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ISSUE 004

JUNE 2016

H AVA N A

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MILAN

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DUBAI

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MORE

06 | THE SOUL OF CUBA

22 | FOOD AND LOVE IN DUBAI

Salsa rhythms, classic cars, dark rum, thick cigars and iconic revolutionary faces are only a fraction of the imagery evocative of the Grande Caribbean Island.

If you have ever thought about doing a stint abroad, Chef Lij and his wife Kari give us some pointers on what to look out for as prospective expatriates.


CONTENTS Issue No.4 WORLD S TORIE S The Soul of Cuba - Noémie Trusty

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Seven by 30 : Karissa Johnson - Nicole Staton

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E AT & DR I N K Excellent Expatriots : Food and Love in Dubai - Summer Johnson

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HO TEL F EATURE

Cooking With Cocktail Rings P.46 How to Travel Inspires Cuisine - Brittany Templeton Behind the Bitter The History of Campari - Summer Johnson

An Architectural Crescendo at The Conservatorium Hotel - Anne Foong

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M US E S & ME RCHANTS Audrey Louise Reynolds : The Dye Queen Summer Johnson

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The Return to Our Earliest Art Form Wildlife Paintings with Sarah Stribbling Nicole Stanton

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CONTENTS

PHOTO: FOOD AND LOVE IN DUBAI P.22

TR AV E L T I PS

INS TA-HIG HL IG HT

Going Abroad? 11 Travel Tips From Mom - Ashley Puckett

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Grab Your Passport and My Hand Michael Jesus & Allison Richard

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FO U N D E R SUMMER JOHNSON

SENIOR EDITOR DAKOTA ARKIN

O P E R AT I O N S D I R E C T O R SANDY ANDERSON

C OV E R D E S I G N IKER FERNANDEZ

DESIGN JESSICA BAILEY & IKER FERNANDEZ

E D I T O R I AL SUMMER JOHNSON, ANNE FOONG, NICOLE STANTON ADAM CHARLES, BRITTANY TEMPLETON DAKOTA ARKIN, NOÉMIE TRUSTY ASHLEY PUCKETT, MICHAEL JESUS & ALLISON RICHARD

M AR K E T I N G JENNA JACKSON & ILKA PANDILOVSKA

O P E R AT I O N S JANNET NAZARENO

W E B SI T E U P WA R D MAGAZ INE. C OM

SOCIA L

C O NTA C T

FA CEBOOK.COM/UPWA RDMA GA ZIN E INSTA GRA M.COM/UPWA RDMA GA ZIN E

HEL L O @ U PWA R DMA G A ZINE.C O M

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U P WAR D S TAF F

FOUNDER’S LETTER - SU M M ER J OHN SON

Hello everyone and welcome to Upward. As we embark on another month of concepts that comprise of travel, I’m inspired by the awakening of Cuba. Our photographer Noémie went on assignment to cover the beauty of a country preserved by grace. It’s no wonder the runway was flocked to by the house of Chanel to cover Karl Lagerfeld’s cruise line. The people of Cuba were destined to dwell among those who create, for they have been creating and recreating beauty from ashes for over half a century. A country blossoming and budding through the Spring has all the world watching and experiencing its bloom. Follow us on a journey through the streets of Havana and let Cuba pour out its hidden love into your heart. UPWARD MAGAZINE - 5


NO.1 World Stories

THE SOUL OF CUBA

TEXT AND PHOTOS: NOÉMIE TRUSTY

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THE SOUL OF CUBA

alsa rhythms, classic cars, dark rum, thick cigars and iconic revolutionary faces are only a fraction of the imagery evocative of the Grande Caribbean Island. Cuba is big; Cuba is rich; Cuba is alive with its centuries-old culture and traditions, but what strikes the newcomer is the omnipresent feeling of happiness and joy Cubaneros carry with them. From battle time to austere economic hits, they have learned how to survive and enjoy simple life better than anyone. The box of the forbidden land, the inaccessible crown jewel sealed in the 1950’s, has started showing some cracks to its U.S. neighbor. But, don’t be fooled! Cuba has been a highly touristic destination for 30 years now and welcomed three millions visitors in 2014. While the U.S. administration is beginning to ease travel regulations, Cuban customs are well familiar with daring U.S. Citizens sneaking in via a third country, so much so that often they won’t stamp American passports to avoid trouble. As comfort is not popularly a prominent feature of communist countries, high-end hotels (while being developed) are still in short supply. However, the independent traveler might be glad to know Airbnb is well established in Castro’s territory and makes stays at Casas Particular (private homestays) easier than ever. For the spontaneous type, a multitude of rooms are available for rent in Havana — and really, in any place of interest across the country. One need only show up at any door featuring the commonly used blue anchor sign. A visitor is welcomed with open arms or redirected to a nearby homeowner in case of a full house. The close proximity among Habaneros will quickly prove invaluable when it comes to the time to sit on the musty doorstep of a colonial house.

