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BA (Hons) Fine Art Degree Show School of Visual and Performing Arts

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WWW.CHIUNI.AC.UK/FINEART

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contents To the degree show students 2008

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Value

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Artist’s work

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Directory of artist’s work

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Fine art at the University of Chichester

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Fine art BA (hons)

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Directory of staff

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Visiting

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TO the degree show STUDENTS 2008 The Fine Art staff are proud to be associated with your impressive work in the exhibition. We have enjoyed working with you over the past three years and hope your experience has been rewarding as well as challenging. We value the effort and contribution that each of you has made in ensuring such a successful year. We wish you all the very best for your future and look forward to seeing you prosper as valued members of society

Steve McDade Subject Leader Fine Art

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Value April 2008, and the whole notion of value is being reviewed in the light of global markets and the ‘downturn’. Finances are being squeezed once again. It is rewarding to see that there is a currency that transcends the market place and is not driven by the fluctuations in base rates, interest rates, mortgages, capital investment or speculation in ‘futures markets’. It is the currency of creativity, skills and knowledge. The value of creativity always outstrips the vagaries and uncertainties of monetary exchange, always gives back more interest than the fluctuating percentages of money markets, of creative accounting in banks or real estate investment! The investment in talent, in the value of passionately driven research and the exploration of advanced skills and knowledge in the expression of individuality is a value that exceeds that of simple financial profit and loss. The creative individual, with knowledge and skills, always has access into the ‘market place’ and approaches it with a realism that doesn’t ignore the ‘money go round’ but meets the demands of the market with courage and understanding, by offering something new and challenging. The determination, and self-discipline, the ability to solve problems arises out of a deep personal investment in study and in time spent in the pursuit of knowledge. It brings with it a sense of self-worth and of value to the broader culture that we aspire to be part of and to shape. This year the degree exhibition displays the investment in talent, creative energy, sustained study and brilliant originality. The value of the work transcends any reductive accounting or equivalence to cash (although a bit about that later!). The work

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represents the total life-changing experience that advanced study brings. It is a currency that will last a life-time and pay dividends in a future that values endeavour and a deeper connection to values and civilization. All the work is remarkable evidence of the power of ambition of each individual to ‘move to the next level’, to be confidently in control of complexity. The exhibition presents the diversity of practices and personal interests that forms Fine Art at the University of Chichester. Each exhibition highlights the individuality of each artist and reveals the breadth and depth of research, and testifies to their critical engagement across the expanded field of visual practices, social and cultural issues, and audience reception. The exhibition as a whole is another strong statement about the ‘value-added’ that students receive in their journey from pre-degree to graduate status at Chichester. Each individual shows not only the professionalism one would expect to find in their art but also an ability to move into the wider culture with conviction, confidence and some certainty of their worth and ambition to succeed. Of course the value of study has also to be seen against the hard-nosed currency of monetary value. No-one here is naïve to the pressures of competition and the importance of financial reward. Fine Art has the added currency of real objects and resounding originality. It is possible for you to invest in that original talent by exchanging cash for something of value (I said I’d get back to the cash thing!) It will repay your investment time after time and help to propel the author of the work into their career. Invest wisely. Invest in the value of talent!


artist始s work

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Robyn Allen: Untitled, digital photograph, 28.5cm x 34cm (see page 49) Tel: 07845 040822 Email: rocky_robyn@hotmail.co.uk

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Nic Blair: Untitled, installation, 6m x 6m (see page 49) Tel: 07772 029730 Email: nicblair@live.com

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Charlotte Bush: The Hair Trap, digital photograph, 59.4 x 42cm (see page 49) Email: Boosh51@hotmail.com

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Ruth Butterfield: Between the Waking and the Dream, felt, 139 x 132cm (see page 49) Email: Talk_to_the_wind@hotmail.co.uk

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Diana Chandler: Untitled, oil on canvas, each: 50 x 48cm (see page 50) Tel: 01483 569708

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Rebecca Coates: Untitled, photography, 40in x 27in (see page 50) Email: Burning-BrightUK@yahoo.co.uk

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Daniela Cordi: Barrel, mixed media on fabric, detail (see page 50) www.danielacordi.com

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Jade Craig: Mutating Mass (detail), felt, dye and thread, 88 x 21 x 14 cm (see page 50) Email: jadefilthy1@hotmail.com

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Jennifer Craven: Brick & Glass Bird, water colour, 28cm x 37cm (see page 51) Tel: 07746 839526 Email: preraphp@fsmail.net

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Rachelle Dare: Untitled, emulsion on canvas, 105 x 80cm (see page 51) Email: rf.dare@googlemail.com

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Katie Davis : Sub-conscious Space, mixed media on canvas, 36in x 48in (see page 51) Email: paintmadgirl@hotmail.co.uk

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Somiyeh Djavanroodi : Hotsie, acrylic spray paint on paper, A2 (see page 51) Email: Somiyeh2581@hotmail.com

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Lesley Evans: Untitled etching, each: 60cm x 60cm (see page 52) Email: laevans27@yahoo.co.uk

