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C ommunity I nvestment F und R esults 2011

United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County


This is what it means to

LIVE UNITED: UNITED WAY IS

mobilizing PEOPLE INTO COLLECTIVE ACTION THROUGH

GIVING, ADVOCATING & VOLUNTEERING IN THE AREAS OF

Education, Income and Health. WE BELIEVE THESE ARE THE

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OF A GOOD LIFE FOR EVERYONE.

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BY MAKING RESULTS-BASED INVESTMENTS IN OUR COMMUNITY, WE SUPPORT LONGLASTING, MEASURABLE CHANGE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES RIGHT HERE IN ASHEVILLE AND BUNCOMBE COUNTY.


When youth drop out of high school, their chance of gaining employment is 50 percent. If they find work, their income is 40 percent less than their peers who graduate. Accessing quality healthcare then becomes a daunting challenge. Education, Income and Health are interconnected, just as we are interconnected with our neighbors in need. • When children do not enter kindergarten ready to learn - that impacts everyone. • When people cannot meet their basic needs - that impacts everyone. • When people are not safe in their homes and don’t have the primary, behavioral or dental care they need that impacts everyone. At United Way, we believe what happens to our neighbors matters to us, and we have a stake in their success. Our futures are intertwined. We also believe we have more power than we think to support long-lasting, measurable change in people’s lives. By making a results-based investment in United Way’s Community Investment Fund, you combine your gift with those of your neighbors, giving you the power to change lives today and in the future. Join the movement. Be part of the change. LIVE UNITED!

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In May 2011, the United Way Board of Directors approved its 2011-2012 Investment Strategy. More than $2.7 million Community Investment Fund dollars were invested in Education, Income and Health, as well as Hands On Asheville-Buncombe, 2-1-1 of WNC and our Middle School Success initiative. The investments in Education, Income and Health, determined by knowledgeable volunteers in these fields, were made during a competitive grant process to community partners whose results best align with the specific improvements we want to see. You’ll find more information on the results we expect throughout the pages of this brochure or visit us at www.unitedwayabc.org.

2011-2012 INVESTMENT STRATEGY Education - $702,816 Income - $721,286 Health - $1,032,929 2-1-1 of WNC - $112,169 Hands On Asheville- Buncombe - $76,706 Middle School Success Initiative - $100,000

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Our Finances TOTAL EXPENSES - $6,079,090 Community Investment Fund and Designations - $4,881,232

(Includes Community Investment Fund, 2-1-1 of WNC, Hands On AshevilleBuncombe and Middle School Success, as well as outside designations and in-kind contributions.)

United Way Overhead/Fundraising - $833,158

(Overhead as a percentage of total revenue and services is 13.7 percent; Overhead as a percentage of campaign pledges is 16 percent.)

Reserved for Uncollectible Pledges - $364,700

TOTAL REVENUE & SERVICES - $6,079,090 Annual Campaign Revenue - $5,210,000 Other Income - $295,690 In-Kind Contributions - $350,000 Investment Income - $42,000 Grants - $181,400

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FOCUS ON

EDUCATION. We envision an engaged community where each child develops and succeeds academically, socially and emotionally.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS IN EDUCATION:

Middle School Magic (Asheville City Schools); Volunteer Outreach and Training (Asheville City Schools Foundation); Big Brothers Big Sisters (Big Brothers Big Sisters of WNC); Project MARCH Learning Center (Children First/Communities in Schools); Girl Scout Leadership Outreach (Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont); Youthful HAND (Housing Authority of the City of Asheville); Community Child Care Center, Early Learning Center (Irene Wortham Center); Augustine Project (Literacy Council of Buncombe County); Youth Conflict Resolution (The Mediation Center); Early Care and Education – Montmorenci, Early Care and Education – Riceville, Parent Education and School Readiness (Mountain Area Child and Family Center); 21st Century Community Learning, Project RISE (YMCA); Child Care Center, FutureVision, MotherLove, School Age (YWCA)

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MANY CHILDREN ARE NOT PREPARED TO ENTER KINDERGARTEN. • Increase high quality, affordable early care and education opportunities for children from birth to kindergarten. • Enhance families’ and caregivers’ ability to support the development of children from birth to kindergarten. • Enhance the community’s capacity to identify and address children’s developmental vulnerabilities.