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WORLD STORIES

While the paved streets are two lanes wide, few cars ever drive by. Three story tall decrepit buildings boast gigantic carriage doors, and wrought iron balconies making front row seats to watch the world go by. Street life watching really is a special treat in some neighborhoods like Centro Habana where the dusty streets are the ground of choice for the lively local community to gather, check in on each other and share the latest news. At every street corner, there are classic cars, often parked on the sidelines getting fixed, services are traded for goods, improvised soccer games take over a block, romances bloom and mature out in the open, musicians practice on benches, and empty corners make the perfect baseball diamond.

Life can be just as sweet as the famous local ice cream shop, Coppelia but happiness in Cuba seems inversely proportional to the material conditions. As social relationships and togetherness extend beyond the close family circle to a radius of several blocks, Cubanos find in them a much-needed solidarity for coping with the limitations of everyday life. While doctors and lawyers can make up to 1,200 Cuban Pesos (CUP) or $50 a month, a basic government employee’s income ranges from 200 to 400 CUP. The State provides every citizen with a small monthly ration of oil, rice, beans, chicken, eggs, coffee and milk with children up to seven years old, so the bare essentials are covered.

Laughter, music and joy are boundless. Broadcasted from house speakers, car radios or pedicab amplifiers, Afro Cuban rhythms set the free and easy pace of the Habaneros. And, may the wanderer be a Habanera, every single step she takes will be accompanied by some piropos of choice: the sound of kisses, whistles and other “beautiful lady” isms. Solicitations may be relentless, but are never rude or rough and the adoring Cubano is often subtle and charming. As for those seeking a little romance, there is no better dating site for the lonely soul than the busy Malecón at sundown to find some immediate company. Sunsets here are astonishing, waves crash against the old fortification wall and pelicans bend their wings to dive to their prey in the Caribbean Sea.

In addition, everyone benefits from almost free housing and transportation as well as free social security, education, culture and entertainment. With this socialist reform inherited from the revolution, homelessness and begging have basically been eradicated and the public services have good enough standards that even some neighboring countries would be floored.

As the private sector has been encouraged for the past five years, many families jumped on the opportunity to open their beautiful houses to travelers

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THE SOUL OF CUBA

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WORLD STORIES

Life can be just as sweet as the famous local ice cream shop, Coppelia but happiness in Cuba seems inversely proportional to the material conditions

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THE SOUL OF CUBA

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WORLD STORIES

The Cuban system uniquely has a dual economy: On one hand the government subsidizes a wide range of services assessed in CUP while imported goods along with tourism activities and independent work are valued in Convertible Pesos (CUC) [24 CUP = $1 and 1 CUC = $1] at a cost similar to the Western market. The end result is the frustrated 75 percent of government workers who want to access some basic nonessentials, in example, furniture or a varied diet, but struggle to. As the private sector has been encouraged for the past five years, many families jumped on the opportunity to open their beautiful houses to travelers, turning them into rooms for rent or restaurants, paladar. Considering a household often consists of an extended family of three generations, an extra 30 CUC per night can make a huge difference. Street trade has also expanded so the plumber, nail salon,

phone repair guy, fortuneteller and cobbler have all set up shop on the sidewalk despite very limited resources. Cuban society has an incredible level of resourcefulness and imagination developed to acquire a relative quality of life. As the clock of progress broke in the late fifties, keeping the old classic American cars running is an everyday challenge as tools and parts are barely available. But, according to cab drivers, it’s worth any sacrifice to keep the vintage icons spitting thick exhaust smoke and dispatch half a dozen riders across town to devilish salsa rhythms. Meanwhile, there are barely any motorized vehicles to be found in Cuba’s tobacco fields. One might expect to hear some obsolete tractor roaring, or other coughing agricultural machinery, but in the Viùales valley only hand-held and animal traction equipment is in use. In this quiet

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THE SOUL OF CUBA

village nested at the foot of the mogotes, green rounded hills of limestone stand tall. Family run farms are scattered along the lush valley where exotic fruits, fragrant plants and flowers along with coffee and tobacco are organically grown. Because State farms hold the vast majority of agricultural land, the government levies up to 90 percent of the harvest on tobacco, generally less for other crops, but life in the tropical fields of ViĂąales seems comfortable for the farmers who benefit from the many tourists drawn to the area. Every night, the town is electrified by DJs who set up their booths near the church on the main square and the whole village comes together to practice some well mastered salsa steps into the wee hours. During the day, when the sun is too high to work in the fields, local ViĂąaleros gather on their adirondack chairs under the shade of brightly painted colonial porches.

Family run farms are scattered along the lush valley where exotic fruits, fragrant plants and flowers along with coffee and tobacco are organically grown.

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WORLD STORIES

Having the unique chance to discover the incredible Cuban community culture is an eye opening experience for the western citizen who is often driven for more material comfort in a consumer society. Most Cuban people surely wish to have a more democratic country, an open outward-looking economy and maybe just a little more tourism, but overall, the preservation of their culture and tightly-knit social fabric will be the greatest challenge in the midst of one more new era to come. No trip to Cuba would feel complete without a basic knowledge of the ins and outs of its system, and no matter how long your stay, the desire to re-immerse yourself in the beauty of the Pearl of the Antilles may never wane.