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Kate Foy: Organic Forms, digital photographs, various (see page 52) Email: skycat_foy@yahoo.co.uk

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Jade Hanley: hooami, www.hooami.co.uk (see page 52) Tel: 07850 555937 Email: jade@kiss-my-art.co.uk www.kiss-my-art.co.uk

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Dan Hasker: Film Still #01, film (digital), site-dependent projection (see page 52) Email: djhasker@hotmail.com

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0204 361: Shredded paper, polymerised acrylic, 3,624,556,327 cubic millimetres (approx) (see page 53) Email: eatyourfudge@gmail.com

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Di Hockin: Corridor No 3, installation, variable dimensions (see page 53) Tel: 07957 191729 Email: di.hockin@sky.com

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India Hocking: Untitled, mixed media, 101.5 x 76cm (detail) (see page 53) Email: india_mcr@yahoo.co.uk

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Loise (Lola) Holmes: Untitled, digital photography, AO x 3 (see page 53) Email: Lola_J@hotmail.com

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Gavin Howard : Urban:city_one, acrylic and gloss paint on canvas, 50 x 76.5cm (see page 54) Email: tornado_records@hotmail.com

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Terri Humby: Summer 89 (detail), photo album, bleached photographs on digital print paper, 150 x 210cm (see page 54) Email: terrihumby@hotmail.co.uk

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Hannah Ireland: Look Above You, mixed media on acrylic, 3 x 122 x 44 cm (see page 54) Email: info@HannahIreland.co.uk

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Vicki Isted: Untitled, digital print, 203 x 305cm (see page 54) Email: vik.isted@btinternet.com

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Stephen James: Past Times, oil on canvas, 40 x 35cm (see page 55) Email: stephenjamesart@hotmail.co.uk

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Emily Jones: Untitled, mixed media, 32.5 x 37.4cm (see page 55) Email: froodyemily@btinternet.com

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Kim Jordan: Untitled No 1, oil on canvas, 1 x 2m (see page 55) Email: license_creative@yahoo.co.uk

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Cassandra Joucerand: Parallel Illusion, mixed media, installation (see page 55) Tel: 07725 697962 Email: cassiecasscass87@yahoo.co.uk

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Alan Lock: Untitled, digital photograph in perspex, 30 x 46cm (see page 56) Tel: 02392 466861 Email: alan@alanlock.wanadoo.co.uk

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Victoria McQuoid: Untitled, watercolour, acrylic and PVA glue, 93in x 96in (see page 56) Email: vmcq@hotmail.co.uk

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Julie Morrow: View Point, ceramic, installation (see page 56) Email: morrows@marlborocott.freeserve.co.uk

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Stefan Murphy: Boxes, print, various dimensions (see page 56) Email: Stefanmurphy1985@yahoo.ie

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Chris Pinder: A Changing Experience, mixed media, installation (see page 57) Email: Chris_pinder99@hotmail.com

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Kate Prosser: Bank, glass bottles, cotton yarn and mixed media, 2m x 2m (see page 57) Email: kate.prosser1@btinternet.com

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Lucy Redknap: Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 160 x 160cm (see page 57) Email: lucy220@hotmail.co.uk

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Hannah Sapsford: Anon, plaster, various dimensions (see page 57) Tel: 07851 837234 Email: hannah.sapsford@hotmail.co.uk

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Amy Strike: Love Poem: 5 seconds following the end of gravity, copper, onion, rhyme, 56ft 6in (see page 58) Email: miceonstrings@hotmail.com

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Anthony Tivey: Empty Space, digital photography, various dimensions (see page 58) Email: anthony.tivey@btinternet.com

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Sophie Willson: Untitled, digital photograph, 42 x 29.7cm see page 58) Tel: 07780 982092

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Jonny Wright: Deltitnu, film still (see page 58) Tel: 07837 615267

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directory of artist始s work

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Robyn Allen: Untitled, digital photograph, 28.5cm x 34cm

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“If I could tell a story in words I wouldn’t need a camera” (Lewis Hine) The work shows an intimate personal documentation of the lives of my family and friends. The intention is that each photo is to be seen in relation to and as part of the others, each one feeding and contrasting the other to form a complex account of everything I see. My work is ultimately about life, my life, the life of my subjects and in turn the viewer’s life. Each picture is familiar and of the everyday, allowing the viewer to relate to and read into the works underlying themes of loneliness, loss, time, poverty, friendship and the concept of home. Tel: 07845 040822 Email: rocky_robyn@hotmail.co.uk

Nic Blair: Untitled, installation, 6m x 6m

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I hope to create a feeling of stillness and calm through the use of lines and curves. The simplicity of the white forms produces a serene environment. It encloses and holds the viewer in a safe, nurturing place. The way in which the work sits in the space makes it an intrinsic part of the room - the work becomes the space. Tel: 07772 029730 Email: nicblair@live.com

Charlotte Bush: The Hair Trap, digital photograph, 59.4 x 42cm

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The work is about exploring the relationship between Fashion and Art, and the combination of glamour and emotion. The photographs are violent and aggressive yet beautiful due to elements of fashion. The hair wrapped around the subjects face constrains both visually and physically, causing discomfort and reflecting the power the fashion industry has on society to dictate what is considered beautiful. Ultimately these intimate photographs capture a personal battle, not only with the complex ideal of fashion and beauty but also with myself. Email: Boosh51@hotmail.com

