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University of Jyväskylä

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT GUIDE Academic year 2011-2012

Editor: Cover: Photos:

Emilia Tolvanen PIGME Petteri Kivimäki, Solja Ryhänen, Tuukka Rönkkö, Antti Soini, Marja Tepponen


CONTENTS 1. THIS IS FINLAND................................................................................................................................................ 4 2. THIS IS JYVÄSKYLÄ .......................................................................................................................................... 8 3. UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ ........................................................................................................................... 9

4. 5. 6.

7.

8.

3.1. Faculties and Departments ............................................................................................................................................... 9 3.2. International Cooperation in Education............................................................................................................................. 10 3.3 Academic Calendar............................................................................................................................................................ 10 3.4. System of Studies ............................................................................................................................................................. 10 3.5. Registration ....................................................................................................................................................................... 14 3.6. Student Card ..................................................................................................................................................................... 16 3.7. Study Counselling ............................................................................................................................................................. 17 3.8. Certificates and Transcipts ............................................................................................................................................... 17 3.9. Services Provided by the University ................................................................................................................................. 18 3.10. Students with Special Needs……………………………………………………………………………………………….…….21 3.11. International Office .......................................................................................................................................................... 21 3.12. The Student Union (JYY) ................................................................................................................................................ 22 3.13. Subject Associations ....................................................................................................................................................... 23 3.14. Alumni Activities .............................................................................................................................................................. 23 HOW TO GET TO JYVÄSKYLÄ .......................................................................................................................... 24 LIVING EXPENSES AND HOUSING .................................................................................................................. 26 5.1. Cost of Living .................................................................................................................................................................... 26 5.2. Housing ............................................................................................................................................................................. 27 FINNISH STATE REGULATIONS ........................................................................................................................................... 31 6.1. Visa and Residence Permit .............................................................................................................................................. 31 6.2. Work Permit ...................................................................................................................................................................... 32 6.3. Taxation ............................................................................................................................................................................ 33 TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION ............................................................................................................. 34 7.1. Railways ........................................................................................................................................................................... 34 7.2. Long-Distance Coaches and Buses ................................................................................................................................. 35 7.3. Local Buses ...................................................................................................................................................................... 36 7.4. On Foot and by Bike ......................................................................................................................................................... 37 7.5. Taking a Taxi .................................................................................................................................................................... 37 7.6. By Car in Finland .............................................................................................................................................................. 38 7.7. Travelling Abroad.............................................................................................................................................................. 38 7.8. Telephones ....................................................................................................................................................................... 39 7.9. Post & Post Offices ........................................................................................................................................................... 40 7.10. Money & Banks............................................................................................................................................................... 40 7.11. Lost &Found ................................................................................................................................................................... 42 7.12. TV and Radio Programmes ............................................................................................................................................ 42 HEALTH CARE AND OTHER SOCIAL SERVICES............................................................................................ 43 8.1. YTHS—The Finnish Student Health Service .................................................................................................................... 43

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8.2. Pharmacies....................................................................................................................................................................... 45 8.3. Emergency Cases ............................................................................................................................................................ 45 8.4. Emergency Telephone Numbers...................................................................................................................................... 46 8.5. In Case of Crisis ............................................................................................................................................................... 46 8.6. Insurance .......................................................................................................................................................................... 47 8.7. Drugs ................................................................................................................................................................................ 48 9. SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AND LEISURE TIME ........................................................................................................ 49 9.1. Sports ............................................................................................................................................................................... 49 9.2. Sauna ............................................................................................................................................................................... 49 9.3. Movies .............................................................................................................................................................................. 50 9.4. Theatres ........................................................................................................................................................................... 50 9.5. Art, Museums and Exhibitions .......................................................................................................................................... 51 9.6. Libraries ............................................................................................................................................................................ 51 9.7. Live Music and Concerts .................................................................................................................................................. 53 9.8. Hungry, Thirsty, Feel like Dancing? ................................................................................................................................. 53 9.9. Religious Communities..................................................................................................................................................... 54 9.10. Associations and Clubs .................................................................................................................................................. 55 10. USEFUL FACTS ABOUT LIVING IN FINLAND .................................................................................................. 56 10.1. Holidays .......................................................................................................................................................................... 56 10.2. Time Zone ...................................................................................................................................................................... 57 10.3. Electricity ........................................................................................................................................................................ 57 10.4. Weights and Measures................................................................................................................................................... 57 11. TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND ADDRESSES .................................................................................................... 58 11.1. Embassies and Consulates ............................................................................................................................................ 58 11.2. Other Useful Addresses ................................................................................................................................................. 59 11.3. Some Useful Web Sites ................................................................................................................................................. 60 12. THE FINNISH EXPERIENCE .............................................................................................................................. 61 12.1. The Way We Are ............................................................................................................................................................ 61 12.2. A Few Common Expressions ......................................................................................................................................... 61 12.3. Snowbound..................................................................................................................................................................... 62

GENERAL UNIVERSITY TERMINOLOGY: ENGLISH-FINNISH .............................................................................. 63 DEGREE PROGRAMMES AND MAJOR SUBJECTS .............................................................................................. 65 CHECKLISTS ............................................................................................................................................................ 67 DEGREE REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ ........................................................................ 69

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WELCOME TO THE UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ Welcome to the University of Jyväskylä! We are very pleased that you have chosen our university as your study abroad destination. You will be pleased to know that it is one of the most distinguished and fastest-growing institutions of higher education in Finland and provides a genuinely supportive and enjoyable environment for studying. By entering our university you will join a community of 15 000 students from approximatrly 90 countries. We believe that interaction with people from different cultures and backgrounds is an essential part of academic studies and the university experience. We are therefore committed to promoting international cooperation. It is not always easy to adapt to the way of life in a foreign country. This booklet has been designed to help you settle in. It would be impossible to make an exhaustive guide covering all possible situations that could arise during a study abroad period - instead, our aim is to give you an idea of what kind of a university, city and country you are about to enter and to help you avoid some common misunderstandings. We encourage you to work hard and to make the most of your stay in academic terms, but also to try out new things with an open mind and to enjoy yourself. In that way your stay in Jyväskylä will grow into a rewarding experience, both professionally and personally. It is our aim to give you all the support we possibly can, so please do not hesitate to turn to us with any questions you may have. The staff of the International Office is looking forward to meeting you in Jyväskylä!

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1. THIS IS FINLAND

Finland is bounded by the Baltic Sea, the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, and the neighbouring countries are Sweden, Norway, Estonia and Russia. St. Petersburg is only a three hour train trip away from Helsinki.

The republic of Finland is one of the Nordic countries and - in terms of area - the seventh largest in Europe. It is a modern welfare state with a high standard of living, a small and educated population of five million and pioneering high tech know-how. Finns are proud of their advanced welfare system, the high level of education, and Finnish design and architecture. The country and its people have been moulded by the location between East and West. From the 13th century Finland was part of the kingdom of Sweden. In 1809 it became an autonomous Grand Duchy within Imperial Russia and finally, in 1917, declared itself independent. During World War II Finland retained its independence and has since then pursued a policy of neutrality and military non alliance. Finland joined the European Union in January 1995. The head of state is the President, currently Ms Tarja Halonen (since 2000).

Languages The Finnish language belongs to the Finno-Ugric family. There are two official languages in Finland: Finnish and Swedish, the latter of which is spoken by 5.5% of the population. The most widely spoken foreign language is English. You will be able to deal with all your official business in English. Religion About eighty percent of Finns are Christians. Most Finns belong to the Lutheran Church of Finland. About one percent of the population belong to the Orthodox Church. 5


Climate

epic that includes creation stories and the fight between good and evil and is based on ancient Karelian folklore. The writer credited with being the founder of modern Finnish literature is Aleksis Kivi, whose classic epic, Seven Brothers, is a realistic description of rural life in Finland in the 19th century. Väinö Linna, Mika Waltari and the Nobel prize winner Frans Emil Sillanpää represent Finnish literature from the early 20th century. One of the most widely translated Finnish authors is Tove Jansson, whose Moomin-trolls have an international reputation. Among our most modern composers is Kaija Saariaho, famous for her computer music. Finland has had more than its share of internationally known conductors, such as Esa-Pekka Salonen and Jukka-Pekka Saraste. Finland also enjoys a strong operatic tradition, and singers like Karita Mattila, Soile Isokoski and Matti Salminen have established international careers.

Finland is the northernmost country in the world after Iceland, but the climate is not as cold as that might suggest. Owing to the warming influence of the Gulf Stream, Finland enjoys a temperate climate. The mean temperature in the warmest summer months may exceed 20 degrees centigrade and in winter the temperature may fall to 30 degrees centigrade below zero. However, due to the dry climate, it feels warmer than the thermometer actually indicates at all times of the year. Also, as a result of climate change, the winters are becoming warmer. If you are going to stay in Finland during the winter months, you will need a good pair of warm, insulated shoes or boots, a warm winter coat as well as woollen sweaters and long underwear. The year in Finland is divided into four distinct seasons: winter, spring, summer and autumn. Southern and central Finland are covered with snow for an average of four-five months, from November/December until April. Nature is in many ways part of everyday life here. With the vast forests, about 188,000 lakes, and the unspoiled countryside Finland has often been described as “one great national park”. The archipelago to the south and south west of the country, containing around 30 000 islands, is one of the most beautiful marine areas in the world.

Economy Before World War II Finland was predominantly an agricultural country with a rather narrow industrial sector; exports came only from the wood-processing industry. The subsequent development into a complex market economy took place very rapidly. Today, the main export sectors are electronics and other metal industry products as well as timber, paper and chemical industries. Finland is also one of the leading European countries in biotechnology. Certain high tech fields, such as computers and communications equipment have also grown spectacularly: Finland is a world leader in the development of mobile phones and their networks.

Culture Nature has always been an endless source of inspiration for Finnish artists. Jean Sibelius, one of the greatest modern composers, wrote recognisably Finnish music glorifying his people and the Finnish landscapes. Along with the nationalistic painter Akseli Gallén-Kallela, Sibelius fell under the spell of the Kalevala, the Finnish national

Education system The Finnish education system is comprised of a comprehensive school system, post compulsory general 6


and vocational education, higher education and adult education. Most of Finland’s six-year-olds attend voluntary pre-school education in day care centres or special classes. Comprehensive school provides a nine-year educational programme for all school aged children beginning at the age of seven. After completing their compulsory education students may go on to the upper secondary school (three years, ending in a national matriculation examination), which qualifies students for higher education, or to vocational institutions (two-three years, leading to basic vocational qualification). Finland has one of the most comprehensive university networks in Europe with 16 universities, all of which carry out research and confer doctorates. Ten of these universities are of the traditional multidisciplinary type, and six focus on specific fields. Finnish university degrees correspond to Bachelor’s (kandidaatti in most fields), Master’s (maisteri in most fields) and Doctor’s degrees (tohtori). In most fields students can also take a Licentiate’s degree (lisensiaatti) before a Doctorate. Nonuniversity higher education is provided by 27 universities of applied sciences; multi-field institutes of professional higher education emphasising close contacts with business, industry and services. Universities of applied sciences have been formed by upgrading and merging specialised institutions which offered vocational higher education.

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2. THIS IS JYVÄSKYLÄ

stadium, an indoor sports centre with squash courts, training halls, football pitches, tennis and badminton courts and a swimming hall, all within walking distance of the main campus.

“A small city with a big feel” accurately describes Jyväskylä, located in the lake district of Finland some 270 kilometres north of Helsinki. It has the advantages of a small town being comfortable, compact and safe, and at the same time it is a bustling modern centre of industry and learning. Out of the 160 000 inhabitants in the Jyväskylä region almost one fourth are students. The buildings designed by world famous architect, Alvar Aalto, add their own flavour to the cityscape.

The city plays host to a variety of international sports and cultural events, such as the Neste Rally Finland, the Alvar Aalto Symposium, Graphica Creativa and the annual Jyväskylä Arts Festival. A versatile cultural programme including theatre performances, concerts by choirs, orchestras and rock bands, art exhibitions, literary matinees and handicraft events, is offered throughout the year. During the past few years Jyväskylä has become a centre of specialist know-how in important worldwide growth areas, such as energy, information technology and environmental technology. Entrepreneurship based on these areas of expertise is nurtured at the Jyväskylä Technology Centre. As one of Finland’s busiest congress

Surrounded by lakes, ridges and forests, Jyväskylä is a place of great natural beauty. In summer there are numerous attractive beaches in the city, and the lakes can be used for fishing all year round. In winter, there are dozens of miles of cross-country skiing tracks and slalom slopes near the winter sports centre in Laajavuori. The Hippos Sports Centre includes, for example, an indoor ice 8


3.1. Faculties and Departments

cities, Jyväskylä is also developing a strong reputation as an international congress and exhibition centre.

The University is comprised of seven faculties. The faculties and departments are listed below.

3. UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ

EDUCATION: Education Teacher Education

The University of Jyväskylä has played a significant role in Finnish cultural history. It was established as the first Finnish-language teacher training college in the 1860’s and was granted the status of an institution of higher education in 1934. Today it is a top-ranked and dynamic university with a wide range of disciplines, good contacts with local businesses and active international cooperation. The faculties and departments are mainly located on three campuses: the Main Campus area near the city centre as well as Mattilanniemi and Ylistönrinne Campuses on opposite shores of Lake Jyväsjärvi, united by a bridge, some 10 minutes walk from the Main Campus area.

HUMANITIES: Art and Culture Studies Communication History & Ethnology Languages Music

The University offers undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, teacher training programmes and over 120 subject area disciplines within the Faculties of Education, Humanities, Information Technology, Mathematics and Science, Social Sciences, and Sport and Health Sciences, and the School of Business and Economics. Separate institutes include the Agora Center, the Continuing Education Centre, the Open University, the University Language Centre, the Institute for Educational Research, the Institute for Environmental Research, and the Centre for Applied Language Studies. The University of Jyväskylä has received national and international recognition carried out in its core fields of research and education, which include human centred sciences, natural sciences, sport and health sciences and teacher education.

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE: Biological and Environmental Science Chemistry Mathematics and Statistics Physics SOCIAL SCIENCES: Psychology Social Sciences and Philosophy INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Computer Science and Information Systems Mathematical Information Technology

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recommended arrival date:

SPORT AND HEALTH SCIENCES: Sport Sciences Biology of Physical Activity Health Sciences

1 September

orientation programme: 2 and 5-6 September

classes

begin on 1 September (with some variation between departments) and end by 16 December

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Spring semester 2012: 3.2. International Cooperation in Education

recommended arrival date: 2 January orientation programme: 3 - 5 January classes begin on 9 January and end by 18 May Easter Break: 2 - 9 April

We aim to offer our students good opportunities for studying abroad and for internationalisation at home. Therefore, the University of Jyväskylä is active in a variety of international programmes, such as the Lifelong Learning Programme (Erasmus), Nordplus, North-SouthSouth Higher Education Exchange, FIRST and ISEP. We have also concluded bilateral agreements on student exchange with 31 universities around the world. Altogether, the University is involved in student exchanges with more than 360 universities worldwide.

3.4. System of Studies The system of studies in Finnish universities may differ considerably from that of your home institution. The following sections briefly introduce the Finnish structure of studies, the academic regulations at the University of Jyväskylä, the forms of instruction, the system of grading, and the language requirements as well as describe the academic culture in Finland.

3.3. Academic Calendar The academic year at the University of Jyväskylä is divided into two semesters: the autumn semester from 1 September to 31 December and the spring semester from 1 January to 31 May. The lectures usually finish before the end of the semester to allow for an examination period. In addition to the Christmas vacation, most departments have an Easter break.

Student Status International students studying at the University of Jyväskylä can be registered as degree students or nondegree students. Degree students are studying towards either an undergraduate Bachelor’s, graduate Master’s or postgraduate Licentiate or Doctor’s degree. By nondegree students we refer to both exchange students, whose admission is based on student exchange programmes or agreements between universities, and visiting students who apply for entry independently,

Autumn semester 2011:

Intensive

Summer Course in Finnish: 4 - 30 August (registration by 15 June) 10


outside the aforementioned programmes or agreements. Non-degree students are full-time students of a university or college who will join classes at our university for one semester or academic year and have the right to complete selected parts of the syllabus to be submitted for recognition at the home university.

given course/module. In ECTS, 60 credits normally represent the workload of a year of full time studies, 30 credits a semester, and 20 credits a term (in a three term system). Studies are classified, with respect to their contents and their position in the curriculum, into the following types: general studies, basic studies, subject studies and advanced studies (yleisopinnot, perusopinnot, aineopinnot, syventävät opinnot). General studies familiarise the student with the basic principles of scientific thought and research. In basic and subject studies students learn the concepts, theories, methods, problems and results of the chosen disciplines. The advanced studies concentrate on some central, scientifically relevant problem within the degree programme. Research work and the writing of the Master’s thesis take up a large part of the advanced studies.

Scope and Structure of Studies A new two-cycle degree system, consisting of a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree, was adopted by Finnish universities in August 2005. A Bachelor’s degree, kandidaatin tutkinto in Finnish, is composed of 180 ECTS credits and can be completed in three years. A Master’s degree, maisterin tutkinto, comprises of 120 ECTS credits and can be obtained in two years. Within a degree programme students take one or two minor subjects to complement the studies in their major subject. Please note that in Finnish universities the term postgraduate refers to a student holding a Master’s degree or equivalent.

Basic studies Subject studies Advanced studies

Degrees, courses and studies in general are measured in ECTS credits (opintopiste in Finnish). One year of studies refers to an input of 1600 hours of work and corresponds to 60 ECTS credits. It includes lecture hours, exercises, seminars as well as compulsory reading and examinations. In practice, the workload required for obtaining one ECTS credit varies according to the level of study and between disciplines.

at least 25 ECTS credits at least 35 ECTS credits 60 ECTS credits + Master’s Thesis 20-40 ECTS credits

Time Frame for Completion of Studies for Master’s Degree Students The law on the limitation of the study time came into effect in Finland on 1 August 2005. According to the law, the standard completion time for Master’s degrees is two academic years. A student admitted to a Master’s degree has the right to complete the degree at the latest within two additional years of the designated study time. It is possible for the student to register as absent for a

The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), which was developed by the European Commission to provide common procedures to guarantee the full transferability of credits for university studies abroad, is used throughout the University in transcripts, faculty guides and course catalogues. ECTS credits are a value allocated to course units which describe the workload required to complete a 11


maximum of four university terms, and this time is not included in the designated study time.

to study a particular subject as a minor. There are different regulations in different faculties concerning free minors. For detailed information, please do not hesitate to turn to the Head of Academic Affairs of your own faculty.