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THE SOUL OF CUBA

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NO.2 Hotel Feature

An Architectural Crescendo at the Conservatorium Hotel

TEXT: ANNE FOONG / PHOTOS: COURTESY OF CONSERVATORIUM

F E AT U R E D P LAC ES

A RTISTS

A M ST E R D A M , NETH ER LAND S

A NDY WA RHOL & BA NKSY

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LINK S C O NS ER VAT O R IU MHO T EL .C O M


CONSERVATORIUM HOTEL

BRA SSERIE

“The hotel integrates modern design into the classic façade. A floor-to-ceiling glass atrium allows natural light to fill the main level. ”

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CONSERVATORIUM HOTEL

I LOV E A MSTERDA M SUITE

“...wooden vaulted corridors fuse minimalism and simplicity with utmost sophistication.”

Italian architect, Piero Lissoni transformed former Sweelinck music academy into Amsterdam’s luxurious Conservatorium Hotel. The hotel integrates modern design into the classic façade. A floor-to-ceiling glass atrium allows natural light to fill the main level. An interior arboretum adds to a sleek and airy ambience. A chandelier of violins gives ode to the building’s history. Ceramic tiles, angular steel staircases and wooden vaulted

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CONSERVATORIUM HOTEL

ROYA L DUPLEX SUITE

“...works by Banksy will be on display in the lounge of the Conservatorium Hotel through the month of July.”

corridors fuse minimalism and simplicity with utmost sophistication. Centrally located in the heart of Amsterdam’s museum district, the Conservatorium Hotel is partnering with the brand new Modern Contemporary (Moco) Museum which will debut works by Andy Warhol (April 9, 2016 thru July 3, 2016) and Banksy (April 9, 2016 thru September 4, 2016). Three works by Banksy will be on display in the lounge of the Conservatorium Hotel through the month of July.

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NO.3 Eat & Drink

E XC E L L E N T E X PAT R IO T S:

Food and Love in Dubai CHEFANDSTEWARD.COM

IF YOU HAVE EVE R T H O U GH T AB O U T DO ING A ST I NT A BROA D , C H E F L I J A ND HIS WI F E K A R I GI VE U S S O M E P OINT ERS O N W H AT TO L O O K O UT FO R A S PROSPECT I VE E XPAT R I AT ES . T HI S B E AUT IFUL BL O GGI NG FA M I LY HAV E MA D E A BR A ND O U T O F T H E I R L OV E FO R FOOD ; CHEF L I J C R E AT I NG D I S HE S AN D KARI CREATI NG A H O M E AWAY FRO M H O ME IN D U BA I .

TEXT: SUMMER JOHNSON PHOTOS: KARI HERON

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E XC E L L E N T E X PAT R IO T S

On my long distance call from New York to Dubai with Kari, almost immediately after picking up, she blurted out at me, “You have a Jamaican Accent?!” I never thought I had a Jamaican accent. I told her that I come from the New York area and she was so excited. I know the Caribbean people that I grew up around had affected my speech, so I tried to explain that to Kari, but there was no need for explanation. She had family from New York and I sounded just like her stateside cousins. For a Jamaican living in Dubai for 10 years, a familiar accent can sound like a true friend. The feeling was mutual. When I was in college, I had a Jamaican mentor, and Kari was full of a certain wisdom that can only come from an Afro Carib mother. It was comforting to get the perspective of moving across the world from someone so grounded. She came to Dubai for her husband, Chef Lij and they began their renowned blog Chef and Steward. He came for work; she came for love. He was trained at the Culinary Institute of America in New York and has worked in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Asia, until his current post in Dubai. The couple relocated from Turks and Caicos to Dubai in 2010. Kari describes being an expat as a totally different experience from traveling; “It’s not like you go away for a couple of weekends and then you go back home. You literally eject yourself from everything that is comfortable to you and go into someone else‘s country. If I was going away to Brooklyn, I wouldn’t miss home. I have lots of family in the states and there are lots of Caribbean people in Brooklyn.” Kari says, “In the states I was very comfortable; you can settle yourself and be at home. Such is the same in the U.K., such as Brixton, as well as in Canada where they have a very strong West Indian population. It’s easy to be away in those places and not miss back home, but when you’re here in Du-

bai, everything is so drastically different from anything that we have been exposed to. This culture is a completely different ball game.” Kari accredited her West Indian and African parents, notably her mother, with her ability to travel between cultures. Her parents taught her, “Manners take you around the world. Essentially, I found that to be an invaluable lesson in travel and in living in other countries, especially one as conservative as this. The truth is if we can actually respect other people, and if we respect ourselves, we can find a way to co-exist. Even if we don’t agree on everything, it’s really just about respecting values. Once we have that common ground to explore and find out more about each other, that’s when it becomes something really special, and you can find yourself actually becoming attached because there are commonalities, even in a foreign place.” Chef Lij and Kari travel home to visit family and friends with their two year old son, who has been on six transatlantic trips. He once traveled for 55 hours to reach California, and he was brilliantly behaved. He is infatuated with travel and loves to watch the airplanes. “So much of what we do is for our children,” and Kari says you’re creating their world. He loves to cook like Daddy as well. It’s nice to know that there are good neighbors abroad when visiting Dubai. Make sure you visit Chef Lij and Kari for a bite next time you’re in town.