Ruth Butterfield: Between the Waking and the Dream, felt, 139 x 132cm

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I am inextricably drawn to the physicality and tactile nature of felt. The felt-making process has become central to my artistic practice. Felt appeals to all the senses: it suggests warmth, protection, security. It’s tactile, blanket-like qualities connect it to real-life, domestic experience and to the universal experience of sleep. This draws the viewer in and enhances feelings of intimacy suggested by the sleeping male figure: a figure at once both vulnerable and yet also secure, peaceful. This dichotomy sets up a relationship of trust between the viewer and the viewed: as we stand at once within and without the sleeper’s frame. Email: Talk_to_the_wind@hotmail.co.uk

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Diana Chandler: Untitled, oil on canvas, each: 50 x 48cm

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This abstract painting comprises forty-eight smaller canvasses. The work represents the strange and fragmented world of someone who is partially sighted. Impaired vision exaggerates light and dark whilst eliminating detail. The piece moves from dark to light to reflect this. The deep red masks the shapes and is indicative of the haemorrhage. The central section relates to the laser treatment. The colours represent those observed during this process. For example, magenta represents the loss of sight. The lighter section of the work symbolises hope, whilst also depicting the isolation and confusion that diffused light can create. Tel: 01483 569708

Rebecca Coates: Untitled, photography, 40in x 27in

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My work explores the subject of woods, and particularly our interpretation of them. In the fading light amongst the trees there is a sense of spirituality, peacefulness and beauty, but there is also trepidation. Memories of myths, horrors, histories and fairy stories come alive in our minds whilst surrounded by looming trees and reaching branches. Woods can be places of refuge but can also be places of hidden fears, whether that fear is rational or not. As so many stories of woods are ingrained into our minds can we ever truly see them for what they really are? Email: Burning-BrightUK@yahoo.co.uk

Daniela Cordi: Barrel, mixed media on fabric, detail

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I have always been interested in creativity and visual perception as a means of analysing and interpreting reality and its many truths. The ability to project meaning onto an image or object and to link apparently unrelated events - is central to my investigations. In particular, I am drawn to those creative processes that use chance whereby the ‘interchangeability’ of forms and concepts come to light. In a highly technological society, where artificial images are relied on to know the world, the ambiguous nature of human perception paradoxically allows for a critical reading of what is in front of our eyes. Tel: 07733 451628 Email: cdani2uk@yahoo.com www.danielacordi.com

Jade Craig: Mutating Mass (detail), felt, dye and thread, 88 x 21 x 14 cm

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“We are prisoners of our own bodies shocked when realised” (Mark Quinn, The Eye Illumination, video, 2003) I’ve taken away the shell of the human body and left the viewer with an internal view of an entangled felt sculpture. I feel we can relate to the body more without the skin as this takes away race, colour and cultural issues. The work plays with the repulsive and taboo aspect of our internal physical existence. The change in scale allows the viewer to react and interpret each piece differently. I want the pieces to challenge the audience as to whether they think it is dead or alive, evolved, evolving or maybe mutating? Email: jadefilthy1@hotmail.com

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Jennifer Craven: Brick & Glass Bird, water colour, 28cm x 37cm

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I enjoy looking in great detail at everyday mundane objects. I have collected old bricks, glass, clay pipes and many other discarded objects from the foreshore near Portchester castle. I have arranged some of the objects into animal shapes and painted them as a still life. The presentation of the paintings is in a museum format to comment on the Victorian enjoyment of museums and artefacts. The use of watercolour mimics the Victorian embrace of this medium. My paintings also include a general view of the collection site to show the surrounding landscape. Tel: 07746 839526 Email: preraphp@fsmail.net

Rachelle Dare: Untitled, emulsion on canvas, 105 x 80cm

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My paintings explore the concept of personal space. Layered paint and graphically flat monochromatic shapes allow me to discover each figure enclosed within the boundary of the frame. The suggestion of vulnerability in the image is intentional, and seeks to discomfort whilst raising questions on the space between intimacy, comfort and voyeurism. Are we intimately sharing the space of each anonymous figure? Or are we intruding so close as to be uncomfortable? My aim is to evoke curiosity in the viewer, prompting an exploration into the work and the way in which the idea of a personal space can be interpreted. Email: rf.dare@googlemail.com

Katie Davis : Sub-conscious Space, mixed media on canvas, 36in x 48in

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“If we do not rapidly open all the doors of consciousness, and freshen the putrid space in which we are cribbed, the sky-blue walls of our unventilated heaven, will be bright red with blood” Lawrence D. H. 1975, Nemesis’. My work consists of abstractions which float on a surreal sub-conscious landscape. The contemporary inspiration behind my work comes from the artist Fiona Rae. Some imagery in my painting recollects natural forms, placed in an unnatural world. Centred on the act of contemplation, the painting’s contrasting marks and surfaces are originally taken from preliminary automatic drawings, drawn from the uninterrupted sub-conscious mind. Email: paintmadgirl@hotmail.co.uk

