2026 Upton Master Plan Public Document

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Introduction In early 2016, The Community Builders, (TCB), the Upton Planning Committee, (UPC), and the Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center, (BEWC), partnered to coordinate a process to create a resident-driven strategic plan in Baltimore’s Historic Upton Neighborhood (“Upton”). Supported by the Wells Fargo Regional Foundation National Pilot Neighborhood Planning Grant Upton’s master planning process was a comprehensive communityled initiative. This planning process resulted in the 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan. The Upton plan area encompasses approximately 60 square blocks situated in central Baltimore City and bordered generally by Bloom Street to the north, Madison Avenue to the east, Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd to the south, and Fremont Avenue to the west. In greater detail, the exact borders

are the following starting at Bloom and Fremont and going clockwise: Division, Laurens, McCulloh, Lanvale, Madison, Preston, McCulloh, Martin Luther King Jr., Druid Hill, Preston, Pennsylvania, Hoffman, Brune, George, and Fremont as shown below. UPC and TCB contracted with Lamar Wilson Associates and Interface Studio to support the develop of the resident-driven plan. The master plan proposes specific goals, objectives and strategies across seven core components of community economic development that emerged from discussions with Upton residents, businesses and stakeholders, and consultations with local governmental officials. The seven subject areas include: community engagement, economic development, green space and safety, housing development,

quality of life, education, and transportation. Each subject area was informed by primary and secondary data sources used to describe and interpret demographic, physical and environmental conditions and trends in Upton. Both sets of information were used to identify strengths, challenges and opportunities at play in Upton and serve as the basis for the master plan to help guide Upton’s revitalization and resurgence as an attractive place to live, raise a family, operate a business, work, learn, worship and play. The 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan provides a blueprint for the community’s development over the next 10-years. The plan provides recommendations or future physical development that generate long-term economic sustainability and stimulates growth. The plan presents a comprehensive implementation plan that outlines short-term, medium-term, and long-term strategies, milestones, and outcomes. Implementation of the 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan will position Upton as a prominent African American community celebrating its unique history, character, and history while building new opportunities for industry, commerce, and living that shapes a collective revitalized community. Together we have:

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2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Upton Vision Statement The Upton Master Plan seeks to expand and deepen the constituency for a revitalized Upton based on a vision current residents now hold for their community and one future residents will be invited to embrace and work towards as well. That vision is spelled out below: Reclaim the vestiges of its distinct African-American heritage and be the hub of a cultural revitalization where the memory of the great entertainers, artists and civic leaders who proudly proclaimed Upton as their neighborhood will serve as a beacon drawing investments back into the community. As the revitalization of the

community moves forward, Upton will be envied for its fine architecture and places for cultural expression, business development, social services, and health activities, all contributing to a feeling of wellbeing and belonging. Uphold the value that the Upton community has historically placed on its residents, faith- based organizations, and civic institutions to promote unity, harmony, and community economic development.

Attractive commercial districts

High-performing schools

Maintained green spaces

High-quality recreational facilities

Signage, historic markers, and attractive gateways that serve as invitations to those currently living in Upton to renew their appreciation for its assets and those considering making Upton their home to join in its preservation, revitalization, and rebirth.

A vibrant and healthy community characterized by and composed of: 

Engaged citizenry

Strong residential blocks

Guiding Principles The Upton Master Planning process was guided by a set of 8 guiding principles agreed upon by the community: Build on the physical and historical strengths of the neighborhood Preserve the existing character of the neighborhood Create a mixed-income community Capitalize on its African American heritage Provide amenities that meet the needs of families, senior citizens, children and youth, professionals and merchants Build a critical mass of each type to support and sustain a viable commercial district, and vice versa Find a healthy balance between new development on and permanent greening of vacant lands in the neighborhood Prevent displacement of and embrace equitable development for lower-income residents 2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Community Process A successful master planning process requires the involvement of the community it is supposed to benefit. The Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Planning process has been open and transparent and all community stakeholders were invited to participate. The planning process was designed to capture vital information to better understand the neighborhood’s progress since the last master plan was developed in 2005 while engaging Upton residents and stakeholders in a process of collective reflection. A formal feedback process on the Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan was implemented and comments were incorporated into the final plan. All seven Upton neighborhood clusters are fully supportive of the Master Plan Framework. The Historic Upton Neighborhood, (HUN), master planning process explored the state of Upton in 2005 and the state of Upton in 2016 through data analysis of current housing statistics, area demographics, and market analysis of commercial and residential sales, social service and education statistics, and community crime statistics. The HUN master planning process included a robust community survey process and physical dwelling assessment. Phases 1 and 2 focused on research and data gathering, community mobilization, trust building, and information and data analysis.

Phase 3 was about community cohesion, visioning, and systematic planning. Phase 3: The Future Desired community vision was used as a baseline for the future. 

Where does Upton want to be in 2026?

What do we want the Upton Community to look like in 2026?

Throughout the planning process well over 300 community residents and stakeholders participated in master planning meetings and activities. A Master Planning Community Congress was held on December 10, 2016 at Furman L. Templeton Academy. Over 70 people participated in the Community Congress. Highlights were posted on the UPC website and workgroups were established to generate ideas and planning recommendations.

Phase 1: The Past Upton’s 2005 Master Plan served as the baseline for the past. The past seeks to honor the community work in 2005 to cast a 10-year vision and master plan for the Upton Community. Questions considered: 

What was Upton’s community vision for 2015?

What were Upton’s desired short-term, medium-term, and long-term community goals and implementation plan?

Phase 2: The Present Current community demographics and statistics served as the baseline for the present. The present worked to gain clarity around what has changed between the past and the present. 

What achievements have been made in Upton’s 2005 master plan?

What are Upton’s current challenges/weaknesses and successes/strengths?

What are Upton’s opportunities for current and future growth and development?

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A second Master Planning Community Congress was help on May 21, 2017 at Furman L. Templeton. Over 70 people participated in the Community Congress, which focused on developing short-term, medium-

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


term, and long-term plan recommendations. A third Community Congress to share the draft Master Plan was held on August 5, 2017 at Furman L. Templeton Academy. There were three large-scale community Congress events to engage residents and stakeholders in the planning process and 5 workgroups were established to develop goals, and strategies to achieve the community’s desired results. Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan workgroup areas: Quality of Life A community’s quality of life is directly influenced by the level of supports, opportunities, and services available. This workgroup will monitor a range of “quality of life” strategies, including but not limited to: healthy food access; quality educational opportunities; quality healthcare; and reduction of crime and blight.