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FOOD AND LOVE IN DUBAI

“It’s not like you go away for a couple of weekends and then you go back home. You literally eject yourself from everything that is comfortable to you and go into someone else‘s country. If I was going away to Brooklyn, I wouldn’t miss home”.

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NO.4 Muses & Merchants

Audrey Louise Reynolds: The Dye Queen

TEXT: SUMMER JOHNSON / PHOTOS: NOÉMIE TRUSTY

IN SP I R E D PLAC ES

WORKIN G WITH

UK , P E R U & M EXIC O

JIGSAW, ULLA JOHNSON, & KA REN MCCA LLA HA NO

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L INK S A L R DY EING .C O M


AUDREY LOUISE REYNOLDS

“...absorbed by the nature and beauty of the production of natural dyes — dried flowers and herbs hanging from every cove...”

The irony of the Brooklyn neighborhood that Audrey Louise Reynolds chose to build her three story castle of artisanal dye is pretty interesting. Audrey tells a story of a factory down the street that used to produce chemical red dye. She said that the chemicals would send a horrible smell through the neighborhood and that the whole operation was really just as a cover up for narcotic sales in the building. This went on for decades until the people involved were found out and the whole thing was shut down. Now in the same neighborhood, Audrey has set up an all-natural dye company that would make the most devout vegan proud. I was ready for Audrey to pour the oil and anoint me with the next artisanal something

or other. Upon entry to her home/factory I was absorbed by the nature and beauty of the production of natural dyes — dried flowers and herbs hanging from every cove, a huge caldron in the backyard, plants and flowers growing in every beam of light. Natural dye production made up every inch of Audrey’s Brooklyn brownstone. Audrey’s materials were in a mariposa which made for the perfect backdrop of a story about someone who has truly found their purpose. Audrey has been coined as the”fashion industry’s artisanal dyer.” As an artist who works with mixed-media I saw Audrey’s work and instantly felt a kindred spirit. She dyes clothing with her

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AUDREY LOUISE REYNOLDS

"The whole process should be beautiful. You should be enjoying materials, what’s natural, and pressing that into the fabric."

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AUDREY LOUISE REYNOLDS

own dyes! She lays dozens of yards of silk out in the rain to experiment with color. She makes her dyes from herbs, spices, rocks, dirt, flowers, anything that will extract these ethereal colors used for clothing. It was as if I had awoken to a wonderful little paradise of color and texture. What incredible inspiration. I sat like a lady in waiting, delighted to learn more about this experimental studio, with knowledge at my fingertips, ready to be plucked and eaten as choice morsels. No, really. She grinds turmeric, berries, fruits and veggies of all types and makes them into dyes too. I did mention that my maiden name is Dye right? The very same materials that she uses for her dyes, I use on my canvas. I was in an artist’s paradise. Not only was Audrey a gifted designer, but her knowledge of ecology seemed infinite. What made her passionate points of view envelope so calmly into her medium was her intuition.

Upward: What are some of the projects that you’re working on and people that you’re working with? Audrey: Right now the most exciting thing for me is working with Jigsaw in London, Ulla Johnson, Karen McCallahan; I love working with designers. It’s also important to me that I have something for everyone. I want to be able to reach a full range of customers. I love being able to reach the most frugal customer to someone who shops at Barneys. If you’re a creative kid there’s always the at-home dyes. The idea was that you don’t have to play with harmful chemicals. When I was a kid I would be given a box of red dye and I would dye my ballet shoes and no one knew exactly what it was. That is the message I want to reach everyone with, that you can use harmless dyes and that everything we do does not have to be at the expense of something else.

Upward: What inspired you to merge fashion with art? Audrey: It was never a choice. It was always something that I had to do. From a really young age I was either creating clothing or in the garden. As someone who had their hands in the dirt, I would come home covered in it, and my mom would say ‘oh I have to wash that’, and I’d say ‘no this is cool.’ Then I got the idea that the baseball players look really cool after a game, so I went out with all white clothes and slid on the ground intentionally. When I’d see that grass stains would make a pattern, I would think that’s really cool too. So as I’m doing all of this, I’m looking for what I’m suppose to do in life, and people would ask me what do you do? I followed my heart and ended up here with more work that I can handle. It’s been a very happy path.

Upward: I remember being told not to touch dyes when I was a child. I would mix acrylic paint with a bucket of water and throw that onto a canvas instead of dyes. I think it’s still in my psyche not to touch dyes... and now that you mention it, I realize that it has hindered me from working with fabric. In what way is natural dye important to you? Audrey: The whole process should be beautiful. You should be enjoying materials, what’s natural, and pressing that into the fabric. The fact that we are not allowed to touch something and then people are expected to turn around and wear it on their body as they’re sweating and absorbing it into their bloodstream is just criminal. I don’t want to be a part of it. It’s very dangerous. Upward: Are you influenced by travel? Audrey: I am totally and completely influenced

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AUDREY LOUISE REYNOLDS

"It was never a choice. It was always something that I had to do." UPWARD MAGAZINE - 30