Somiyeh Djavanroodi : Hotsie, acrylic spray paint on paper, A2

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“I am the Big Shot. You heard me right the first time. Name of bachelor Johnny Cool. Occupation: Big Shot. Occupation at the moment: just having fun. What a party that was - the drinks were loaded and so were the dolls. I narrowed my eyes and poured a stiff Manhattan. Then I saw... Hotsie. What a dame. A big, bountiful babe in the region of 39-23-33. One hell of a region. She had the hottest lips since Hiroshima: I had to stand back for fear of being burned. Whiskey wow wow. I breathed. She was dressed as before the bed. In that kind of outfit she could get rolled at night... and I don't mean on a crap table.” Bonzo. Dog Doo Dah Band. Email: Somiyeh2581@hotmail.com

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Lesley Evans: Untitled, etching, each: 60cm x 60cm

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The subject of my work is the grid translated through architecture. Each print is created using a number of etching plates each of which is an individual module. The physical changes in each plate are a semiotic to suggest both a narrative to reflect the changing attitudes to our social climate and the concept that as individuals, we appropriate our environment. Krauss says that in the spatial sense the grid states the autonomy of the realm of art, flattened, geometricized, ordered. Krauss R. 1986, The Originality of the Avant-Garde and the Modernist Myths. The presentation of my work within the exhibition uses the grid to delineate a structure of tight control and to suggest the limitless. Email: laevans27@yahoo.co.uk

Kate Foy: Organic Forms, digital photographs, various

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My work, using the format of photography, explores the context of how we perceive Organic, along with the uncertainty of abstract form. The images impose a certain amount of unease in the viewer; imploring them to question what they actually see. The images can often conjure different responses in an audience; depending upon each persons vision. I wanted them to have a lot of texture; to entice the viewer. The detailed imagery of different matter, substance and intricate patterns all made abstract through the photographic form. Email: skycat_foy@yahoo.co.uk

Jade Hanley: hooami, www.hooami.co.uk

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"hooami" is the next generation of social networking website, which considers how identity is fashioned on the internet. Other social networking sites aim to connect you with people you know; hooami wonders how well you know yourself. Tel: 07850 555937 Email: jade@kiss-my-art.co.uk www.kiss-my-art.co.uk

Dan Hasker: Film Still #01, film (digital), site-dependent projection

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My work plays with the knowledge of our own self-existence and the finality of it; working on that uncertainty of life and death that is within us all. I address my subject through film, the media through which life and death is most commonly fed to us in easy digestible pieces. The use of objects as metaphors is one that is not uncommon in the art world, from the more recent works of Hirst, to the use of iconography within still life painting; we have become fluent in the language of objects. These simple photo-like videos stand as visual thoughts on the concept of death. Email: djhasker@hotmail.com

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0204 361: Shredded paper, polymerised acrylic, 3,624,556,327 cubic millimetres (approx)

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‘…Well, why not? In twenty minutes you can sink a battleship, down three or four planes, hold a double execution. You can die, get married, get fired and find a new job, have a tooth pulled, have your tonsils out. In twenty minutes you can even get up in the morning. You can get a glass of water at a night club – maybe. Twenty minutes’ sleep. That’s a long time, especially on a cold night, out in the open. I began to shiver.’ Chandler R. 1940, Farewell My Lovely. Email: eatyourfudge@gmail.com

Di Hockin: Corridor No 3, installation, variable dimensions

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“I do not see space according to its exterior envelope; I live it from the inside; I am immersed in it” Merleau-Ponty, M. 1964. In Bishop, C. 2005. Installation Art.

I am interested in creating temporary but static places, spaces that challenge our senses. When I think about these archetypal structures that speak of labyrinths, I imagine how people will approach them, and I ask myself how a person walking through these small spaces might be affected. The spatial layout, with its narrow passages, is intrinsic to this work. What is important here is how participant perception will be confronted through an immersive interaction within this piece. Tel: 07957 191729 Email: di.hockin@sky.com

India Hocking: Untitled, mixed media, 101.5 x 76cm (detail)

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“They grow out of darkness and into darkness they return” Donna McLean. Ian McEwan: The Art of Darkness, Private Worlds Exhibition Catalogue, 2007.

