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Tuesday, August 21, 2007 - Page C2 Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - Page 33

All classified ads are charged 20¢ per word. Ads may be emailed to starclassifieds@txstate.edu. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. Classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. Refunds will only be given when a classified ad has been paid by credit card. The Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, and discontinue any classified ad at any time without prior notification. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. Classified ads that do not note heading, will be put under the appropriate heading. All classified ads are published free, on-line at www.universitystar.com. Since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

E-mail starclassifieds@txstate.edu Email Classifieds Classifieds at starclassifieds@txstate.edu

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SIGMA ALPHA LAMBDA, a National Leadership and Honors Organization with over 70 chapters across the country, is seeking motivated students to assist in starting a local chapter (3.0 GPA Required). Contact Rob Miner, Director of Chapter Development at rminer@salhonors.org. $5,000 PAID. EGG DONORS. +Exps. N/Smokers, ages 19-29, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

AUTO 1997 JEEP CHEROKEE, excellent condition, new tires, 12 CD player, $2,600. (512)353-3224.

FOR RENT

ROOM FOR RENT, $150 PER MO. Walk to the university. In exchange for very light housekeeping. (512) 353-3224.

FOR RENT-APTS. LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Walk to class-large 1BD/1BA in block adjoining TSU. 412 Burleson St. Apartments. Tile floors, W/D, $675 mo. James K. Wise Real Estate. (512) 396-8400.

FOR RENT-DUPLEX 939/941 SAGEWOOD. 3BD/2.5BA for $1,075 and 3BD/3.5BA for $1,175. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call (512) 665-3321 for showing.

FOR RENT-DUPLEX

336 CRADDOCK. 2BD/1.5BA for $835. Visit legacyrealstate.biz and call (512) 665-3321 for showing. LARGE 3BD/2BA. Approximately 1,250 sq. ft., 1312 Baylor, $875. 1408 Earle, with new floors & paint, $895. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call (512) 665-3321 for showing.

FOR SALE 1998 OAKWOOD MANUFACTURED HOME. Clean 17 x 75, 3BD/2BA. Includes deck and shed, all appliances convey. Bike to campus. $32,500. Jeff, (512) 363-3696.

FOR SALE

BRAND NEW 14” GATEWAY WINDOWS VISTA LAPTOP FROM BEST BUY. Geek fixed and installed security and teaching discs. Has carrying case, electronic mouse and “Windows Vista for Dummies”. Price $500. Call Louise at (512) 754-6122.

HELP WANTED NOW HIRING: Full-time, Part-time experienced servers, cooks, dishwashers, hostess, in both Cedar Grove Steakhouse and Casa Loma Tex Mex Cantina; located RR 12 at The Junction (Wimberley). Call (512) 847-3113 for info. TUTOR/NANNY POSITION AVAILABLE in San Marcos beginning August 20, 2007, through May 23, 2008. Prefer Interdisciplinary Studies/Education Generalist 4-8 major with GPA of 3.0 or greater. Non-smokers only. Pays $7.50+/hour, plus bonus opportunities. Call (512) 787-7609 for an application. More info on Jobs4Cats #5123. Interviewing now! GREAT JOB! Dependable, responsible, attentive female to care for handicapped boy near campus. Fall and Spring semester, 25 hrs./week. 6:30-7:30 a.m. and 4-8 p.m. $8/hr. with bonuses. Call Jenny, (512) 392-9737. Leave message. ATHLETIC, OUTGOING MEN FOR CALENDARS, GREETING CARDS, ETC. $75-200/hr. No exp. needed, (512)684-8296.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FRONT DESK CLERK WANTED. Duties include: answering phones, reservations, guest check in, and check out handle cash & credit card transactions and guest services. Will train. Math and sales skills necessary. Need smart, hardworking, computer literate, enthusiastic person with common sense. Apply in person at Americas Best Value Inn, I-35, Exit 221, Buda. CRI IS SEEKING INDIVIDUALS TO WORK AS TELEPHONE INTERVIEWERS. Flexible Schedule, Paid Training, No Experience Necessary. Within walking distance of TxState. $7-$12/hr. Call (512) 353-3627x209 today! BUSY RESTAURANT IN WIMBERLEY NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS. Apply in person at 500 River Road between 2-4pm, daily. (512) 847-1320 for directions or juanhenrys.com WANTED DANCE INSTRUCTORRuiz Dance Studio & Co. in Lockhart (20 min. from San Marcos) needs a ballet, jazz, tap instructor to teach Creative Movement, Tap & Ballet Combo and Teen Jazz! Great pay and great students ready to learn from a very enthusiastic person. Please inquire immediately (512)738-2035, (512)376-5153 or aruiz6@austin.rr.com. Send your resume-CALL! TEACHERS NEEDED: PT/FT. Leads, assistants, after-school program supervisor, teachers and PT kitchen help. Education major/experience/bilingual preferred, but not required. Positions starting now and in Fall. Kyle. (512) 405-3700 or fax (512) 405-3701. www.rockinghorseacademy.com