AUDREY LOUISE REYNOLDS

"I admire the thoughtfulness and the beauty of the construction of things and I take that back here..."

by travel. We are in the youngest country and we don’t realize how young it is until going somewhere else. Walking around Europe outside of a beautiful brick building from the 1500’s or in Asia and Africa, so old, it’s amazing. I admire the thoughtfulness and the beauty of the construction of things and I take that back here to Charlotte, North Carolina where I grew up. I’m inspired by the history of a place. For instance in England, dyes were sourced for the Queen. During a time that the world was less connected, a lot of the economies burgeoned because of dye sales. Peru and Mexico used the cochineal bug that could make the most regal red. Before that, they had mater root which was available in the U.K. for kings and queens of that time. Somebody found this bug husk that makes the most beautiful red and they were able to sell it to the royals, stimulating trade in these countries, and that’s important. I am also fascinating by two distinct cultures coming up with the same thing. In example, two totally different people on two separate continents figured out fermenting indigo creates blue dye. One needs to grow a green plant, cut it down when it’s blue inside and discover oxygen turns it blue — like with blood. Then it needs to be dried for 100 days, cut it into little pieces, mixed

with urea or ammonia (urine) and finally, people added yeast, figs, dates and other fruits for sugar. And still, they put a lid on it for another 100 days and came back to oxygenate it… how? That stuff blows my mind. Upward: When you visit another country are you looking for dye? Audrey: That is my first stop. In Peru, I was looking around for natural dyes and I couldn’t find anything. At a market, I met the Natural Dye Professor of Cuzco. He said, ‘there’s stuff to make dyes with everywhere.’ Together, we went for a walk through a cemetery and came upon a qull tree. From it, we harvested the flowers which make orange, red and yellow dye. Upward: What impact do you want to leave on the world? Audrey: Making products that are harmless and you can leave your kids alone with, and not worry is important to me. Dyes are scalable products, so a four year old child or fifty year old clothing designer can use it. We can change factories to produce naturally dyed clothing but we have to change the demand, and that starts with these children. It is the lesson we can pass on to the next generation.

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NO.5 World Stories

Seven By 30: Karissa Johnson TEXT:

NICOLE STANTON

“I had a desire to see all seven continents by age 30. I understand that it probably just boils down to semantics but I really detest the whole ‘bucket list’ thing… setting goals around death just doesn’t attract me. Antarctica was the frozen jungle gym that I just couldn’t pass up.”

F E AT U R E D P LAC ES

PHOTOS

AN TA R C T IC A - S OUTH P OLE & CHINA

KA RISSA JOHN SON & A NDRÉ S GS

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L INK FLYSEVENBY30.COM


KARISSA JOHNSON

“She has traveled to over 20 countries, taught in China and been to places others only talk about visiting.”

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KARISSA JOHNSON

"Wherever I go, I love communing with the natives. Antarctica was no different—then again, it was. These natives had fur, feathers, and flippers.”

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KARISSA JOHNSON

It’s not everyday that you meet someone that can boast that they have been to all seven continents by the time they were 30, but Karissa Johnson completed her trip to the South Pole last year. After having a stroke at 21 she recovered with the insight that the world is a ginormous playground and she wanted to see as much of it as possible while she can. She has traveled to over 20 countries, taught in China and been to places others only talk about visiting. “When you’re plopped in a city with a language that is drastically different than yours, you are forced to get with it or get left. It was truly a slipup, trip-up adventure as I learned the [Chinese] language,” Karissa explained. “During my first week, I remember trying to tell the driver where I lived in Chinese and to make a long story short, I got kicked out of the cab because he couldn’t understand me. That was rough! I was fortunate to have local and foreign English teachers who would take me out to eat and help me learn how to order. One American friend gave me an Instant Immersion CD that I remember listening to at the airport

before I took off. I was so intimidated by the language and didn’t think I would be able to even say Ni hao (‘hello’), but eventually I tackled greetings, directions, ordering, small talk, and asking for help.” “Wherever I go, I love communing with the natives. Antarctica was no different—then again, it was. These natives had fur, feathers, and flippers. We had to enter the mindset of being their guests. What are their customs? What is their tone? What sounds do they make? What should my posture be as their guest? In my travels, I’ve discovered that my senses have become sharpened. Antarctica definitely drew me to notice new sounds, textures, flavors, sights and scents.” It’s a big world and traveling as a solo female can be met with quizzical looks and concern. “Using your wits and being aware will often keep you out of harm’s way. My parents made me watch Taken before I took my first trip abroad to Luton, England,” she laughed. “Apparently they wanted to make sure that I didn’t get taken during my travels…I was spared. Actually, the scariest moment I’ve

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In my travels, I’ve discovered that my senses have become sharpened. Antarctica definitely drew me to notice new sounds, textures, flavors, sights and scents.�

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KARISSA JOHNSON

“...you end up spending a lot of time meeting people who want to know your story.”