The barn is representative of feelings of anxiety and terror that are best forgotten. The theme signifies a nightmare situation that is suggested within the genre of Romanticism. The lack of physical beings in the paintings convey a feeling of loneliness experienced by humans, though the narrative plays on the theme of classic ‘tongue in cheek’ horror films. The dark but electric colour palette and the variety of techniques I have used to apply the medium reflects the atmospheric charge within the paintings. Email: india_mcr@yahoo.co.uk

Loise (Lola) Holmes: Untitled, digital photography, AO x 3

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“Let fear be defined as a sort of pain or agitation derived from the imagination of a future destructive or painful evil” Kennedy G. 1991, Aristotle, On Rhetoric; A theory of Civic Discourse My work is an exploration of the hidden elements or emotions that make up our fears and the potential of our facial expressions to communicate the complexity of our feelings. Using the camera to focus on the face as a subject I aim to capture the detail of an instant moment and all that is expressed in that moment. Email: Lola_J@hotmail.com

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Gavin Howard : Urban:city_one, acrylic and gloss paint on canvas, 50 x 76.5cm

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How we see cities and environments differ through who we are. Using areas that we recognise in our cities, my work aims to show how I see the urbanisation of our world through expressive mark making, drips and splatters. Using acrylic and gloss paints, these works are heavily influenced by artists such as Dave Kinsey, Shepard Fairey and John Virtue. Inspiration is also taken from graphic novels and skateboarding photography. We all memorise places in various individual ways and using visual information gathered from visited sites, I have created a series of paintings that represent how I visualise where we live. Email: tornado_records@hotmail.com

Terri Humby: Summer 89 (detail), photo album, bleached photographs on digital print paper, 150 x 210cm

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Why do we remember what we do? My work addresses the relationship between photography and memory, using family snaps from which to draw reference. The main focus of the work is based upon how family snaps affect our memories and memory processes, how our personal and emotional attachments to the past influence the way we think about our own family snaps and how digital photography will effect these processes. Email: terrihumby@hotmail.co.uk

Hannah Ireland: Look Above You, mixed media on acrylic, 3 x 122 x 44 cm

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The vast and immersive sensations of the romantic sublime are central to my work. My approach to these sensations is through an exploration of the inherent allure of colour and light. I use the suggestive and affective qualities of painting rather than the descriptive, creating works that challenge the need for imagery. To confront this allure I play with aspects of display such as site and scale, formulating the viewing experience to both seduce and distance the viewer relating to the intangible. Email: info@HannahIreland.co.uk

Vicki Isted: Untitled, digital print, 203 x 305cm

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We are surrounded by media images of perfection everywhere we look which tantalize us with hints of what we should aspire to be. The images represent perfection and an ideal beauty that is so unattainable because, in reality, models do not look like that themselves. My work consists of appropriating and scanning found media images, then digitally manipulating and â&#x20AC;&#x153;detouchingâ&#x20AC;? them to highlight the editing processes they have taken. This draws attention to the sociological pressures taken on by the audience with regard to eating disorders, drug use and the inevitable ageing of our bodies. Email: vik.isted@btinternet.com

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Stephen James: Past Times, oil on canvas, 40 x 35cm

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The painter Gerhard Richter wrote “Perhaps because I’m sorry for the photograph, because it has such a miserable existence even though it is such a perfect picture, I would like to make it valid, make it visible – just make it” In Silverman, K. 2007, The Painting of Modern Life. My work is about painting from photographs, not photorealist copies but an exploration of the formal elements within an image. I play with scale, colour and form. Some works are composites, some are inspired by particular artists but all the works are linked by an exploration of the formal elements within an image; making visible, images that go un-noticed, images that record change. Email: stephenjamesart@hotmail.co.uk

Emily Jones: Untitled, mixed media, 32.5 x 37.4cm

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The founding principle behind this body of work is the notion that still life can double as portraiture. Inanimate objects have the potential to tell us something of their owner. When collated these small clues form an implied narrative that is different for every viewer. This is an area that interests me greatly. Drawing is an art form that is personal, humble and direct. “Drawing is not a window on the world but a device for understanding our place within the universe” Dexter, E. 2006, Vitamin D – New Perspectives in Drawing. These drawings are connected but it is for the viewer to decide how and why. Email: froodyemily@btinternet.com

Kim Jordan: Untitled No 1, oil on canvas, 1 x 2m

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I am predominantly interested in portraying the female. Strong compositions on large canvases challenge the audience with confident and intense gazes. Through oil paint, I am passionate about exploring the multiple different faces people possess. I am intrigued by the complex diversity of the face and how the same face can be viewed through infinite emotions. My aim is not to persuade the audience to look at my portraits with loaded context, but to decipher the features through their own perception. On the surface a façade is evident, but what is beyond that, and what is not shown is just as important to the dynamics of female identity. Email: license_creative@yahoo.co.uk

Cassandra Joucerand: Parallel Illusion, mixed media, installation

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“The Illusion created by the theatre must be a partial one, in order that it may always be recognized as an illusion. Reality, however complete, has to be altered by turning into art…” Willet, J. 2001. Brecht on Theatre – The development of an aesthetic. How can you create a world that your imagination can only see? By reading books, watching films and television or going to the theatre we can be transported into another realm where anything is possible. This 3-Dimensional canvas displays the relationship between reality and fantasy- or is it a film/stage set? Surrounded by reality, step inside to an alternative a place and let your imagination explore all the possibilities. Tel: 07845040822 Email: cassiecasscass87@yahoo.co.uk

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Alan Lock: Untitled, digital photograph in perspex, 30 x 46cm