History of Upton Throughout the 20th century, Upton was known throughout the nation as a wellspring of African American culture, achievement and activism. African American professionals were prevalent in Upton, and Pennsylvania Avenue running through this neighborhood was the premier shopping strip, evoking comparisons to Lenox Avenue in Harlem. Upton is also a notable launching pad for civil rights movements; Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois and Marcus Garvey were among those who frequented area churches and gatherings. Notable residents of Upton included Chief Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, Furman Templeton, Judge Harry Cole, former Baltimore Mayor Kurt. L Schmoke, and Congressman Elijah Cummings is still a neighborhood resident.

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Housing/Community Development Upton will preserve affordable housing so that barriers to entering the residential market for lower income homeowners and renters are mitigated as the local housing market improves. This workgroup will monitor goals and strategies for attracting and sustaining housing investment for households with a range of incomes, ages and physical challenges. Land Use and Infrastructure The inclusion of safe and connected streets, trails, green space, parks and trees contribute to the character, health and safety of a community. This workgroup will monitor initiatives or projects that will increase the Upton community’s access to green spaces, parks as well as protect and preserve natural resources and increase public safety in the Upton Community. This workgroup will monitor projects that are envisioned to strengthen the transportation network that affects the Upton neighborhood. Economic/Business Development Sustainable communities provide employment and business development opportunities for residents and merchants and consider opportunities for sustaining and strengthening vulnerable households. This workgroup will partner with the Pennsylvania

Avenue Mainstreet Program to achieve goals and strategies to improve the community’s economy, including the local business district and connecting the local workforce to job opportunities. Community Engagement Quality communication and established relationships with residents and community groups is important to equitable community development. Thus, it is vital that the community is part of this revitalization process and remain informed of the efforts associated with it. This workgroup will monitor engagement and awareness efforts to keep community stakeholders engaged in the revitalization process. The community planning process created a blueprint for the Upton community to follow and has established a firm foundation for moving the necessary work forward to realize common goals. Working together in partnership Upton residents and stakeholders will achieve the collective desired results.

History of Upton Upton is one of Baltimore’s historic neighborhoods and enjoys a reputation as one of the nation’s premier centers of African American history and culture. Beginning after World War I, Upton was home to Baltimore’s growing African American middle class, many of whom continue to have a long-standing tie to the community and play an active role in its political, social and cultural institutions. Upton can claim numerous local and national “firsts.” Many of which were born out of racial and discriminatory policies and attitudes. Although separated and excluded by race, it was these patterns and practices that enabled the community to create its place in history.

homes were built on east-west streets and alleys. The majority of buildings have retained their original architectural details although they suffer from substantial deterioration and deferred maintenance.

The Civil War through World War I marked the urbanization of Upton. Investors built the majority of three-story homes along Druid Hill Avenue and McCulloh Street, which were intended to attract wealthy Like many city neighborhoods, Upton began as an residents. Many of Upton’s churches were built outgrowth of country estates, including the Upton during the 1870’s and reflect the community’s Mansion. Pennsylvania Avenue was the primary growth and prosperity. This era also marked the commercial artery and was the first road to link rural beginning of a strong African American community areas to the northwest portion of the City. Most presence in Upton, many having moved to the area homes built after the Civil War were built on north- from South Baltimore. Families that could afford to south streets. More modest and working-class bought the former homes of wealth German

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2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Planning Partners An outstanding team was assembled to facilitate the Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Planning process. The team was led by The Community Builders, Inc., a leading nonprofit developer bringing 50 plus years of experience in urban redevelopment. Local leadership and direction was provided by the Upton Planning Committee and the Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center. The Community Builders, (TCB) TCB is one of America's leading nonprofit real estate developers and owners. Their mission is to build and sustain strong communities where people of all incomes can achieve their full potential. Their mission is realized by developing, financing and operating high-quality housing and implementing neighborhood-based models that drive economic opportunity for residents. Since 1964, TCB has constructed or preserved hundreds of affordable and mixed-income housing developments and secured billions of dollars in project financing from public and private sources. TCB is headquartered in Boston with reginal hubs in

Chicago and Washington, D.C. Upton Planning Committee, (UPC) UPC for more than 40 years has been a leading community organization in central Baltimore City, Maryland. This community organization was founded by citizens of the Upton community with the purpose of halting and reversing the decline in quality of life that many urban neighborhoods face. The Upton community is represented by eight neighborhood associations, which together make up the Upton Planning Committee leadership. Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center, (BEWC) BEWC is a community resources hub that connects people to resources and service providers. Through these connections, the BEWC seeks to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the Upton community and beyond. Formerly known as the Bethel Outreach Center, it provided vital resources to support the 2005 Upton Master Plan.

History of Upton residents on Druid Hill Avenue and McCulloh Street. Less wealthy families purchased more modest twostory and alley homes. In 1910, George McMechen attempted to purchase a home at 1834 McCulloh Street and was refused based on race. His efforts resulted in the City’s first exclusionary zoning laws to prevent African Americans from purchasing homes in certain neighborhoods. Upton has all of the ingredients to be a thriving, successful neighborhood: great housing, livable streets, proximity to employment and cultural centers, five train stations within a short walk or drive, a neighborhood commercial district and an extraordinary story to tell about its past. Most of all, Upton has a dedicated core of residents, many of whom

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

have lived in the neighborhood for more than 30 years. These stake holders have refused to let go of their belief in Upton's potential and provided the momentum that moved this planning process forward. The historically rich African American community of Upton is a focus of urban revitalization. Together with the Upton Planning Committee, seven neighborhoods have created a family atmosphere while working to keep the community safe and clean. Shaped like a Christmas tree, Upton has zigzag boundaries which extend clockwise from Dolphin and Pennsylvania along Pennsylvania, Preston, Druid Hill, Biddle, Argyle, Hoffman, Myrtle, Harlem, Brune, George, Fremont, Bloom, Division, Lafayette, McCulloh, and Dolphin.