If the student fails to complete his/her degree within the designated time, the university may grant the student more time in which to complete the degree. This additional time can be granted only after the student presents a purposeful and realistic study plan. If this requirement is not met, the student will lose his/her study right. If the student wants to continue her/his studies at a later date, she/he will have to make a new application for the right to study at the university.

Non-degree students If you are an exchange student or a visiting student, you can choose courses from the curriculum of your host department and/or from the international study programmes arranged at the University of Jyväskylä. However, there are some restrictions that you have to take into consideration: some of the courses may require preenrolment (especially courses including seminars, workshops, laboratory work or other work in small groups) and have some prerequisites that the participants must fulfil. Please note that, as a rule, the Department of Communication and the English Section of the Department of Languages offer courses for those students only who come in the framework of their own exchange agreements. Participation in the courses of the School of Business and Economics, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences and Department of Teacher Education is also restricted. The international programmes are presented on the web pages of the International Office at https://www.jyu.fi/study

What Subjects Can You Study Degree students An individual study plan will be prepared for all degree students who start their studies at the University of Jyväskylä. This will help you determine which subjects to take in order to take a degree. The individual study plan for students accepted to one of the two-year international Master’s programmes (conducted totally in English) will be made according to the instructions given by the programme coordinators at the beginning of the studies. In addition to the core study modules, the study plan will include optional advance-level studies, depending on the student’s major and previous studies.

Courses, Examinations and Grading The most usual form of instruction is a lecture course with a final examination at the end. You have to pass the examination after attending the lectures in order to receive credit for your work. The lecturer usually announces the time and place of an examination during the last couple of lectures. A re-examination is arranged, if students so require. If you fail an examination or cannot participate in it, you can have at least one more try. Exchange and

Please note that students who are not studying in two-year international Master’s programmes must be prepared to study more than one subject if you wish to take a degree. In most subject area disciplines the basic studies are open to all students of the university. You can choose your minor subjects from these subjects (called “free minors”), or you can - after starting your studies - apply for the right 12


visiting students should notice however that examinations can only be taken during the time for which s/he has been accepted. After the exchange period has ended, i.e. at the end of December of May, it is no longer possible to take examinations. Please note also that in some faculties and/or departments it is also required to register separately to a lecture course exam.

identity card. You may only take the objects that you need for writing and erasing to the examination. Other items, such as mobile phones, bags, books, handouts etc., are not allowed. You are expected to be silent from the moment you enter the examination room to the moment you leave it. If you have any questions, raise your hand and one of the proctors will help you. Please note that speaking to other students during the examination is also considered cheating. Students with disturbing behaviour can be expelled from the examination room. A student who is caught cheating in an examination will fail the examination and, in some cases, the home university will be notified. Also note that it is not allowed to look at the examination papers before the proctors have given permission to do this. Please see the examination regulations at the end of this guide for further information.

Another common type of a course is a reading course (also known as a book exam): you read literature specifically agreed on with the lecturer/professor, write essays and/or take a written examination after completing the necessary readings. In addition to lecture and reading courses, departments organise seminars (instruction given in small groups introducing students to independent research), laboratory work in natural sciences, as well as other kinds of practical course and written assignments.

A grading scale from 1 to 5, with 1 as the lowest and 5 as the highest grade is used at the University of Jyväskylä as of 1 August 2005. These grades correspond to the ECTS scale as follows:

Every faculty has at least one general examination day (yleinen tenttipäivä) per month. The required preregistration to an examination varies from faculty to faculty and, in some cases, from department to department. In some faculties and departments you are required to complete a registration envelope and submit it at the department in question at least one week prior to the examination. In many departments and/or faculties, the registration is done in the Korppi web-based registration environment or on the website of the department at least one week prior to the examination. Please visit the website of the department or ask your departmental coordinator for more information. To find out about the dates and times of general examinations, please consult the faculty web sites.

University of Jyväskylä scale

ECTS grading scale

excellent (E) very good (K) good (H) satisfactory (T) sufficient (V) fail

A B C D E FX, F

5 4 3 2 1 0

The following grades can also be used:

pass — fail excellent (erinomainen)

From time to time the identity of students will be checked in the examinations. You should always be able to prove your identity by showing your student card or another

(hyväksytty) - fail (hylätty)

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- good (hyvä) - pass


erinomaiset

you take a DIALANG test available at http://www.dialang.org/. If your academic English skills need brushing up, we highly recommend that you take part in the course “Academic Study Skills”, which is offered after the Orientation Programme, or in the English courses available throughout the year at the Language Centre.

tiedot (5) – hyvät tiedot (3) – tyydyttävät tiedot (2) – hylätty (0)

laudatur – eximia cum laude approbatur – magna cum

laude approbatur – cum laude approbatur – non sine laude approbatur – lubenter approbatur – approbatur – improbatur

Language Requirements Academic Culture

The language of instruction at the University of Jyväskylä is mostly Finnish, except for the Master’s degree programmes which are conducted in English and the courses in the Department of Languages. There are also a variety of international programmes in English which are listed on the International Office web pages and in the handouts available at the beginning of each semester (with detailed information on the course times, places, etc.). In addition to the international programmes, most of the departments offer a few courses and seminars in English every year.

The relationship between students and teachers in Finland is quite informal. Both students and teachers like to consider one another as equals. You are always encouraged to ask questions both in and out of the classroom and to express your opinion on the themes discussed during the courses. The informal atmosphere does not imply, however, that an overly relaxed attitude towards the studies would be accepted. On the contrary, the independent nature of university studies in Finland presupposes that students show initiative and take responsibility in the planning of their studies and in keeping to their own schedules.

Those studying in other than international Master’s degree programmes will eventually need a working knowledge of Finnish (i.e. they should be able to understand spoken and written Finnish) to be able to complete the degree programme.

3.5. Registration Prior to starting your studies you have to enrol at the University. Please complete the registration form, which will be sent to you together with the letter of admission, and return it to the International Office before your arrival. When completing the registration form, please use your name as it appears on your passport. Pay the Student Union membership fee (not required from students in certain exchange programmes) as well and send a copy of the receipt to the International Office. Further information on the payment is included in the letter of admission. If you have sent the registration form and receipt of the Student Union membership fee payment to the university

In addition to the studies in your major and minor subjects, both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees include compulsory language and communication studies. Please see the website of your faculty or programme for more information. The compulsory language and communication studies will also be included in the individual study plan prepared at the beginning of your studies. To find out if your English skills are sufficient to cope with studies in English, the International Office suggests that 14


according to the instructions sent with the letter of admission, a student number will be sent to you by e-mail by 15 August or 15 December. Please use your number when applying for a student card online at http://www.lyyra.fi. Please see below for further information on how to order the card (3.6. Student Card).

Exchange students and visiting students are registered as full-time non-degree students for a maximum of one academic year. If you are interested in continuing your studies at the University of Jyväskylä after your exchange period has ended, please consider applying to one of the degree programmes of the University of Jyväskylä. The deadline for international undergraduate applicants and for most international Master’s programmes is in JanuaryFebruary . Please consult the following websites for more information: https://www.jyu.fi/studywithus and http://www.universityadmissions.fi/

Doctoral students and visiting doctoral students may join the Student Union and apply for a PhD student card if they wish. This should be done when registering to the university. By paying the Student Union fee one gets the right to rent an apartment at the Kortepohja Student Village. Doctoral students are unfortunately not entitled to reductions on trains and buses nor to the services of the Finnish Student Health Service (YTHS). Doctoral students get a small discount in student cafeterias by presenting a certificate of registration or a PhD student card.

Degree students After the first year, all regular students are required to register annually. The Student Union membership fee € 92.30 must be paid before 15 September by quoting the personal reference number which will be sent to you in a letter in late summer and which is also included on your student card. Registration for attendance will appear automatically in the student register in a couple of days after the payment has been made. The registration via bank using the personal reference number is possible only until 15 September. If you fail to register by that time, you are automatically removed from the University register. You may, however, continue your studies after reregistration (the re-registration fee is € 35). There is a separate reference number for those who register late, so please do not use the personal reference number. Details on the payment are given in the letter which is sent to you in late summer. Should you wish to postpone your studies for one or two semesters, you may register for nonattendance and still remain enrolled. Registration for nonattendance is not possible during the first year of studies. Please note that PhD students should register to the university annually as well.

Exchange and visiting students Students arriving in the framework of ISEP, FIRST, UNCEP, North-South-South or the university-level bilateral agreements (Alberta, Asian Institute of Technology, Baylor, Beihua, Bonn, Chiao Tung, Chile, Debrecen, EWHA Womans University, Hiroshima, Hong Kong Baptist, Jaroslavl, Kanazawa, Kanda, Kyoto Sangyo, Macquarie, Mississippi, National Chiao Tung, National Yang-Ming, Osnabrück, Saint Mary’s, WisconsinWhitewater, Pittsburg State, Prince Edward Island, Santiago de Compostela, Regina, Simon Fraser, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, Toronto, Xi’an Jiaotong, Victoria and Youngstown State) are exempted from the student union membership fee. However, these students should also fill in the registration form and return it to the International Office prior to their arrival. NORDPLUS, NORDLYS, visiting and ERASMUS students will have to pay the fee themselves. 15


Those taking part in student exchange or practical training abroad during their studies at Jyväskylä should also register to the university as a full-time students while they are abroad. Students starting their exchange or practical training period in the autumn should register by filling in the ‘Form for out-going exchange students’ (‘Ulkomaille opiskelemaan lähtevien lomake’) at the Office for Student Affairs and Services. Those leaving for the spring semester should register normally at a bank in the autumn by using their personal reference number. Before departure, they should also fill in the ‘Form for out-going exchange students’ so that the Student Register is informed of their study period abroad. There is no need to pay the Student Union membership fee during the semester while you are abroad unless you plan to study or carry out exams at the University of Jyväskylä during your studies/training abroad and unless you wish to use the services of the Finnish Student Health Service (YTHS) or other benefits (reduced prices, right of residency in Kortepohja etc.) brought by the membership of the Student Union. The old sticker will be valid until the end of September (as for YTHS until the end of August).

as accents, in the application. Your JyU student number and a digital photo are required for the card application. You can choose either a Lyyra Card (€ 14,60) or a Lyyra ISIC Card (€ 36,60). Your student card application will be processed after you have paid for the card. If you come from an EU/EEA country, you are requested to pay for the card already before arriving in Finland, after you have filled in the online application for the card. Instructions for paying the card are presented in the online form. You will receive an email when the card is ready. You can pick up the card from the Student Union Office (Building Y1, next to the student restaurant Ilokivi). If you come from a non-EU/EEA country, you are requested to fill in the online application for the student card as soon as you receive your JyU student number, but you should pay the card only after your arrival in Finland. When you arrive in Finland, your student tutor will take you to the Student Union Office (Building Y1, next to the student restaurant Ilokivi) to pay for the card. The card will be ready in 2-3 weeks after you have paid for it. You will receive an email when the card is ready, and you can then pick it up from the Student Union Office.

3.6. Student Card In order to utilise the services available to members of the Student Union (for example discounts offered by the railways, buses and airlines, campus cafeterias, theatres, exhibitions etc.), you should obtain a student card. You can apply for the student card online at http://www.lyyra.fi after you have sent your registration form and the receipt of the Student Union membership fee to the International Office and received your JyU student number by e-mail. Please read the instructions on the Lyyra website carefully. Also, remember to use your name as it appears on your passport. Otherwise the system does not recognize it. Please do not use special characters, such

Degree students may validate the card for each subsequent academic year in the Office for Student Affairs and Services (Administration Building, 2nd floor) or in the Student Union Office after they have paid the Student Union membership fee with the personal reference number. If you would like to collect the sticker for the student card, the student calendar and the study guides immediately after having paid the fee, remember to take the receipt of the payment with you.

16


Ms Merja Lehtomäki, International Coordinator - School of Business and Economics, Ohjelmakaari, Ylistönmäki, Room OHJ10 B153, tel. (+358 14) 260 2977, e-mail: intlecon@jyu.fi

3.7. Study Counselling You can always turn to the staff of the International Office with your questions and problems. If we are not able to help you, we can usually tell you whom to contact. In academic matters concerning a particular faculty you can also contact the Head of Academic Affairs or the International Relations Coordinator of the faculty in question:

Ms Sanna Väisänen –

International Relations Officer – Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Room Viveca412, tel. (+358 14) 260 2008, e-mail: intlaffairs@sport.jyu.fi

Each department has appointed a member of its staff to be a study counsellor in the respective subject. The names of these counsellors and their contact information c a n b e f o u n d a t http://www.jyu.fi/en/study/contact_us/coordinators. Furthermore, visits to different departments are made during (or right after) the Orientation Programme. The study counsellor will help you with all subject-related questions.

Ms. Riitta Kesonen - Faculty of Education Building D on the University Main Campus, 2nd floor, room D 206, tel. (+358 14) 260 1604, e-mail: riitta.kesonen@jyu.fi

Mr Ossi Päärnilä - Faculty of Humanities Building A on the University Main Campus, 2nd floor, room A217, tel. (+358 14) 260 1204, e-mail: ossi.paarnila@jyu.fi

3.8. Certificates and Transcripts Registration certificates are available at the customer service counter of the Office for Student Affairs and Services. Registration certificates are required, for example, when you apply for an extension to your residence permit. Before you get your student card you will need a temporary student discount card from VR or Matkahuolto to get student discounts on trains and longdistance coaches. A registration certificate is needed for this.

Ms Eija Ihanainen – Faculty of Information Technology Agora Building in Mattilanniemi, 2nd floor, room AgoraC 421.2 , tel. (+358 14) 260 2791, opintoasiat@it.jyu.fi; Ms Maija Komulainen – International Affairs Coordinator, room AgoraC434.1 , tel. (+358 14) 260 4602, e-mail: international-info@it.jyu.fi

Ms Marja Korhonen – Faculty of Mathematics and Science, Building D in Mattilanniemi, 1st floor, room MaD 145, tel. +358 40 770 7777 , e-mail: marja.e.korhonen@jyu.fi

A transcript of records in English, containing the information of all the courses completed and the credits and grades received, is automatically sent to all degree students free of charge once a year. Should you need additional transcripts, they are available in the Office for Student Affairs and Services and the Information

Ms Maija Pöyhönen - Faculty of Social Sciences Building C in Mattilanniemi, 1st floor, room MaC115, tel. (+358 14) 260 2804, e-mail: maija.t.poyhonen@jyu.fi 17


Management Centre. Please note that you can also check your credits in the Korppi course registration environment. You can also order an unofficial transcript of credits to your e-mail every time you pass a course. The order can be placed in the Korppi environment.

informed your student tutor of the exact time of your arrival at least one week before your arrival, you will be met by a student tutor at Jyväskylä Travel Centre (railway and bus station). S/he will then take you to your student apartment. If your travel plans change, please keep your tutor informed of them. Your tutor will contact you a few weeks before your arrival. Please note that the tutor and the arrival service are usually available only in the beginning of each semester or a few days before it.

Before leaving Jyväskylä, every exchange student is requested to fill in a departure information form online: www.jyu.fi/en/study/forms/departure_information/. A complete ECTS transcript will then be mailed to exchange students at their home address. Students can also request an additional transcript of records to be sent directly to the home university.

Orientation programme This three- to four-day programme, organised in the beginning of both semesters, is designed to help new international students settle in by introducing them to the University and its support services, to Jyväskylä and – last but not least – to fellow students. The programme includes guided tours and visits to different offices, lectures and social events. The working language of the programme is English.

3.9. Services Provided by the University The University of Jyväskylä offers a wide range of services for international students. These include an arrival service, student tutors (mentors), an orientation programme, a friendship family programme, and the loan of a basic domestic item kits (so called ’survival kits’). Below is a brief introduction to the different services available.

Survival Kits The student dormitories have basic furniture but there are no sheets, blankets or kitchenware. Exchange and visiting students can borrow basic domestics items, so called “survival kits”, against a partly refundable deposit, from the Secretary of the Kortepohja Student Village. The survival kit includes a blanket, pillow, bed linen, 3 plates, fork, knife, table spoon, tea spoon, pot with lid, ladle, mug and glass. All the items are second-hand. The deposit for such a package is € 60, of which 40 € will be refunded if the kit is returned in good and clean condition! Please note that it is not always possible to get the kit right after the arrival. Also, please remember to have the deposit money with you when you collect the supplies. The Secretary of Kortepohja Student Village is on duty in the

Student tutor (mentor) The International Office employs tutors (senior students) for each faculty. Their task is to acquaint new international students with the system of studies and campus life in Jyväskylä and to help them with practical questions, such as planning a timetable for studies and finding the way around the campus and the city centre. Arrival Service This service is provided by the University in order to make your arrival in Jyväskylä more comfortable. If you have 18


Kortepohja C building, Taitoniekantie 9, tel. (+358 14) 60 7213, mobile: +358 50 325 2963, e-mail: kylasihteeri@jyy.fi. Her office hours are: Mon-Thu 15 - 17, Fri 13 - 15.

Borrowing books is free of charge. There are, however, some fees for specific services, such as interlibrary loans, and fines for returning books and other material after the due date.

Friendship Family Programme

Language Centre (kielikeskus)

The purpose of the friendship family programme is to give international students a chance to have first-hand experience of the Finnish culture and way of life in a Finnish family, in addition to life on campus. Through meeting international students, the families also get an opportunity to learn about the students’ home countries and cultures. It is up to the student and the family to decide how often they meet and how they will spend their time together. If you study in Jyväskylä for at least one full semester you can apply to the programme. Please note that the programme does not include accommodation with families. Due to the limited number of families, the programme cannot be offered to all incoming international students. Application forms are available at: www.jyu.fi/en/study/services/friendshipfamily

The University Language Centre offers a wide variety of courses as well as excellent self-study facilities in the Oppio Building. At the learning centre, which is intended for self-directed learning, educational technology, interactive studios, computer laboratories as well as wide variety of material are available for students. Furthermore, the Language Centre also provides study counselling and training in language learning. In addition to Finnish and English courses for international students, we recommend the Each One Teach One programme, in which students – counselled by a teacher – teach one another either their own native language or their language of education. For more information on language courses, please visit the Language Centre web pages at http://kielikeskus.jyu.fi/. Finnish Language Courses

University Library (yliopiston kirjasto)

The University Language Centre arranges Finnish language courses for international students mainly during the academic year. The courses range from intensive survival courses to advanced special courses. The Survival Finnish course is targeted at students who stay only one semester in Finland, or who do not plan to continue their Finnish studies during the following semester. The aim of the course is to learn basic phrases, vocabulary and grammar for coping with the most common everyday situations in Finnish. Finnish 1 is designed for students who stay in Finland for at least two semesters and plan to continue their Finnish studies on the Finnish 2 course or equivalent.

