agave in underground pit ovens. The heart, which resembles a giant pineapple, is juiced and responsible for mescal. The smokiness of mescal is the first thing you will notice when taking a sniff or swig of it. After it has been kept underground, it is mashed, fermented and distilled. Nothing else is required to make the liquor and it is usually above 50 percent in alcohol content. Types vary through the way in which they are stored, how many years they are distilled, and if there is a worm added to mix — the worm is a caterpillar larvae that lives in the heart of the agave in these unique bottles. As one might expect, these bottles with “the worm” are often the most sought after by tourists coming to Mexico. Truth be told, the best agave is rimmed with sal de gusano, or worm salt, which also shares the smoky complex flavor, but nothing is more authentic than freshly distilled mescal off the ranch.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 37


NO.6 Eat + Drink

Katie Parla: The New Roman Holiday TEXT:

SUMMER JOHNSON / PHOTO: KATIE PARLA

We talked to New Jersey native Katie Parla, Food Expert and Writer, who gives us insight on what to do and where to eat in Rome.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 38


T H E N E W R OM AN HOL I DAY

Katie Parla decided to move to Italy after a visit during her sophomore year of high school. She fell in love with the country and since completing her degree in Art History from Yale University, she made Rome her home. She now writes for several magazines including The Guardian, Food52, and Bon AppĂŠtit, and all the while, she gives amazing art history tours. Katie has also written and edited more than 20 books; this year she published her first ever cookbook, Tasting Rome: Fresh Flavors and Forgotten Recipes from an Ancient City. Katie shares her insights on how to get the best out of this timeless city.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 39


K AT I E PAR L A

WHERE TO EAT

Start the day off with coffee and pastries

For a late afternoon bite, head to Pizzarium

at Roscioli Caffe in the city center.

for Potato Pizza.

Explore the Testaccio Market for

It’s time for the aperitivo. Sip a wine,

pizzette at Artenio’s and a brisket

a spritz or a Negroni.

sandwich at Stall Number 15. At dinner, taste the Burrata and Mortadella Lunch at Cesare al Casaletto. Get the

at Salumeria Roscioli - run by the same

fried starters and pasta.

family who owns the Roscioli Caffe. They are devoted to quality food, which is no

Take a post-lunch nap in Villa Pamphili.

longer such a given in Rome.

Roscioli Caffe

Cesare al Casaletto

Piazza Benedetto Cairoli, 16

Via del Casaletto, 45

00186 Rome, Italy

00151 Rome, Italy

Testaccio Market

Villa Pamphili

Via Galvani | Via Alessandro Volta

Via di S. Pancrazio

00153 Rome, Italy

00164 Rome, Italy

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 40


T H E N E W R OM AN HOL I DAY

Start the day off with coffee and pastries at Roscioli Caffe in the city center.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 41


NO.7 Photography Spotlight

Photography That Inspires TEXT: BRITTANY TEMPLETON PHOTO: DELIA BAUM

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 42


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

They say when one door closes, two doors open

They say when one door closes, two doors open… and that is exactly what happened to Delia Baum. After missing her enrollment deadline to begin her studies in art and design, she quickly sought after an internship to fill her time. Little did she know, said internship would become the foundation of a career in photography. “I wasn’t even interested in cars, or spending my days without daylight, but working in a commercial photo studio for car photography was the best way to learn skills such as how to set light,” Delia explains. Two and a half years later, despite some ups and downs, Delia Baum was a trained photographer.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 43


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 44


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 45


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

Goodbye cars; hello freelance lifestyle photography

Today, this Berlin resident certainly has worked her way around the world and up the ladder. With clients such as Adidas and MTV on her resume, Delia still continues to live in the moment and shoot for the joy and passion of it, especially when traveling. “I don’t plan much when I am traveling. Of course, I know the places I would like to go and sometimes I even know exactly what I would like to photograph, but most of my shots are spontaneous,” she says.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 46


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 47


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 48


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 49


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 50


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

Delia’s most memorable locations to shoot include Istanbul, Turkey and Tel Aviv, Israel. However, like many travelers, Delia struggles with pinning down her list of favorites. She explains, “Of course, I love beautiful places, nature and the sea, but I am also fascinated with large cities like Hong Kong — an endless sea of skyscrapers, masses of people and extraordinary things.” I learned from Delia that when we find ourselves off the beaten path or feeling lost, we should remember that life has a way with taking care of itself. Delia Baum took advantage of each opportunity and found her passion. She says, “[It’s] the way we live, the places we live, the things and people that we surround ourselves with — I think it’s ourselves that inspires us.”