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Goals & Strategies The Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan created a comprehensive set of goals and strategies based on the existing conditions analysis and priorities as expressed by residents and stakeholders through all phases of outreach and engagement in all five critical work areas.

Ensure community stakeholders are engaged in the revitalization process for their neighborhood. Goal 1:

Deepen Community Outreach Efforts 

Build on community strengths and publicize all community neighborhood meetings

Work collectively with all Upton constituencies

Goal 2:

Strengthen UPC Infrastructure 

Goal 3:

Market and Promote Upton 

Market the Upton Community

Develop a robust social media campaign for the Upton Community

Strengthen coordination of Upton economic development opportunities by implementing a community-led property disposition strategy that will track and monitor quality of economic development.

Establish a technical assistance program that supports developers and helps them access Federal, State, and City economic development resources.

Court banking institutions and quality businesses needed in the community

Improve local business districts and connect the local workforce to job opportunities locally and in the region. Goal 1:

Goal 2:

Strengthen Heritage Tourism in the Upton Community 

Promote current heritage trail and Upton’s destinations

Re-brand and market Pennsylvania Avenue as a tourist destination

Identify cultural heritage oriented development opportunities in Upton (i.e. Jubilee Arts/ Cultural Spaces)

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Create wealth creation opportunities for residents 

Partner with workforce development programs in Upton and promote opportunities to residents in the community

Establish programs that foster entrepreneurship and provide workforce development opportunities on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Implement development standards that require developers to use local workers.

Redevelop Local Business Corridor 

Establish standards for commercial development on Pennsylvania Avenue

Strengthen Main Street organization and UPC infrastructure

Create a comprehensive commercial development design for Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street

Increase community access to green spaces, parks and recreation facilities, and enhance public safety and security. Goal 1:

Goal 3:

Beautify the Upton Community 

Green Space revitalization in Upton

Vacant building community clean-up

Goal 2:

Expand operational capacity of the Upton Planning Committee

Coordinate community-wide clean-up activities

Strengthen Upton’s tree canopy

Strengthen Public Safety 

Increase community street lighting

Community patrol programs

Create community safe spaces

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Goals & Strategies Preserve and increase the stock of quality affordable housing for lower income homeowners and renters. Goal 1:

Goal 3:

 Create a community homeownership pipeline  Develop a mixed-income neighborhood

Preserve Historic Character of Upton

 Work collectively with all Upton communities

 Garner resources for historic preservation  Educate the community on the value of historic

preservation

Revitalize Community Without Displacement and Mass Gentrification

Goal 4:

 Provide CHAP designation supports

Manage Strategic Demolition for Community Growth and Development  Manage demolition and maintenance in the

 Support redevelopment that maintains the

community

character of the neighborhood

Goal 2:

Foster New Housing Development and Rehabilitation  Market the Upton Community  Create Upton community development clusters  Create developer network in Upton

 Strengthen adult education supports

Ensure access to affordable healthy foods, quality education, affordable healthcare, and public safety. Goal 1:

Goal 3:

Strengthen Healthy Food Access

 Publicize the importance of a medical home

 Establish a farmer’s market in the Upton

 Provide healthcare information in the community

community

 Publicize fresh food options in the community  Work to attract healthy food options and

Strengthen Health Care Supports in Upton

Goal 4:

restaurants to the Upton community

Foster Community Pride in Upton  Promote Community Cleanliness  Celebrate Community Strengths

Goal 2:

Strengthen Education Supports in Upton  Support community school activities at Upton

schools

Support transportation choices and promote transportation networks that are efficient and environmentally sustainable. Goal 1:

Goal 2:

Control Community Traffic Flow 

Strengthen community streetscapes

Traffic light signal review

Red light and speed camera utilization

Goal 3:

Strengthen Transit Service 

Publicize State of Maryland’s new bus schedule

Highlight Pennsylvania Avenue Metro Station

Identify strategies for improving public transportation in the community

Foster Community Oriented Developments  Strengthen community transit oriented

development

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Findings In aggregate, Upton has 16.5 acres equivalent to 14 and a half football fields of vacant land, two acres of which is being maintained is some way ranging from those that are simply mowed and kept free of litter to those that have been planted and/or adorned with murals and art.

The inclusion of safe and connected streets, trails, green space, parks and trees contribute to the character, health and safety of a community. In conjunction with the Upton Planning Committee,

the Upton CDC will identify initiatives or projects that will increase the Upton community’s access to green spaces and parks as well as increase public safety in the cluster neighborhoods.

At 16%, Upton’s tree canopy coverage is far below that of Baltimore as a whole, which is 27%. Gaps in the canopy coverage are visible along several streets and there may be additional opportunities for more shade trees within superblocks and by finding space for trees on surface parking lots.

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2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Vacancy 23% of the total parcel area in Upton is comprised of fully vacant buildings and land, making it the second most prevalent land use [or in this case, lack thereof] in the neighborhood, after residential uses. In addition to fully vacant buildings and land, there are also a smaller proportion of properties that have some partial vacancy, as represented in the map. 57% of the parcel area of all properties that are affected by some type of vacancy are fully vacant buildings, followed by the 41% that is comprised of vacant land.

blocks of Upton that is far more vacant than occupied. Less concentrated vacancy is found in and around the edges of Marble Hill and in the northern reaches of Upton east of Pennsylvania Avenue.

Removing active land uses from the map makes the patterns of vacancy clear. Very concentrated clusters of vacant properties are found west of Pennsylvania Avenue south of Mosher--a large area of several

Among Baltimore’s 55 neighborhoods, the Upton/ Druid Heights area has the second highest rate of vacant and abandoned residential buildings, surpassed only by neighboring SandtownWinchester/Harlem Park. 33% of Upton’s residential buildings are vacant. Given the structure of traditional rowhomes, a vacant and abandoned building-especially if it is not properly protected from the elements-can make the buildings it shares party walls with vulnerable to structural 2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

damage, exposure to the elements, and susceptible to rodent and pest infestations, among other issues. That said, it is common to see the effects of vacancy and improperly sealed abandoned buildings spread down a block, reinforcing the tendency of vacancy and abandonment to cluster.