The University Library is the central academic library in Finland in the fields of education, psychology and physical education. It provides literature and other material required in research, teaching and studying at the university, and takes care of other library and information service tasks. You can use your student card to borrow books from the University Library (Main Campus, building B) as well as from the department libraries on the Main Campus and other campuses. For more information on libraries, see chapter 9.6. You can also find out more about the University Library by browsing through the “Library Skills Tutorial” on the Library’s website at http://kirjasto.jyu.fi/. 19


An intensive Finnish 1 summer course is arranged on 4 30 August 2011. A pre-registration by 15 June is required for the summer course. Erasmus students can also apply for an Erasmus Intensive Language Course (EILC). The University of Jyväskylä does not organise an EILC during the summer 2011, but Erasmus students can apply to EILCs organised at other universities in Finland. Applications for the EILC should be submitted electronically to your home institution, which will be responsible for forwarding the application to the EILC organising institution. More information on the Erasmus Intensive Language Courses can be found on the European Commission website at http://ec.europa.eu/education/erasmus/doc902_en.htm.

instructional courses available in a wide variety of sports, such as downhill skiing, afro dance, body pump, and fitness boxing. The university also offers an optional credit course that aims at familiarising students with the different sport facilities in Jyväskylä and with the sports of their choice (2- 4 ECTS cr.). During the academic year 20102011, the fees for the activities were the following:

supervised exercise: € 40/academic year, € 30/semester

unsupervised exercise: free of charge (a few exceptions)

courses: the fee varies from € 10 to € 65 The fees are possibly a little higher for the academic year 2011-2012. The Sports Programme is available at www.jyu.fi/yliopistoliikunta/en. For further information, please visit the Sports Coordinator’s Office in building C, room 128, Main Campus, tel. (+358 14) 260 1062 (Mon-Fri 9-12), e-mail: yo-liikunta@jyu.fi.

Computers at the University Most departments have a computer room for their students. In addition to these, there are computers for public use at the University Library (Building B on the Main Campus), at the Information Management Centre (Building D in Mattilanniemi), in the Agora Building and in the Administration Building (no printing). All international students gain access to the multi-user computing facilities via their user accounts, which are given during the Orientation Programme.

Student Cafeterias There are eight student cafeterias on the University premises: Lozzi, Ilokivi, Musica, and Syke (closed during the academic year 2011-2012) on the Main Campus, Wilhelmiina and Piato in Mattilanniemi and Kvarkki and Ylistö at Ylistönrinne. In these cafeterias undergraduate students receive a discount on the price of a lunch by showing their student cards. The student price for a reasonably ample lunch is around € 2.50. All the cafes on the campuses give student discounts.

Recreation and Athletic Facilities The University of Jyväskylä offers one of the most diverse and exciting sport and recreational programmes in the country for students and staff alike. The sports opportunities range from spinning, wall climbing and snow boarding to the more traditional skiing, aerobics, squash, tennis and different ball games. You can either participate by coming along to one of the supervised groups or by forming a team with your fellow students. There are also 20


3.10. Students with Special Needs

Marita

The University of Jyväskylä aims at ensuring that the needs of students with special needs are accommodated as well as possible.

Elina Isännäinen, Foreign Student Adviser, coordinates

Ekman, International Liaison, coordinates visits of foreign delegations, and is a contact person for Fulbright and DAAD scholarship affairs, room T107, tel. (+358 14) 260 1118; the application procedure of international degree students, recruits and counsels degree students; room T203A, tel. (+358 14) 260 1079;

Universities or municipalities in Finland do not provide any special services for foreign students with special needs (for example interpreting or a personal assistant). Services for special needs are provided only for students who have permanent Finnish citizenship and are registered at their home municipality.

Laura

Laamanen, International Coordinator, responsible for the application procedure and counselling of incoming Erasmus and visiting students as well as for the accommodation; room T208, tel. (+358 14) 260 1032.

Solja Ryhänen, International Coordinator, NORDPLUS,

Some student exchange programmes (for instance Erasmus and Nordplus) include a possibility of obtaining extra funding for costs caused by special needs. Please contact the Erasmus / Nordplus coordinator of your home university for further information.

NORDLYS and ISEP programmes; room T204, tel. (+358 14) 260 1069;

Anita

Saari, International Affairs Assistant, financial matters of the Office, contact person for teacher mobility; room T206, tel. (+358 14) 260 1052;

Tiina

Savela, Student Exchange Coordinator, coordinates bilateral student exchanges and the NorthSouth-South programme; room T203B, tel. (+358 14) 260 1083;

Students with special needs can turn to the International Office with any questions they may have about studying at the University of Jyväskylä or living in Jyväskylä. For further information, please https://www.jyu.fi/en/study/services/special_needs

Kazimiera

Väisänen, International Liaison, coordinates the Friendship Family Programme and the FIRST programme, tel. +358 14 260 1034.

see:

The Office also employs student trainees (tel. +358 14) 260 4144. In addition to the phone numbers listed above, you may contact the Office by e-mail: intl@jyu.fi or by fax: (+358 14) 260 1163. The office hours of the Student Exchange Coordinator, International Coordinators, and Foreign Student Adviser are from Monday to Wednesday at 13-15, and on Thursdays at 10-12.

3.11 International Office The International Office is one of the first places you should visit after you have arrived in Jyväskylä. The Office, located on the second floor of the Administration Building (building T, Main Campus), has eight employees:

The International Office works in close cooperation with the Secretary of International Affairs of the Student Union, (Student Union Building, Y1), room 126,

Tuija

Koponen, Head of International Office, coordinates international cooperation programmes, exchanges and agreements at the University; room T205, tel. (+358 14) 260 1086; 21


academic, social, cultural, sports, development cooperation, environmental and equality issues.

Keskussairaalantie 2, tel. +358 10 423 4503, e-mail: kvsihteeri@jyy.fi.

The main benefits for members of the Student Union include inexpensive health care at the Finnish Student Health Service (YTHS), student apartments, survival kits for exchange and visiting students and discounts at student restaurants, on public transport, in museums, theatres etc. The Student Union edits a student newspaper Jyväskylän ylioppilaslehti (“Jylkkäri”), which is available in several locations around the Campus area (for instance, at the Library) and on the Internet at http://www.jylkkari.fi/.

3.12. The Student Union (JYY) The Student Union of the University of Jyväskylä (JYY, http://www.jyy.fi) is the students’ own organisation. Every degree and exchange student is a member of JYY. The Student Union represents its members and guards their interests and rights in society. It helps in questions concerning studies, accommodation, and getting along financially. JYY also offers a wide range of services and free time activities related to culture and sports as well as international and environmental matters. We encourage you to participate in the activities organised by the Student Union.

Erasmus Student Network A good way for an international student to get involved in the activities of the Student Union is to join the Erasmus Student Network (ESN). ESN is a European student organisation, which was founded in 1990 to support and develop student exchange. To make the most of your stay in Jyväskylä, ESN organises various events, parties and trips to neighbouring countries and in Finland. The most popular of the activities is a get-together called “Stammtisch”. ESN also coordinates Café Lingua, where you can practise your language skills, and Buddy Programme, which aims at bringing together international and Finnish students by forming mixed groups of five to eight students. Despite its name, the Erasmus Student Network is meant for all students who are interested in getting to know people from different cultures. For more information on ESN, please see http://esn.jyy.fi/.

The Student Union maintains, for example, the following services for the benefit of students:

student cafeteria Ilokivi in the Student Union Building,

Keskussairaalantie 2, open Mon-Fri 11.00-16.00, check menu at http://www.jyy.fi/fi/ruokalistat/

restaurant

Rentukka in Kortepohja student village, Taitoniekantie 9, open Tue-Sat 20.00-02.00. When there are events in Rentukka, the restaurant is open until 03.00.

Kampus

Kino, Ilokivi, Keskussairaalantie 2. Show time every Tuesday at 7pm, doors open at 6.30pm. Tickets: students 5 €, others 6 €, www.jyy.fi/ilokivi/index.php?id=197

computer

shop Kampus Data and bookshop Kampus Kirja, Gummeruksenkatu 6, open Mon-Fri 10.00-17.30 and Sat 10.00-14.00; there are also small bookshops in Mattilanniemi and Ylistönrinne Campuses, open on weekdays

Subcommittee for International Affairs (SIA) This Student Union's subcommittee is particularly aimed at international degree students. The subcommittee organises events to inform students, for example, on

social facilities - concerts, movie nights, subcommittees

for various activities and interests, such as international, 22


Finnish job market and academic teaching in English. The subcommittee meetings are also a good channel to find answers to questions and to discuss issues such as healthcare, benefits in Finland, language policy, study programmes etc.

More information: Alumni Coordinator: asta.ruodemaki@jyu.fi Secretary of the Alumni Association JYKYS: pirjo.heikkinen@jyu.fi

If you would like to know more about SIA or ESN and their activities, please contact the Secretary of International Affairs, kv-sihteeri@jyy.fi, or visit the web site http://www.jyy.fi/fi/in_english/what_is_jyy/subcommittees/. 3.13. Subject Associations Students have established faculty, department and/or subject associations (ainejärjestö) according to their major subject. These associations carry out a variety of activities connected both with studies and recreation. For more information about your own subject association, please contact your host department or see http://www.jyy.fi/fi/in_english/what_is_jyy/subject_associatio ns. 3.14. Alumni Activities In English, the word ‘alumnus’ (plural ’alumni’) has come to be used for the former students and staff members of a university or a higher education institution. For more information on the alumni activities of the University of Jyväskylä, please visit http://alumninet.jyu.fi/. International exchange students, graduates and former staff members of the University of Jyväskylä are also welcome to join the Alumni Association of the University of Jyväskylä (JYKYS). To join, fill in the registration form at http://alumninet.jyu.fi/.

23


4. HOW TO GET TO JYVÄSKYLÄ

will arrive at Jyväskylä (Tikkakoski) airport some 40 minutes after take-off. The airport is located about 20 km from the centre of Jyväskylä. An airport bus takes passengers from the Tikkakoski airport to the centre of Jyväskylä (Travel Centre) after each incoming flight. The bus fare is € 5 and has to be paid in cash. However, it is yet uncertain whether this service will be available from July 2011 onwards. For further information, please see: http://www.finavia.fi/airports/airport_jyvaskyla.

The city of Jyväskylä is located in Central Finland, some 270 km north of Helsinki, and can easily be reached by plane, train or coach. The connections are relatively frequent and the journey from Helsinki to Jyväskylä takes 3 - 3½ hours by train. By plane:

You can also take a taxi from the airport to the centre of Jyväskylä. The airport taxi service (a shared taxi) costs approximately € 20 to Kortepohja and € 22 to Myllyjärvi and Roninmäki. The airport taxi should be booked in advance by calling +358 0100 6900. Your student tutor can book the taxi for you if you inform him/her of your exact time of arrival at Jyväskylä airport well in advance. Please note that a taxi which has not been booked in

Most of the flights to Finland arrive at Helsinki-Vantaa airport (about 20 km from the centre of Helsinki). It is also possible to arrive by ferry via Stockholm, Tallinn, Rostock and Travemünde. From Helsinki-Vantaa airport you may continue by plane or bus to Jyväskylä. Should you continue by plane, you 24


advance costs € 35-40 to Jyväskylä. For more i n f o r m a t i o n , p l e a s e s e e http://www.ilmailulaitos.fi/airport_jyvaskyla. Book the connecting flight to Jyväskylä at your local travel agency.

There are direct connections to Jyväskylä, but in some cases you will have to change trains at Tampere. The journey to Jyväskylä takes 3 to 3½ hours. The train fare (one way) varies from € 46 - € 53 (including seat reservation). Unfortunately, you do not get a student discount on trains with the ISIC card (International Student Identity Card). After having registered at a Finnish university and paid the Student Union membership fee, you will be entitled to receive a 50% student discount on trains and long-distance coaches. Please note that the registration is not valid before the beginning of the semester and you are also not entitled to student discounts before this. Please visit http://www.vr.fi for the latest train timetables in Finland.

If you arrive at Tampere-Pirkkala airport, take a bus or taxi to the centre of Tampere (the trip will take about 40 minutes). From the centre, you can continue your journey to Jyväskylä by train or coach. For more information on the connections to and from Tampere-Pirkkala airport, please see http://www.ilmailulaitos.fi/airport_tamperepirkkala. By coach:

From Helsinki-Vantaa airport you may also catch a local bus number 61 to Tikkurila (it takes about 15-20 minutes) and take the train to Jyväskylä from there. Catching the train at Tikkurila cuts down the time of travel to Jyväskylä a little. For the timetables, please see http://www.vr.fi

There is also a direct bus connection from Helsinki-Vantaa airport to Jyväskylä. The trip takes about 4 -5 hours and costs approximately € 47 without the student discount. Unfortunately, you do not get a student discount on trains with the ISIC card (International Student Identity Card). You will receive your Finnish student card only after your arrival in Jyväskylä. For the coach timetables, please see http://www.matkahuolto.com. By train: If you choose to travel by train, you should first catch a bus which stops in front of the terminal building of Helsinki-Vantaa airport. The fare of the Finnair city bus is approximately € 5.90. There is also a local bus connection, number 615 (platform V5351), to the railway station (bus fare € 4.00, night fare € 5.00). It will take some 35 minutes to get to the railway station, where you can catch the train to Jyväskylä. For the timetables, please see: http://www.helsinki-vantaa.fi/to-and-from/bus-andtaxi-service. 25


5. LIVING EXPENSES AND HOUSING

Depending on your personal spending habits (food, social life, hobbies, travelling, books and other study materials, sports equipment, etc.) you should plan to supplement your budget by € 100-300 monthly. Besides, there are always unanticipated expenses for any international traveller, especially if you want to see and experience as much as possible during your stay. Remember that with a student card you will get meals and other services at a student price as well as reductions for transport and cultural and recreational activities (only partly applicable to doctoral students).

5.1. Cost of Living Finland used to be among the most expensive countries in the world, but the situation changed to some extent after Finland joined the European Union. However, Finland cannot be regarded as a ‘cheap’ country yet. The cost of living in Finland is, on average, comparable to the rest of Europe. The total monthly living expenses of a single student average around EUR 700 and will roughly be spent in the following way: Rent in a student apartment Food Transport, leisure and other costs

Please note that there will be some initial expenses, such as the housing deposit (€ 250), deposit for the ’survival kit’ (€ 60, only applicable to exchange students), and the Student Union membership fee (€ 92.30/year, € 45.50/autumn semester, € 46.80/ spring semester). The cost of course literature is

€ 190 – 270 € 200 – 250 € 150 – 200 26


KM-Kirpputori, Isännäntie 1 G Kumppanuuskirppari, Vapaudenkatu 4 Seppälän kirpputorimarket, Laukaantie 3 SPR-Kirppis, Ahjokatu 10 SPR-Kirppis, Keskussairaalantie 1

not very high, since most of the course books can be borrowed from the University Library. The University of Jyväskylä cannot offer financial aid to international students. Thus, you must be able to cover all the expenses during your stay yourself. Below are some examples of what things cost in Jyväskylä:

Please see: www.kirpputorihaku.com/kirpputori/jyvaskyla. 5.2. Housing

lunch in a student cafeteria – about € 2.50 pizza or a meal in one of the cheaper restaurants € 6-15 glass of wine or a beer € 4-6 movie ticket € 7—13 bus ticket on a local bus € 3.00 one-month bus pass in the downtown area € 44 40-trip bus pass in the downtown area € 47

International students are accommodated in the housing units of KOAS (The Student Housing Foundation of Central Finland) or in Kortepohja Student Village. Unfortunately, it is not possible to accommodate all international students in one location due to the difficult housing situation in Jyväskylä. The student apartments are located about 2,5 - 4 kilometres from the University main campus and the city centre. The apartment will be reserved for you from the first working day of the month during which you plan to arrive and the rent has to be paid from that month onwards. The reservation has to be confirmed by paying the deposit by the given date. When the deposit is paid, the reservation is binding. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that you inform the accommodation office immediately of any changes in your plans, so that the reservation can be changed accordingly. In this way you can avoid paying extra rent. Please note that if you arrive in Jyväskylä before the first working day of the month, you may have to stay in a hotel or a hostel.

Please note that there are also several second-hand shops in Jyväskylä, for example:

Centrum Kirpputori, Ilmarisenkatu 2 EkoCenter, Gummeruksenkatu 13 EkoCenter, Hakkutie 9 EkoCenter, Kankitie 10 Estheco Secondhand, Kauppakatu 4 Fida lähetystori, Tapionkatu 12 Kierukka, Taitoniekantie 9, Building C Kirpputori Silinteri, Laajavuorentie 2

Please apply for accommodation no later than :

1 June if accommodation is needed from the beginning of August, September or October

27


1

The Student Housing Foundation of Central Finland, KOAS

At

KOAS offers ca. 3900 apartments all around the Jyväskylä town area. The apartment buildings are located in the suburbs of Jyväskylä and offer an excellent opportunity to integrate with people outside the University. International students are usually placed in the furnished apartments in Roninmäki and Myllyjärvi. Laundry rooms, saunas and store rooms, as well as hobby rooms, are available in the buildings. All KOAS apartments have an Internet connection. The price for a furnished single studybedroom with a shared kitchen and bathroom varies from € 200 to € 300 per month.

November if accommodation is needed from the beginning of January, February or March other times, the application for accommodation should be submitted at least two months prior to arrival.

If you would like to share an apartment with a friend (both having your own rooms), please state the name of the friend in the application. If you wish to change rooms later, a transfer fee of € 55 (Kortepohja) or € 60 (KOAS) will be collected. If you change apartments during your stay in Jyväskylä, remember to inform the Accommodation Office in question about your plans in writing at least one calendar month in advance, otherwise you will have to pay the rent of both apartments for a month. As a rule, it is very difficult to change apartments in the autumn semester, when large numbers of new students enter the University. Also in the beginning of the year, accommodation offices tend to accommodate new incoming exchange students first, before processing applications of students who wish to change apartments. When moving out, remember to inform the Accommodation Office about moving at least one calendar month before, even in cases when you do not pay the rent yourself.