MANY CHILDREN DO NOT MOVE SUCCESSFULLY FROM KINDERGARTEN THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION. • Strengthen the social and basic life skills that youth need for success. • Increase the involvement of families, caregivers and the community in the academic success of all children. • Increase basic academic skills of children performing below grade level.

THE DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH ARE NOT MET. • Increase adults’ awareness of and responsiveness to the impact of cultural variables on education. • Increase diverse educational options for all learners.

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $269,514

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $392,215

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $41,088

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RETURN ON YOUR INVESTMENT IN EDUCATION: 2011-2012 Selected Results

• By investing in community partners utilizing best practices to provide high quality early care, more than 200 children will be prepared for kindergarten. • By investing in community partners providing mentors and tutors, conflict resolution, leadership and life skills training, homework assistance and after school support, almost 2,100 children will receive support to move successfully from kindergarten through high school graduation. • By investing in community partners addressing developmental delays and language-related difficulties, almost 100 children’s diverse educational needs will be met.

CAMPAIGN FOR THE COMMON GOOD IN EDUCATION United Way is bringing together parents, students, teachers, community leaders and people across the community to talk about their goals for education, how those goals are different than what they see in their community and what needs to happen to create change.

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Almost 100 people attended our Community Conversation last fall after the release of the education documentary “Waiting for ‘Superman,’”and our Community Conversations with high school students and other groups have provided us valuable insight on education issues in Asheville and Buncombe County.


DEBORAH AND SARAH’S STORY Sarah was accustomed to being very active, often involved in artistic and crafty projects. However, now in her 80s, she had struggled with depression since her husband passed away, especially during the cold, grey winter months. After securing professional help, her daughter Deborah regularly made suggestions of ways Sarah could pass her time in constructive ways. One day, Deborah found the Teacher’s Pet Portable Project in the Hands On AshevilleBuncombe e-newsletter. This project engages volunteers to create educational materials, such as flash cards and games, for use in and out of elementary school classrooms. Deborah makes the copies, and Sarah cuts out flash cards. They have a ball together, creating packets of materials and talking about the project’s impact on the children. Best of all, Sarah feels useful again. Hands On Asheville-Buncombe’s Teacher’s Pet project gives volunteers an easy way to help increase the basic academic skills of local students giving them an even better chance of moving successfully from kindergarten through high school graduation.

EDUCATION: KEY STATISTICS FOR 2011-2012 Investment $702,816 Community Partners 12 Total Individuals Impacted 2,398

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FOCUS ON

INCOME. We envision a thriving community working together, fulfilling basic needs and building economic self-sufficiency for all.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS IN INCOME:

Disaster Services (American Red Cross); Assistance to Individuals (The Arc of Buncombe County); Refugee Assistance Program (Catholic Social Services); Advocacy and Community Engagement, Family Resource Center at Emma (Children First/Communities in Schools); Green Opportunities (Green Opportunities); Pathways to Permanent Housing (Homeward Bound of Asheville, Inc.); Supported Employment (Irene Wortham Center); Living Wage Employers Certification (Just Economics); Adult Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages (Literacy Council of Buncombe County); Food Distribution, MANNA Packs for Kids (MANNA Foodbank); Changing Together (The Mediation Center); Mothers On the Move (Mountain Area Child and Family Center); Emergency Home Repair (Mountain Housing Opportunities); Financial/ Housing Counseling, HomeBase, Money Self Sufficiency (OnTrack Financial Education and Counseling); Homelessness Prevention, Immigrant Self-Sufficiency (Pisgah Legal Services); Social Services Client Assistance (The Salvation Army); Swannanoa Emergency Assistance (Swannanoa Community Council); New Choices (YWCA)

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MANY PEOPLE CAN NOT MEET THEIR BASIC NEEDS. • Reduce the stigma associated with public and private basic needs assistance programs. • Increase availability and use of public and private services that provide basic needs assistance for people in crisis or with ongoing needs.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE LIVING WAGE JOBS. • •

Increase the vocational, language and literacy skills of individuals. Increase the number of workers who earn a living wage.

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $263,222

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $139,109

MANY PEOPLE ARE NOT FINANCIALLY STABLE. • Increase the capacity of individuals to move out of financial crisis. • Increase individuals’ skills needed to manage financial resources and build stability.