had is when I didn’t get my currency exchanged before I arrived in Egypt from China. I had taken the trip alone. I was a newbie traveler and didn’t know the importance of exchanging renminbi for U.S. dollars before going to any new country. I knew from that point forward, I could do anything and go anywhere. I went to Cairo in 2012 during the revolution. Most would say it wasn’t the best time to go. There were tanks on the roads and riots down the street from

my hostel. Yet, I had a blast. I’m still in contact with some of the locals too.” Anyone who has traveled for extended periods of time knows that you end up spending a lot of time meeting people who want to know your story. It can be tricky when there are preconceived conceptions about backpackers and travelers. “I definitely call myself an explorer,” Karissa explains. “Again, it boils down to semantics, but I can revisit

Photo of Karissa Johnson: Andrés GS

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KARISSA JOHNSON

“Challenges met on your journey have been conquered with courage and joy.”

places simply by closing my eyes…fragrances and textures of times past just from dancing back to the corners of my mind. But I am also part backpacker. The backpacker, I believe, totes an invisible crown. You reign as the ultimate authority for where your feet tread. That which you carry is what you’ve deemed necessary. Challenges met on your journey have been conquered with courage and joy. Your attire is probably far from regal, but your journey truly is royal.”

It’s also about moving away from the tourist trap, guided tours, and finding nature. Karissa enjoys hikes and long treks. “I do hit up plenty of touristy spots…but being a solo traveler allows you the space to create your own expedition according to your palette and preferences. I would love to revisit all of the places that I’ve traveled and see it through my eyes now. As I look back, my mindset and perspective was significantly different than it is now.”

Karissa blogs about her journey on sevenby30.com.

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NO.6 Muses & Merchants

@SARAHSTRIBBLINGWILDLIFEART |

SARAHSTRIBABLINGWILDLIFEART.COM

Wildlife Painting with Sarah Stribbling TEXT: ANNE FOONG

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WILDLIFE PAINTING WITH SARAH STRIBBLING

Staring at an oil painting of a wolf ’s head, I couldn’t help but be mesmerized by Sarah’s fierce attention to the most minute details.

anchester native, Sarah Stribbling, has always been fascinated with wildlife. “If I wasn’t outside hunting for insects and birds, then I was drawing them, copying photos or recreating scenes from the animals of farthing wood,” she recalls. Staring at an oil painting of a wolf’s head, I couldn’t help but be mesmerized by Sarah’s fierce attention to the most minute details. Its fur and eyelashes, the shades and tones of the animal — it made it come alive, I felt as if I were standing right next to this breathing animal. Incredibly Sarah never studied art, but rather pursued a degree in Zoology which makes her paintings even more outstanding. For a class assignment, she drew biological and zoological illustrations capturing the structure and specific details of whole animals and microscopic organisms. “I think my love of realism started here and I still apply these techniques to my work today,” Sarah says.

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A RETURN TO OUR EARLIEST ART FORM

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WILDLIFE PAINTING WITH SARAH STRIBBLING

I apply the paint in layers. The first layer is rough and darker. Once the base coat is dry, I then go over it with all the lighter fur details and apply light paint onto a darker layer to add depth.”

Sarah specializes in realist oil paintings and pencil drawings. She uses blending, burnishing, and wet-on-wet or alla prima techniques. She explains, “I apply the paint in layers. The first layer is rough and darker. Once the base coat is dry, I then go over it with all the lighter fur details and apply light paint onto a darker layer to add depth. For my pencil drawings, I blend polychromos oil-based pencils with a paint diluent made by Zest-it.” “I am always trying to aim higher to try new techniques, styles and mediums. It’s so easy to self-criticize and mark yourself a failure but the more you practice the better you will get and any failures are lessons you can learn from. Don’t give up,” says Sarah.

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A RETURN TO OUR EARLIEST ART FORM

“I drew a lot of my inspiration from my father. He has been a wildlife and portrait artist for as long as I can remember.”

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WILDLIFE PAINTING WITH SARAH STRIBBLING

Sarah’s most recent body of work is called the Dream series. It consists of vibrantly colored, playful animals and wildlife in oil. Sarah credits her father for inspiration and support. “I drew a lot of my inspiration from my father. He has been a wildlife and portrait artist for as long as I can remember. As a young girl, I would sit and watch him paint. I became fascinated.” Through her work, Sarah hopes to evoke in people, an appreciation for wildlife. She says, “At the end of the day it’s important to do what makes you most passionate and through my work, I am able to bring awareness of the plight of animals. I am and always will be passionate about wildlife.

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COOKINGWITHCOCKTAILRINGS.COM

NO.7 Eat & Drink COOKING WITH COCKTAIL RINGS:

TEXT: BRITTANY TEMPLETON

PHOTO: KYLIE MAZON

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HOW T R AV E L I N S P I R E S C U I S I N E

Some may find it difficult to turn a passion into a career, but for Kylie Mazon, it is a natural talent. An East Coast native and West Coast transplant, she began her cooking journey as a young girl. With her mother, the baker of the family, she found herself taking on the role of family chef. She experimented in the kitchen and combined different ingredients to see how they would turn out. Kylie believes wholeheartedly that food brings people together and she has become the master of hosting and cooking for her friends and family.

She was also fortunate enough to train under Anne Willan, owner of Santa Monica French cooking school, La Varenne.