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 51


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 52


PHOTOGRAPHY THAT INSPIRES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 53


NO.8 Merchants

Capturing Adventures Around the World How One Click Gets You a Personal Travel Photographer

TEXT: BRITTANY TEMPLETON / P H O T O S : F LY T O G R A P H E R

LIN KS

FEATUR ED PLA CES

FLYTOG R A PHER .C O M

PAR IS

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 54


CAPTURING ADVENTURES

Just when you think innovation has hit its peak, Nicole Smith takes travel photography to a whole new level. Since 2013, Flytographer has been connecting travelers with photographers. Already in it’s short life span, the Canadian-based brand has connected travelers with more than 350 local photographers in 175 global destinations . Whether celebrating a honeymoon, family holiday or even solo adventure, Flytographer makes it easy to capture the priceless moments of your adventure. Truly changing the way people remember their trips, these photographers, or Flytographers, double as local tour guides to the hidden gems of your destination. Nicole, a native of Canada, turned a moment of frustration into a beautiful creation. While on holiday in Paris, Nicole found it difficult to capture the essence of her experience with her best friend. Between selfies and amateur snapshots taken by fellow tourists, Nicole

was determined to find a solution. Upon her return from Paris, she knew just what she needed to do… and Flytographer was born. Nicole took her experiences from her first job at her father’s deli into her own business. “I not only learned the importance of providing a great customer experience, but I was able to see how much work it takes day in and day out to run a business. I also learned just how important it is to make your team feel valued and appreciated,” she says. Since launching Flytographer some three years ago, let us say that Nicole has no complaints when it comes to her increased travel. As she must connect with photographers and partners all over the world, jet-setting is a perk of the job. Nicole explains, “the best part is that we have this global family of photographers, so everywhere I visit, I get to connect with locals and see the city through their eyes.”

“Truly changing the way people remember their trips, these photographers, or Flytographers, double as local tour guides to the hidden gems...” UPWARD MAGAZINE - 55


CAPTURING ADVENTURES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 56


CAPTURING ADVENTURES

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 57


CAPTURING ADVENTURES

LUCILLE IN PARIS FOR FLYTOGRAPHER

“...everywhere I visit, I get to connect with locals and see the city through their eyes.”

The incredible community of Flytographers also host a Flytographer Meetup for a three day workshop and community building. This year their second meetup was held in Barcelona. As a young entrepreneur and mother, Nicole admits it is also important to find balance; “Next month I am off to Kelowna, San Francisco and New York. I try to cluster my trips, as being a

mom, I don’t want to be away for too long.” “Just do it! If you have a great idea, get started on it,” Nicole says of pursuing a dream. It’s human nature to want to wait for the perfect moment in life, but it’s not always logical. She adds, “make sure your idea is something you are 100 percent passionate about. Running

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 58


CAPTURING ADVENTURES

OLGA IN PARIS FOR FLYTOGRAPHER

“Just do it! If you have a great idea, get started on it...”

a startup is incredibly draining and there will be many lows along with the highs. If you truly love and believe in what you are creating then it will get you through those tougher periods.”

words and push yourself through the tough period. But most importantly, the next time you take a trip, consider allowing the photographers at Flytographer to capture the moments you just can’t collect on your own. Whether proposing in the Nicole’s journey and passion inspires us Maldives or on a family vacation in Japan, all to take the leap. The next time you Flytographer makes the perfect souvenir hit a bump in the road, embrace Nicole’s for any fellow traveler.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 59


NO.9 Art

Andile Dyalyane A Leader in Art and Design T E X T : S U M M E R J O H N S O N / P H O T O S : A N D I L E D YA LV A N E