MANY PEOPLE LIVE IN SUBSTANDARD OR UNAFFORDABLE HOUSING. • Increase the awareness of those in need, supporting agencies and the housing industry about housing regulations, resources and availability. • Maintain existing and increase affordable and safe housing stock for low-income households. • Increase housing subsidies for low-income households.

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $159,946

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $159,009

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RETURN ON YOUR INVESTMENT IN INCOME: 2011-2012 Selected Results • By investing in community partners providing food, utility and rent assistance, more than 12,900 people will meet their basic needs. • By investing in community partners that work to reduce barriers to employment and provide vocational and literacy training, almost 3,000 individuals will acquire the skills they need to gain living wage jobs. • By investing in community partners providing financial and housing counseling, money management services and tax preparation, almost 4,500 people will access resources and gain the skills they need to become financially stable. • By investing in community partners providing home repairs and preventing unlawful evictions and substandard living conditions, more than 330 people will secure safe, affordable housing.

EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT AND TAX PREPARATION ASSISTANCE 2-1-1 of WNC connects callers who may be eligible for an Earned Income Tax Credit and/or to have their taxes prepared for free with local organizations who provide tax assistance services.

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Last year, 504 Buncombe County callers were referred to tax preparation assistance programs that assist people at sites across the community by helping prepare their tax forms, saving hundreds of dollars in professional preparation fees, finding credits and deductions they qualify for and steering people away from high-interest refund anticipation loans.


SHERRI’S STORY Sherri and her daughter were living in a tent. A single mother, she became homeless after losing her job and falling behind in her rent. A family member offered to help, but the only space he could offer was his backyard, so Sherri and her daughter put up a tent. Sherri got a new job, but her savings weren’t adding up fast enough to cover the up-front costs of moving into a new place. Summer turned into fall, and Sherri called 2-1-1 for help finding a warm place for her and her daughter to live. Keith, a 2-1-1 referral specialist, did a housing pre-screening and connected her to a homelessness prevention program. When Keith called her back to follow up shortly afterward, Sherri was carrying groceries up the stairs to her new home. Because too many people cannot meet their basic needs, partnerships like this help people out of crisis by increasing the availability and use of public and private services that provide basic needs assistance. Last year, 2-1-1 referral specialists pre-screened more than 600 households and made referrals to the homelessness prevention program for case management, housing search and placement services, financial assistance and more.

INCOME: KEY STATISTICS FOR 2011-2012 Investment $721,286 Community Partners 18 Total Individuals Impacted 20,741

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FOCUS ON

HEALTH. We envision a safe community where everyone has the knowledge, resources, access and opportunities to be healthy.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS IN HEALTH:

All Souls Counseling Center (All Souls Counseling Center); Neil Dobbins Center (ARP Addiction Recovery Prevention); Eye Care (Asheville Lions Eye Clinic); Home-Based Services for Juvenile Sex Offenders (Barium Springs Home for Children); Adult Day Services (CarePartners); Angels Watch, Cornerstone Transitional Living, PERCS, Respite Scholarship Program, Trinity Place Runaway and Homeless Youth Shelter (CARING for Children); Personal Safety Education/Outreach, Crisis Intervention/Counseling (Child Abuse Prevention Services); Resource Coordination, Seniors Safe at Home (The Council on Aging of Buncombe County); Girls on the Run/Girls on Track (Girls on the Run of Western North Carolina); Court Advocacy for Victims of Domestic Violence, Crisis Counseling for Victims of Domestic Violence, Crisis Stabilization for Victims of Domestic Violence, Preventing Domestic Violence through Awareness (Helpmate); Adult Mediation, Family Visitation (The Mediation Center); MemoryCare (MemoryCare); Rainbow in My Tummy (Mountain Area Child and Family Center); Crisis Support for Victims of Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence Prevention Education, Support Services for Victims of Sexual Assault (Our VOICE); Disability Assistance, Domestic Violence Prevention, Elder Law (Pisgah Legal Services); Women at Risk (Western Carolinians for Criminal Justice); HIV Prevention & Wellness (Western North Carolina AIDS Project); Behavioral Health, Dental, HIV Treatment Adherence Services (WNCCHS); Youth Fit for Life (YMCA); Preventive Health (YWCA)

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NOT ALL PEOPLE, HOMES AND COMMUNITIES ARE SAFE. • Increase the power of individuals and the community to prevent violence and abuse. • Increase the likelihood of recovery for anyone experiencing trauma from violence or abuse. • Reduce the prevalence of unsafe environments in our community.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE QUALITY SUPPORT FOR PREVENTIVE HEALTH AND WELLNESS. • Increase awareness of and opportunities for wellness, prevention and early detection. • Increase physical activity and healthy eating for children, families and those at risk of poor health. • Increase supportive networks for seniors and people with disabilities.