WANTED: San Marcos Baptist Academy, a private Christian school, has the following dormitory and activities positions available. Must enjoy working with 7th – 12th graders in a Christian environment. Dormitory Resident Assistants: Male and female R.A.s needed. Positions may include room and board plus an hourly wage. Night Proctor Night: Proctors needed to supervise in the girls’ and boys’ dorms. Needed 3-4 nights per week with shifts every other weekend. Weekend Discipline Coordinator: Will supervise weekend discipline details. Recreation Assistant: Working in the recreation center and gym after school and on weekends. Includes supervision on activity trips. Life guard certification helpful, but not necessary. Contact Mike Simondet at (512) 753-8110 or simondetm@smba.org

SERVICES WWW.STUDENTATTORNEY.COM

ROOMMATES ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BD/2BA trailer in San Marcos mobile home park. Furnished, covered parking, 10 min. from campus. $210/mo. plus half of bills. $100 refundable deposit. Call (281) 639-8048.

WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell, (512) 353-4511.


Tuesday, August 21, 2007

SPORTS

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SPORTS

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Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Sport of passion takes over San Marcos They play because they love the game, it runs in their blood and it can be bigger than life itself. It’s routine for a few footballers who gather JAVIER GONZÁLEZ each week fueled Guest Columnist solely by passion. Most Tuesdays and Thursdays next to the Jowers Center at the City of San Marcos Public Park, roughly two-dozen footballers (as soccer players are referred to outside of the U.S.) play from the early evening until the day is done and night cuts them off. If they had their way, with the help of a couple of lights, they would never stop playing. Welcome to the wonderful, spontaneous and, at times, completely unpredictable world of pick-up soccer, where

matches can happen almost anywhere, at any given time, at least outside of the U.S. Traditionally, all it takes is four players (granted, you want a two-on-two game), four objects to set on the ground as the goals, a ball and you are set to play the beautiful game. Thing is, unlike formal matches involving a referee and a net hooked up to a goal, these matches are driven by nothing more than the desire to play. And that’s what makes it so insanely easy to play. It only requires a minimum amount of equipment and it should be noted that your playing experience (in terms of years) may not make that much of a difference. When you put your first foot on the field and realize who your teammates and opposition are, you have no doubt in your mind that the only way you’re going to survive is if you play as though you’re

in the World Cup final. Yeah, the games get that intense. The one thing you do need, however, is heart. Having been to a few of these pick-up games myself, the only thing you do not want to forget is your passion. Just like on the streets in France, or just about anywhere for that matter, you cannot hide behind the ref’s whistle. Your feet have to do all the talking. I’m not saying you necessarily have to be fully prepared to slide tackle left and right, or run a marathon in order to be in decent condition to play with the crew from San Marcos. No, though it might be helpful if when you have the ball, you know what you’re doing with it. What you do have to be aware of is that the players who do show up for these Tuesday and Thursday evening games make every reasonable attempt

to play as if tomorrow they would say goodbye to it all. Believe me, when you play with this small group of guys, as I have, there’s no crowd; there are no rules (apart from basic fundamental ones), only an open field and heart against heart. It’s not my intention to scare you away from the beautiful game. No, no, no. Just know that if you ever do find yourself in a situation where you want to get some exercise, have played soccer in the past and are wanting to get “back into it,” there are a handful of guys who would be happy to assist you with a game. The best part of the “Jowers Bunch” is, if you preferred, you can play literally wherever you would like and be as involved as you desire. It’s a simple thing really: the guys who want the ball will battle to keep it, by being the most

aggressive and commanding player they can be. This is why most Americans might find it hard to understand why the rest of the world cares so much about the game. So as the new school term begins, I encourage most any athletically-inclined person to take a few friends, and a ball too, out to the local park and enjoy the only sport played the world over. If nothing else, you can say to your friends, “Hey, I play soccer.” You could even talk about David Beckham, the world’s most recognizable footballer, who now plays in Los Angeles. I’m sure the guys over at Jowers will have an opinion or two about him. Go join them, and at the same time, you can kick a ball around. Just be ready, because they will be. — Javier González is an electronic media senior. He can be reached at JG1337@txstate.edu.

2007 All-Southland Conference Football Preseason Teams and Polls First Team Offense POS QB RB RB FB WR WR TE OL OL OL OL OL PK

NAME Danny Southall Louie Runnels Jay Lucas Blake Burton Steven Whitehead Carlese Franklin Blake Martin Brandon Hale Eman Naghavi Taylor Cobb Brock Pasteur Matt Jenkins Blake Bercegeay

Second Team Offense UNIVERSITY — HT. — WT. — CL. Stephen F. Austin — 6-3 — 214 — Sr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-0 — 250 — Sr. Southeastern Louisiana — 5-11 — 220 — Jr. Texas State — 6-0 — 226 — Jr. McNeese State — 5-8 — 170 — Sr. McNeese State — 5-11 — 178 — Sr. Sam Houston State — 6-3 — 236 — Sr. Sam Houston State — 6-3 — 311 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-2 — 325 — Jr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-2 — 296 — Sr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-6 — 290 — Sr. Texas State — 6-3 — 301 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-2 — 168 — Jr.