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Despite the challenging physical conditions of a large percentage of vacant buildings, one of Upton’s

strongest assets is its housing stock. Spacious homes with architectural details and a strong, compact urban grid create a feeling of community that should be strengthened and preserved.

The physical parcel survey included an evaluation of the condition of every building in Upton, rated according to the scale at right. Given the number of teardowns of vacant and dilapidated structures that have already happened in Upton, combined with smaller scale rehabs and restoration, the majority of remaining building stock is in fair to very good condition. Buildings on 50% of Upton’s parcel area appear to need no or very minor maintenance/repairs.

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2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Over 290 parcels in Upton are fully vacant buildings with private ownership. Baltimore City Department of Housing and Community Development maintains ownership of over 400 vacant lots in the community and Private owners control over 90 vacant lots. Vacant lots provide an opportunity for strategic infill development throughout the community.

In aggregate, vacant land combined with buildings rated “D” or “F” comprise 21% of the total parcel area of Upton. Mapping these properties together begins to suggest opportunities for an infill reinvestment strategy. Not surprisingly, given the previous maps of conditions and vacancy, the Upton West area and areas west of Pennsylvania Avenue south of Mosher present the heaviest concentrations of vacancy and potential teardowns. In many cases, full block faces--or close to it --could be considered development opportunity sites. These maps are intended to aid in factoring in issues of public versus private ownership in defining infill opportunities.

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Baltimore’s Enterprise Zone covers portions of the neighborhood, particularly along Pennsylvania and Freemont Avenues, and pockets of commercial establishments facilitated by the Community Business District zoning. The enterprise zone, which is managed by the Baltimore Development Corporation, is intended to encourage investment in distressed areas by offering incentives to existing businesses to expand and helping to attract new companies to invest and create jobs.

Vibrant and healthy neighborhoods provide employment and business development

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opportunities for residents and merchants. The goals and strategies for improving Upton’s economy give priority to improving the local business district, connecting the local workforce to job opportunities in and outside the neighborhood, and capitalizing on the historic resources to promote tourism to capture and reinvest the economic benefits generated from it. The Main Streets program will also be integral in shaping the future of Pennsylvania as a healthy and sustainable commercial district. The Baltimore Food Policy Initiative [BFPI] created Food Retail Incentive Areas to incentivize food retail development in areas with poor access to food. The program provides a ten-year abatement on property taxes for new food stores. The same incentive is available for existing stores that undergo significant renovations that improve or expand access to healthy foods . Upton is a food retail incentive area. In Food Retail Incentive Innovation Areas, according to the Baltimore Department of Planning, “BFPI will support and provide technical assistance to organizations exploring innovative models such as non-profit stores, cooperatives, mobile markets, ride sharing services and delivery platforms.”

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Though there is a multitude of vacant storefronts scattered throughout the Upton neighborhood, active commercial businesses are concentrated primarily along a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue centered on Upton Station at Laurens Street --Upton’s most active intersection characterized by a constant flow of foot traffic. However, 28% of community survey participants rated Upton’s “Variety of goods and services available for purchase in the community” “Poor” or “Very poor,” ranking this aspect of the community the second lowest among ten aspects.

Healthy neighborhoods offer institutions and services for their residents and business community. Many of these elements exist in Upton but require physical improvements, capacity building and a collaborative effort to be considered viable institutions. Building a critical mass of residents to support and sustain Upton commercial corridors and districts. Thriving commercial districts require strong and economically stable, residential areas.

Encouraging new residential developments will attract new customers who will help provide the critical mass necessary to attract and sustain high quality commercial development. In addition, providing amenities that meet the needs of Upton families , seniors, children and youth, professionals and businesses. The mission of the CDC will be to build on Upton’s strengths and preserve the existing character of neighborhood while creating a mixed income community that capitalizes on the unique African American heritage and becomes a destination. 2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Strategies and proposed projects are envisioned to strengthen Upton’s public and private transportation network and promote efficient and effective circulation for and between pedestrians, motor vehicles and bicyclists. Coordinating existing public transit service and orienting economic development efforts towards a well-maintained and improved metro station will provide a tangible link that services the needs of the community. Creating walkable streets with improved streetscapes, reviewing traffic and signage, as well as implementing ideas to slow and decrease vehicular traffic in the commercial area to give way to more safe pedestrian, amenity areas will be a priority.

Upton residents face some of the hardest economic challenges in the City. Out of 55 neighborhoods, renters in Upton have the second lowest median household income at $16,000. Additionally, Upton is one of five neighborhoods in Baltimore that, as a whole, have median incomes below the 2014 poverty line for a family of four, which is $23,850. On a more granular level, 56% of Upton’s residents have incomes below the poverty line. With Upton’s concentration of public housing and relatively low occupancy rate of other housing options in the neighborhood, these income levels are largely a factor of the types of available housing stock.

Unemployment Out of Baltimore’s 55 neighborhoods, Upton has the second highest unemployment rate, at 26%. This is another very serious socioeconomic issue that has implications for those experiencing unemployment that play out on a daily basis. Looking at the unemployment rate map, stark divisions between adjacent geographies emerge in patterns that are similar to the race distribution maps and income maps. When rating Upton’s access to employment centers, community survey participants were very split, with 52% rating it “Very good” or “Good,” and 26% rating it “Poor” or “Very poor,” making “access to employment centers” both the third highest and third lowest ranked characteristics of the community, out of ten indicators. Page 16

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Upton has a distinct concentration of young people with over a third of residents under 18 years old. Taking a closer look at household types, we see that 40% of households have children under 18 and that 8 in 10 of those households are led by a single female parent/guardian.