KOAS sends an offer of accommodation by email to the applicant approximately a month before the accommodation is needed. The offer should be confirmed or refused by the time given on the offer. When confirming a housing offer, a deposit of € 250 (€ 400 for families) must be paid to KOAS’s account. Unconfirmed reservations will be cancelled automatically and the room offered to another applicant. The confirmation is legally binding. The deposit will be refunded if no damage or loss is detected in the apartment during the departure checkup. Please note that the apartment should be left in clean condition. Otherwise, it will be cleaned at your expense and the cleaning fee deducted from your deposit. Both your own room and the common areas (kitchen, bathroom and hallway) must be cleaned.

Bear in mind that not only the front door of the apartment but also the door to your room has a lock in it. When you leave your room to go to the kitchen or bathroom, be careful not to lock yourself out. In case that happens, you can borrow a spare key from the Accommodation office. Outside office hours, call the maintenance men. They charge approximately € 10 (8 – 16) or € 20 (16 – 8, weekends) for opening the door.

The KOAS Accommodation Office is located at Kauppakatu 11 A, 2nd floor.. Opening hours are: Mon Tue-Thu Fri 28

9.00-17.00 9.00-15.00 10.00-15.00


Tel. (+358) 10 820 4444 , Fax (+358) 10 850 4411 E-mail: asiakaspalvelu@koas.fi http://www.koas.fi

mailboxes on the ground floor of your building - the mailbox can be opened with your apartment key. The Student Village offers all the basic services: there is a small shopping centre, a party room to rent, a student restaurant, a piano room and several sports facilities. Contact the Secretary of Kortepohja Student Village, kylasihteeri@jyy.fi, to find more about the use of the recreational facilities in Kortepohja.

Kortepohja Student Village Kortepohja Student Village is owned by the Student Union of the University of Jyväskylä. Kortepohja, located about 2.5 kilometres from the Main Campus and city centre, houses approximately 1700 students. The Accommodation Office of the Student Village is at Vehkakuja 2 B. The rent for a single study-bedroom with a shared kitchen and bathroom ranges from € 200 to € 266 per month. A refundable security deposit of € 250 per person (€ 500 for families) must be paid in advance to the bank account of Kortepohja Student Village. The payment details and instructions will be sent to you by e-mail approximately one month before the apartment is needed. Please note that the payment should be made without charges to the beneficiary.

The Kortepohja Accommodation Office is located at Vehkakuja 2 B. The opening hours are: Mon–Thu Fri

13–15 8–12

Every first and last working day of the month: 8–15 Telephone hours: Mon-Thu Fri

The security deposit will be refunded to your bank account in your home country if no damage or loss is detected in the apartment during the departure check-up. Please note that the apartment should be left in clean condition. Otherwise, it will be cleaned at your expense and the cleaning fee deducted from your deposit. Both your own room and the common areas (kitchen, bathroom and hallway) must be cleaned.

10–15 8–12

Tel. (+358 14) 60 7201 Fax (+358 14) 311 1174 E-mail: asunnot@jyy.fi Internet connections through Kortex networks All apartments in the Kortepohja Student Village are connected to the Kortex network, and using the network is free of charge. You need your own computer and a cable (RJ-45 CAT 5 or better) for using the network. Wi-fi connection is not available in the Kortepohja Student Village apartments. A contract for network use (between the Computing Centre and the tenant) is included in your tenancy agreement. Instructions for installing the network are available at http.//www.kortex.jyu.fi/en/. In case you

Most of the rooms are rented unfurnished. Some furnished rooms are available, and for unfurnished rooms you can find some basic furniture in storage rooms. Bear in mind that if you want to change rooms inside the student village, the fee is € 55. Saunas with separate bathing times for men and women are warming up every night in the Student Village. Incoming mail is delivered to the 29


although the kitchen and bathroom are in common use,

need help with installing the network or have other computer-related problems, please contact the volunteer helpers at atkapu@lists.jyu.fi.

each tenant takes care of his/her own things and also uses only his/her own things, unless of course you have agreed otherwise with your flat mate(s).

you should respect the people who are trying to study.

Home Insurance

Have parties in the club rooms, not in your own room! Further information on the club room and saunas from the accommodation office (KOAS) and the Secretary of the Kortepohja Student Village (Kortepohja).

All Student Union members living in the Kortepohja Student village have a basic home insurance through the Student Union. This insurance covers the personal property of all Student village tenants with certain limitations. More information on the insurance and its coverage: the insurance broker Alansa Partner Oy (Ltd.), Jukka-Pekka Nieminen, jukka-pekka.nieminen@finser.fi. Visiting address: Väinönkatu 28 A 8, 40100 Jyväskylä.

When moving out, make sure you leave the apartment

in clean and tidy condition. Please note that both your room and the common areas (kitchen including the stove and the refrigerator, bathroom and hallway) must be cleaned. If the apartment is not in a proper condition, it will be cleaned at your expense and the cleaning fee (approx. € 30/hour) deducted from your housing deposit or charged from you. Also, when moving out, do not leave any personal belongings in the apartment. A fee will be charged and deducted from your housing deposit if you leave anything, e.g. furniture you have purchased, in the apartment.

Students living in a KOAS apartment are advised to check from their insurance broker in their home country, whether their home insurance is valid also during their stay in Finland. If not, you are strongly advised to take a home insurance from Finland or a travel insurance which covers all personal belongings.

Disturbing

neighbours in the apartments must be avoided. Night-time silence at KOAS lasts from 23.00 (11 pm) to 6.00 on Fridays and Saturdays and from 22.00 (10 pm) to 6.00 at other times.

There

is silence in the Kortepohja Student Village between 23 (11 pm) - 07 am.

Rules and guidelines for living in a student apartment

When

We hope you feel at home in your student apartment. At the same time, however, please take the other tenants into consideration and follow the rules and guidelines of the student housing foundation. Bear in mind that :

living in a student apartment, you cannot get away from your neighbours and therefore some extra tolerance and respect towards others come in handy. Keeping common areas clean and avoiding making too much noise are ways to ensure that not only you but also your neighbours can enjoy living in the Student Village/KOAS. The official quiet hours are given above, but it is good to mind your neighbours during the daytime as well.

you

and your flat mate together are responsible for keeping the apartment clean. All tenants must do their share of cleaning the kitchen (including the refrigerator and stove), bathroom and other common areas. Cleaning supplies can be rented from the Secretary of the Kortepohja Student Village (Kortepohja) or borrowed from the tenant committee (KOAS).

Failure

to comply with the rules and regulations may lead to liability for damages or cancellation/termination of the rental agreement. Full compensation is required from the person responsible for damaging of constructions or furniture or for neglecting cleaning. The residents are responsible for ensuring that their visitors also observe these rules and regulations.

you should take the garbage out regularly. Take turns if necessary.

30


6. FINNISH STATE REGULATIONS

mania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom) and citizens of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland do not need a residence permit, but they must register their right to reside in Finland if they stay in Finland continuously for longer than three months. This should be done at the local police station (in Jyväskylä: Urhonkatu 2, tel. +358 71 874 0521, office hours: Mon & Wed 8-16.15, Tue & Fri 8-15, Thu 8-17.30) within three months after entering the country. For registration you need:

6.1. Visa and Residence Permit Students from the EU (European Union) and EEA (European Economic Area) countries do not need a visa to enter the country. If you are a citizen of any other country you must apply for an entry visa at the nearest Finnish Embassy or Consulate.

EU1 registration form (available at www.poliisi.fi) valid passport or another valid travel document (that is,

Residence permit: EU and EEA nationals Whether a residence permit is required depends on the country you come from and on the duration of your stay. European Union citizens (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ro-

for EU and EEA citizens, an identity card approved as a valid travel document)

certificate of your registration at the University of Jyväskylä or Finnish student card

account on the applicant’s means of support 31


The residence permit costs € 45 for citizens of the EU and Extending the residence permit EEA countries. More information can be found at A residence permit for study obtained before coming to www.migri.fi and www.poliisi.fi. Finland is usually valid for one year. After this, the permit Citizens of the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway, Den- can be extended at the local police station at the beginning mark and Iceland) should register at the local Register of each new academic year for one year at a time. To obOffice, if their stay exceeds six months, by presenting an tain a new residence permit, a bank statement of the required funds (€ 500 per month or € 6000 per year) is reInter-Nordic Migration Form (Registration Office, Yliopistonkatu 28, tel. +358 71 874 0331, office hours: Mon-Fri 9.00- quired. Also a transcript of studies has to be enclosed with the residence permit application form. An extension of the 16.15). permit requires that the student is still registered at the educational institution, is a full-time student and has compResidence permit: other nationals leted the required courses in the institution’s study programme. If the student has poor study performance, an extensiCitizens of non-EU or non-EEA countries who wish to stay on of the residence permit may be denied. The application in Finland for more than three months must be in possessi- forms are available at the passport office of the police station of a residence permit when entering the country. An on. application for the permit should be submitted to the Finnish Embassy or Consulate in the student’s country of origin in good time before arrival in Finland. Further information on 6.2. Work Permit the application process and the application forms can be An EU citizen can work while studying in Finland and does found at www.migri.fi. not need to acquire a special work permit to do so. Students from non-EU or non-EEA countries have the right to The following documents are required for the residence work part-time (25 hours/week) without a work permit dupermit application: ring the academic semesters and full-time during holidays when the university does not arrange teaching as such. letter of admission This right is stamped in your passport in conjunction with the initial granting of your residence permit. A student may details of comprehensive health insurance cover also work within certain limits on a residence permit granted proof of means of support for study purposes if the work is practical training included If necessary, a statement of the applicant’s previous stu- in the degree. dies and language skills. Students from non-EU or non-EEA countries need a sepaThe applicant must remain abroad while waiting for the rate work permit if they intend to work more than the stipudecision on the residence permit application. The residence lated hours during the academic term. To obtain a work permit is issued by the Finnish Immigration Service which permit, you need to get a certificate of employment from receives the application from the Finnish Embassy or your prospective employer detailing: Consulate. 32


employer’s name, address and telephone number your name in full and your identity number nature of the work total length of your period of work salary

give your employer a tax at source card (lähdeverokortti). If you stay in Finland for over six months, your income is taxed at a progressive rate. You can obtain the tax at source card or the tax card from the Tax Office - do not forget to bring along evidence of the duration of your studies (a registration certificate). Once employed you must give your employer the tax at source card (if you are working less than 6 months) or tax card (if you are working more than 6 months. This is crucial, because your employer cannot pay your salary before having received the card.

The required form can be obtained from the Employment Office. You may also have to supply a certificate of registration from the University. Work requests can be made at: Employment Office (Työ– ja Vapaudenkatu 58 A Tel. +358 10 604 0149 (switchboard) Office hours: Mon-Fri 9.00-15.45 www.mol.fi

If you stay in Finland for less than six months, you are not required to file an income tax return. Those staying in Finland for more than six months must file an income tax return in Finland. The deadline for tax returns is the following April after the calendar year concerned. The final tax will be calculated on the basis of the tax return form and the information given on it. When leaving the country, please remember to inform the Tax Office of Jyväskylä about the change of your address.

elinkeinotoimisto)

Unfortunately due to a high unemployment rate in Central Finland it is not easy to find work in the Jyväskylä region, especially if you do not speak any Finnish. Therefore, you should not count on finding a job to finance your stay.

Jyväskylä Tax Office (Jyväskylän verotoimisto) Vapaudenkatu 58 A, 40100 Jyväskylä Tel. (+358 14) 413 5301, http://vero.fi Office hours: Mon-Fri 9.00-16.15

6.3. Taxation If you are paid for the work you do in Finland, you usually have to pay income tax in Finland. The taxes payable are determined in accordance with the provisions of the Income and Property Statutes. Treaties ratified between Finland and your home country will also determine your net tax liability. You can consult the Tax Office for information on taxation. Finnish employers collect a 35% tax at source on the wages of those foreign employees who stay in Finland for a maximum of six months. The tax rate is the same for all amounts of income. If you earn no more than € 510 per month or € 17 per day, no tax is collected from the amount. To obtain this benefit, you must 33


7. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION

tickets € 0.50 cheaper when buying them from a vending machine. Tickets can also be bought on trains, but the price is € 3 (€ 6 in Pendolino trains) higher than elsewhere if the ticket office is open at the departure of the train. Note that it is not possible to use a Visa Electron card when purchasing a ticket on the train. A seat reservation is included in the price of a train ticket. You may choose from a range of trains featuring different travel standards and prices.

7.1. Railways Throughout the year, the Finnish State Railways (VR) grants a 50% student discount for both one-way and return tickets. When purchasing and using the ticket you must always submit your Finnish student card, valid for the academic term. If you have not received your Finnish student card yet, you can collect a VR student card at the railway station (€ 8). For that you need a photograph and a VR certificate from the Office for Student Affairs and Services or from the International Office.

Please note that if you want to break your journey, you must purchase separate tickets for each part of your trip. In other words, if you are travelling, for instance, from Jyväskylä to Helsinki, and you want to break your journey in Tampere to visit a friend for a few days, you must buy two tickets: one to cover the trip from Jyväskylä to Tampere and another from Tampere to Helsinki. Of course, if you only need to change trains in Tampere, one ticket (Jyväskylä-Helsinki) will do.

Railway tickets are sold at railway stations and at about 300 travel bureaus around the country. You can also buy tickets online or from ticket vending machines, located in railway stations, with your cash card. You will get your 34


7.2. Long-Distance Coaches and Buses

One-way and return tickets are also sold for groups. A reduction of 15% is granted for a group consisting of 3 to 10 persons. For a group consisting of 11 or more persons the reduction is 20%. For further information, please contact the railway travel service offices (matkapalvelu), which are located at the railway stations in the biggest towns in Finland.

Long-distance coaches are a good alternative to trains. The long distance coach network in Finland is one of the densest in Europe, and the coaches are modern and comfortable. There are two types of long distance coaches: the ordinary coaches (vakiovuoro) stopping at all the bus stops if needed, and express coaches (pikavuoro) which usually drive longer distances and stop only at the places indicated in the schedule.

You can also buy a Finnrail Pass that entitles the holder to three, five or ten days of unlimited travel on Finnish State Railways (the days may be used one by one, that is, you do not need to travel 3, 5 or 10 days in a row). These tickets are valid for one month, and may be purchased at the railway travel service. Students living outside of Europe may also buy a Eurailpass that is valid on 25 railways in Europe.

Students are granted a 50% discount for coach tickets if the trip covers at least 80 km. When purchasing and using student tickets you must show your Finnish student card, valid for the academic term. If you have not received your student card yet, you can collect a Matkahuolto student card from the Travel Centre (€ 8). For that you need a photograph and a certificate from the Office for Student Affairs or the International Office.

It is worth remembering that a passenger without a duly stamped ticket will be charged an inspection fee (€ 80) and the price of the ticket. Also note that you are not allowed to take your luggage to the dining car. Smoking is allowed only in special compartments marked with a sign.

The Coach Office (Matkahuolto), an organisation owned by the Finnish Coach Operators Association, maintains bus stations in the cities and municipalities around the country. Tickets are sold at these stations and they also provide information about the schedules and services. The coach tickets sold at bus stations are valid on all Finnish coaches and buses, except for municipal buses of some cities. Also travel agencies sell coach tickets.

Jyväskylä Travel Centre (railway and bus station) is located at Hannikaisenkatu 20. The opening hours of the ticket office (lipputoimisto) are Mon- Fri Sat Sun

6.00 – 19.45 8.00 – 17.35 10.00 – 19.45

Tickets can be bought before the trip or on the coach. Both one way and return tickets are valid for 30 days if they are bought beforehand. Seat reservations are recommended during peak periods. The reservation can be bought separately or it can be included in the coach ticket.

Further information on VR, timetables and different kinds of tickets is available at http://www.vr.fi.

35


7.3. Local Buses

The express coaches carry a small surcharge. All coaches carry skis, bicycles, and pieces of luggage (an extra fee may be charged). If you need to send a large or heavy package quickly, an express coach is a good and cheap alternative to the post. Packages are delivered from one bus station to another or to a bus stop within Finland. You can use this service by taking the package to the local coach office (Matkahuolto) at the bus station, giving the destination and paying the charge. The name of the person who will collect the package must be written on the package. Matkahuolto takes care of the rest. Packages can also be sent so that the receiver pays for the transportation.

Jyväskylän Liikenne Oy, tel. +358 207 425 800, provides local transport. The prices of single tickets, bought in cash on the bus, depend on the length of your journey. The lowest single fare is € 3.00 and after 23.00 the price goes up to € 6.00. Tickets of all kinds are sold at Jyväskylä Travel Centre, at the information desk of Sokos Department Store (1st floor) at Kauppakatu 24, at Jyväskylä Regional Tourist Information at Asemakatu 6, and on the buses. If you use local buses regularly, you save money by purchasing a season ticket:

Please note that smoking is strictly prohibited on all Finnish buses and coaches. The ExpressBus coaches usually have a lavatory (toilet) and some magazines.

30-day-ticket at € 44 (student price), which is valid for 30

days (you do not have to buy it on the first day of the month) - a good choice if you use buses more or less daily.

A long distance bus stop sign is blue with a white bus on it. The text “PIKAVUORO” indicates that express coaches stop there. It is necessary to signal for the bus to stop.

10-trip card at € 22 and 40-trip card at € 47. The card

can be reloaded when all the trips have been used. The card is valid for 180 days from purchase or until the following August.

Jyväskylä Travel Centre (railway and bus station) is located at Hannikaisenkatu 20. The opening hours of the ticket office are: Mon – Fri Sat Sun

When purchasing a season ticket (called a smart card) for the first time, you must pay an additional € 3 for the card itself. It may be a good idea to buy a one-day travel card for the local buses if you are planning to make several trips in one day (€ 7.50 sold at Jyväskylä Travel Centre, Sokos, and Tourist Information). For more information on all the tickets, please contact Matkahuolto.

8.00 – 18.00 10.00 – 16.00 11.00 – 18.00

Further information and timetables are available at http://www.matkahuolto.fi/.

