Ultra Journal - vol. 5

Page 1


THIS IS THE FIFTH EDITION OF ULTRA. LOCATED ON THE FAR SIDE OF


A WORD FROM YOUR EDITORS

2020 will forever be remembered as a year of extremes: raging bushfires in Australia, Brazil and California; threat of nuclear war, stock market crashes, worldwide protests against systemic racism, monstrous typhoons and countless other natural disasters. Oh, and not to mention the onset of a worldwide pandemic. In the face of everything that has happened in the past year, it’s important to remember that not all extremes are bad. We saw the world come together to combat these crises in unprecedented and unbelievable ways; through drastic international cooperation, the demand for racial justice across the globe, innovation and adaptation in every industry worldwide, and the fastest vaccine development in history. On the Far Side of ___ represents these extremes, questioning where our limits truly lie and how far we can be pushed when we cannot back down. 2020 challenged us to adapt and overcome when it seemed like the world was crashing down around us. Cities shut down overnight, working from home became the new norm for those of us privileged enough to do so, students migrated to Zoom for online classes, and we all relearned how to communicate with others through a screen when it was no longer safe to do so in person. We experienced shifts in our routines everyday, as we emerged from challenge after challenge. ULTRA V honours the incredible students who rose to this challenge of forging ahead with their education and lives during the most tumultuous year of our lives so far (may it also be the most tumultuous year in our lives, period). Through this past year, we have all logged way too many hours on Zoom and probably have a far more intimate relationship with our home offices (or kitchen tables) than we ever would have liked. ULTRA V is a compilation of the phenomenal work produced during this year like no other, a compilation of work that under regular circumstances would be extraordinary, and is made all the more impressive given the stress, unrest, disruption, and revolutions happening around us. With this edition of ULTRA, we the editors sought not only to ‘make-do’ with the challenges of producing a physical publication during an intensely digital year, but instead embraced opportunities for innovation that we hope will improve the journal for years to come. We hope our endeavours result in a compilation that the community of SAPL can not only be proud of as a body of work, but that also captures the spirit of 2020 - when we are pushed to the far side, we emerge on the other side better than before. Alana Kerr, Danielle Kim, Madisen Killingsworth


Dr Brian R. Sinclair School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape sapl.ucalgary.ca University of Calgary Bookstore calgarybookstore.ca Print Three csr@printthree.ab.ca

ACKNOWLEDMENTS

All images presented in this edition of ULTRA are collected from the student body of the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at The University of Calgary. We could not have made this publication without the talent of our peers. To contact the editors: ultra@ucalgary.ca

ISSN-2561-648X Paperback: ISBN 13: 978-0-88953-447-6 ISBN 10: 0-88953-447-0 Digital: ISBN 13: 978-0-88953-449-0 ISBN 10: 0-88953-449-7


clover fields forever edward park

12

to create a high-quality public realm to support an education district 14 samira dehesh

cascade: southview housing caleb hildenbrandt ugonna ohakim mojdeh kamali john amiel rivera

44

city of a thousand courtyards laura sandor

17

cafe with a view madiha mehdi

46

tsuut’ina east | tsuut’ina west asawari modak martina macfarlane

19

northwest goldberg, detroit revitalization elizabeth cook

49 50

urban manifesto: assuming a position joshua tebokkel

20

socializing industrial landscapes lucia blanco

53

detourism: museum of journey alfred gomez

23

sanguine shift peter tomanek

54

streets as playful places lucia blanco celia lee

24

nw agriculture commons thomas acheson

inter-city danielle kim

26

high level city alana kerr, brennan black, dustin dodd, faezeh yousefi, john baziuk, jonathan monfries, vijul shah

28

kuniya anil yadav

designing out the standard: a guide to mass customization in architecture jessica adamson shelby christensen gurkaran dhaliwal xuefei wang

56

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE STREET CORNER

the space in which we are all naked lauren fagan

59

equilibrium abir birani

76

inner city prairie jay heule

60

fractal sweta shah

80

30 32

reclaiming public ground cassidy westrop

62

83

circularity: from voids to obsolescence alana kerr

gallery of discovery shelby christensen alea reid

nisk’a-hi nathan stelfox mitchell stykalo

35

anti social social club marshall evens

64

aqueous monolith obinna ekezie

84

the drift of eastern gray gurkaran dhaliwal vikram johal

87

36

crescent hill park mona meschi

66

agrihood mina rahimi tina dadgostar asawari modak

encompass melissa amodeo

88

crossroads hearts jennifer comrie reza bacchus arvind gopalakrishnan

39

forest lawn mosaic jason ip lilian wang

90

drownosaurs weijian li (llewellyn)

40

vaha mehakpreet sidhu yagmur yurtbulmus

92

partonomy matt walker

42

u adam majer

95

VAN(IS)HING(E): A Phenomenology of Architectural Drawing 68 mohammad moezzi common ground allison davelaar