Combined with the other demographic data, including poverty rates, unemployment, and housing burdens; the socio-economic indicators begin to suggest the magnitude of challenges these single women face in raising children under very difficult circumstances. and out of school time pressures; Education-related issues parents are deeply concerned about include the depressing physical and social environment, and the trauma that causes including a negative impact on personal self-worth/ esteem. The factors that contribute to this detracting environment include abandoned buildings, trash strewn/unmaintained vacant lots, drug dealing, and street violence. The mixing of high school age students (e.g. Renaissance) and middle school age students (e.g. Booker T) is harmful for both student populations and especially for the latter. This should be avoided at all costs; a number of possible solutions that will be targeted include:  Providing safe havens and spaces for children and youth; 

Establishing mental health services to help students and their parents address in-school

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

More community outreach staff, school psychologists and guidance counselors in the schools;

Targeting investments in the blocks surrounding the schools to better serve the community;

Parents and administrators teaming-up to engage youth on neighborhood-based activities combining academic, vocational, and community development activities (e.g. greening and adopting vacant lots near their school, partnering with Pennsylvania Avenue Merchants Association on corridor beautification, matching up with businesses to “learn the business”, and mentoring)

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Recommendations The Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan includes a comprehensive set of goals, strategies and activities for each priority area. The chart below identifies the number of strategies and weighs them as critical, important, and needed. The critical strategies have been prioritized for implementation within the first three years. Specific recommendations in several priority areas are featured in this section.

STRATEGIES, IMPLEMENTATION PRIORITIES

56 Strategies (17 Critical) Critical: Ensure community stakeholders are engaged in the revitalization process for their neighborhood. Enhance the capacity and infrastructure—as needed—among community-based organizations to facilitate/take the lead on the action plan categories.

76 Strategies (27 Critical) Critical: Increase community access to green spaces, parks and recreation facilities, and enhance public safety and security.

7 Strategies (7 Critical) Critical: Meet with the owners/developers of V2V acquired sites and other vacant properties, Assemble and package vacant sites to generate greater economies-of- scale and preserve and increase the stock of quality affordable housing for lower income homeowners and renters.

76 Strategies (34 Critical) Critical: Improve local business districts and connect the local workforce to job opportunities locally and in the region. Commission studies to assess market feasibility residential, scale/volume, target markets: Commercial, Residential, Mixed-Use, Housing (affordable, mixed-income, and market rate)

58 Strategies (19 Critical) Critical: Support transportation choices and promote transportation networks that are efficient and environmentally sustainable.

72 Strategies (24 Critical) Critical: Ensure access to affordable healthy foods, quality education, affordable healthcare, and public safety.

In pursuing the economic development goals, the existing physical and business conditions in Upton need to be acknowledged and addressed in partnership with the City of Baltimore, the Pennsylvania Avenue Merchants Association, and the Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street Program. According to the head of the Pennsylvania Avenue Business Association, Upton is experiencing a slow but steady decline in business activity along its main commercial corridors. Individual businesses and the avenue as a whole are not attractive in appearance. Vacant and deteriorated storefronts and upper floors dot the streetscape between occupied/ operating businesses, contributing to the negative perceptions. Page 18

There has been a similar paced decline in the volume of shoppers. The efficient and accessible transit system brings people to the area—good for Upton business in theory— but also facilitates their ease of access to shopping outside of the district. The business association recognizes the “chicken and egg” dilemma preventing the revival and revitalization of the legitimate retail activities, that being: 

Attracting and sustaining a broader mix of merchants and products is more achievable if there is a larger base of potential customers in Upton and adjacent neighborhoods from which to draw to shop in Upton.

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Attracting more people is a function of developing more housing, but they will only be attracted if the area is safe, units are affordable, and shopping districts are vibrant.

Negatively impacting both sides of this dilemma are the extra-legal businesses—“fronts and illegal off- the-books transactions”—operating under the table and along the Avenue that detracts from legitimate operators and brings with it disinvestment versus investment in the buildings, and in the district as a whole.

Explore best practices for community patrol programs in the inner city.

Address the promises of city resources to Upton that were made post-Freddie Gray.

Drug trafficking continues to be a major problem that has gone unabated over time. Seek strategies to combat this issue.

Security cameras exist but more are needed, particularly along the 1500 to 1800 block of Pennsylvania Avenue (95% of the retail district); Lauren and Wilson between Division and Fulton, and Wilson and Pennsylvania Avenue (on the corners of side streets).

Leverage Main Street-Type Resources 

Change the “norm” and make immediate changes through streetscape dress-up, fix-up, and clean- ups during regular business hours (also enhances safety via officer in plain views, on the ground, and eyes peeling and engaging people). Other low-cost/high-immediate impact investments:  Power

wash sidewalks

 Festive/colorful

banners

 Uniformed

crews from neighborhood (caps, shirts, carts, brooms)

 Maintained  Pole

trash cans

UPC has a robust Development Committee which hosts monthly meetings and information sessions with private developers interested in investing in Upton and considerate of equitable development principles in engaging the community in their work. 

Helping developers identify qualified community members to hire as a first step in creating and maintaining a workforce development pipeline.

Developing training programs that provide construction skills for community members across all trades and that provide on the job experiences.

Developers providing resources to the community through negotiated community benefit type agreements.

Potential redevelopment of the 800 block of Edmondson Avenue and the Upton Mansion located at 811 West Lanvale Street to include MBE contractors.

and street lighting

 Bring

entertainment to commercial districts to attract shoppers.

Beautify the Upton Community 

Create a green space revitalization plan that prioritizes green space development efforts in Upton.

Host vacant building community clean-up activities regularly in the community, and coordinate community-wide clean-up activities.

Strengthen Upton’s tree canopy by planting more trees along the commercial corridor and throughout the community.

Strengthen Public Safety 

Increase community street lighting and develop a comprehensive community light safety plan.

Address the steady turnover of police district commanders (2-3 over the past 2 to 3 years) by reestablishing predictable/ consistent leadership in the interests of developing rapport and trust between police, merchants, residents, and shoppers.

More coordination of police presence during shift changes to eliminate gaps.

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

Baltimore City has committed to taking down imminently dangerous buildings to protect health and safety while honoring commitment on moratorium on other properties that do not pose an immediate threat pending completion of the Upton Master Plan and an agreed upon community demolition strategy.

Incorporate job training/employment as part of all real estate development projects in Upton (new and renovation work), make it a priority of all such projects supported by public funding, and make appeals to private developers for local hiring across all skill levels.

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Building and renovating housing for homeownership (including rent-to-own options) should be given more priority to counter the high rate of rental properties in Upton and to repurpose the high volume of vacant properties (with special tools needed to address larger buildings that will be costly to develop and maintain as single-family.