It is good to know that the buses in Finland arrive almost exactly according to the schedule. A few minutes’ delay might occur in wintertime due to bad weather.

36


Biltema, Seppäläntie 16 Polkypyörätori, Minna Canthin katu 22 B Tekevä Pyöräkorjaamo, Pajatie 3 Huoltopilotti, Vapaaherrantie 2 Pekan rysä, Cygnaeuksenkatu 2 Polkupyöräkorjaamo Rikman, Ilmarisenkatu 7-9 Jyväspyörä, Yliopistonkatu 30 Bike Planet, Vasarakatu 9 Intersport Megastore Tourula, Vapaaherrantie 2

7.4. On Foot and by Bike Most student apartments are more or less within walking distance from the University and city centre. As in any other city, in Jyväskylä there are some restless spots in the downtown area during weekend nights. It is therefore wise to be careful and to avoid walking out alone at night, especially if you are a woman. The next cheapest way to move around is probably by bike (pyörä or polkupyörä). Bikes are sold in department stores and stores selling sports equipment. There are also stores that specialise in bikes. New bikes, even the very simple ones, are quite expensive, from € 250 upwards.

The following firms rent out bikes for a couple of days or weeks:

If you do not know anybody who could lend or sell his/her bike to you, you can try, for instance, the lost property auction (löytötavaroiden huutokauppa) at the Police Station. The auction takes place in the autumn and it is announced in the local newspaper (Keskisuomalainen) about one week earlier. The bikes on sale range from very old to brand new ones. The cheapest bikes cost € 20 and the most expensive ones (cross-country bicycles) around € 350. At the same time you have a chance to see how a Finnish auction works! For more information, please contact the Police Station, Lost Property Office (löytötavara-toimisto), tel. +358 71 874 8801, email: loytotavara.keski-suomi@poliisi.fi.

Rent

@ Bike, Travel Centre, Hannikaisenkatu 20, tel. +358 50 443 3820

Polkupyörätori, Minna Canthin katu 22 B. When riding a bike you should use the bicycle paths marked with a sign. In places where there is no special bicycle path, please use the right side of the roadway, not the sidewalk. You should follow the same traffic rules as motorists. Also, remember to use lights on the bicycle when driving in the dark. Furthermore, we strongly recommend that you wear a helmet.

You can also try putting out “Bicycle wanted” ads to the notice boards of department stores, in the newspaper (e.g. Suur-Jyväskylän Lehti) or use the internet market place of the University at http://www.jyu.fi/tori. Flea markets and recycling centres may also sell used bicycles.

7.5. Taking a Taxi Taxi fares are quite expensive in Finland and taking a taxi is not as common as in some other countries. There are only a few taxi stations in the city centre; for example at the Travel Centre (railway and bus station) in Hannikaisenkatu, the old bus station (next to the market square), and in Kauppakatu next to the Church Park

The following stores and repair workshops sell new and/or used bikes: 37


(Kirkkopuisto). It is usually easier to get a taxi by phone (tel. 0100 6900, € 1.15 + local call charge; from abroad +358 0100 6900). On top of the basic fare and the kilometre fare there is a small extra charge in the evenings, at night and during weekends. A taxi ride from the city centre to the student apartments costs about € 10 – 15. The taxi drivers do not expect you to give them a tip.

following Easter Monday if this is later than the end of March). At other times, they may be used only if the weather conditions so require. The period during which studded winter tyres may be used is restricted because they wear down the road surface. Also note that winter conditions require a different kind of driving. You may loose control of your vehicle if your speed is too high, you brake suddenly, you accelerate too rapidly or you do not turn the steering wheel smoothly. Overtaking also requires special care in slippery winter conditions. If you plan on driving in Finland in the winter, please read more about winter driving at http://www.mintc.fi/.

7.6. By Car in Finland Driving licences issued in other EU or EEA countries are equally valid in Finland. Licences granted in one of the signatory countries to the Geneva or Vienna International Road Traffic Convention are valid in Finland for one year. For more information, please see http://www.poliisi.fi or contact the Police Station at Urhonkatu 1-2, tel. +358 71 874 0521.

Please remember that in Finland the car coming from the right has the right of way! There are GIVE WAY signs on some crossings, but it is best to be cautious and always check if there is somebody coming from the right. According to the law, one must give way to buses when they are setting off from a bus stop. Pedestrians have the right of way at zebra crossings. You should always stop before the crossing, not on it.

Driving a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or intoxicating drugs is a crime in Finland. The penalty for drunken driving is confiscation of the driving licence, a fine and a ban on driving for a certain period. Those guilty of gross drunken driving are usually sentenced to prison for 3 months. The police set up roadblocks from time to time to carry out spot checks on drivers.

Self service gas stations (itsepalvelu) will save you a few cents/litre. There are also many automated petrol stations operating 24 hours a day with machines taking € 20 and € 50 notes, bank or credit cards. Please note that the price of petrol is relatively high in Finland, in February 2011 approximately € 1.399 - 1.559 / litre (95 E).

Seatbelts are compulsory by law both in the front and the back seats. Children must be seated in the back, unless there is a special safety seat. Outside city areas, headlights must always be used. In Finland all cars must use winter tyres in December, January and February. Foreign-registered cars must also use winter tyres (or all-season tyres) in Finland. The tread groove of winter tyres must be at least 3 millimetres. Studded winter tyres may be used between the beginning of November and the end of March (or the Monday

7.7. Travelling Abroad It is an experience to travel by one of the big ferries to Sweden, Germany or Estonia. To get to Central Europe, it is the fastest and easiest to fly. You can also take a train through Sweden and Denmark. What is more, St. 38


 number of your contact

Petersburg is only a three-hour train trip away from Helsinki.

An example: calling from Italy to Jyväskylä, phone # 123456:

You can get the International Student Identity Card (ISIC), if you are a student under 34 years old, and the IYTC/Euro<26 Youth Card (which is meant for all young people under 26) at Area Travel Agency. Both cards help you save money on airline tickets, rail-passes, accommodation, entrance fees to museums and cultural events etc. The card costs € 12 and you will need one passport photo for it. You can apply for the card for example at http://kilroytravels.fi.

you need to dial 00 358 14 123456. For national phone number inquiries, please dial e.g. 118 or 020202 (the price depends on the operator and the time of the day the phone call is made. Please see http://www.118info.fi or http://en.02.fi for further information). Most students in Finland have a mobile phone because they are relatively inexpensive to use. Mobile phones are often also the only way of reaching people in Finland as it is nowadays rare to have a landline and as pay phones have become almost extinct. A basic mobile phone costs from € 50–150. There are several mobile phone operators in Finland. The biggest nation-wide operators include dna, Elisa, Saunalahti and Sonera. A simple way to open a line is to acquire a pre-paid card (e.g. dna Prepaid, GoMobile Prepaid, Saunalahti Prepaid, Sonera Easy, Tele Finland). The cards are rechargeable and can be purchased at Rkiosks and/or mobile phone shops and/or online. Opening a normal mobile phone line is often free of charge, but foreigners who do not reside in Finland permanently are usually required to pay a deposit. The monthly fee and the prices of phone calls vary according to the operator and the connection.

7.8. Telephones If you would like to make an overseas phone call from Finland, dial:  00, 990, 999 or 996 (international prefix depending on the operator; see telephone directory for a full list)  country code (see telephone directory for a full list)  area code leaving out the first number  number of your contact An example: calling from Finland to Stockholm, Sweden, phone # 123456: you need to dial 00 46 8 123456.

If you have an Internet connection, you can also stay in touch with your friends and family free of charge by making use of for example the MSN Messenger (http://get.live.com/messenger/), Skype (http://skype.org) or other peer-to-peer Internet telephony networks. There are also commercial Voice over Internet Protocol providers

If you want to make a phone call to Finland from abroad, dial:  international prefix of the country you are calling from  358 (Finland’s country code)  area code leaving out the first 0 39


7.9. Post & Post Offices

which provide phone calls at lower prices. More information on their services can be found on the Internet (e.g. http://cubio.fi/en, http://scandicom.fi, http://web.net2phone.com).

The Main Post Office is located at Vapaudenkatu 61 and it is open from Mondays to Fridays at 8.00-20.00. The post office nearest to Kortepohja Student Village is at Vehkakatu 5. It is open from Monday to Friday at 9.0020.00 and on Saturdays at 10.00-14.00.

It is also possible to rent a telephone line at the local phone company (Elisa). Opening a line costs € 99 (€ 40 on the Internet) and the fee for each month is € 12.45 on top of your regular phone bill. Additionally, non-permanent residents have to pay a refundable deposit when opening the line.

Stamps are available at post offices, some book shops, Rkiosks and stamp machines. Mailboxes, as well as stamp machines, are orange in colour. The postal rates (€ ) for standard postcards and letters of 20 g, 50 g and 100 g are (February 2011): 20g 50 g 100 g Finland € 0.75 € 0.75 € 1.10 Europe € 0.75 € 1.05 € 1.50 Outside Europe € 0.75 € 1.50 € 3.10

For more information, please visit the Elisa website at http://www.elisa.fi. Elisa Oy, Yliopistonkatu 28, Tel. +358 10 26 000 , E-mail: shopit@elisa.fi

For further information, please visit http://www.posti.fi.

The Central Office of the Student Union in the Student Union Building, tel. (+ 358 14) 260 3355; fax (+358 14) 260 3928 and the Accommodation Office in Kortepohja Student Village, tel. (+358 14) 60 7201; fax (+358 14) 311 1174, provide faxes for your disposal. For members of the Student Union, the cost of sending a fax is as follows:

7.10. Money & Banks Finland uses the European single currency, EURO. EURO (€) is made up of 100 cents. The denominations in circulation are:

Within Finland: € 1.50 / first page, € 1 / following pages Within EU: € 2.50 / first page, € 1 / following pages Outside Europe: € 3 / page

Notes: 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 euros Coins: 2 and 1 euros, and 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents. Different banking groups in Finland offer services, which are rather similar to each other, and it is up to you which bank (pankki) you choose. Most banks have branch offices throughout the country. No matter at which office you have your account, you can make a deposit, withdraw money, and pay bills at any other office of that bank nationwide. Almost all banks can arrange for deposits or payment of bills to foreign banks by electronic transfers or

To receive a fax is free of charge. Remember to inform the Student Union beforehand if you are expecting a fax.

40


through certified checks of foreign banks with which they are affiliated. Banks are open from Monday to Friday usually 9.30-16.30.

The bank will then provide you with more information on the different services and charges. There is usually an additional charge when bills are paid at automatic cash dispensers. If you would like to pay your bills at a bank cashier, be prepared to pay a service fee of 4 – 8 euros. The banks also offer a budget account service (maksupalvelu) which takes care of your bills at a reduced charge. Still, it is usually cheapest to pay bills on the Internet or at cash points using a self-service machine.

Money can be exchanged at practically every bank in Finland. Upon proper identification (passport) they will honour, for example, traveller’s checks and bona fide letters of credit. When opening a bank account, take your passport and the student card/certificate of registration with you. Most banks only accept a passport as a proof of identification. It is therefore advisable to bring your passport with you even if you can enter the country with an ID only. Ask for an Internet banking service and a cash card (automaattikortti) at the bank. With the cash card, you can withdraw cash from any cash dispenser throughout Finland marked with the logo: otto, 24 hours a day. Cash dispensers that do not have the logo described above are not in public use but belong to a particular bank. You may withdraw money from such a dispenser only if you are a client of the bank in question. Make sure to memorise your secret code number - it enables you to use the card. If you do not trust your memory and want to write it down on a piece of paper, please note that you should never keep the number in your wallet or anywhere near the cash card.

The major credit cards (Visa, Eurocard, Access, Mastercard) are widely accepted in Finland. Automatic cash dispensers accept Visa. Other credit cards, such as American Express and Diner’s Club, are usually accepted by hotels, airlines and restaurants, but not in all stores. Foreign currency accounts can also be opened in Finnish banks if you do not want to change all your money, but still want to keep it in a bank account. Traveller’s checks are bought and sold in all banks. Foreign personal checks are not accepted in stores, and cashing them in a bank may involve a lengthy procedure unless you are a regular customer. Foreigners may bring in unlimited amounts of any currency, and freely retransfer it. The names and addresses of the largest banks in Jyväskylä are: Handelsbanken, Kauppakatu 27 www.handelsbanken.fi Keski-Suomen Osuuspankki, Kauppakatu 22 www.op.fi Nordea, Kauppakatu 18 www.nordea.fi Kiuruveden osuuspankki, Väinönkatu 34 www.paikallisosuuspankit.fi

You have to pay service fees in the banks for almost all services, for example, every time you want to cash a traveller’s cheque. The service fees vary between different banks. Therefore, it is a good idea to compare the prices and choose the bank which offers the cheapest price for the services you need. Generally, you are well advised to use the Internet bank services or automatic cash dispensers for paying your bills and checking your balance. If you would like to use the Internet for your banking, ask your tutor which banks offer Internet banking. 41


There are several radio stations for you to listen to in Jyväskylä:

Sampo, Kauppakatu 37 www.sampopankki.fi Säästöpankki Optia, Kauppakatu 23

YLE Radio Puhe 87.6 MHz YLE Radio 1 89.9 MHz Järviradio 91.3 MHz YLE X 92.5 MHz Suomi Pop 95.1 MHz NRJ 97.3 MHz Radio Rock 97.7 MHz YLE Radio Keski-Suomi 99.3 MHz Radio Aalto 101.0 MHz The Voice 101.6 MHz Radio Jyväskylä 102.5 MHz Groove FM 104.5 MHz Radio Nova 105.8 MHz

www.optia.fi 7.11. Lost & Found If you loose something, you can enquire for it from the two lost & found offices in Jyväskylä. The Lost Property Office of the Police station is located at Urhonkatu 1, tel. 071 874 8801 and the other Lost & Found office in Vapaudenkatu 85 (open : Mon 11-18, Tue-Fri 11-17, Sat-Sun closed). Also, If you find something that does not belong to you, please take it to the Police Lost Property Office. 7.12. TV and Radio Programmes All television broadcasts in Finland are digital. In order to watch television one should be in possession of a DVB receiver (set top box) or an integrated digital receiver (digital television). Basic set top boxes cost around € 100. When buying a set top box, bear in mind that cable subscribers and those living in antenna households should buy different models. If you live in a KOAS or Kortepohja student apartment, you should buy a cable set top box. For more information on the digital television, please see http://digitv.fi.

For the latest news, please see for example http://www.yle.fi/news/ or http://www.hs.fi/english/.

Please note that if you have a television set, you are required to pay a television fee for using it. The fee can be paid in one-month (€ 21.15), three-month (€ 62.35), sixmonth (€ 123.25) or twelve-month (€ 244.90) instalments. Please visit the website of the Television Fee Administration at http://www.tv-maksu.fi for more information. 42


8. HEALTH CARE AND OTHER SOCIAL SERVICES

swimming hall in Pitkäkatu 1. For more information, please visit http://www.yths.fi/.

8.1. YTHS - The Finnish Student Health Service

You should bear in mind that the services provided by YTHS are available during office hours only: there are no services available in the evenings or during weekends. Also, please note that the Student Union fee (including the mandatory health care fee) is not a payment for any kind of insurance policy. Because of this, you are strongly advised to take out insurance before your arrival. Students from countries within the European Union should have the European Health Insurance Card with them. Students from outside the EU or EEA should take a private medical insurance against possible illnesses or accidents. It is important to know that outside the YHTS heath care centre (for example, at municipal health centres or at city hospitals) the cost for treatment may total several thousands of euros.

The Finnish Student Health Service (generally referred to as YTHS) provides health and medical care for university students. The Student Union membership fee (€ 92.30/year), which is compulsory for all undergraduate students, includes a health service fee (€ 42.00), entitling you to use the services offered by YTHS. When you go to a YTHS health care centre, you have to show your Finnish student card or the receipt showing that you have paid the Student Union membership fee. There are altogether 17 YTHS health care centres around the country, and students are entitled to use the services of any of them. YTHS’s main facilities in Jyväskylä are located behind the

43


Please note that PhD students and visiting PhD students are not entitled to the services of YTHS.

as individual physiotherapy, tel. +358 46 710 6613. Moreover, for the laboratory and x-rays you need a referral from one of the doctors or nurses of YTHS. With a referral, these services are free of charge. Health care services are located at Pitkäkatu 1 on the first floor.

Medical examination During the first academic year, new undergraduate degree students can make an appointment for a medical examination which is free of charge. For further information call +358 46 710 1068.

Mental Health YTHS provides preventive mental health care, counselling, mental health examinations, and psychotherapy. The staff includes psychologists and psychiatrists and the consultation costs € 4 or € 6 respectively. For appointments and cancellations, the phone number is +358 46 710 1073. Telephone consultation hours for new patients are Mon-Thu 9.00-10.00.

Health care You can consult the nurses of YTHS free of charge. The nurses of YTHS can help you with less severe problems or questions concerning your health. They can also perform some laboratory tests and, if required, give you a referral to the laboratory for further testing. Nurses’ consultation hours are on Mon-Wed & Fri 8.00–10.00 and Thu 9.00– 10.00 (acute cases) , other times by appointment. For an appointment, call (+358 46) 710 1068 .

Dental care Degree students are entitled to a free dental examination during their first or second year of study. A dental appointment costs between 4.50 and 22.50 euros depending on the procedure. Every appointment should be paid for beforehand. Acute cases are normally treated immediately.

You can get the basic vaccinations (tetanus and difteria) free of charge. If you think you need other vaccinations, please consult the nurses. Make an appointment by calling +358 46 710 1068 .

Appointments and cancellations can be made on Mon-Fri 8.00-13.00, tel. +358 46 710 1070. Cancellations can also be made outside office hours by leaving a message on the answering machine, tel. +358 46 710 1070 or by using an online form available at http://www.fshs.fi -> cancelling. Please note that if you do not show up for your appointment and you have not cancelled, you will have to pay for the appointment! Dental care is located at Pitkäkatu 1 on the second floor.

You can book an appointment with a doctor on Mon-Fri 10.00 – 13.00, tel. +358 46 710 1068. Cancellations should be made one day before the appointment at the latest. Cancellations can also be made outside the office hours by leaving a message on the answering machine or using an online form available at http://www.fshs.fi -> cancelling. Consultation with a general practitioner is free of charge, whereas consulting specialists costs € 6.00-18.00. You must see a doctor if you want a referral to such services 44


Pregnancy and Contraception

Kauppakatu 39, tel. +358 300 20200 Yliopiston Apteekki

You can take a pregnancy test at YTHS free of charge. You should first consult the nurses who will then give you a referral to the laboratory and provide you with further information. Information on the various means of contraception is also provided.