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Leaving the freedom of the streets to seek images within urban ruins, my work reflects the silence of the Grid. Krauss R. 1986, The Originality of the Avant-Garde and the Modernist Myths. I stumble past warning signs of crumbling structures, broken windows, doorways, fences and barbed wire looking for traces of life. Fear adds to the eerie silence as well as to the elation and intrigue. My camera centres on three sites that have been virtual mental and physical prisons for the inhabitants. Images hint at a life that has gone before. Ansel Adams said â&#x20AC;&#x153;A photograph is usually looked at â&#x20AC;&#x201C; seldom looked intoâ&#x20AC;? Ansel Adams, at www.nga.gov.au/VIP. I invite the viewer to do just that. Tel: 02392 466861 Email: alan@alanlock.wanadoo.co.uk

Victoria McQuoid: Untitled, watercolour, acrylic and PVA glue, 93in x 96in

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Watercolours are of interest to me for their delicate and ethereal quality. I experiment binding them with other materials that enhance or change their inherent qualities. By allowing my materials a certain amount of freedom to create their own natural forms within the painting, different textures and surface finishes are achieved. This contrasts with the large open space that I allow to surround the painted area. These two elements interact with each other to create a compositional whole. Balance is created between the two areas by the careful and purposeful positioning of the painted area within the canvas. Email: vmcq@hotmail.co.uk

Julie Morrow: View Point, ceramic, installation

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This installation intends to portray the disintegration of the family unit. From some angles the shapes are ambiguous, made of woven and broken ceramic grids. However, each figure emerges to enable a glimpse of the shattered yet suggested human form. The composition represents society in its fragility. Political, economical and cultural influences break the boundaries needed to preserve unity and to establish limits and order. Clay is an appropriate material to use since many cultures have believed earth to be the substance of life. Email: morrows@marlborocott.freeserve.co.uk

Stefan Murphy: Boxes, print, various dimensions

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These boxes show images or text I made or found that look to me as though they connect. Must be I connect myself to them all. I printed them because of the gap it places between an action and an idea. Looking at a public notice or a product printed on its box I see nothing of the hand that made it belonging to the somebody that thought it. I like that trick of detachment being used for self expression. Email: Stefanmurphy1985@yahoo.ie

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Chris Pinder: A Changing Experience, mixed media, installation

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I want to entice the viewer into my art. By touching and trying on my textile sculptures, they enter into the phenomenology of eroticism. My work challenges the myths of woman’s ‘ideal body image’. I use fabric, as clothing is the ‘second skin’ suggesting wrinkles, curves and rolls. The sewing implies surgery. The addition of expander foam gives the work a taut voluminous quality. Some psychologists connect the feminine to the grotesque. In response, I have created an inner chaos, an uncontrollable aspect of woman which might seep or contaminate. Email: Chris_pinder99@hotmail.com

Kate Prosser: Bank, glass bottles, cotton yarn and mixed media, 2m x 2m

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This work began as an investigation of process. The transformation of a linear substance (yarn) to three dimensional forms is intriguing, while the repetition of simple stitches has a meditative quality. The intimate scale and knitted structure suggest cell growth; organic or engineered, living or dead? The forms invite close scrutiny and tactile exploration which is denied by their display, suspended in liquid in specimen jars. The presentation juxtaposes the domestic (knit) with the scientific; they become something “other”. Email: kate.prosser1@btinternet.com

Lucy Redknap : Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 160 x 160cm

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Light and moving light is the basis of my work. In the beginning I took photographs of moving light, for example; lights in clubs, glow sticks, sparklers and fireworks. At first I used a paintbrush to represent the images and shapes I got from the photos, but could not get the effect I wanted. Strongly influenced by Jackson Pollock, I began to use other techniques to apply the paint, seeking strong, bright unbroken lines of colour to represent the movement of light. Email: lucy220@hotmail.co.uk

Hannah Sapsford: Anon, plaster, various dimensions

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The main influence and theme throughout my work has been ideas of the body: the colours, the shapes and the texture, which also take on sculptural form. Another important factor has been the material process that has developed through experimentation, research and refinement. Also, the idea of suggestion, interpretation and interaction with the audience became apparent in the work. The work then begins to form diverse connotations for the viewer as well as myself, and in turn becomes increasingly interactive, allowing the viewer to develop a personal response and relationship with the work. Tel: 07851 837234 Email: hannah.sapsford@hotmail.co.uk

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Amy Strike: Love Poem: 5 seconds following the end of gravity, Copper, onion, rhyme, 56ft 6in

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How many fingers am I holding up? What’s 112 minus the length of the room? Numbers rule our lives; they define the spaces in which we move, even the words we use. Every day, we travel through a miasma of calculation. But what happens when a number flatly refuses to act as it should? Numbers are echoes, and we use them to see. A sound doubles into an echo over fifty one and a half feet, so to hear an echo is to “see” that space, but what if it doesn’t return? These are the equations that inspire my work. Email: miceonstrings@hotmail.com

Anthony Tivey: Empty Space, digital photography, various dimensions

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I started to look at artists who investigated storage and spaces. This began my own experimentation of storage places, the spaces they take up and the objects being stored. My ideas then focused on the empty space in between the objects themselves and why they should be important to me. Should empty spaces be filled? Can an object meant to store items be left? Email: anthony.tivey@btinternet.com