Pursue large-scale developments not just single/one-off projects and assemble vacant land to create a critical mass of investments that generate greater economies of scale in production. Public investments should be used to leverage and trigger private investments that otherwise would not be forthcoming, and vice-versa. UPC should meet with the owners/developers of current projects who have site control of the vacant properties for the purposes of: 

Identifying opportunities to enhance or add value to each to the extent possible (e.g. site/building design, market feasibility, workforce development, sales/ leasing, etc.)

Exploring the potential of participating in the transaction to add value and advance project feasibility as supporter, co-sponsor, or special limited partner

In general, UPC should consider partnering with or soliciting development entities capable and committed to implementing equitable development principles on projects where other private developers have acquired vacant city land. In general, UPC might partner with or solicit development entities capable and committed to implementing equitable development principles on projects where other private developers have acquired vacant city land.

Deepen Community Outreach Efforts 

Build on community strengths and publicize all community neighborhood meetings and activities.

Work collectively with all Upton constituencies to foster positive community development efforts.

Strengthen UPC Infrastructure 

Start preparing kids early—Pre-K for STEM based curriculum (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)— for the jobs of the 21st century. Targeting investments in the blocks around the sites of schools serving the community, including Booker T. and Renaissance (building from key physical and institutional anchors and assets).

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Expand operational capacity of the Upton Planning Committee by seeking operational dollars that will support hiring more staff.

Market and Promote Upton 

Market the Upton Community to perspective homebuyers.

Create a pipeline of potential homeowners for development projects underway in the Upton community.

Develop a robust social media campaign for the Upton Community that publicizes events, development opportunities, and partnership opportunities.

Determining the scope, scale, status, and timeline of each project to assess impact and opportunities based on the proposed development program (e.g. workforce requirements, rezoning, end-uses).

Parents and administrators teaming-up to engage youth on neighborhood-based activities combining academic, vocational, and community development activities (e.g. greening and adopting vacant lots).

Control Community Traffic Flow 

Strengthen community streetscapes and create pedestrian friendly streets that invite walking and shopping in the neighborhoods.

Establish a traffic light signal review process to help with speed issues.

Increase red light and speed camera utilization as traffic calming efforts.

Strengthen Transit Service 

Publicize transportation nodes linked to the Upton community

Identify strategies for improving public transportation in the community

Foster Community Oriented Developments  Strengthen community transit oriented development

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Implementation Upton’s shared vision, common agenda and community partnerships will ensure that the 2026 Historic Upon Neighborhood Master Plan is implemented and proposed recommendations are fully realized. A detailed Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan Implementation Matrix has been crafted and provides strategies and milestones for each goal. Partners to facilitate the work are also identified. Implementing all of the recommendations in the plan is expected to take up to ten years. Recommendations have been organized into three categories: 

Short-term strategies which will be achieved within 1 to 3 years;

Medium-term strategies which will be achieved within 4 to 6 years; and

Long-term strategies which will be achieved within 7-10 years.

Each category has a set of key projects that are critical to garnering the level of activity and investment required for optimal community revitalization. UPC working with Jules Dunham Howie of Jul Enterprise; and Cory A. Brown, City Planner/Urban Designer of EPIC Consulting Services, have crafted a substantive Master Plan Implementation framework.

Marble Hill Upton West

Northwest United Protective Assn.

Pennsylvania Ave. Redevelopment Collaborative McCulloh Homes/Spencer Gardens Providence Neighborhood Assn. Etting Neighborhood Assn. Heritage Crossing

The implementation framework builds off of the Master Plan and provides a workplan for each Upton neighborhood cluster to map their priorities. The key strategies which will be explored for each neighborhood cluster include: 

Community Engagement,

Green Space & Safety,

Housing & Community Development, and

Quality of life.

A comprehensive housing redevelopment strategy will be developed to guide revitalization of each neighborhood cluster, primarily including rehabilitation and selective demolition with new construction.

Underutilized vacant and corner lots will also be identified for transformation into healthy and well maintained green spaces, utilizing best practices to incorporate strategies that will improve public safety.

The implementation plan will explore these fundamental areas which are essential to providing a high-standard quality of life for residents and families that live in each Upton neighborhood. An overview including a geographic areal view for each of the eight neighborhoods in Upton provides insight into the quilt of many colors that make-up the Historic Upton Neighborhood.

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Historic Marble Hill

Northwest United Protective Association

Marble Hill is located in the eastern section of the neighborhood and remained relatively untouched by urban renewal. The area was declared a National Historic District in 1985. The defining characteristic of this cluster are the many historic rowhouses of the Queen Anne and Italianate styles with magnificent high ceilings, majestic decorative ironwork, and marvelous white marble steps.

The Northwest United Protective Association is situated in the western corridor of the Upton community. It encompasses a mix of different size traditional Baltimore rowhouses with large swaths of vacant land, and a combination of mixed uses including places of worship and small commercial establishments. The Upton Mansion, the last surviving Greek Revival country house in Baltimore can serve as a catalyst for revitalization of the neighborhood, along with other key, well positioned projects.

Upton West

Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Collaborative

The neighborhood cluster of Upton West is nestled in the southwestern corner of the Upton community. Adjacent to the Heritage Crossing development, it encompasses a mix of different size traditional Baltimore rowhouses. The majority of the housing stock comprises vacant and abandoned properties.

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The Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Collaborative is a cluster of mixed uses that surround the famed Pennsylvania Ave. The key strategies for this area will be Community Engagement, Green Space & Safety, Economic Development, Housing &

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Community Development, Transportation and Quality of life. A myriad of partners and stakeholders will collaborate around the identified implementation strategies to continue to drive the rebirth of The Avenue as a place the serves the community in a multitude of ways and pays due homage to the legendary history of the neighborhood.