Andile Dyalyane’s first solo exhibition of approximately 30 large clay sculptures is on display at the Friedman Benda Gallery in New York City. It is entitled “Camagu” which is a Xhosa word which loosely translates to “I am grateful.” Andile’s rural birthplace in the Eastern Cape of South Africa is reflected in his work. Through his sculptures, which are housed in permanent museum collections all over the world, he pays homage to his ancestors. He founded of Imiso Ceramics in South Africa’s Western Cape. His large vessels are made in a traditional African encaustic clay style which consists of building forms rather than using a wheel. Andile builds his vessels into geometric silhouettes influencing the viewer’s eye to move continuously around the piece. The geometric lines of each piece evoke urban sophistication which is gracefully united in rustic familiarity and simple forms. View Andile Dyalyane’s beautifully balanced work at exhibitions around the world from South Africa to Denmark, France to Taiwan and now, in Manhattan.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 60


ANDILE DYALYANE A LEADER IN ART AND DESIGN

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 61


NO.10 Art

Into the Woods TEXT: SUMMER JOHNSON / PHOTOS: RICHARD WOODS

This summer, Richard Woods presents his latest work in the Frieda Bender Gallery in New York City. Trained at the Slade School of Fine Art, the Chester, England native portrays life on the English countryside. The themes he expresses in his stenciled table tops, such as a workman who forgot his saw, or an abandoned picnic blanket reflect both his upbringing on the English countryside and his sense of humor. Woods’ designs have a playful attitude, leaving his audiences to find the funny side in the mundane.

that are reminiscent of Jacob Lawrence’s work — a African American artist who made his art with bold color blocking and limited color scheme. Wood’s work has a melody that connects us to African patterns. His palate of bright and fresh colors cause us to find humor in the human tendency to seek order in mishaps. His use of uncommon color combinations are reminiscent of pop art, which invite us into his pieces. While he’s garnered attention for designing prints on these table tops, he is also known for his commissioned work for buildings and His work is full of figures with bright and furniture all over the world, from London to bold color combinations in rhythmic patterns South Korea.

FEATURED PLACES

RICHARDWOODSSTUDIO.COM

NEW YORK

RICHARDWOODSSTUDIO

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 62


INTO THE WOODS

“His use of uncommon color combinations are reminiscent of pop art, which invite us into his pieces.”

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 63


NO.11 Postcard

Going the Distance TEXT: NATALIE HOLLOWAY

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 64


GOING THE DISTANCE

MAXIMILIAN KISLEVITZ

Long-term travel has always been a dream of mine.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 65


NATALIE HALLOWAY

GOING THE DISTANCE

Long-term travel has always been a dream of mine. Since my parents swept my sisters and I off to Disneyland when I was six, I knew I’d travel the world. I just didn’t know when. Now a twenty-something, late nights at the office – at a top-tier advertising agency headquartered in Los Angeles – were often alleviated by elaborate thoughts of expansive beaches, mysterious streetmeat, and the personal enlightenment that comes with taking a risk. Though friends and family gasped at the idea, rattling off reasons to reconsider, my boyfriend Max and I were determined to silence our doubters.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 66


MAXIMILIAN KISLEVITZ

GOING THE DISTANCE

It’s now been two months – of our year-long ‘sabbatical’ – since we set sail for Southeast Asia. We’ve rubbed elbows with Japanese salarymen at a tiny Izakaya in Tokyo, swam with whale-sharks off the Philippines’ coast, bathed elephants in Vietnam, and learned the deceptively simple art of making green curry in Northern Thailand. We’ve walked well-worn paths – it’s hard not to. But we’ve also forged some of our own. And though it’s all been dramatically different than I expected, slowly but surely, I’m learning not to. Yesterday, we crossed the border into Laos. I’m desperately searching for a WIFI signal while overlooking the famed Mekong river. And I’m certain that it’s all been worth it.

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 67


NATALIE HALLOWAY

NATALIE HALLOWAY

GOING THE DISTANCE

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 68


NATALIE HALLOWAY

NATALIE HALLOWAY

GOING THE DISTANCE

UPWARD MAGAZINE - 69

Upward Magazine: Issue #006  

sharing journeys of unconventional #travel to inspire the next generation of explorers + influencers

Upward Magazine: Issue #006  

sharing journeys of unconventional #travel to inspire the next generation of explorers + influencers