Puistokatu 4, tel. +358 300 20200 Keljon Apteekki Keljonkeskus, Citymarket, Kylmälahdentie 6, tel. +358 10 666 1080 Seppälän Apteekki Ahjokatu 7, Prisma, tel. +358 14 339 3300 Kuokkalan Apteekki Polttolinja 7, tel. +358 10 425 6000

Please note that YTHS does not offer maternity services. If you are pregnant and need maternity services, please contact the Social and Health Services of the City of Jyväskylä, the Central Hospital and/or the Social Insurance Institution of Finland (KELA) for more information on the price and availability of the care.

Please note that you are allowed to bring a maximum of one year’s use of legally acquired prescribed and self-cure medicine from a EU and EEA country and a maximum of three month’s use of legally acquired prescribed and selfcure medicine from a non-EU and non-EEA country. You must be able to prove with a doctor’s prescription or a medical certificate that the prescribed medicine is intended for your own use. Note also, that a medicine you use may not be available in Finland, but it is strictly forbidden to send medicines to Finland by mail! For more information, please see www.tulli.fi.

8.2. Pharmacies Pharmacies are usually open until 17.00 or 18.00. The University Pharmacy (Yliopiston apteekki) at Kauppakatu 39 is an exception - it is open every day 8.00-23.00. Below is a list of pharmacies in Jyväskylä. Vanha Apteekki Kauppakatu 13, tel. +358 14 211 252 Uusi Apteekki

8.3. Emergency Cases

Yliopistonkatu 32, tel. +358 14 338 2900 Hoviapteekki Kauppakatu 35, tel. +358 14 337 1350 Jyväs-Apteekki

If you become ill and need urgent medical attention when YTHS is closed (in the evenings and during weekends), you should contact the Central Hospital (Keski-Suomen Keskussairaala). The address is Keskussairaalantie 19 and phone number (+358 14) 2691 811. To order an ambulance, dial 112 (urgent cases) or (+358 14) 211 606.

Keskussairaalantie 20, tel. +358 14 334 2600 Voionmaan Apteekki Voionmaankatu 9, tel. +358 14 211 305 Yliopiston Apteekki 45


The Central Hospital charges an initial fee of € 27.40. There may also be an additional service fee, depending on the treatment. Please note that non-permanent citizens, apart from the EU and EEA citizens and those who have domicile in Jyväskylä (see chapter 8.6 for further information), must pay for all treatments themselves and claim for a refund from their insurance company. The hospital fees may run high if you are not a citizen of the EU or EEA or do not have domicile in Jyväskylä (e.g. appendicitis € 1831-2753, visit to first aid € 122-559, daily bed charge in a specialised unit is € 367). Thus, if you come from a country outside the EU or EEA it is absolutely vital that you obtain a private medical insurance to cover unexpected emergencies.

These numbers (except 118) are free of charge also when the call is made from a phone booth. Jyväskylä Police Station is located in two addresses: Urhonkatu 1 and 2, close to the Travel Centre +358 71 874 0521. Toxicological emergency number (for the whole of Finland): (+358 9) 4711. 8.5. In Case of Crisis Mobile Crisis Centre provides help around the clock for all people in the Jyväskylä region in acute personal and family crisis situations, for instance related to substance abuse, domestic violence or mental health. Mobile provides customer-centred support services in cooperation with local health and social services free of charge. No appointments are necessary. You can contact Mobile by phone (+358 14) 625 960 or simply by visiting the office at Asemakatu 2, 2nd floor.

While studying in another member state, citizens of EU and EEA countries are entitled to the same benefits in case of an emergency (medical care required by the state of health, accident, sudden illness etc.) as the local population. The European Health Insurance Card certifies that you are entitled to these benefits. The card is standardized throughout the European Union and can be obtained from the social security institutions of the country where you are insured. To speed up your claim for benefits, present this card in the hospital or at the health centre.

SOS Center/Crisis Prevention Tel. (09) 4135 0510, telephone hours: Mon-Fri 9.00 – 15.00 (local or mobile phone charges) Maistraatinportti 4 A, 4th floor. 00100 Helsinki

8.4. Emergency Telephone Numbers General emergency

112

Ambulance Fire station Police Pharmacies on call

112 112 112 118

The SOS center helps foreigners and their family members living in Finland in different crisis of life. The help is short-term therapeutic conversation help. A client can tell about his / her own life situation in his / her mother tongue with the help of an interpreter, or in English, Finnish or Swedish. The principle of the center is to give help as soon and flexibly as possible. You can also get help anonymously. The help is cost-free for the client. It is 46


not necessary to have a referral to the center, but it is important to make an appointment beforehand.

concluded social insurance agreements with Finland, which may concern you. You should check this before your departure.

HIV /AIDS Telephone Service

Further information:

If you would like to get more information on HIV or AIDS or need support or guidance, please call HIV/AIDS telephone service tel. 0207 465 705, Mon-Fri 10 – 15.30 (maintained by the Aids Council) or tel. 0203 27000, Mon – Thu 17.00 – 20.00 (maintained by Finnish Red Cross).

KELA (Kansaneläkelaitos) Vapaudenkatu 40-42 40100 Jyväskylä Tel. 020 692 207 (nationwide telephone service concerning moving to Finland and social security) http://www.kela.fi Mon 9.00-16.00, Tue 9.00-17.00, and Wed-Fri 9.00-16.00.

Tukinainen – Rape Crisis Centre

If you come from outside the EU or EEA, you are required to have private medical insurance as follows:

Tel. 0800 – 97899 (free of charge), telephone hours: MonFri 9.00 - 15.00, Sat-Sun, on holidays and holiday eves, 15.00 – 21.00. Confidential conversation and information about sexual abuse and violence. More information can be found at http://www.tukinainen.fi/.

For studies of less than two years, a student must have

private insurance which primarily covers the costs of medical treatment up to 100,000 euros.

If the duration of studies is two years or more, a student

will usually have a home municipality in Finland and is therefore entitled to municipal health care services. In such cases, it is sufficient for the insurance to primarily cover the cost of medicines up to 30,000 euros.

8.6. Insurance Citizens of EU and EEA countries are covered by the National Health Insurance Scheme administered by the Social Insurance Institution (Kansaneläkelaitos, KELA). To be eligible for these benefits, you need to bring with you an European Health Insurance Card from the local social security office in your home country.

You are required to have insurance cover when applying for a residence permit. The residence permit cannot be granted without the insurance. Students studying in Finland for at least two years are entitled to domicile (home municipality) in Jyväskylä. Domicile is granted by the Registry Office (Maistraatti, Yliopistonkatu 28, open Mon-Fri 9-16.15) to students who have a valid residence permit and certificate stating a study period of two years or more. The right to domicile entitles students to the municipal health care services at the same prices as the local population (excluding medicine. Please see above for more information on insurance requirements).

In general, the full benefits of KELA are available to those, who have permanent residence in Finland. Those residing in Finland because of their studies, and their family members, are, as a rule, not considered to be permanent residents. Students coming from the Nordic countries have the same benefits as Finns. Some EU and EEA countries have 47


8.7. Drugs Drug dealing is strictly forbidden in Finland, and also the use and possession of drugs is against the law. Anyone in possession of drugs, including hash, runs the risk of being arrested and expelled from the country or imprisoned. Drug dealing carries very heavy penalties. Please note that the Finnish customs regularly checks mail deliveries from abroad, and a person receiving a postal delivery including any kind of drugs (including medicines) runs the risk of a penalty.

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9. SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AND LEISURE TIME

courts, cycling, jogging tracks, Laajavuori Winter Sports Centre, outdoor recreation areas, Killerjärvi Equestrian Sports Centre. Student discounts on tickets for sporting events vary. If you want to know more about sports facilities in the city of Jyväskylä (other than University sports), contact the Sports and Physical Activity Services tel. (+358 14) 624 848 or e-mail liikunta.info@jkl.fi.

9.1. Sports As you might have heard, Finns are great sport enthusiasts, with a particular passion for winter sports such as ice-hockey, cross-country skiing and ski-jumping. Finns also excel internationally in athletics, swimming, wrestling, and motor sports. Most Finns learn to ski at a very early age. One speciality during the summer is the Finnish version of baseball (pesäpallo) which is also an example of how Finns have adopted foreign sports.

9.2. Sauna In Finland, there are five million inhabitants and one and a half million saunas! For Finns sauna is much more than just a place for washing: it is a place for physical and spiritual relaxation, and truly a part of the Finnish way of life. An old Finnish proverb proclaims the effectiveness of the sauna stating that ‘if sauna, liquor and tar don’t help, the disease must be fatal’.

If you like sports, Jyväskylä is the place to be! The University has a Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, which is unique in Finland. The following is a list of some of the sports facilities in Jyväskylä: fitness and aerobics clubs, swimming, spas, squash, badminton and tennis 49


What do you do in a sauna? First, having undressed, you take a shower. Then you enter the dimly lit sauna room and sit on wooden benches. The stones on top of the stove in the corner are very hot and when you throw water on them, a humid cloud of steam suddenly fills the small room. Your face gently burns and your body sweats. You can also try the sauna whisk (vasta or vihta) - a bunch of young, leafy birch twigs. Dip it into warm water and then gently beat yourself all over with it - it feels better than it sounds! If the sauna is by a lake and it is summer you can take a swim to cool yourself. During the winter many Finns make a hole in the ice and enjoy dipping themselves into the icy water or rolling in the snow - both are worth trying! However, usually you only take a shower.

theatres at Kauppakatu 32. Tickets can be reserved online at www.finnkino.fi. Ask for possible student discounts. There is also a small movie theatre, Kampus Kino, on the main campus in the Student Union Building (Keskussairaalantie 2). The tickets to Kampus Kino cost € 5 for students. For information on the programme, please visit http://www.jyy.fi/ilokivi/kampuskino.php. 9.4. Theatres The variety of theatre performances on offer in the Jyväskylä region is impressive. In addition to the City Theatre, more than dozen amateur drama companies serve audiences of all ages. There are, for example, the following theatres:

Please note that it is not customary for men and women to go to the sauna together, unless they are members of the same family or particularly close friends.

Jyväskylä City Theatre, Vapaudenkatu 36, tel. (+358 14)

266 0110 (student tickets € 16 – 23, “last minute tickets” € 5-10 an hour before the performance (if not sold out)

In Kortepohja Student Village, each apartment building has its own sauna with separate times scheduled for men and women. Also KOAS apartment buildings have saunas. Having tried a Finnish sauna once, you will wonder how you ever managed without it!

Huoneteatteri (The Room Theatre), Sammonkatu 4, tel. (+358 14)266 0114

Jyväskylä

University Student Theatre, Student Union Building, Keskussairaalantie 2, www.jyt.fi

Jyväskylän kansannäyttämö, Sammonkatu 7 AdAstra Theatre, Koskenharjuntie 8 Teatterikone, Köhniönkatu 31 Jyväskylänn teatteriyhdistys Kulissi, Siltakatu 25 Improvisaatioteatteri Ässiä Hatusta, University Campus,

9.3. Movies Films in Finland are shown in their original language with Finnish and Swedish subtitles. A cinema ticket costs around 9 euros depending on the day and time of the show. You will find the weekly programme in the local newspaper. The programme is usually changed on Fridays.

Y-building, Keskussairaalantie 2

The student prices in theatres vary. Do not hesitate to ask for a discount and always take your student card with you. For information on current programmes, see the local newspapers.

The biggest cinema, called Fantasia, is located in the Jyväskeskus Shopping Centre. Fantasia includes six 50


9.5. Art, Museums and Exhibitions

Data

If you are interested in art and museums, information on current exhibitions and activities can be found in the local newspapers, Keskisuomalainen and Suur-Jyväskylän Lehti, under the entry for galleries (Galleriat) .The following museums and art galleries can be found in Jyväskylä or in the Jyväskylä region:

Ask for a student discount in the museums and galleries! Admission is free for all on Fridays to Jyväskylä Art Museum, Craft Museum of Finland and Museum of Central Finland.

Jyväskylä

9.6. Libraries

Art Museum, www.jyvaskyla.fi/taidemuseo

Processing Museum (Tietojenkäsittelymuseo), Agora Building in Mattilanniemi and IT-Dynamo building Piippukatu 2, http://suomentietokonemuseo.fi

Kauppakatu

23,

You can borrow books from the University Main Library, department libraries, Jyväskylä City Library and JAMK University of Applied Sciences Library. Most of the library services are free of charge. However, if the books are not returned in time, a fine will be charged. When borrowing books from the University Library please remember that the course books can be borrowed for two weeks at a time and other books for four weeks. Overnight and weekend loans are also possible, with a few exceptions (e.g. if items belong to the reference collection). There is a great demand for some of the course literature, so be sure to return your books by due date.

Museum

of Central Finland, Alvar Aallon katu 7, www.jyvaskyla.fi/ksmuseo

Home of the Artist Family Heiska, guided tours Fri 1314, departure from the Museum of Central Finland

Alvar

Aalto Museum, www.alvaraalto.fi

Alvar

Aallon

katu

7,

Craft

Museum of Finland and The National Costume Centre of Finland, Kauppakatu 25, www.craftmuseum.fi

Jyväskylä G)

University Museum (Main Campus, building

Natural

History Museum of Central Finland, Water Tower, Ihantolantie 5

On your first visit to the City Library or to any of its branch libraries, you will receive a library card. Remember to bring your ID. You must have your library card with you every time you want to borrow something. In the University libraries you can borrow books with your student card. In the City Library you can also borrow, for example, CDs, LPs and audio and video tapes.

Jyväskylä Centre for Printmaking and Galleria

Harmonia, Hannikaisenkatu 39 (opposite the railway station), www.jyvaskyla.fi/taidemuseo/grafiikkakeskus

Kivikäs

Centre for Prehistoric Art, Riihimäentie 3, www.arkeo.net/kivikas

Galleria

Becker (gallery and art leasing), Seminaarinkatu 28, www.jkltaiteilijaseura.net

An Adult Education Institute (Jyväskylän seudun kansalaisopisto) (tel. (+358 14) 266 4071, http://www.jyvaskylanseutu.fi/kansalaisopisto) is also located on the premises of the City Library. The Institute provides evening classes covering a wide variety of fields,

Aviation

Museum of Central Finland (Keski-Suomen Ilmailumuseo), Tikkakoskentie 125, Tikkakoski, www.ksilmailumuseo.fi

51


such as languages - from beginners’ level to more advanced studies, painting, music and handicrafts. There is also another adult education institute in Jyväskylä called Jyvälän kansalaisopisto (address: Kortesuonkatu 52-54, tel. (+358 14) 217 202, e-mail: jyvala@jyvala.fi, www.jyvala.fi). The programme of the two adult education institutes also includes courses that are particularly targeted at foreigners (e.g. Finnish language courses).

You can also renew your loans at jyklainaus@library.jyu.fi. Opening hours during the autumn and spring semesters:

Libraries:

Mon-Thu 8-18 (customer service 10-16), Fri 8-16 (customer service 10-16), Sat 11-15 (first floor only, no customer service).

Mon-Thu 8-20 (customer service 10-18), Fri 8-18 (customer service 10-18), Sat 9-16, Sun 9-16 (first floor only, no service). During Christmas and other public holidays the opening hours can be different. The library informs its customers about the changes. During the summer the library is open at the following times:

Jyväskylä City Library (Kaupunginkirjasto/Maakuntakirjasto) Vapaudenkatu 39-41 Tel. (+358 14) 266 4104 http://www.jkl.fi/kirjasto/englanti/ Open: Mon-Fri 10.00-20.00, Sat 11.00-16.00 (June-August: Mon-Fri 11.00-19.00, Sat 11.00-1.00). The reading room for magazines and newspapers has slightly different opening hours: Mon-Fri 10.00-20.00, Sat 10.00-16.00, Sun 11.00-17.00, Eves 10.00-17.00 (June-August: Mon-Fri 10.00-19.00, Sat 10.00-15.00, Sun 12.00-18.00)

Other libraries at the University:

Mattilanniemi

Library (Social Sciences and Mathematics), Mattilanniemi Campus, building A, open: Mon-Thu 10-18 (service 10-16), Fri 10-16

Ylistönrinne

Library (Physics and Chemistry) on the Ylistönrinne Campus, Survontie 9, open Mon-Thu 10-18 (service 10-16), Fri 10-16

JAMK University of Applied Sciences Library and Information Services

Main

Library, Rajakatu 35, open Mon-Thu 9-18, Fri 916 and Sat 9-14

Lutakko

Kortepohja Branch Library (Kortepohjan lähikirjasto) Isännäntie 3 Tel. (+358 14) 266 4136 Open: Mon-Thu 13.00-19.00, Fri 10.00-16.00 (June-August: Mon, Tue and Thu 14.00-19.00, Wed and Fri 10.00-16.00)

Library, Piippukatu 2, open Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 8.30-16, Thu 8.30-17

Music Library, Pitkäkatu 18-22, Mon-Fri 10-16 Institute of Natural Resources Library, Tuumalantie 17, Tarvaala, Saarijärvi, Mon-Thu 9-16, Fri 9-14

School

of Health and Social Studies Library, Keskussairaalantie 21, Mon-Thu 9-17, Fri 9-16

University Main Library (yliopiston pääkirjasto), on the Main Campus Tel. (+358 14) 260 3432, 260 3452 (loan office) 52


9.7. Live Music and Concerts

To see what is on offer, keep an eye on advertisements in Keskisuomalainen and Suur-Jyväskylän Lehti and on University notice boards.

Various kinds of music from classical to opera, jazz to rock & pop, folk music to the Finnish tango are appreciated in Finland. Some examples of the latest Finnish musical exports are the metal band Nightwish, “love metal” band HIM and the cello-plying rock band Apocalyptica. Due to the wide-ranging devotion to music in Jyväskylä and to the good variety of local music institutions, musical entertainment is offered almost every day of the year. For instance, Jyväskylä Symphony Orchestra, University Symphony, Polytechnic Symphony and a good many local choirs give concerts frequently. And at night you can enjoy live jazz, rock or dance music in numerous restaurants.