Baltimore and traditional Baltimore rowhouses along Druid Hill Avenue, immediately adjacent to the Marble Hill National Historical District, that have similar architectural characteristics. Etting Neighborhood Association

McCulloh Homes

McCulloh Homes is a family and mixed population development consisting of 970 units along with Spencer Gardens, consisting of 20 townhouse units located between Division and McMechen Streets. The site is bordered by Sharp Street Methodist Church to the north, the State Office Building to the east, Martin Luther King Boulevard to the south and Zion Methodist Church to the west. Providence Neighborhood Association

Etting Neighborhood Association is one square block to the east of Pennsylvania Ave. and Furman L. Templeton Elementary School. This neighborhood cluster contains the famed Sharp Street Memorial United Methodist Church and Community House; which is known as the “Mother Church� of Black Methodism in Maryland and was the location of formative meetings for the NAACP. It was highly influential in the freedom movement and was also the birthplace of the first Black School in Baltimore following the Civil War. A marvel in history and architectural stature on the National Register of Historic Places; the building represents a phenomenal strength from which to build the future of the resilient Upton community. Heritage Crossing

The Providence Neighborhood Association is one square block to the east of Pennsylvania Ave. that contains the Total Healthcare facility, the Immaculate Church of Conception part of the Archdiocese of

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

Heritage Crossing is a community comprised of semi-

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detached homes and town homes that replaced the Murphy Homes high-rise housing development. The mixed income community contains open space, treelined streets, traditional architecture, sidewalks and paths throughout the community surrounding the historic gazebo in the village green. This neighborhood cluster which also contains garden apartment buildings, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School and New Hope Academy. The community is within walking distance to schools, major employers and recreational activities. The area which borders the southwestern boundary of the Upton community is described as being minutes from downtown, the State Center, the Inner Harbor, both Camden Yards, M&T Bank Stadium, and both Interstate 95/695. Heritage Crossing is a healthy neighborhood that is an important piece of the puzzle which should fit cohesively and in harmony with the surrounding pieces of Upton to create an entire healthy community; the description of the location is accurate and also applies to the other neighborhood clusters. Improvement of the surrounding neighborhood clusters will only enhance and sustain the health of this important investment in the community.

create more jobs, provide more green space, and improve quality of life as well as increase the number of affordable housing for the benefit of existing residents. In 2016, UPC received a $640,000 Project CORE reward to support the rehabilitation and development of 11 houses in the Historic Marble Hill Community; and 7 houses on Dolphin Street. In 2017, UPC received a $2,200,000 Project CORE reward to support an Upton homeownership initiative and the stabilization of the Lenox Theatre on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Plan Leverage For Resource Cultivation UPC has been leveraging the Historic Upton Master Plan to seek resources to support community revitalization efforts identified in the planning process.

Upton Planning Committee has successfully garnered over 3.5 million dollars to support Upton’s revitalization through the last 24-months On January 5, 2016, Governor Larry Hogan announced Project C.O.R.E., a four year partnership to remove blight through demolition or stabilization to serve as the catalyst for redevelopment, reinvestment, and stabilization in Baltimore City. The goal of this partnership is to improve economic opportunity, encourage redevelopment, and improve quality of life in Baltimore City neighborhoods. Project C.O.R.E. is designed to address the needs of the existing community and will result in safer and more attractive neighborhoods,

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Community Legacy Awards UPC received two Community Legacy Awards in 2016 and 2017 for a total of $300,000 to support the rehabilitation of the Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center located in the Historic Marble Hill community.

Technical Assistance Grant In 2017, UPC received a $25,000 Technical Assistance Grant, (TAG ), from the State of Maryland to provide technical assistance to the Upton Planning Committee board and to work with neighborhood associations in Upton. UPC is grateful for Wells Fargo Regional Foundation’s initial investment to support the Upton master planning process. Their investment in the Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan has provided a solid foundation for future growth and development.

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Management Structure The Upton Planning Committee has been a stalwart of the community for decades working to ensure valuable and essential services are provided to the community, keeping the spirit and heart of the Upton Community alive. From the backbone of this hard work and dedication, the UPC Westside Community Development Corporation will evolve to provide guidance and direction for the future of Upton. The Upton Westside CDC will systematically and strategically work with the neighborhood clusters to achieve their vision and put the puzzle of Upton back together again in an undeniable and remarkable fashion. A community beset with difficult circumstances that are evident today represents a unique opportunity for the City of Baltimore. Not unlike the beacons of hope that provided a refuge of freedom and the beginnings of social, religious and educational institutions; the prominent history of Upton is screaming for a new day, the UPC Westside CDC will lead the way in collaboration with essential stakeholders that have steered the ship through the difficult times and stayed committed to the vision: History will repeat itself in Upton, providing an atmosphere where all persons can thrive by embracing their talents, learning new skills, and being proud of the environment in which they live providing a sustainable and healthy future for the neighborhood.

The UPC Westside CDC will facilitate and coordinate economic and community development efforts in Upton, Harlem Park, Sandtown Winchester, Penn North and The Pennsylvania Avenue Mainstreet. The Upton Planning Committee, UPC Westside CDC, and Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center will continue to work together closely ensuring that implementation efforts are seamless and well managed. Leadership The UPC Westside CDC has a governance board which provides operational oversite and an advisory board, which provides programmatic recommendations and support. The UPC Westside CDC advisory board includes representatives from key community stakeholders including: 

Harlem Park

Sandtown Winchester

Penn North

Pennsylvania Avenue Mainstreet

Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Corp.

Upton Planning Committee

Etting Neighborhood Association

Heritage Crossing

The UPC Westside CDC will manage resources garnered to support development and rehabilitation efforts in Upton and beyond.

Historic Marble Hill Community Association

McCulloh Homes

Historically, successful neighborhoods have a range of incomes, services and housing types. New development should strive to attract new marketrate housing, while continuing to provide quality affordable housing. The goal of the UPC CDC will be to work with each Upton neighborhood cluster to identify housing redevelopment strategies.

Northwest United Protective Association

Providence Neighborhood Association

Upton West

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Conclusion The Upton 2026 planning process was designed to capture vital information to better understand the neighborhood’s progress since the last master plan was developed in 2005 while engaging Upton residents and stakeholders in a process of collective reflection. The 24-month Upton community master planning process culminated with the creation of the 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan, a comprehensive 10-year community development plan, which outlines goals and strategies in 7 critical community growth and development areas. All of the Upton neighborhoods are fully supportive of the Master Plan Framework. Baltimore City Department of Planning, Baltimore City Department of Housing and Community Development, and Vacants to Value have reviewed the Master Plan and expressed appreciation for the thorough redevelopment and planning recommendations.