MANY PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE QUALITY PRIMARY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE. • Increase community support options to keep people as independent as possible. • Increase integration of behavioral and primary care services for all. • Increase access to quality primary, behavioral and dental health care regardless of ability to pay.

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $479,427

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $154,132

2011-2012 INVESTMENT TO TACKLE THIS BARRIER: $399,370

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RETURN ON YOUR INVESTMENT IN HEALTH: 2011-2012 Selected Results • By investing in community partners providing education, training, counseling, legal support and much more, almost 13,600 individuals will learn how to avoid and prevent or recover from violence and abuse. • By investing in community partners providing opportunities to exercise, eat healthy and reduce future health risks, more than 14,700 people will have quality support for preventive health and wellness. • By investing in community partners connecting clients to medical providers, providing behavioral health and support services and increasing access to affordable medications, more than 7,500 people will receive quality primary and behavioral health care.

PRESCRIPTION DRUG CARDS United Way is partnering with Buncombe County government to distribute Coast2Coast Rx Discount Cards to residents. The cards reduce the cost of prescription drugs for those who have little or no insurance. Last year, Buncombe County residents used the Coast2Coast Rx Discount Card to fill prescriptions that had a cumulative retail price of $1,747,710. The discount price they realized was $862,455.

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Thus, the use of this card saved these residents $885,255, or 50.65 percent, of the cost of their prescriptions. For many, this made it possible to access quality healthcare and remain well.


KATE’S STORY Kate’s sister had been diagnosed with cervical cancer six months prior, so she jumped at the chance when 2-1-1 Referral Specialist Rachel offered to provide her information about cancer prevention. Kate was uninsured, had not had an exam in more than 10 years and was afraid of possibly having undiagnosed issues. As a result of calling 2-1-1, Kate was enrolled in My Body My Test, an initiative in which 2-1-1 partnered with UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health to offer WNC women a home HPV test kit and a no-cost pelvic exam at a local clinic. To help overcome the barrier that too many people do not have quality primary and behavioral health care, the My Body My Test partnership increased many women’s access to quality healthcare regardless of their ability to pay. 2-1-1 prescreened more than 500 women like Kate last year, and 172 were referred to the My Body My Test program. When Rachel called Kate back to follow-up, she was healthy and happy to be connected with resources for continued preventative health care.

HEALTH: KEY STATISTICS FOR 2011-2012 Investment $1,032,929 Community Partners 20 Total Individuals Impacted 35,823

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Hands On Asheville-Buncombe makes it easy to get involved in meaningful volunteer opportunities in Asheville and Buncombe County. By accessing our comprehensive online database at www.handsonasheville.org, volunteers can search for opportunities that meet their skills, interests and availability. Many projects last just 2-3 hours, occur on evenings and weekends, and don’t require a long term commitment. Hands On also coordinates special service events throughout the year including Day of Caring, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and more. In 2010, Hands On Asheville-Buncombe: • Engaged more than 2900 volunteers who contributed more than 13,000 hours • Coordinated or promoted more than 752 volunteer opportunities • Supported the volunteer needs of 151 nonprofits, schools and public entities in Asheville and Buncombe County

2010 Day of Caring In 2010, nearly 1100 volunteers from 57 local businesses and the public at large completed 82 projects to support 72 local nonprofits, schools, and public entities during our 19th annual Day of Caring. Thanks to everyone who participated!

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2010

highlights 667 fully-stocked backpacks were

assembled and distributed through the annual school supply drive

1642 meals were served to homeless veterans, Hospice patients, and displaced workers.

801 lovies were sewn to help premature babies start bonding with their moms.

515 educational games were assembled for use in area schools.