While Kylie never attended culinary school, she certainly gained learned a tremendous amount about cooking from her uncle, who happens to be a chef. She was also fortunate enough to train under Anne Willan, owner of Santa Monica French cooking school, La Varenne. Under Anne, she learned the technique of classic French cooking and continued to push herself through complex recipes, finding it therapeutic.

PHOTO: KYLIE MAZON

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PHOTO: KATE EDWARDS

“I think I could live off of sushi, ramen and udon! I also have such an appreciation for sushi chefs, they take something so simple and make it so flavorful and elegant.”

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COOKING WITH COCKTAIL RINGS:

PHOTO: KYLIE MAZON

As a fellow wanderluster, Kylie finds inspiration through travel. Part of why she loves what she does is the spontaneity and freedom to experiment with whatever she feels in the moment. “I draw inspiration from everywhere that I travel, whether locally or globally,” she says. One of Kylie’s favorite things to do is figure out how to recreate dishes that she has discovered while traveling, and then add her own touch. She adds, “I love traveling and experiencing different cultures, I have always had the travel bug and have been lucky enough to be able to explore the United States, Europe and Asia.”

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While most would opt for someone in the culinary industry, Kylie would give anything to cook for Jackie O.


HOW T R AV E L I N S P I R E S C U I S I N E

PHOTO: KYLIE MAZON

Kylie’s most recent love is Japanese cuisine and culture. With her life basically revolving around food and eating, one can imagine what her recent trip to Japan entailed. She hadn’t previously intended to make the trip, but it’s suffice to stay the trip transformed her perspective of the land of the rising sun. She couldn’t have asked for a more memorable experience, “I think I could live off of sushi, ramen and udon! I also have such an appreciation for sushi chefs, they take something so simple and make it so flavorful and elegant.” While sushi chefs hold her utmost respect, there is someone else she admires even more. If there is one person in the history of the world Kylie wished she could cook for, it’s Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

While most would opt for someone in the culinary industry, Kylie would give anything to cook for Jackie O “She is someone I have always loved learning about. I have always admired her style and grace. She was such an intelligent woman. She spoke three languages and had a great historical and literary knowledge.” As a well-known Francophile, Mrs. Kennedy even studied at La Sorbonne in Paris, so Kylie says preparing a French meal would seem only fitting. What is next for this globally inspired chef? With her love for combining French cooking techniques with Asian flavors, Kylie will most likely be exploring the South of France soon. Be sure to keep an eye out for her upcoming recipes — they just might include some French wine.

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NO.9 Travel Tips

Going Abroad? 11 Travel Tips From Mom (you will thank me later)

TEXT: ASHLEY PUCKETT

NO.1 PASSPORT

Take a photo of your passports and email it to yourself. If something happens, you will need the pic to get a temporary passport issued. Check the date, some countries won’t let you enter if it expires within 6 months. Kids passports are only valid for 5 years, check because time flies!

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T R AV E L T I P S F R OM MOM

NO.2 VISAS

No, not the credit card. Check to see if the country you are traveling to requires you to have a VISA before entering that country. NO.3 CHILDREN

Credit Cards: inform your bank of the countries you’ll be traveling to, including layovers. Never have all your cards in the same place (same for your ID’s). NO.8 BABIES

If flying solo with your kids outside of the country, have a letter from the other parent with a copy of their passport stating you have their permission.

You can’t exactly stock up on diapers and formula at the airport so make sure you bring not only enough, but extra!

NO.4 PACKING

NO.9 VACCINATIONS + MEDS

Check the weather, inquire about local customs and wear comfortable shoes.

Make sure vaccinations are up to date. Do you have enough prescription meds for your trip?

NO.5 EMERGENCY & CONTACT

Pack a little first-aid bag with tissues, Band-Aids, Tylenol, bug spray, etc.

Where is the closest embassy? hospital? What are the police & emergency numbers? Save the numbers on your phone and fingers crossed you don’t need them. Have a contact — whether it’s a friend or cousin’s roommate’s sister’s boyfriend — any contact you can get while traveling is important. You never know when that contact could come in handy. NO.6 INSURANCE

Get travel insurance, it’s worth it! Bags, Hotels, Accidents... with kids, you know anything can happen. NO.7 $$$$$$$$$$

Always have cash! Check the current exchange rate to make sure you get the best rate.

NO.10 TIME ZONES

Be aware of time zone changes. Even the most seasoned travelers have made this mistake. Always check the date and time zone when you are traveling! NO.11 DOWNLOAD YOUR APPS

Technology is your friend when you travel. Get apps that make your travel life easier and more organized. Google Translate: real time translation TripIt: organizes from your inbox all your travel / cars / hotel in one app TripAdvisor: peer to peer travel advice and tips HotelTonight: Huge discounts on fancy hotels (literally tonight) Momondo: Offline travel maps are a dream! FIELDtrip: a tour guide in your pocket

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NO.10 Eat & Drink

Behind the Bitter: THE HISTORY OF CAMPARI GALLERIA

TEXT: SUMMER JOHNSON / PHOTOS: ORLANDO CHIARI OF CAFFÈ MIANI

FE AT U R E D P LAC ES

DÉ COR

M I L AN , I TALY

AN GELO D’A NDREA , EUGENIO QUA RTI & ALESSA N DRO MA ZZUCOTELLI

L INK S

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C O MPA R INO .IT


CAMPARI GALLERIA

“Experiencing this caffè was like walking back into the 1920’s, full of sophistication, beauty, and impeccable hospitality.”