A formal feedback process on the Historic Upton Neighborhood Master Plan was implemented and comments were incorporated into the final plan document. UPC and the Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center are grateful for all of the Upton community members and stakeholders who have helped to shape this 10-year plan by working in partnership with us since July, 2015. UPC and the Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center are committed to maintaining open and sustained communications with residents and community groups as we work collectively to achieve equitable community development where current and long-term residents and merchants can participate in and enjoy the benefits of their revitalized Upton. Please join us on the journey!

Special Thanks Special thanks to the over 500 Upton residents, community groups, faith based institutions. educational institutions, merchants, homeowners, renters, outside community stakeholders, and funders who joined this twoyear planning odyssey. Your collective work will yield significant fruit and build a lasting legacy for the Historic Upton Neighborhood. UPC and the Empowerment and Wellness Center express sincere appreciation to all of the elected officials, city departments, and state departments that have supported the master planning development process including; 

Baltimore City Department of

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Housing and Community Development

Councilman John T. Bullock, 9th District

Baltimore City Department of Planning

Senator Barbara A. Robinson, 40th District

Baltimore City Vacants to Value

Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation

Senator Shirley Nathan-Pulliam, 44th District

Delegate Keith E. Haynes, 44th District

Delegate Antonio L. Hayes, 40th District

Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development

Hon. Catherine Pugh, Baltimore City Mayor

Hon. Bernard C. (Jack) Young, City Council President

Councilman Eric Costello, 11th District

Councilman Leon Pinkett III, 7th District

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood


Acknowledgements V. Lamar Wilson & Associates Interface Design Studios Wells Fargo Regional Foundation Jul Enterprise EPIC Consulting Services

The Community Builders Upton Planning Committee Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center

Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center Board of Directors Officers: Sheila Dixon, Co-Chair. Consultant, MMCA Larry Rosenberg, Co-Chair, Project Executive, Cross Street Partners Rev. Patrick D. Clayborn, Ph.D., Senior Pastor, Bethel AME Church Liz Glenn, Treasurer Retired, Deputy Director, Neighborhood Improvement, Baltimore County Planning Dept. Emma Middleton, Secretary PHRS, HUD, PIH Division

Neighborhood Building: Wanda Best, Executive Director, Upton Planning Committee Darroll Cribb, Board Chair, Upton Planning Committee Chad Haynes, Department of Planning, Western District

Planner Stuart Hudgins, Community Historian Officer Charles Lee, Baltimore City Police Department Arlene Fisher, Central Democratic Committee Member Economic Development: Richard D. Sussman, Pennsylvania Avenue Merchants

Sandy Shapiro, Retired, Cambridge Iron & Metal Members: Ken Banks, President, Banks Contracting Company Wanda Best, Executive Director, Upton Planning Committee David Carliner, Executive Vice President, Shelter Group Jackie Cornish, Fair Housing Specialist, Baltimore County Dept. of Planning Eric Costello, Councilman, 11th District Neil Demchick, Managing Partner, Verity LLC

Association

Rabbi Steven Fink, Senior Rabbi, Temple Oheb Shalom

Eric Costello, 11th District City Council Representative

Jules Dunham Howie, CEO, Jul Enterprise

Marion Blackwell, Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street

Judge Cynthia Jones, Associate Judge, Baltimore City Circuit Court

Manager John Wesley, Director of Communications, Baltimore City

Office of Civil Rights Sharlene Paul, Main Street Intern Affordable Housing: Howard Tutman III, Department of Housing and Community

Dr. Virginia Keane, Attending Physician, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital Mark Levin, President, Levin/Brown and Associates Joann Levy, COO, Strong City Baltimore Lt. Colonel Melvin Russell, Baltimore Police Department Zed Smith, COO, Cordish Companies

Development, Vacant to Value, Central District Planner

Dawn Taylor, Senior Associate/Broker, Otis Warren Company

Jules Dunham Howie, Community Development Committee

Buddy Sapolsky, Retired President, Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore

Co-Chair, Upton Planning Committee; Program Chair, Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center Gladys Medder, Mid-Atlantic Community Life Director, The Community Builders, Inc. Social Services: Larry Rosenberg, Board Co-Chair, Bethel Empowerment &

Wellness Center Melanie Barber, The Community Builders James Hill, President and Resident, McCulloh Homes

Extension Adrian Harpool, CEO, Harpool & Associates Education: Bronwyn Mayden, Executive Director, University of Maryland,

Baltimore School of Social Work, Promise Heights

This document is an Executive Summary of the 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Plan. The complete 2026 Historic Upton Neighborhood Plan is on file at the Upton Planning Committee Headquarters, 828 N. Carrollton Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21217 and posted at www.historicupton.com. The City of Baltimore has agreed to post the final adopted Plan on its website, www.Baltimorecity.gov

Rosalyn Lockwood, Executive Director, Furman L.

Templeton Elementary School

2026 Master Plan: Building a Legacy for Historic Upton Neighborhood

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Historic Upton Neighborhood

2026 Master Plan

UPC Board of Directors LEADERSHIP

MEMBERS

Darroll Cribb

President

Deacon Myrtha Allen Providence Baptist Church

Atiba Nkrumah Historic Marble Hill Neighborhood

Norma Green Upton-West Neighborhood Association

Cory Brown Domestic and International Planner

Harry Preston Educator

Ernest Green Provident Neighborhood Council

Larry Rosenberg Co-Chair, Bethel Empowerment and Wellness Center

Vice President Mr. James Hill McCulloh Homes, President Resident Council

Secretary Kali Madden Northwest United Protective Association

Treasurer

James Hamlin Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Corporation Avenue Bakery, Owner

Arnetta Simms Etting Street Community Association

Officer Charles Lee Baltimore City Police Department

Wanda Best, Ex-Officiao

Executive Director Licensed Dietitian/Nutrition (MD), MPA

Upton Planning Committee 

828 N. Carrollton Avenue 

Baltimore, MD 21217 

410-646-8744  www.historicupton.com

Upton Planning Committee 828 N. Carrollton Avenue Baltimore, MD 21217

A Jul Enterprise Publication


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