Sophie Willson: Untitled, digital photograph, 42 x 29.7cm

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How easy would it be to spend a whole day surrounded by people and not really notice anyone? The aim of my work is to draw my audience’s attention to the unseen people of our streets, the individuals that we just don’t ever really notice. I intend to show that, however ordinary someone may look or however mundane their actions may be, when studied closely they can be as fascinating and interesting as the celebrities that our tabloid magazines promote. Tel: 07780 982092

Jonny Wright: Deltitnu, film still

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There was a loud noise. It scared me, then I realized it was sound. Since then it’s been alright! The beginning of this quest is the beginning of the end already. Once we have found out, we have found out, unless there are obligations to prove me wrong, let’s repeat ourselves. Surrealist video unleashes the shadowy parts of the conscious. Visual awareness from screens has the power to undermine our thought or, on the other hand, to illuminate our conscious control. In childhood you are closest to real life yet you get weaned away from this truth… A child’s experience is guided by impulse and curiosity rather than a slow recognition of this “truth”. Tel: 07837 615267

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fine art at THE University of chichester

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Fine Art AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICHESTER The Fine Art Programme at the University of Chichester is focused on individual progress and achievement with the freedom to explore studio and workshop practice across a broad range of skills and techniques. The study of Fine Art at Chichester encourages you to be creative, research driven and will provide the skills for the production of art and the professional and key skills essential for employment in the 21st century. You can act independently to pursue your work within a specific discipline such as sculpture, printmaking or painting or work more strategically to gain skills in many areas and to define your work across a more diverse set of material practices. You will find support and help from the staff and technicians to enable you to get the most out of your experience. Fine Art will work for you when you meet the challenges you face with drive, intellectual curiosity, a sense of adventure and an ability to accommodate the unpredictable. The staff team look forward to helping each of you develop your skills and ideas and to support you to become increasingly confident in your work

Fine Art is at the forefront of cultural production, trailblazing new territories for others to follow. You will become part of this momentum and by entering the community of artists at Chichester, you will be supported and encouraged to extend your work into new creative areas and make new discoveries. The Fine Art programme is centred on the concept of practice as research. This can be seen as a bringing together of all aspects of art knowledge, skills and critical understanding to the investigation of materials, experimental approaches to processes and to the construction of new responses to the making of art. Practice as research makes the fundamental connection between theory and practice that forges new links and relationships between materials, and representations to create new insights to the socio political context in which we live. Fine Art is exciting and deeply rewarding. It will take you deeper into the subject that you already have a passion for, so be prepared to take some risks and to challenge assumptions. And remember also, that whatever you make has never existed before!

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Fine Art BA (HONS) An inclusive specialist and/or multidisciplinary course offering each student a range of skills, disciplines and aspirations appropriate for contemporary artists of the 21st Century. Some Fine Art degrees in the UK ask you to make choices based on a single discipline or subject. At the University of Chichester, we recognise that not all students wish to be labelled so early in their education, and may want to learn a range of disciplines before becoming more specialised. Our programme of study is built around this principle, allowing students to specialise OR move between various disciplines over their period of study. Centred firmly within leading edge contemporary art, we encourage students to become confident practitioners through creative experimental approaches within single-discipline OR multi-disciplinary studio work. This approach will enable individual responses to concepts, issues and themes that reflect contemporary professional Fine Art through a range of material practices such as; sculptural and video installation, painting, sound and performance work, textile and placement as well as site-based work in different environments. At Chichester, drawing is seen as an important element in the development and realization of ideas and is the basis of the initial studio work at level one.

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Main Studio Activities At present our main studio activities are: Painting: Oil, acrylic, drawing, construction, mixed media. Textiles: Constructed textiles, feltmaking, embroidery, papermaking, printed textiles, mixed media. Sculpture: Wood, metal, casting, plaster, ceramics, found materials, mixed media. Printmaking: etching, screenprint, relief print, monoprint and combined media. Digital Art: digital photo, video, sound, net.art, animation, installation. Methods of study In level 1, students will initially be set a series of research and drawing based activities that will drive the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ideas towards a self-directed practice, greater independence, and by level 2, the attainment of a distinctive vision. Both individual and group tutorials take place and workshop instruction occurs throughout. Lectures and seminars in the contextual strand and the peer group critique in the studio, support independent, self directed work. Students will learn to create their own negotiated pattern of work as they move towards a final exhibition for their degree show in level 3.


Professional Experience It is vital that students are prepared for at least some of the things the contemporary art world will throw at them on graduating. We have developed a programme in which level 3 students have to focus on aspects of professional practice and vocational experience. Recent students have worked on commissions, community arts projects, work placements with local galleries and museums, residencies in schools, and even creating their own virtual gallery. The experience is invaluable in terms of working to time and budgetary constraints, dealing with the public. Employment The course provides the opportunity to develop skills across a broad range of areas and become resourceful, reflective learners, finding creative solutions to new problems and with the ability to be self-disciplined and able to work independently. These are all key characteristics that employers are seeking. Critical and Contextual Strand The Critical and Contextual Strand encourages Fine Art students to re-think the nature of the Visual Arts; In addition it develops study skills necessary for the Personal Study in Level 3. The integration of theory and practice provides the stimulating scholarly debate that is central to teaching and learning, and offers students an opportunity to relate concepts to their own studio practice.