Growing up outside of New York City, I would see Campari posters on the walls of Italian Restaurants everywhere, full of mystique and humor. I wondered what exactly Campari was all about. Visiting Milan, one of the most swankiest cities in the world, I got a chance to visit the first Campari caffe. Now that I have spent time here I can say that those posters and this restaurant captures the essence of the city as a whole. Experiencing this

caffè was like walking back into the 1920’s, full of sophistication, beauty, and impeccable hospitality. Gaspare Campari started out selling his specialty liqueurs out of his small shop in Novara, Italy. Around 1867, he lost the business and moved to Milan to become a waiter. He soon found favor with a financier who loved his products and opened a new shop in Rastrelli. Business went so well that he was able to move to the

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CAMPARI GALLERIA

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CAMPARI GALLERIA

“The exquisite décor lives up to its dazzling location, where the entire foyer and bar is walled by a “Liberty Style”mosaic by Angelo D’Andrea...”

Piazza Duomo, under the Coperto dei Figini. When the Piazza Duomo was torn down and renovated, Gaspare obtained the right of first refusal, and built his caffè on the corner spot as soon as you enter the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. The exquisite décor lives up to its dazzling location, where the entire foyer and bar is walled by a “Liberty Style”mosaic by Angelo D’Andrea that tower at least nine feet from the ground. The restaurant is an impeccable work of art, that also inhabits the work of Eugenio Quarti, a famous cabinet maker as well as custom lamps created by Alessandro Mazzucotelli, the only “iron monger” who produced real works of art out of iron in his time. The caffè and restaurant has expanded six times its original size where it remains. Royals, aristocrats and nobility would frequent the shop at the turn of the twentieth century, and now I suggest the sitting gallery where you can turn your chair outward and people-watch with a cappuccino and pastry.

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GRAB YOUR PASSPORT AND MY HAND

NO.8 Instagram Highlight @DELICIEUSEVIE |

DELICIEUSEVIE.COM

Grab Your Passport and My Hand TEXT: MICHAEL JESUS AND ALLISON RICHARD

Six months ago, we opened the page to the most beautiful chapter of our lives. Native Parisians and impassioned soul mate, we set out to discover the world - one so colorful, it would prove to be the key to happiness. Our adventure began across the world in Asia, beginning our travels in Thailand, then to Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and Malaysia. We would explore the largest cities of the region such as Bangkok, Ho Chi Minh and Kuala Lumpur, and the tranquil countryside of Sangkhla Buri, Kampong Chhnang and the Gili islands. We would lose ourselves to nature or in an urban jungle.

NEVER LOOK BACK JUNGLE AND MEDITATION, THE BEAUTIFUL CONTRAST OF BALI UBUD PHOTO BY: MICHAEL JESUS

A journey between land and sea, by plane or a long tail boat, a tuk-tuk or skateboard, on horseback or a sea turtle’s back, we traveled many miles with a constant smile. We took control of our lives and we were challenged to push ourselves along the way into the the unknown. Everyday, we are learning how to freely be ourselves.

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INSTAGRAM HIGHLIGHT

FOLLOW ME RIDING ACROSS A COUNTRYSIDE. MEETING A LITTLE GIRL WHO RUNS THROUGH THE SALT FIELD. KAMPOT. CAMBODIA PHOTO: ALLISON RICHARD

HAVE A BREAK HIGH FIVE IN THE MIDDLE OF VIETNAM. HOI AN PHOTO: MICHAEL JESUS

LA VIE EST DELICIEUSE AT THE TOP OF KAMPOT. CAMBODIA PHOTO: MICHAEL JESUS

LOVE BALI LANDSCAPE OF THE GREEN TEGALALANG RICE TERRACE. AMAZING UBUD. BALI PHOTO: MICHAEL JESUS

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GRAB YOUR PASSPORT AND MY HAND

POP UP THE SHOES PARIS JE T’AIME. COLORFUL STREET: RUE CRÉMIEUX. FRANCE PHOTO: MICHAEL JESUS

RAIL X SKATE DISCOVERING THE WORLD BUT NEVER WITHOUT MY BOARD! RIVER KWAI BRIDGE. THAILAND PHOTO: MICHAEL JESUS

STAND UP BABY PADDLE SESSION FOR THE WONDERFUL SUNSET IN KOH PHA NGAN. THAILAND PHOTO: ALLISON RICHARD

RODEO DRIVE WILD MEETING. THE BEST SWAP: FROM A BICYCLE TO A BUFFALO. VIETNAM, HOI AN. PHOTO: ALLISON RICHARD

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Upward Magazine #004  

sharing journeys of unconventional #travel to inspire the next generation of explorers + influencers

Upward Magazine #004  

sharing journeys of unconventional #travel to inspire the next generation of explorers + influencers