First Team Defense DL DL DL DL LB LB DB DB DB DB DB P RS

Bryan Smith Nate Langford Kirby Joseph David Branch Trey Bennett Damian Perkins Kareem Moore Jonathan Walker Tommy Connors Daniel Varvel C.L. Grogan Chris MacDonald Steven Whitehead

QB RB RB FB WR WR TE OL OL OL OL OL PK

Bradley George Zack Morgan Ross Brown Leonard Lynce Quinten Lawrence Dominique Edison Clay Broyles Ben Gombossy James Jordan Crawford May Demetrius Bell Brennan Williams Andrew Ireland

COACHES (1st Place Votes) Texas State — 6-6 — 230 — So. Nicholls State — 5-9 — 190 — Jr. Central Arkansas — 5-9 — 184 — Sr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-0 — 220 — Jr. McNeese State — 6-1 — 180 — Jr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-3 — 200 — Jr. Northwestern State — 6-3 — 248 — Sr. Nicholls State — 6-0 — 300 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-4 — 300 — Sr. Texas State — 6-2 — 305 — Sr. Northwestern State — 6-5 — 263 — Sr. Sam Houston State — 6-0 — 290 — Sr. Texas State — 5-8 — 194 — Jr.

Second Team Defense McNeese State — 6-3 206 — Sr Texas State — 6-1 — 248 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-2 — 256 — Sr. Sam Houston State — 6-1 — 250 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-1 — 227 — Sr. Stephen F. Austin — 6-0 — 212 — Jr. Nicholls State — 6-0 — 210 — Sr. McNeese State — 5-11 — 175 — Sr. Southeastern Louisiana — 6-0 — 195 — So. Texas State — 6-3 — 220 — Sr. Northwestern State — 5-10 — 177 — Sr. Texas State — 6-4 — 215 — Sr. . McNeese State — 5-8 — 170 — Sr.

DL DL DL DL LB LB DB DB DB DB DB P RS

Ray Martin Nick Clark Jordan Stone Ramel Borner Allen Nelson Dominic Cooper Tristan Jackson Marquis Powell Jarrod Dale Travis Williams Johnny Thacker James Paul Tristan Jackson

Northwestern State — 6-0 — 223 — Sr. Texas State — 6-0 — 255 — Sr. Nicholls State — 6-1 — 290 — Sr. Texas State — 6-0 — 305 — Sr. McNeese State — 6-1 — 210 — Jr. Nicholls State — 6-3 — 230 — Sr. Central Arkansas — 5-9 — 192 — Sr. Southeastern Louisiana — 5-10 — 207 — Jr. Central Arkansas — 6-3 — 214 — So. Southeastern Louisiana — 5-10 — 192 — Jr. Stephen F. Austin — 5-11 — 185 — Sr. Central Arkansas — 6-2 — 200 — Sr. Central Arkansas — 5-9 — 192 — Sr.

1. McNeese State (6) 48 2. Stephen F. Austin (2) 42 3. Sam Houston State 36 4. Northwestern State 31 5. Texas State 27 6. Nicholls State 20 7. Central Arkansas 10 Southeastern Louisiana 10

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTORS 1. McNeese State (5) 47 2. Sam Houston State (3) 43 3. Stephen F. Austin 32 4. Texas State 27 5. Northwestern State 24 6. Central Arkansas 23 7. Nicholls State 19 8. Southeastern Louisiana 9 — Courtesy of Southland Conference Media Packet


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

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Veteran defensive linemen will anchor Bobcats one more season By Carl Harper Sports Reporter The 2007 season will feature the final opportunities senior defensive lineman Ramel Borner, defensive end Nick Clark and defensive end Nate Langford will get to line up together as Bobcats. The well-experienced trio has gained enough recognition and respect over the years to earn themselves the title “the tip of the spear.” “The idea of the name first came from coach (Kyle) Tietz,” Clark said. “Everything revolves around us and the whole defense. We have to set the line back two yards so it makes it easier for our linebackers to run and do what they have to do. We also have to get a good pass rush for the secondary so they don’t have to sit out in the island for five or six seconds. Everything just revolves around us and that’s where the tip of the spear comes from.” Coach Kyle Tietz is entering his fourth season as co-defensive coordinator and defensive line coach. His D-line from the 2005 Southland Conference Championship team was responsible for 19 of the 30 quarterback sacks that led the conference. The Bobcats went three games deep into the playoffs, advancing to the national semifinals, before being knocked out by Northern Iowa in an overtime thriller 40-37. “2005 was the best experience that we have had as players,” Borner said. “We know how to win and what it takes because of that year.” The coaches refer to Borner as a solid player who does the “extra things” to get better. He has 75 tackles entering his fourth season; six of which were for lost yardage. He has recovered three fumbles. “I just lift a lot of weights and really work hard on my techniques,” Borner said. “I’m the type of player who is always ready and is dedicated to the cause.” Clark has taken care of the right defensive-end position for 36 straight games as a Bobcat. He has never missed a start and has posted 121 tackles, including 18 for lost yards. Not only has his enduring strength kept him healthy enough to play every game, but his intelligence has paid off in the classroom. Clark received his undergraduate degree Aug. 11, carrying a 3.77 grade point average, with a major in math and a minor in physics. Clark will begin his master’s degree program in physics this month. “I’ve worked hard in the weight room and have conditioned hard,” Clark said. “I’m blessed to not have any injuries.” Clark is a candidate for the National Football Foundation’s Vincent dePaul Draddy Award, which is considered to be the “Academic Heisman” of college football. “In any sport or anything you do in life, if you have someone intelligent doing it, that’s a great thing,” Coach Brad Wright said. “I wish we had a full team of them,” Wright said as he laughed.