70

symbiome: an intervention in the fringe rebecca cey

72

three below caleb hildenbrandt madisen killingsworth

75

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE METROPOLIS

bridging the divide kristen mei megan asbil

96

touch me not anagha patil rejwana rahman

133

gaze ryan austin destiny kirumira

99

135

famville ashley hu

100

9 block project canopy shelby christensen raye liu jonathan monfries ji song sun

portrait of calgary anagha patil rejwana rahman

103

sculptures in space aliyah dosanjh

136

104

exposure michael gross lindsey harbord

138

southview community pavilion joshua tebokkel mnemonic blend dania shahab

106

the conscious society alexis valentine

140

ripples of change rosemary joseph

109

fable hannah mousek zachary ward

143

circadia faith lynch

110

retreat house for an artist shreya wilson

145

kunsthalle experience john amiel rivera dexter zhenshi lu

113

art in the city city in the art zainab ahmad vijul shah

147

spike vivian lee christiaan muilwijk

149

recalibrating rustic: a parametric evolution of canadian rocky mountain vernacular 115 nicolas hamel restore sam baril

117

indigenous futures danny roy

118

calgary kunsthalle dalvir nanara joshua tebokkel

121

the new suburbia hanna paulsen ellen odegaard

122

wonderland alexandra zabarka

125

scandare maria grygoryeva

127

hotel royale michael gross isabelle jackson madisen killingsworth

129

billy 2020 harmen verbrugge

131

ON THE FAR SIDE OF ONE’S BODY

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE TABLE OF CONTENTS shifting perspectives alana kerr danielle kim

150

canvas de bowness s s anudeep mummareddy

152

engrain: a meditation cabin mark popel alexander semegen

154

revelation nilendu bala

156

user centric normal kiran rai

158

distant bodies taylor crozon

163

fruiting bodies cindy nachareun

164

biolume stevia hatzikiriakos

166


10

11

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE STREET CORNER

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE METROPOLIS

ON THE FAR SIDE OF ONE’S BODY


12

13

clover fields forever edward park m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: alberto de salvatierra AXON_local view no.1 ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review

EXISTING SITE LANDSCAPE 5M WATER LEVEL RISE

Fascinated by the natural patterns of the white clover, Clover Fields Forever begins to explore the intricacies and nuances of this flower commonly found in Calgary, Canada. Exploring this flower begins to reveal stories of never-ending fields and repeating patterns. Utilizing these aspects of the white clover, though projective in nature, addresses a prompt concern and proposes a shift in thinking in Calgary by integrating landscape techniques, urban EDWARD PARK | 10 farming, pedestrian-centric transportation, solar equity, green building technology, a haven for climate refugees, and facilities and programming to combat a global health pandemic. Beginning from the interface of land to water, flows of people to site, and site to city, exposing the ephemeral, yet grounded nature of the white clover, is just the beginning of a new condition for Clover Fields Forever.

PROPOSED SITE LANDSCAPE 5M WATER LEVEL RISE

PLAN ANALYSIS_flooding level comparisons ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

AXON_landform genealogy

landform genealogy

ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review

EDWARD PARK | 07

AXON_local view no.2

AXON_local view no.3 ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review EDWARD PARK | 31

EDWARD PARK | 32

ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review

EDWARD PARK | 33


14

15

samira dehesh

Bow

Rive rfro

nt A ve S E

11

Harry Hays Building

8

9

m.la 2 6 3

7

7

13 6

6 5 Ave SE 3

1

5

7

1

Layout A

10

2

1

3 6 Ave SE 4

4

1

7

1 Bow Valley College Campus 2 The Family of Man statues

10

3 Mixed-Use Development 7 Ave SE Calgary City Hall

7

Arts Commons

Macleod Trail SE

Olympic Plaza

12

In the heart of downtown Calgary, there is an invisible education district. Bow Valley College, School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Building (old library), and the new Central Library together form a major part of the education district. However, this precinct remains unrecognized. Bow Valley College alone has 17,500 students and 600 full-time employees. But the downtown campus area is not that different from other part of downtown Calgary, and it is facing the same issues of safety and vibrancy. Students are rarely seen on the streets and the connectivity is lost among these places.

7

4 Ave SE

land 702: senior research studio instructor: dr. beverly sandalack

Rive r

9

3 St SE Woonerf

to create a highquality public realm to support an education district

4 Faculty of Social Work and Sorce 5 SAPL Building 6 Courtyard 7 Commercial Buildings 8 Orchard 9 Residential 10 Plaza 11 Bistro 12 Central Library 13 Seniors and Students Cohousing

This Master plan is proposing public realm improvement in following criteria: Health & Wellbeing, Safety, Redevelopments and New Programing, Identity & Sense of Place, and movement & Streetscape with a focus on the precinct and students’ needs.


16

17

city of a thousand courtyards laura sandor m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: alberto de salvatierra

City of a Thousand Courtyards started with an analysis of the common tomato plant’s logical and formative patterns and applied them at an urban scale. Through the use of landform design as a base, the project aims to mitigate severe flood patterns present in Calgary, Alberta. The project becomes a vibrant backdrop for continuing life on earth and decreasing our

ecological footprint. The need for a mixture in agrarian and urban life is more than ever before. The city is thriving, with an intricate network of roadways, building densities and farming mixed into it. You can start to get a picture of how the small mounds of the tomato plant have driven the design of this eco-opolis.