9.8. Hungry, Thirsty, Feel Like Dancing? In Finland alcohol is sold only in liquor stores (ALKO - the State Alcohol Monopoly of Finland) and in restaurants, bars and pubs, but you can purchase medium strength beer and cider in supermarkets and grocery stores. Bear in mind the following ground rules for purchasing alcohol in Alko.

An 18-19-year-old can buy alcoholic beverages with a maximum of 22% alcohol content

A 20-year-old can buy all alcoholic beverages Sales staff cannot sell alcohol if they have

The following list contains some examples of where to go for different styles of music: Jazz lovers:

reason to assume that an alcoholic beverage will be illegally passed on to an under aged person

Poppari Puistokatu 2-4

Alcoholic beverages cannot be sold to a person who is acting in an disorderly manner or is clearly intoxicated

Live music: Bra, Kauppakatu 35 London, Puistokatu 2 Lounge Club Kharma, Väinönkatu 32 Ilokivi, (Student Union Building), Keskussairaalantie 2 Hemingway’s, Kauppakatu 32 Old Brick’s Inn, Kauppakatu 41 Parnell’s Irish Bar, Gummeruksenkatu 7, Väinönkatu 3 Sohwi, Vaasankatu 21 Tanssisali Lutakko, Schaumaninkatu 3 Vakiopaine, Kauppakatu 6 Ylä-Ruth, Seminaarinkatu 19

You

must be prepared to present a valid photo ID. A passport, an official identity card or a drivers licence issued by a police authority are accepted as a proof of identification. Student cards are not accepted.

Going out for a drink with friends is very popular. On Fridays and Saturdays you may see people queuing in front of the most popular pubs and clubs. The pubs do not have admission fees, whereas the discos/night clubs charge € 4 - 8, especially during weekends. Tipping is not compulsory. Most pubs have a doorman who lets people in and who also has the right to remove anybody who is disturbing other clients. Some of the most popular pubs and nightclubs in Jyväskylä are: 53


Night clubs: Bra, Freetime, Giggling Marlin, London, RUMA, Lounge Club Kharma,.

and twice a year in English. For more information: tel. 020 6100 380 and http://www.ort.fi

Pubs: Amarillo, Anneli, Gastropub Jalo, Grand Star Café, Hemingway’s, Musta Kynnys, Poppari, Old Brick’s Inn, O’Malleys, Parnell’s Irish Bar, Pub Katse, Red Neck, Rentukka (pub/dance club, Kortepohja Student Village, offers discounts for students), Sohwi, Soolo, Vakiopaine (you’ve got to see it to believe it!), Vihreä haltiatar.

Saint Olaf’s Roman Catholic Church (Mass also held in English) Yrjönkatu 36, tel. (+358 14) 612 659, olavi@catholic.fi, http://olavi.catholic.fi/ Mormon Church (Myöhempien aikojen pyhien Jeesuksen Kristuksen kirkko), Sammonkatu 9, tel. (+358 14) 615 274, http://www.mormonit.fi/

9.9. Religious Communities

Free Evangelical Church (Vapaaseurakunta), Puutarhakatu 16, tel. (+358 14) 614 026, http://www.jyvaskylanvapaaseurakunta.fi/ (English fellowship group held every other Saturday at 2 pm. For more information contact: stevek@metacase.com)

The majority of Finns (80 %) are Lutherans. The Evangelical Lutheran Congregation of Jyväskylä has nine churches in Jyväskylä. One of them is located next to the Kortepohja student village (Isännäntie 4). During its renovation events will be held at Ulpukka recreational space in Kortepohja Student Village (Taitoniekantie 9B). Sunday services in English are held in the Old Vicarage (Vapaudenkatu 26) every second Sunday at 5 pm. If you would like to get more information on the activities of the congregation, please get in touch with reverend Raimo Laine (mobile 050 518 5445, e-mail raimo.laine@evl.fi) or join the “Christian Fellowship in Jyväskylä” Facebook group.

Adventist Church, Ilmarisenkatu 18, tel. (+358 14) 217 767 http://jyvaskyla.adventtikirkko.fi Pentecostal Church (Helluntaiseurakunta), Lyseonkatu 3, tel. (+358) 50 4099 170 , http://www.jklhelluntaisrk.fi/ Jyväskylä City Church (Jyväskylän Cityseurakunta), Kauppakatu 1, tel. (+358 14) 3100 155, info@jyvaskylancityseurakunta.org www.jklcitysrk.org

There are five Christian organisations for students in Jyväskylä. More information about their activities can be found on notice boards, in the student newspaper and in the Student Union calendar.

The Islamic Community of Central Finland, Vaasankatu 4 a, tel. +358 40 535 2010 (prayers every Friday at noon).

Churches and religious communities: The Orthodox Church of Resurrection, Rajakatu 39, next to the JAMK University of Applied Sciences. The Divine Liturgy in church Slavonic is celebrated five times a year 54


9.10. Associations and Clubs The following associations have local groups in Jyväskylä: AIESEC Association Internationale des Etudiantes en Sciences Economiques et Commerciales; International Association of Economic, Computer Science and Business Students.

SETA Jyväskylä is located at Vapaudenkatu 4 and organizes various activities. More information tel. (+358 14) 3100 660 or +358 45 638 9540 (Wed 19.00-21.00), jklsetainfo@gmail.com, http://www.jklseta.fi/

AIESEC is the world’s largest student driven organization. The purpose is to provide university students with an international arena, where young people can try out their skills in practice and develop themselves. This is done by running a global Work Abroad-program and organizing national and international seminars and various local events around this theme. Further information: http://www.aiesec-jkl.fi Amnesty International Further information: http://www.amnesty.fi Jyväskylän opiskelijakamerat (Camera Club) See the student newspaper for announcements about meetings once a month - membership entitles you to use the labs in Kortepohja and the Student Union Building, and to get discounts in photo shops. For more information please send e-mail to info@jopka.net or visit www.jopka.net Kehitysmaayhdistys (Third World Association) Maailmankauppa Mango, Kauppakatu 5, tel. (+358 14) 216 431, www.maailmankauppamango.net SETA Jyväskylä SETA or “Seksuaalinen tasavertaisuus” (Sexual Equality) is a human rights organisation in the field of legal equality and social justice for sexual and gender minorities such as lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and trans-people in Finland. 55


10. USEFUL FACTS ABOUT LIVING IN FINLAND

10.1. Holidays The following public and national holidays are celebrated annually in Finland. On these holidays shops and banks are usually closed, and even on the previous day there can be some changes in office hours. Please note that the dates of some of the holidays vary from year to year. Below are the public holidays and other celebrations (*)in the academic year 2011-2012. November 6

All Saints Day (pyhäinpäivä)

November 13 December 6 December 24-25 December 26 January 1 January 6 February 5 February 14 February 21

Father’s Day (isänpäivä) Independence Day (Itsenäisyyspäivä), since 1917 Christmas Eve & Day (jouluaatto & -päivä) Boxing Day (tapaninpäivä) New Years Day (uudenvuodenpäivä) Epiphany (loppiainen) Runeberg’s Day* (Runebergin päivä): He was our national poet. Taste the special cake! Valentine’s Day* (Ystävänpäivä) Shrove Tuesday* (laskiaistiistai): Finns eat peasoup and special buns, and head for the slopes for sledding Good Friday (pitkäperjantai) Easter (pääsiäinen) May Day Eve* & May Day (vappuaatto & päivä) Mother’s Day (äitienpäivä) Ascension Day (helatorstai) Whitsun (helluntai):’If you don’t have a girl/boy friend by Whitsun you won’t have one the whole summer’ (a Finnish proverb)

April 6 April 8-9 April 30-May1 May 13 May 17 May 27 June 22-23

Midsummer Eve & Day (juhannusaatto & -päivä)

56


10.3. Electricity

10.2. Time Zone

The voltage in Finland is 230 AC (50 Hz), and the plugs are two-pin continental size plugs. Adapters are available in some department stores and in the shops for electrical equipment. You are well advised not to bring incompatible electrical appliances with you to Finland, unless absolutely necessary.

Finnish time is two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time. ‘Daylight saving time’ or summer time (kesäaika) is used from the last Sunday of March to the last Sunday of October.

10.4. Weights and Measures Kilometres

Miles

Centigrade

Fahrenheit

1 1,6 10 50 120

0.6 1 65 30 72

100 20 0 -5 -18

212 68 32 23 0

Metres 0.01 1.0 2.0 0.30 0.915

Inches 0.39 39.37 78.74 1 foot 1 yard

Litres 1 5 10 30 50

Gallons 0.26 1.32 2.6 7.9 13.2

Kilos 0.454 1 5

Pounds 1 pound 2.2 pounds 11 pounds 57


11. TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND ADDRESSES

11.1. Embassies and Consulates You may want to contact the embassy or consulate of your home country while in Finland. Below is a list of addresses of some embassies; all embassies and consulates are located in Helsinki, except those of Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana and Nigeria. Australia Museokatu 25 B, tel. (+358 9) 4777 6640 Austria Unioninkatu 22, tel. (+358 9) 681 8600 Bangladesh Anderstorpsvägen 12, 1st floor 171 54 Solna, Sweden, tel. (+46 8) 730 58 50 Belgium Kalliolinnantie 5, tel. (+358 9) 170412 Britain Itäinen Puistotie 17, tel. (+358 9) 2286 5100 Canada Pohjoisesplanadi 25 B, tel. (+358 9) 228 530 China Vanha Kelkkamäki 9-11, tel. (+358 9) 228 90 110 Czech Republic Armfeltintie 14, tel. (+358 9) 612 088 11 Denmark Mannerheimintie 8, tel. (+358 9) 684 1050 Estonia Itäinen Puistotie 10, tel. (+358 9) 622 02 60 Ethiopia Löjtnantsgatan 17, 10055 Stockholm, Sweden, tel. (+46 8) 665 6030 France Itäinen Puistotie 13, tel. (+358 9) 618 780 Germany Krogiuksentie 4B, tel. (+358 9) 45 85 80 Ghana Egebjerj Alle 13, 2900 Hellerup, Copenhagen, Denmark, tel. (+45 39) 62 8222 Greece Maneesikatu 2 A 4, tel. (+358 9) 622 9790 Hungary Kuusisaarenkuja 6, tel. (+358 9) 484 144 Iceland Pohjoisesplanadi 27 C, tel. (+358 9) 612 2460 India Satamakatu 2 A 8, tel. (+358 9) 228 9910 Ireland Erottajankatu 7 A, tel. (+358 9) 646 006 Italy Itäinen Puistotie 4 A, tel. (+358 9) 6811 280 Iran Kulosaarentie 9, tel. (+358 9) 686 92 40 58


Japan Unioninkatu 20-22, tel. (+358 9) 686 0200 Latvia Armfeltintie 10 tel. (+358 9) 476 472 44 The Netherlands Erottajankatu 19 B, tel. (+358 9) 22 89 20 Nigeria Tyrgatan 8, Stockholm, Sweden, tel. +46 8 24 63 90 Norway Rehbinderintie 17, tel. (+358 9) 686 0180 Morocco Unioninkatu 15A, tel. (+358 9) 612 2480 Poland Armas Lindgrenintie 21, tel. (+358 9) 618 280 Portugal Unioninkatu 22, tel. (+358 9) 682 4370 Republic of Korea Erottajankatu 7, tel. (358 9) 251 5000 Romania Stenbäckinkatu 24, tel. (+358 9) 241 3624 Russia Slovakia Spain Sweden Turkey United States

Tehtaankatu 1 B, tel. (+358 9) 661 876 Annankatu 25 tel. (+358 9) 6811 7810 Kalliolinnantie 6, tel. (+358 9) 687 7080 Pohjoisesplanadi 7 B, tel. (+358 9) 68 77 660 Puistokatu 1 b A 3, tel. (+358 9) 681 1030 Itäinen Puistotie 14 A, tel. (+358 9) 616 250

11.2. Other Useful Addresses

www3.jkl.fi/sotepa/maahanmuuttajat/officeforforeigners.sht ml

Immigrant Services (Maahanmuuttajapalvelut) Puistokatu 2 C 40101 Jyväskylä Tel. (+358 14) 626 675 The Office for Foreigners helps immigrants in their adjustment to Finnish society and supports the preservation of their own cultural identity. It also seeks to promote the development of our society into a multicultural community accepting diversity.

Gloria Centre for Multiculturalism Kauppakatu 18 C 35 40100 Jyväskylä Gloria provides information on foreign cultures to Finns and information on the Finnish culture to foreigners. The Centre also aims at preventing racism and racial prejudice. www.monikulttuurikeskus-gloria.fi

59


FINFO information service You can ask questions about education, employment, health and social issues in Finland in your own language on the telephone or by email. Tel. +358 207 40 1160, email: info@finfonet.fi. More information: www.finfonet.fi.

Ministry for Foreign Affairs (Ulkoasiainministeriö) Merikasarminkatu 5 F, Laivastokatu 22 A, Helsinki

Finnish Immigration Service (Maahanmuuttovirasto) Lautatarhankatu 10, Helsinki (Postal address: P.O.Box 18, FI- 00581 Helsinki)

11.3. Some Useful Web Sites

+358 9 160 05 http://formin.finland.fi/

Discover Finland http://finland.cimo.fi/

Tel. +358 71 873 0431 (switchboard) General enquiries, Tel. +358 71 873 3400. By calling the number you will get information on the application process and required attachments, the receipt of applications and the current status of the matter. Mon-Fri: 9.00 – 15.00. http://www.migri.fi

The Finnish Student Health Service (YTHS) http://www.yths.fi/ Virtual Finland http://virtual.finland.fi/

Centre for International Mobility CIMO

Travelling in Finland http://www.visitfinland.com/ http://www.centralfinland.net/

Hakaniemenranta 6, Helsinki E-mail: cimoinfo@cimo.fi Tel. +358 20 690 501 (Tue-Wed 13-16, Thu 13-17) www.studyinfinland.fi

Finnish weather http://www.fmi.fi/en/ http://www.weather.fi/eng/ http://www.foreca.com

CIMO is a Finnish governmental agency operating in the field of international mobility. Please contact CIMO also to find information about Finnish courses arranged in different towns in Finland.

City of Jyväskylä http://www.jkl.fi/lang

National Board of Education (Opetushallitus) Hakaniemenranta 6, Helsinki http://www.oph.fi/

Acculturation information http://www.jyu.fi/mclinic/cis/

60


12. THE FINNISH EXPERIENCE

problems and provide you with information. If you get a negative answer to your request it is not likely to change by asking the same question over and over again or by trying to get a different answer from someone else in the same office. Persistence in such cases is considered rude and annoying, and might have quite the opposite effect to what you want.

12.1. The Way We Are It usually takes some time to adapt to a culture that is different from one’s own, but after a while, you will probably notice that despite our national characteristics we are not so very different after all.

Please keep in mind, though, that these are all generalisations. On the other hand, taking the differences between conversation styles into consideration is useful. Due to the process of internationalisation in various fields, the typical stereotype of a silent Finn is slowly but surely breaking and the Finns are becoming more and more international. Whether this leads to drastic changes in our national character remains to be seen. It certainly takes a lot of sisu (= ‘guts’) to transform Finns into anything. You will find supplementary information about Finns and Finnish culture on the internet, at and http://www.kulttuuri.net.

The foreign language skills of Finns could be described by saying that people know more than they show. Most Finns have learnt the basic skills of at least one foreign language at school, the most common language being English, with German and French following not that far behind (as mentioned before, Swedish is not a foreign language in Finland). Thus, English is quite widely spoken and understood among us and you will be able to deal with your official business in English. However, you may notice that some Finns are a bit shy to use a foreign language, especially in a group conversation.

12.2. A Few Common Expressions

One thing that might strike you as a bit peculiar is our great tolerance of silence in conversation. A Finn may talk with you excitedly for several minutes and then suddenly there is a long pause - for no apparent reason. Generally, Finns speak up when they feel that there is something significant to say and silence is sometimes tolerated, and even preferred to empty phrases. Indeed, there is a Finnish saying that goes, ‘speech is silver, but silence is gold’. When a Finn says something, he/she usually means it, too. So, if a Finn suggests that you could have lunch together sometime you are usually to consider this as a real invitation, not just small talk.

Finnish is not among the easiest languages in the world, but you need not worry - as mentioned above, you can usually manage quite well by using English. However, Finns are always very pleased and positively surprised if a foreigner knows even a few words of Finnish. Below is a list of a few simple, very common expressions. hello see you good morning cheers! good night maybe

In any office, be it at the university or outside, the personnel will usually be willing to help you with your 61

hei/terve/moi hei/moi hyvää huomenta kippis! hyvää yötä ehkä


How do you do thank you see you you’re welcome yes How are you? no excuse me I don’t understand good night

päivää kiitos hei/moi ole hyvä kyllä Mitä kuuluu? ei anteeksi en ymmärrä Hyvää yötä

Can you help me?

Voitko auttaa minua?

but occasionally it gets colder, even down to -30 C°. Fortunately, Finnish houses are equipped with tripleglazed windows and central heating, so you will have no reason to worry. However, when you go out of doors in cold weather, it is always wise to be wary of frostbite - that is best done by wearing appropriate clothing. But do not let this discourage you from going out, since very cold days have an atmosphere of their own which you should not miss! After the winter solstice in December, the amount of light slowly but steadily increases again. However, you need to wait until the end of March until the day once more outlasts the night (spring equinox). The day becomes longer and longer and although it might still snow a little occasionally, the snow gradually melts away. Spring is slowly but surely on its way again.