Due to his speed and effort, Langford has been described as “a warrior” by his coaches. He has 99 tackles –– nine of them for lost yards –– and 5.5 quarterback sacks. “I just play hard and go hard every snap,” Langford said. “These two guys (Borner and Clark) that I play with are my buddies and we have a good time on the field. We all came in together and have been through ups and downs together. We’re pretty close and its fun playing with players that you are close with because you can trust them and they can trust you.”

The three defensive seniors said they are excited for their side of the ball this year and believe this squad will get them back into the playoffs. “Last year we weren’t defensively solid in the build up positions,” Clark said. “We had a lack of experience because there were a lot of young guys in those positions. But now they have a year under their belt and they know how everything goes. I think we’ll be right back on top this year.” With this season being his first as head coach, Wright said he is relieved there is already great

leadership and experience coming from different angles of the team. “Anytime you have a group of seniors that are leading the defense you’re excited about it. If you look back at the history of this conference, the two things that have been consistent with championship teams are a good quarterback and a good defensive line. We have three guys who have started together and will end together here,” Wright said. “Their teammates think highly of them and they do the job out on the field and in the classroom.”

Monty Marion/Star photo A STRONG DEFENSE: Linemen Nick Clark, Nate Langford and Ramel Borner call themselves the “Tip of the Spear” of the Texas State defense.

Football fanatics rejoice, it’s almost time again So that new scorelikely won’t repeat the board out there looks success of the playoff pretty sharp. Actually run they had a couple it’s about time Bobcat years ago. That being Stadium got a couple said, this team will of bells and whistles definitely be better added to it. Over the than last year. I had the last few weeks, as I’ve opportunity to talk to driven by and watched GABE MENDOZA Coach Wright during Star Columnist them building the new the spring, and any scoreboard, I’ve been skepticism I had about getting more and more excited this being his first time heading about the upcoming football up his own college program was season. I don’t even care about wiped away. Brad Wright knows last season’s disappointing 5-6 football, period. I’m looking overall record, or the transiforward to the way he runs this tion to a new style Coach Brad team and I’m looking forward Wright will have to get his playto a full season with Bradley ers used to. I am writing this George at quarterback. Last column knowing this year’s season, he showed flashes of squad will go through some what he is capable of when he growing pains. This year’s team took over the starting role for

Chase Wasson, and with some minutes under his belt, and full reps with the first team during camp, he should be more consistent and well rounded. The schedule should be fun, too. In addition to the teams we’ve grown to love to hate, the non-conference schedule shows some interesting match-ups. The Bobcats open with nationally-ranked Cal Poly at home, a team they defeated in the playoffs not too long ago, and later they face a Big 12 team they may actually have a shot at beating. Plus, with the game being just up the road at Baylor, a decent Texas State fan turnout should make our presence felt. To be honest, even if the team is a major disappointment

the latest STRAIGHT TO YOU the university star

on the field, I, for one, still plan on having a great time this season at each and every game. I remember the atmosphere and buzz this team created on campus just two seasons ago when they pushed through the playoffs. I remember how much fun I had at the last game of the season, even though the result wasn’t at all what we hoped for. The entire campus was a football party and the stadium was ablaze. Every cheer and chant from the crowd was chilling and for a minute, we all saw what kind of support the students at Texas State are capable of providing. It’s that kind of excitement I’m hoping to see again this year, and it shouldn’t take as long as it did. Ask the

students that tailgate every week and that are in the stands for every game and they’ll tell you, no matter what kind of year the team is having, they’re going to make every Saturday a football Saturday. The football program here at Texas State is on its way up and the students are getting more into it with every passing season. With the constant uproar of people demanding Texas State move up to Division I Football Championship Series, this is as good a time as any to show that we’re capable of supporting a

major program. In the spring, President Trauth and Athletic Director Larry Teis started working with an exploratory committee to investigate the feasibility of such a move. How much do you think attendance plays into that? A complete season of sustained full-stadium games is vital to the growth of the program. Either way, I’ll be there with my friends and I’ll be having a good time, because if there’s one thing I’ve learned about what it means to be a Bobcat, it’s that win or lose, we know how to party…


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SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Sports Briefs

Former Bobcat wins silver

Ex-Northern Colorado punter convicted

Texas State alumnus Mike Hazle notched the first Pan American Games medal of his career, winning silver at the XV Games July 28. Hazle registered just three marks on his six throws in the event but his third mark proved good enough for a medal. His throw of 75.33 meters (247.15 feet) on his fifth attempt moved him into second place. Cuba’s Guillermo Martinez had a throw of 77.66 meters (254.79 feet) on his fifth attempt and won the gold medal. Rounding out the top three was Brazil’s Alexon Maximiano with a throw of 75.04 meters. Hazle, a 2002 graduate of Southwest Texas State, earned his trip to the Pan American Games after placing second at the USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in June. Hazle currently lives at the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif., where he is a full-time Resident Athlete.