Lecturers The lecturing staff are active practising professional artists and researchers who regularly exhibit or publish their work. The friendly team of staff have expertise ranging from painting, sculpture, textiles, digital art, printmaking and installation. There is a programme of visiting lecturers who bring professional contexts and enhance distinctive, specialist skills and practices. Technical Staff A team of technicians with a broad range of specialist expertise support the staff and students. Assessment Assessment occurs throughout the course in the form of visual and oral presentations, seminars, group critiques, essays, exams and culminates in the final year degree exhibition of practical work for all BA students. Study Trips Each year, we offer the opportunity for all students to visit a major international city at an affordable cost to study the museums, galleries and culture. Recent cities have included New York, Barcelona and Madrid. Trips to Museums and galleries in London and other urban centres occur throughout the academic year.

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Fine Art BA (HONS) (continued)

The learning Environment All students doing ‘studio practice’ modules are allocated a personal studio base where each student will carry out their self directed projects and art work. All students also have access to workshop areas and technical support in the following key disciplines: Welding, casting, working in wood, carving, ceramic and plaster, woven and printed textiles, feltmaking, embroidery, drawing, painting, printmaking, digital photography and new media, video and sound.

The Otter Gallery The Otter Gallery is an on campus Art Gallery open to the public. Each year a programme of exhibitions is organised to include the work of established and emerging national and international artists. The Gallery is also used to exhibit both student and staff work and also work from our own ‘Otter Collection’: an important collection of British 20th century art which includes work by Henry Moore, Patrick Heron and Stanley Spencer.

Students have access to instruction and demonstrations in these key disciplines throughout their study in a culture of safe working and professional practice.

Pallant House Gallery, Chichester Students can take full use of the research opportunities offered by the gallery in supporting the critical and contextual strand through group visits and by becoming members of Pallant House Gallery.

‘artOne’ Fine Art is located in a purpose-designed art building called ‘artOne’. The building: provides specialist workshop areas in Sculpture and Textiles, a large spacious open plan studio for personal spaces, a life drawing space, an art materials shop, a Gallery an outdoor working area.

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Pallant House Gallery is one of England’s leading galleries. It’s collection of 20th Century British art is a wonderful resource for study. The gallery won the 2007 Gulbenkian Prize for museum of the year in recognition of its status and public accessibility. Pallant House has a programme of visiting artists, artists talks and an exciting programme of exhibitions that showcase the work of leading contemporary artists. The gallery has links with the Otter Gallery, and strong links to the Fine Art course.


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directory of Staff

Academic Staff Steve McDade Chris Aggs Victoria Brown Shirley Chubb Chris McHugh Tim Sandys-Renton Associate Lecturers Pete Codling Elizabeth Colley Rachel Johnston Mike Savage Art Technicians Sarah Godfrey Nik Jewell Bob Marshall Mandie Saw Anne White Media Specialists Neil Bryant Nicki Norris Damian Wiles Sarah Wright External Examiners Ray Lee, Oxford Brookes University Russell Richards, Southampton Solent University Course Administrator Christine Ferguson

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Subject Librarian Ruth Twiss Visiting Lecturers Louise Burston Pete Codling Craig Fisher Tom Hammick Anna Heinrich & Leon Palmer Professor Charlie Hooker Alice Kettle Velika Janceva Jamie Shovlin Emilia Telese Otter Gallery Exhibitions Going Straight - Lesley Halliwell Tree of Life - Chichester Festivities The Permanent Collection Robert Enoch Retrospective - Derek Davis Boxes and Assemblages - John Adams Drawing on Research - Fine Art Staff Pamela Schilderman Hatch - Fine Art Students Catalogue Credits Design: Roy Donaldson Photography: Bob Marshall


visiting Mature Students' Evening Undergraduate and Postgraduate General Open Days fine art Open Days Fine Art Degree Show Open Days are held throughout the academic year. You may attend talks about the course structure, tours of the workshops and studios in artOne, and you might also like to book a portfolio advice and preparation session. To find full information on the Fine Art Programmes at the University of Chichester go to our website www.chiuni.ac.uk/fineart This will give full details of the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, details of curriculum content, course modules, examples of staff research and student work, as well as details of applications.

For more information visit our website or contact: Christine Ferguson Programme Administrator Department of Fine Art University of Chichester Bishop Otter Campus, College Lane, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 6PE Tel: 01243 816253 Fax: 01243 816080 Email: C.Ferguson@chi.ac.uk

www.chiuni.ac.uk/fineart

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artone

University of Chichester Bishop Otter Campus, College Lane, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 6PE Tel: 01243 816253 Fax: 01243 816080 Email: C.Ferguson@chi.ac.uk

www.chiuni.ac.uk/fineart

Fine Art Degree Show 2008  

The exhibition presents the diversity of practices and personal interests that forms Fine Art at the University of Chichester. Each exhibiti...

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