124 draft stoppers

were created to help our elderly neighbors stay warm and save money.

651 hats were knitted for infants being served by the Health Department.

1050 people had fresh baked cookies after a long day at the hospital with a sick family member.

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To Basic Needs: 35%

Ho Organizational & Community Services: 12%

Med Health Care: 12%

2-1-1 Caller Needs by Category and Volume

Individual & Family Life: 9% Criminal Justice & Legal Services: 8% Income Support & Employment: 8% Mental Health Care & Counseling: 7% Consumer Services: 5%

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Environmental Quality: 2% Education: 2%

Top 5 Needs By Financial Request Total Expressed: $879,159 Housing Expense $349,968

12%

Utility Service Payment $341,020

Medical Bill Payment $83,395 Utility Deposit $31,421 Home Rehab

2%

$12,500

Life: 9%

19% 8%

Top 5 Needs By Volume 13%

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Housing Individual & Shelter & Family Support

Utilities

Food

4% Health Services


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2-1-1 is a community service information line that links people to health and human services in Buncombe, Henderson, Madison and Transylvania counties. Nationally accredited by the Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS), 2-1-1 maintains a database with details about more than 2,000 local, public and nonprofit programs. Accessible by land lines and cell phones, online and by e-mail, this free and confidential multilingual service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. This year, 2-1-1 of WNC celebrates it’s 10th anniversary. While our community has been fortunate to have an information and referral center since the 1970s, the transition to 2-1-1 expanded our reach and simplified the way our community connects to services. We are proud of our accomplishments and partnerships, but we’ve got a lot more to do. Help us spread the word by telling your friends and neighbors or bringing brochures to your gym or faith community. To view 2-1-1’s full 2010 annual report, visit us online at www.211wnc.org.

2010 statistics

Calls (in/out)

54,605

Call Records

38,146

Online Database Visits

8,374

Call Volume Trend 2008 2009 2010

36,763 48,646 32% increase from 2008 54,605 49% increase from 2008

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United Way is focusing on helping students successfully move through middle school in a new and comprehensive way, providing technical assistance to increase the quality of outof-school-time programming. We do this by following the ABCs.

A: United Way provides data collection,

quality assurance and technical support to the In Real Life after school program at sheville Middle School.

A B: By working with Buncombe County

Schools’ Owen Middle School and various out-of-school-time providers, United Way is helping develop an after school program for Owen students, based on input from parents, teachers and, most importantly, students.

C: In our Community, United Way

provides professional development and training opportunities to out-of-schooltime program staff and has facilitated a prestigious Ready By 21 Challenge Grant that provided technical assistance for providers using quality and evaluation tools to improve their services. United Way also advocates for a community commitment to the success of middle school students by getting involved in their lives.

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Through a partnership between YMCA, ARP and the Buncombe County Department of Health, United Way is working to bring the Developmental Assets to our community.

Developmental Assets are 40 building blocks of development that help young people grow up healthy, caring and responsible. These common sense, positive experiences and qualities help influence choices young people make. By training members of our community to build these assets, we will be able to positively impact the lives of our youth. More than 40 members of the community (youth development, nonprofit, government and law enforcement professionals) have already been successfully trained to recognize the developmental assets and focus on increasing the assets of the youth. Research shows young people who have 30 or more of these assets are more likely to be successful in school and life and less likely to engage in risky behaviors. Once you know about the assets, it’s incredibly simple to incorporate them into your relationships with youth. Get involved in a child’s life! Find out how you can become a mentor at: www.handsonasheville.org.

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U nderwriters 2011

MEDIA PREMIER

CAMPAIGN GOLD

CarePartners Health Services

UNC-Asheville

MAHEC

S I LV E R

AB-Tech Arby’s Asheville Savings Bank Bank of America HomeTrust Bank Mills Manufacturing Pepsi US Cellular

LEADERSHIP GIVING GOLD

Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP Northwestern Mutual Financial Network - Asheville

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT P L AT I N U M

GOLD

Blue Ridge X-Ray Company S I LV E R

Progress Energy

United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County 50 South French Broad Avenue Asheville, NC 28801 828-255-0696 www.unitedwayabc.org www.facebook.com/unitedwayabc

2011 Community Investment Fund Results  

Learn more about our focus areas at United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County and how Community Investment Fund dollars are used.