A jury in Greeley, Colo. convicted Mitch Cozad, former backup punter at Northern Colorado, of second-degree assault Aug. 9. Cozad, 22, faces up to 16 years in a Colorado prison for the attack on starting punter Rafael Mendoza. He was acquitted of the more serious charge of attempted first-degree murder. Defense attorney Joseph Gavaldon said he would appeal, arguing another student stabbed Mendoza on the night of Sept. 11, not Cozad. He said he advised Cozad to stay strong and told him, ‘‘This is not over.’’ Texas State played host to Northern Colorado Sept. 16 in the first game following the attack. The Bears defeated the Bobcats 14-13 with neither Cozad nor Mendoza in uniform. The attempted murder charge could have meant a sentence of up to 48 years.

Alumna invited to USA softball camp

Alstott out for year, career in jeopardy

Former Bobcat softball star Kristen Zaleski was named one of 32 invitees for the upcoming Women’s National Team Olympic Selection Camp scheduled for September 10-14 in Chula Vista, Calif. The 17 players selected for the national team could have a historic opportunity in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, as the Games mark the last time until at least 2016 that softball will be considered an Olympic sport. Zaleski, who holds numerous Texas State singleseason and career records, currently plays for the Rockford Thunder of the National Pro Fastpitch League. She ranks among the league leaders for the 2007 season in hits, average and stolen bases and has finished in the top four in each of those categories since 2004. The roster for the 2008 USA Softball Women’s National Team will be announced Sept. 17 and the selected team will begin training together in late September.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers fullback Mike Alstott won’t play this season and may never play professional football again. Alstott announced in an emotional and at times tearful press conference Aug. 9 a neck injury has forced him onto the Bucs’ injured-reserve list, a move that will make him ineligible to play in 2007. The six-time Pro Bowler said he hasn’t decided whether he will retire, however he may not have a choice. “I just want to tell everybody right now: I was ready to play football this year,” Alstott said. “I was ready to play football this year.” Alstott, 33, entered training camp as the Bucs’ starting fullback, but as preseason practices wore on, soreness in his neck persisted. Alstott said an MRI exam and other tests over recent days showed stress to his neck above a repaired area where he underwent career-threatening surgery in 2003 to fuse vertebrae. Because Alstott was placed on injured-reserve and has not retired, he will get his one-year salary of about $1.5 million.

Penny, Shaq reunited Veteran swingman Anfernee “Penny” Hardaway signed a contract with the Miami Heat August 9, reuniting him with former teammate Shaquille O’ Neal. The 36-year-old guard/forward has been out of the NBA since knee problems limited him to just four games with the New York Knicks during the 2005-06 season. “Penny is a player who has been an all-star and had an illustrious career,” Coach Pat Riley said on Miami‘s Web site. “He is a skilled player who can help us at multiple positions (and) we have been impressed with his hard work and dedication this summer.” In 13 NBA seasons with New York, Orlando and Phoenix, Hardaway, a four-time all-star starter, averaged 15.4 points, 4.5 rebounds and 5.1 assists.

Rooney breaks foot Manchester United and England forward Wayne Rooney suffered a fractured left foot in the 0-0 draw against Reading Aug. 12. He could be out for two months, and will be unavailable for United’s upcoming Premier League matches against Portsmouth and Manchester City, plus England’s friendly with Germany Aug. 22. The 21-year-old Rooney was injured in United’s Premier League opener when Reading’s Michael Duberry accidentally landed on his foot. — Compiled from various news sources

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SPORTS

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PREVIOUS NAME

}

NEW NAME Football Bowl Subdivision

I-A (acronym for NCAA manual use)

} } }

Bowl Championship Series

}

Same

Division I-AA

}

NCAA Football Championship Subdivision

I-AA (short hand)

}

Football Championship Subdivision

IAA (acronym for NCAA manual use)

}

FCS

NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship

}

NCAA Division I Football Championship

Division I-AA Football Committee

}

Division I Football Championship Committee

Division I (all other sports)

}

Same

Division I-A I-A (short hand)

Graphic courtesy of Texas State Football

Bowl Subdivision FBS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Division I name change “Division I, by June 1” has been a misleading chant endlessly heard from the chorus of advocates for the Texas State football team to join other big-time college football programs. As of Dec. 15, the previous classifications of Division I-A, I-AA, and I-AAA were scrapped in favor of a less-confusing designation. Division I-A has been renamed the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision, while Division I-AA is now the Division I Football Championship Subdivision. The names are such to recognize the postseason format under which each system operates. The FBS is comprised of collegiate football programs that compete to participate in the postseason bowl system known as the Bowl Championships Series. The FCS, of which

Texas State is a member, is used to describe the playoff tournament structure which schools compete in to qualify for a chance to be crowned national champion. The NCAA Division I Board of Directors voted August 2006 to pass the initiative in an attempt for more positive implications, simplicity and greater clarity. It helps eliminate the stigma associated with the “nonelite” status of what have been considered lesser divisions of college football (i.e. Division I-AA, I-AAA), in terms of talent. It reduces confusion student-athletes face because many schools have multiple programs competing in different athletic divisions. For example, at Texas State, the football team was previously a member of Division I-AA, while the basketball team was a constituent of I-A. — Compiled by Scott Strickman, Sports Editor