12.3. Snowbound Those of you who have not experienced a Nordic winter before may have a lot of questions in mind. To help you come to terms with the winter season, we suggest that you think of it as a sequence of several distinct phases, each of which has an atmosphere of its own, rather than a long period of coldness. By accepting it as it comes, you will find the winter in Jyväskylä a rewarding experience. Typically, Finns themselves complain about the weather more than the visitors. As a first sign of winter the streets are filled with slush every now and then, but eventually everything is covered in real snow. The months from December to February are a time of stillness. There is no kaamos in this part of Finland - that is, the sun always rises above the horizon but the light hours are not that many during mid-winter. As for the temperature, a typical mid-winter reading in Jyväskylä would be something between -5 C° and -15 C°, 62


GENERAL UNIVERSITY TERMINOLOGY: ENGLISH FINNISH

to enrol......................................................kirjoittautua essay...................................................essee, tutkielma exam..........................................tentti, koe, kuulustelu examination results..................................tenttitulokset exercises....................................................harjoitukset faculty..........................................................tiedekunta

academic year…………………………….lukuvuosi administration building......................hallintorakennus advanced studies............................syventävät opinnot amanuensis...............................................amanuenssi assistentti.......................................................assistant attendance......................................................läsnäolo autumn semester...................................syyslukukausi Bachelor of..................................................kandidaatti basic degree............................................perustutkinto basic studies...........................................perusopinnot bureau...................................toimisto, virasto, kanslia cafe...................................................................kahvila cafeteria............................................................ruokala certificate.........................................................todistus certificate of registration.....................opiskelutodistus to charge a fee..........................................periä maksu compulsory..................................................pakollinen computer.......................................................tietokone Computing Centre.....................................ATK-keskus consultation hours...............................vastaanottoaika course..........................kurssi, opintojakso, oppimäärä credit, credit unit.......................................opintoviikko degree.............................................tutkinto,oppiarvod egree programme...............................koulutusohjelma department..........................................................laitos docent.............................................................dosentti Doctor................................................................tohtori

foreign student.......................ulkomaalainen opiskelija form..................................................................lomake general studies..........................................yleisopinnot grade..............................................................arvosana to graduate.....................suoririttaa tutkinto, valmistua health (care) service.............................terveydenhoito international..........................................kansainvälinen Language Centre.........................................kielikeskus language studies........................................kieliopinnot lecture.......................................……………….luento lecturer.......................................................luennoitsija lecture room.................................................luentosali licentiate......................................................lisensiaatti main building...........................................päärakennus main / major subject........................................pääaine mark.............................................................arvosana Master of.........................................................maisteri Master’s programme...........................maisteriohjelma membership fee……….............................jäsenmaksu minor subject....................................................sivuaine Office…............................................................toimisto optional……...............................................valinnainen postgraduate degree...................................jatkotutkinto 63


professor.......................................................professori to register...............................ilmoittautua, kirjoittautua registration certificate..........................opiskelutodistus residence permit.........................................oleskelulupa seminar...........................................................seminaari spring semester......................................kevätlukukausi student............................................................opiskelija student card............................................opiskelijakortti Student Union........................................ylioppilaskunta to study............................................................opiskella Study Counsellor.....................................opinto-ohjaaja subject.....................................................aine, oppiaine subject studies............................................aineopinnot teacher...............................................................opettaja transcript..........................opinto-ote, opintorekisteriote tuition fee..............................................lukukausimaksu undergraduate degreeâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;Ś.......................perustutkinto university..........................................................yliopisto University Library...............................yliopiston kirjasto

64


Musicology/Musiikkitiede

DEGREE PROGRAMMES AND MAJOR SUBJECTS

Organizational Communication and PR/Yhteisöviestintä

FACULTY OF EDUCATION

Russian Language and Literature/Venäjän kieli ja kirjallisuus

Kasvatustieteiden tiedekunta

Speech Communication/Puheviestintä Swedish/Ruotsin kieli

Major subjects/Pääaineet: Adult Education/Aikuiskasvatus

FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES/Yhteiskuntatieteellinen tiedekunta

Early Childhood Education/Varhaiskasvatus Education/Kasvatustiede

Major subjects/Pääaineet:

Special Education/Erityispedagogiikka

Philosophy/Filosofia FACULTY OF HUMANITIES/

Political Science/Valtio-oppi

Humanistinen tiedekunta

Psychology/Psykologia Social and Public Policy/Yhteiskuntapolitiikka

Major subjects/Pääaineet:

Social Work/Sosiaalityö

Art Education / Taidekasvatus

Sociology/Sosiologia

Art History/Taidehistoria Economic History/Taloushistoria

JYVÄSKYLÄ UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS/ Kauppakorkeakoulu

English/Englannin kieli Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology/Etnologia Finnish/Suomen kieli

Major subjects/Pääaineet:

Finnish History/Suomen historia

Accounting/Laskentatoimi

French/Romaaninen filologia

Corporate Environmental Management/ Ympäristöjohtaminen

General History/Yleinen historia

Economics/Kansantaloustiede

German Language and Culture/Saksan kieli ja kulttuuri

Entrepreneurship/Yrittäjyys

Hungarology/Hungarologia

Management and Leadership/Johtaminen

Journalism/Journalistiikka

Marketing/Markkinointi

Literature/Kirjallisuus Music Education/Musiikkikasvatus

65


FACULTY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY/ Informaatioteknologian tiedekunta Major subjects/Pääaineet: Computer Science/Tietojenkäsittelytiede Information Systems Science/Tietojärjestelmätiede Mathematical Information

Theoretical Physics/Teoreettinen fysiikka Mathematics/Matematiikka ja tilastotiede Statistics/Tilastotiede FACULTY OF SPORT AND HEALTH SCIENCES/ Liikunta- ja terveystieteiden tiedekunta

Technology/Tietotekniikka Subjects/Oppiaineet: FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE/ Matemaattis-luonnontieteellinen tiedekunta Major subjects/Pääaineet: Biology/ Biologia Biotechnology/Biotekniikka Cell Biology/Solubiologia Chemical Biology/Kemiallinen biologia

Adapted Physical Education/Erityisliikunta Biomechanics/Biomekaniikka Exercise Physiology/Liikuntafysiologia Gerontology and Public Health/Gerontologia ja kansanterveys Health Promotion/Terveyden edistäminen Physical Education/Liikuntapedagogiikka Physiotherapy/Fysioterapia

Ecology and Environmental

Science of Sport Coaching and Fitness Testing/Valmennus- ja testausoppi

Management/Ekologia ja ympäristönhoito

Sport Medicine/Liikuntalääketiede

Environmental Sciences/ Ympäristötieteet

Sport Psychology/Liikuntapsykologia

Fish Biology and Fisheries/Kalabiologia ja kalatalous

Sport Sociology/Liikuntasosiologia

Limnology and Hydrobiology/Limnologia ja hydrobiologia

Sport Planning and Administration/Liikuntasuunnittelu ja hallinto

Molecular Biology/Molekyylibiologia Applied Chemistry/Soveltava kemia Chemistry/Kemia Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry/Epäorgaaninen ja analyyttinen kemia Organic Chemistry/Orgaaninen kemia Physical Chemistry/Fysikaalinen kemia Applied Physics/Soveltava fysiikka Physics/Fysiikka Electronics/Elektroniikka

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CHECKLISTS Before arrival

 Remember to apply for accommodation no later than 1 June (if you are arriving in September) or 1 November (if you are arriving in January).

 Citizens

of non-EU/EEA countries should apply for a residence permit well in advance. Remember to obtain appropriate health insurance and attach details of it to your residence permit application. Further information: http://www.migri.fi

 Complete the registration form, which has been sent to you together with the letter of admission. Pay the Student Union membership fee beforehand as well, and send a copy of the receipt as well as the registration form to the International Office.

 Apply for a student card at http://www.lyyra.fi/eng/.  Inform your student tutor of your exact time of arrival in Jyväskylä  Write down the mobile phone number of your tutor and take it with you. Call him/her if you do not find each other or if your travel plans change the last minute.

 Bring your passport and the letter of admission with you. You will need them for example when opening a bank account.

 Bring

enough money to pay for the rent (€ 190-270 per month), Survival Kit (€ 60; optional, exchange/visiting students only) and the Student Union membership fee (€92.30year, € 45.50/autumn semester, € 46.80 spring semester) (if you have not taken care of the fee beforehand)

 If you are an EU or EEA citizen, obtain a European Health Insurance Card from the local social security office in your home country and/or acquire private medical insurance

 If you come from a country outside the EU or EEA, obtain a private medical insurance Your first days in Jyväskylä:

 Sign your lease  Open a bank account if necessary (your tutor will help you with this)  Pay the student union membership fee (if you have not done so in advance)  Register at the university and apply for the Finnish student card (if you have not done so in advance)  Contact your host department  Take part in the orientation programme (offered in the beginning of semesters) 67


 If you come from an EU or EEA country, register at the police station after you have registered at the university (that is, if your stay in Finland exceeds 3 months and you are not a citizen of a Nordic country). Fee 45 euros.

 Submit your personal identity data to the Population Information System for registration, if you stay in Finland for

longer than one year. This should be done in writing. Forms are available at the Registration Office (Maistraatti), post office and Social Insurance Institution (KELA)

 If you study in Finland for at least two years, apply for domicile (home municipality) at the Registry Office (Maistraatti, Yliopistonkatu 28, open Mon-Fri 9-16.15)

 Check out the courses you would like to take and enrol in them  Join the foreign students’ mailing list at http://lists.jyu.fi/mailman/listinfo/fs-news Before going home:

 Give notice in writing to end your lease at least one calendar month before you intend to move  Arrange a moving out inspection time at the accommodation office  Give your account number and the address of your bank in your home country to the accommodation office in order to receive the housing deposit back

 Return all the library books you have borrowed  Return your Survival Kit to the Secretary of the Kortepohja Student Village. Remember to make an appointment beforehand (kylasihteeri@jyy.fi)

 Make sure that your rent, sauna fees and other bills are paid  Close your bank account  Make an official notice of moving to the Registration Office (if you have lived in Finland for more than a year)  Notify the post office about your change of residence so that your post will be forwarded to your new address  Fill in the departure information form at http://www.jyu.fi/en/study/forms/departure_information/. A transcript of records will be sent to the address(es) you have given in the form 1-2 months after your departure

 If you need a certificate with the exact dates of your arrival and departure, please stop by at the International Office personally to get it (no earlier than one week before departure)

 Unsubscribe from the foreign students’ mailing list at http://lists.jyu.fi/mailman/listinfo/fs-news  Clean up your apartment (both your room and the common areas: kitchen, bathroom and hallway)  Do not leave any personal belongings in the apartment. They will be disposed and a fee charged (and deducted from your housing deposit) for each item.

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DEGREE REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ

same obligation applies if a student has failed in, or interrupted, two successive examinations of the same study unit. This rule also applies to the electronic eExam system. Furthermore, in the eExam system, signing up for a re-sit examination of a study unit for which the student has given his/her answers but they haven’t been assessed yet, is not allowed until after the assessment results of this previous examination have been announced by the teacher. The number of times a student may participate in general examinations shall not be restricted, however, unless the admitted right to study for a fixed-time dictates any restrictions.

Approved by the University Board on 11 March 2010. The complete Degree Regulations can be read at: https://www.jyu.fi/opiskelu/degreereg. Parts of the Degree Regulations are presented in the following. CHAPTER 6: ASSESSMENT OF STUDIES AND EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS Section 19: Right to participate in examinations Faculty-specific general examinations shall be arranged so frequently that students are able to progress in their studies in a flexible manner and within the set time limits.

The student has the right to a maximum of two attempts to upgrade a passed examination within one year of the first participation in the examination, unless upgrading is necessary for the continuation of the studies.

Examinations potentially related to lectures, courses, practical exercises, and other types of instruction shall be arranged latest during the subsequent study period. At least one re-sit opportunity shall be provided: one week after the announcement of results, at the earliest, and in two months’ time, at the latest. These principles apply to other forms of assessment as well. The students shall be informed in due time about the examinations, re-sit opportunities, and ways to sign up for them.

The thesis included in a master’s, licentiate or doctoral degree cannot be resubmitted after it has been graded and approved. On the basis of a faculty decision, this rule may also be extended to apply to bachelor’s theses. If a student is unable to attend an examination due to its arrangements, an opportunity to re-take the examination shall be arranged without delay. However, the fact that the timing of the examination, albeit announced in due time, is not suitable for the student does not constitute a sufficient reason for re-take arrangements.

Only students who have formally registered for attendance at the University and who have the required right to study are allowed to participate in examinations. If a student has signed up for, but failed to participate, in two successive examinations of the same study unit without giving a valid reason in advance, he/she must consult the teacher about a new possibility to take the exam before a new registration can be made. The

Section 20: Invigilation of examinations The organisers of the examinations shall ensure that an adequate number of invigilators be assigned to each 69


Section 21: Registration for examinations Registration for a faculty-specific or other teaching unit’s general examination is required at least one week prior to the examination date. For some well-grounded reason, however, the unit in charge of the examination has the right to accept a different registration deadline. An earlier registration deadline may apply to examinations The student participating in an examination must provide held between 1 June and 31 August. proof of identity to the invigilator, if so requested. If this is not possible, the invigilator will agree with the student on Registration for all faculty-specific general examinations a way in which his/her identity may be proved is done in the Korppi system, unless the examination is afterwards. If the identity is not proved even in this way, arranged as an eExam. The examiner decides on the possible acceptance of late or incomplete registrations. the student’s examination work may be failed. Registration is not required for mid-term, final or re-sit It is the invigilator’s duty to maintain order during the examinations of lecture series, courses or exercises, examination. The examination of a student causing unless otherwise decided by the examiner. disturbance may be interrupted if the disturbance affects other students taking the examination. The invigilators The registration deadlines and procedures described are responsible for delivering the examination papers to above do not apply to examinations arranged as electrothe examiner after the examination. The examiner must nic eExams. have the opportunity to receive the papers no later than Section 22: Duration of examinations the next working day following the examination date. The duration of faculty-specific general examinations is If the examiner is not present at the beginning of the four hours. If the examination is taken as an electronic examination, he/she must inform the office convening eExam, the duration is 3 hours 55 minutes, after which the examination or the invigilator as to how he/she may time the examination room must be immediately vacabe contacted or how potential problems concerning the ted. The duration of other than the general examinations may be shorter than four hours, depending on the extent examination may otherwise be solved. of the study unit to be examined. The electronic eExam examination is monitored via an access control system and electronic sound and picture The examination starts from the moment that the exasurveillance. The student who has participated in an minees see the questions or are given the assignment. electronic eExam examination is, upon request, obliged The invigilators shall ensure that this happens simulto prove his/her identity in the way instructed. If proof is taneously for all examinees. The examination time for an not shown in this manner, the student’s examination electronic eExam starts at the beginning of the time reservation made in the system. work may be failed. examination room. The invigilators must be informed about their responsibilities. The dean of the faculty decides on the invigilation order of the faculty-specific general examination.The director of the teaching unit decides on the invigilation order of the examinations arranged by the unit.

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The equivalences between the numeric scale, its verbal descriptions, and the ECTS scales are presented in the table below:

Section 23: Arrival to and departure from examination rooms The invigilators shall allow a student arriving late to participate in the examination, provided that none of the examinees has already left the examination room, and that the arrival of the student does not cause major interruption or inconvenience. In the eExam, the examinee must log in within 15 minutes of the exam’s reserved starting time. Departure from the examination room is not permitted until 30 minutes have passed since the start of the examination. This rule does not apply to the electronic eExam system. Invigilation in examinations lasting over two hours must be arranged so that the examinee may for compelling reasons be absent, under invigilation, for a short while from the examination room. This rule does not apply to the eExam system.

Numeric

Verbal

ECTS

ECTS verbal

5

Erinomainen (E) A

Excellent

4

Kiitettävä (K)

B

Very good

3

Hyvä (H)

C

Good

2

Tyydyttävä (T)

D

Satisfactory

1

Välttävä (V)

E

Sufficient

0

Ei hyväksytty

FX, F

Fail

Section 32: Application of grading scales Both the numeric scale and its verbal equivalences may be used. The verbal scale of three levels may only be used in the assessment of licentiate theses and doctoral dissertations. Study entities (basic studies, intermediate (subject) studies, advanced (subject) studies) are assessed separately using the numeric scale.

CHAPTER 7: ASSESSMENT AND GRADING OF STUDIES Section 31: Grading scales The grading scales used in the assessment of studies are as follows:

verbal scale of three levels: pass with honours – pass – fail

The thesis included in the master’s degree is not counted as part of the advanced-level study entity when calculating a grade for this study entity. Instead, the title, extent, and grade of the master’s thesis are detailed in the degree certificate.

The grading scales for all forms of study completion shall be presented in the curricula.

The overall grades for the study entities are given as weighted grade point averages of the credits, using two-decimal mean values. The overall grade of the

 

numeric scale: 0 – 5

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completed study entity based on the mean values is determined as follows:

faculty may decide that the results may be announced later than two weeks after the examination.

1.00 – 1.49 = 1 1.50 – 2.49 = 2 2.50 – 3.49 = 3 3.50 – 4.49 = 4 4.50 – 5.00 = 5

On the basis of specific grounds, the dean or the director of an independent institute may grant an exception for the announcement deadlines of examination results. However, in these cases, too, the results shall be announced within one month of the examination. Any deviation from the deadlines shall be given within ten days of the examination.

If a study unit is not graded at all, it will not be counted when calculating the overall grade of a study entity.The

The published results document presents the names or student numbers and the grades, as well as the number of failed examinees. The document is signed by the teacher or teachers in charge of the study unit. It is the duty of the examiner to keep a file of the assessment information.

content or overall grade of a study entity cannot be changed after the degree has been awarded.

CHAPTER 8: ANNOUNCEMENT OF STUDY RESULTS AND FEEDBACK ON COMPLETED STUDIES

The personal identity code of the examinees shall not be given when announcing the results. Neither is it allowed to publish the results on web pages, unless access to them is restricted to the members of the University community.

Section 41: Announcement of results. The results of examinations and corresponding study completion shall be announced to the examinees within two weeks of the examination date, or from the date by which an essay, lecture journal, or equivalent written assignment was returned to the examiner for assessment. The examinees shall also be informed about how and where the results will be announced. Results of examinations done via the electronic eExam system, shall be announced within three weeks of the examination. Despite the deadlines stated here, the examination results shall be announced in good time before a possible re-sit examination, excluding electronic examinations. In the case of examinations held between June 1 and August 31, however, the

Section 42: Recording of results After the announcement of the results, the completed studies and credits must be entered into the study records without delay. The results have to be filed within one week of their announcement. Section 43: Feedback on completed studies The teacher or teachers in charge of the study unit must give individual or group feedback in an applicable 72


way to the examinees or to students who have completed the study units in some other form, bearing in mind what has been decreed or ordained regarding the publicity and confidentiality of study records. In addition to the actual results, students are entitled to get information on how the published assessment criteria were applied in the assessment of their work. They must also be provided access to their written or otherwise recorded performance and to receive a copy of it at their own expense. If the results are announced in the Korppi system, or in some other way to the student in person, the examiner shall ensure that all examinees completing the same study unit and taking part in the same exam event at least receive information about the distribution of grades.

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YOUR NOTES

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University of Jyväskylä - International student guide 2011-2012