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

The University Star - Page C9

Southland Conference, Big 12 officials set to collaborate By Scott Strickman Sports Editor

The Southland Conference has undergone a number of very visible changes with regards to its football sector this offseason. Central Arkansas football will begin their first year in conference play, new head coaches have emerged at three different schools and many of the in-conference schools have upgraded their athletic facilities. An alteration maybe less apparent, but of arguably greatest impact, is a revamped officiating program that will collaborate, most notably, with the Big 12 Conference. “The Big 12 and the Southland Conference have formed a partnership to share officials throughout all of the season,” said Byron Boston, SLC Coordinator of Football Officials, at the 2007 Southland

Conference Football Media Days July 24 and 25. Boston, who has been an official in the NFL since 1995, was selected to work in unison with Big 12 coordinator of officials, Walt Anderson, in directing the program. “Walt Anderson and I were charged with the responsibility to come up with a program that could integrate officials from two college conferences into a working operation that would benefit both conferences,” Boston said. In doing so, the two leagues will rotate officiating crews between both on a weekly basis. “There will be Southland Conference officials working Big 12 games, and there will be Big 12 officials working Southland Conference games,” Boston said. In addition to the cooperative effort of officials from each league, the Southland is now sub-

ject to the same preparation and training as the Big 12. “The officials have been selected through a pretty restrictive process,” Boston said. “To improve the officiating, you have to develop an evaluation in training process. That’s what we’ve done, is to put together an extensive training and evaluation process… the Southland officials will be in the same process that the Big 12 officials go into.” The advanced technology offered by the partnership with the Big 12 will go a long way toward establishing a more respectable image for SLC officials. “Football officiating has really changed and we have to get the officials up to the speed of the game,” Boston said. “The big thing for the Southland conference is the Big 12 has all the resources. So our officials will now be able to

benefit from the resources the Big 12 conference has.” The hope is the system will improve the quality of in-game referee oversight, with officials remaining relatively anonymous. “We hope that this will translate, for both conferences, into a better product on the field with a better quality of officiating,” Boston said. “We want to make sure that at the end of the season that the best team in the Southland Conference represents this conference in the playoffs. We want to make sure that no officiating mistake determines the conference championship.” Boston said the SLC will be sharing officials with multiple conferences, including the Big 12, the Mountain West Conference, the Western Athletic Conference, the Southeast Conference and the Sun Belt Conference.

“We are getting our guys the opportunity to work more and more games across the country,” Boston said. “That’s the way you get better.” “We’re certainly excited about Mr. Boston coming on and the Big 12 (as well),” McNeese State coach Matt Viator said at the Media Days. “We look forward to working with Mr. Boston and the new officiating situation.” Texas State Coach Brad Wright seemed to be pleased with the efforts at improving the officiating. “Coach Bailiff was very vocal in one area I know, and that was officiating,” Wright said during the Media Days. “I know our people have done an unbelievable job in getting Mr. Boston on board and our officiating is going to get better. We’re excited that this thing with the Big 12 is working out.” Last season, Texas State was

involved in a controversial ruling, as covered in the Sept. 21, 2006 issue of The University Star in an article written by Chris Boehm. In the article, Boehm reported: “Southland Conference commissioner Tom Burnett announced (Sept. 21) an officiating error in last week’s football game versus Northern Colorado, involving a catch made by wide receiver Morris Crosby. Crosby was ruled out-of-bounds at the Bears’ three-yard line after catching a Bradley George pass with the Bobcats trailing 7-0 late in the first half. On the play Crosby dove into the end zone for an apparent touchdown before the score was called back. Stan Zwinggi fumbled on the next play, which Northern Colorado picked up in the end zone for a touchback. The Bears went on to win the game 14-13.”

New coaching style for Cowboys could spell defensive success By David Aldridge The Philadelphia Inquirer SAN ANTONIO, Texas — It’s a fairly good bet that during training camp, Bill Parcells would not have a news conference inside a corporate tent, with fans invited in to watch and sit amicably while a car-dealer representative gushed about some new team-sponsored award for the

Texas high school player of the week. But the new coach of the Dallas Cowboys was happy to be there. “I’m an old Texas high school coach,” Wade Phillips said, and that already makes him much different from Parcells, the Jersey guy with the championship rings and the impatience for fools both real and imagined. But Parcells is gone, retired, again.

Ron T. Ennis/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT: Wade Phillips looks at his players during drills Aug. 6 at Dallas Cowboys training camp in San Antonio.

And Cowboys owner Jerry Jones surprised many when he hired the 60-yearold Phillips, the San Diego Chargers’ defensive coordinator and son of former Houston Oilers coach Bum Phillips, to replace him. The conventional wisdom is that Jones wanted a less strident coach whom he could control after four years of the Tuna, and that’s why he chose Phillips over Jason Garrett (now the team’s offensive coordinator), and Norv Turner, the Cowboys’ offensive coordinator during the team’s last Super Bowl run. But the reality is, while almost everyone obsessed over quarterback Tony Romo’s emergence last season — and his botched hold on a potential game-winning field goal in the playoffs against Seattle — it was the defense that fell apart down the stretch. The Cowboys gave up 153 points in their last five games. It wasn’t all the defense’s fault; Romo crashed to earth in December after setting the league on fire in November. But the defense got run over by the Saints, Eagles and Lions in three devastating December home losses. And the difference between a Parcells training camp and a Phillips camp, both in demeanor and substance, is clear. “It’s very refreshing,” said “The Player,” as Parcells called Terrell Owens last season. Owens, brought to Dallas by Jones for $25 million, had no relationship with Parcells but has no issues with Phillips, who brought in veteran coach Ray Sherman to work with Owens and

his fellow receivers. Phillips doesn’t usually speak loudly, but he’s no shrinking violet. On Saturday, he profanely jumped two players who were late for a special-teams walkthrough, and made them apologize to the team after practice. “Wade is not going to sit there and yell at you and berate you to your face and make you feel like a kid,” Romo said. “But what he will do is he’ll be a football coach, and treat you like a man, and if you don’t do the same, he’ll just get rid of you.” Phillips continually says he doesn’t want to compare himself with Parcells, and many of Parcells’ former players are also reluctant to criticize his methods and demeanor. “It’s not about showing Bill up or anything like that,” linebacker Akin Ayodele said. “If you look at how it was before Bill came, the team was undisciplined. Guys were everywhere. ... If not for Bill, it might have been a different team that Wade had to take over. The foundation has been set by Bill.” But Phillips’ 3-4 defense differs dramatically from Parcells’. Phillips dials up blitzes from everywhere, including zone blitzes that Parcells rarely used. That could be of great benefit to players like third-year defensive end DeMarcus Ware. Under Phillips, the Chargers’ defense had 136 sacks in three seasons, including a league-high 61 last season. San Diego linebacker Shawne Merriman led the NFL with 17 sacks.

“It’s a whole lot better,” Ware said. “Because now the defense is a little bit more aggressive. You get to move around a little bit, which creates mismatches and stuff.” Phillips developed his aggressive defensive philosophy in Philadelphia, where he got his first pro coordinator’s job in 1986 under Buddy Ryan. Ryan taught the 46 defense to Phillips, and Phillips –– with a young Jeff Fisher, then the Eagles’ secondary coach –– taught it to his young, soon-to-be-dominant players. “I came to Philadelphia because I wanted to learn the 46,” Phillips said. “Buddy was the kind to just draw it up on the board and say, ‘Hey, you guys all need to know what to do.’ We had to come up with the ways to do it and the rules to do it and so forth.” And Phillips still has elements of the 46 defense in his 3-4 schemes. So, if you watch the Cowboys this season and start seeing linebackers and safeties overloading on one side like Seth Joyner and Wes Hopkins used to do, you’re not dreaming. Bottom line: Phillips is not Parcells, but he’s nobody’s puppet. “Every team has a different style,” Owens said. “Every coach has a different style. That’s the difference in Coach Wade and Coach Parcells. I’ve heard people saying that we’re having a cupcake camp. But I’ve been in camps where this is a similar routine that I’ve been through, and we’ve been successful with this.”


Page C10 - The University Star

SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Leagues

Flag Football Pre-Season Flag Football Volleyball Pre-Season Volleyball Soccer Pre-Season Soccer Bowling Singles Tournaments

Fantasy Football Inner-tube Water Polo Golf Tournament Fantasy Basketball Tennis Singles Racquetball Singles 3-on-3 Basketball Dodgeball

Captain’s Response

The University Star - Page C11

Entries Due

Entry Fee

Sept. 6

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Sept. 27

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Oct. 4

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Oct. 4

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Oct. 12

Oct. 14

TBA

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TBA

TBA

Enter by:

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Play Begins Sept. 10

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Sept. 16 Oct. 1

Oct. 5

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Oct. 4

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INTRAMURAL

SPORTS

SCHEDULE F∙A∙L∙L

2007


SPORTS

Page C12 - The University Star

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Olympic pride?

Tragedy to Triumph

1.5 million people forced to relocate in wake of Games

Iraqi soccer team wins its first Asian Cup By Hannah Allam Mike Drummond McClatchy Newspapers

BAGHDAD — The players wore black armbands to remember the victims of a car bombing. The electricity went out, as usual, at the most exciting moments of the match. Baghdad was under a citywide curfew for fear of insurgent attacks on sports fans. And all of that was forgotten the instant the Iraqi national soccer team won its first Asian Cup championship July 29 in a fairytale 1-0 upset of heavily favored Saudi Arabia. As the Iraqi players wept and danced with joy on a soccer field in the Indonesian capital of Jakarta, their countrymen rejoiced at perhaps the rarest of Iraqi experiences: a happy ending. “Our gallant youths fulfilled their vows to their country and people,” said Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki

in a televised speech after the game. “They were able to portray Iraq beautifully, in all its shades, and bring a smile of hope to their people. They are a stark contrast to those who lurk in dark corners to plant death and sorrow among the innocent.” Patriotic music filled the airwaves. Children with their faces painted red, black and green, the colors of the Iraqi flag, pelted their neighbors with candies. Families made plans to slaughter sheep or chickens for feasts. Vendors sold out of the T-shirt that emphasizes unity over sectarianism with the slogan, “I am Iraqi.” Even the country’s politicians managed to set aside their squabbles as they crammed onto sofas to watch in the living room of Deputy Prime Minister Barham Saleh’s elegant villa in the capital’s Green Zone compound. There were enough Cabinet ministers to make a quorum, and a handful of senior

American and British diplomats joined them in cheering on the home team. Then, just a few minutes into the game, the power went off. The crowd, dapper in business suits and ties, groaned in the manner of lessprivileged Iraqis for whom such power cuts are an everyday occurrence. “This is the government!” said Saleh, jokingly, as he waved his arms in mock exasperation. “Tomorrow, we’ll bring the minister of electricity to parliament and interrogate him!” cracked an Iraqi legislator. The Iraqis played aggressively but missed many scoring opportunities. About 71 minutes into the game, star forward Hawar Mullah Mohammed arched the ball on a corner kick, and captain Younis Mahmoud slammed a header past the goalkeeper into the back of the Saudi goal. The team’s Brazilian

Leila Fadel/MCT HOPEFUL GOAL: Iraqi soccer players look out from the bus as they arrive Aug. 3 in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq defeated Saudi Arabia 1-0 to capture the country’s first-ever Asian Cup championship July 29.

The Yomiuri Shimbun coach grabbed the front of his shirt, imploring the Iraqis to “play with your heart.” They went on to deny Saudi Arabia an unprecedented fourth Asian Cup title. “I will bow to the ground and kiss the feet of those who brought us the Asian Cup,” read one of hundreds of text messages posted on the crawl of a local TV channel. In marshy southern villages, mountainous northern towns and the battle-scarred neighborhoods of the capital, elated Iraqis pumped bullets into the air in defiance of government and clerical bans on celebratory gunfire. In Baghdad, a few daring celebrants broke the curfew and piled into beat-up cars to cruise until the police stopped them. Others skirted the 14-hour ban on vehicles by roaming the streets on bicycles and scooters festooned with huge banners. In many homes, Iraqis gasped as their TV sets showed scenes that were unimaginable only a month ago: Kurds raised the Iraqi flag in their mostly autonomous northern region, men stripped off their shirts and ran half-naked in southern holy cities, women who usually stay indoors for protection stayed out past sunset. Whether because of the curfew’s restrictions or the stepped-up vigilance by security forces, no major bombings were reported after the match. Stray bullets killed at least two people and injured more than 40, police said. “People are chanting and shouting,” said Haider Mahmoud, 31, a resident of the southern city of Kut. “I heard them yelling, ‘No, no to terrorism! Let them blow up, but we will continue celebrating!’“ “I can’t describe my feelings because I’ve never had such a great feeling,” said Qusai Hadi, 31, from Basra, a largely Shiite Muslim city in southern Iraq. “Those players planted happiness in every Iraqi’s heart. I wish I could kiss them, one by one. ... I hope this happiness lasts forever.” (Leila Fadel contributed, along with McClatchy Newspapers special correspondents Laith Hammoudi, Hussein Khalifa and Sahar Issa.)

BEIJING — Shortly after midnight July 21, Teng Honglian, who was sleeping in the dorm of a clothing manufacturer in Daxing Ward in southern Beijing, suddenly found herself surrounded by men bearing flashlights who had broken into the facility. Before she knew what was happening, Teng and three female relatives were being abducted. Teng, 35, who was five months pregnant, cried out for help, but the men, who did not speak a word, grabbed the women by their necks and forced them into a car with false number plates. They drove for about an hour before the car stopped and the women were ordered to get out. Teng and her relatives walked home and arrived shortly after 7 a.m. They were stunned by what they saw — the two-story dorm in which they had been sleeping a few hours earlier had been half destroyed. They had been asked to move out of the dorm in May so the area could be redeveloped, but had refused to do so on the ground that the building’s contract still had 12 years to run. Teng’s husband, Wang Daoyong, 34, the factory owner, was in another building that night. He called the police after seeing his building being demolished by power shovels. The police arrived 20 minutes later and stopped the demolition. However, Wang, believing his wife and relatives were buried under the rubble, was frantic with worry. In Beijing, breakneck redevelopment continues unabated. Modern high-rise buildings are sprouting up at a furious speed as developers destroy people homes and businesses. Forced evictions, banned by the central government, are often carried out by developers. During the Summer Games, the Chinese authorities are keen to show the world a “beautiful Beijing,” and are currently cleaning up the streets by removing street vendors, among other moves. The Geneva-based Center on Housing Rights and Eviction, a nonprofit organization, released a report in June saying that 1.5 million people, or about 10 percent of the city’s population, had been evicted due to redevelopment for the Beijing Olympics. The Chinese government immediately refuted the allegation, saying it was baseless. However, there seems to be no early end in sight for the misery engendered by such evictions. A man in his 50s still lives in a demolished residential area near the capital’s airport, because the amount of compensation being offered to him is not enough to enable him to move to a new area. “I like the Olympics, but I don’t like losing my house,” he said.

08 21 2007 Section C  
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