AXON_selected building typologies ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review +0m

+1m

+2m

+3m

+4m [100]

+5m [200]

water level and building relationship analysis

DIAGRAM_water level and building relationship analysis

ARCH 700: Solarpunk Urbanism | Fall 2020 | Final Review

LAURA SANDOR | 45

LAURA SANDOR | 39


18

19

HOTELS COMMUNITY FARMS RESIDENTIAL CLUSTERS GREEN HOUSES BOTANICAL LEARNING CENTRE FAMILY CAMPSITES UNDERGROUND PARKING

RV CAMPSITES POWWOW GROUNDS

GROUP CAMPSITE

tsuut’ina east | tsuut’ina west asawari modak martina macfarlane m.plan 2 plan 616: urban design studio instructors: dr. fabian neuhaus and hal eagletail

The project of Tsuut’ina East/ Tsuut’ina West aims at acknowledging that the past and the teachings that come with it is one of the first steps towards undoing the years of damage caused by colonialism. Urban design can be inspired by the four aspects of an individual and approached as a spiritual journey. This project encompasses the teachings of the medicine wheel into urban spaces of today – inclusive, protective and in harmony. This can create better futures for all of us and this shows that the teachings of the elders are actually teachings of the future.


20

urban manifesto: assuming a position joshua tebokkel m.arch 2 arch 675: urban systems instructors: dr. brian sinclair and alberto de salvatierra

Humanity has reached a turning point. Most of the earth’s population lives within urban areas. Several authors have compared the volume of people living together to that of communal insects, representing a new social evolution.1,2 Humanity does not have the same level of cooperation and interaction that allows natural ecologies to sustain themselves – to act as a cohesive whole. Cities and urban sprawl are a manifestation of a capitalistic, individualistic world view – a social, environmental, and economic catastrophe. This Manifesto is an overview of four critical aspects that are needed to challenge the current trajectory of civilization. These responsibilities do not hinge solely on the architect. It is a demanding but hopeful message, a collective effort to secure concrete change, that extends from urban planners, architects, and policy makers, to citizens - a “communitybuilding” effort as described by the Charter for the New Urbanism.3 A shift in thinking. “A radically different collective thought process of some sort has to be instituted.”4 This process begins with a human-centric focus. Urban systems are only meaningful as a human environment and cannot be viewed in isolation.5 Supportive of this focus are three other responsibilities needed in response to current global insecurities: sustainability, history, and technology. HUMAN. First and foremost, this manifesto

21

revolves around the importance of human beings as central to the pursuit. Cities are complex social conditions with complex social problems. They are a shared experience. Ryan, in The Largest Art describes the legacy of urban design “as both a formal and social enterprise but these latter ideals contributed little to the three-dimensional schemes that constituted the disciplines visual language.”6 Similarly, the New Urbanism recognizes that physical solutions alone are not enough to solve the social problems of cities.7 The social dimensions of development need greater consideration to create cohesive urban environments. A sense of belonging, quality of life, and the dismantling of segregation and stigmatization of groups of people, begins with housing opportunities and diverse formal and social communities. There are unintended consequences of neglecting these dimensions such as mass incarceration of racial minorities.8 It is not however enough of a call to action to designers to educate themselves and implement policy that affects social change. This manifesto is also a message to all of humanity. Urbanism as reached complete connectivity. Urban-rural, city-country – these relationships are solidified within a larger urban system. City and country dwellers need to become responsible, active, and educated as urban citizens. The immaterial aspects of a human-centric focus also require physical form within urban systems. Quality form and public spaces are required in communities for them to build identities, sense of place, and inclusivity. Ultimately cities require physical form, but the complexities of social interaction require careful consideration. “The public [is] a living, active agent, enmeshed in urban design as inhabitant, shaper, and designer.”9 People are autonomous and diverse, and therefore need to come together in a communal effort for better cities. SUSTAINABILITY. “Urbanization in the advanced capitalist countries has not in recent history been about sustaining bioregions, ecological complexes, or anything other than sustaining [...] capital.”10 Humanity faces a global environmental crisis evident in the rise of extreme weather events, disasters, declining biodiversity, and

pollution levels. These events are emphatically man-made. Cities are at the vanguard of climate volatility. The natural environment can no longer be a subset of the economy. Cities are uniquely positioned because they contribute significantly to environmental problems while simultaneously feeling their effects the most. Cities need to become part of a sustainable ecological system. The New Urbanism gives specific examples of how to begin to achieve sustainability in cities.11 Cities need to focus on urban form and urban mobility. In other words, increase density and diminish dependence on automobiles. Communities should grow as whole-places – a balance of living, working, and amenities that increases walkability and decreases energy waste. These are only a fraction of urban design, however. Urbanism should repair environmental damage, promote biodiversity revitalization, and preserve natural resources. Sustainability infiltrates all scales of the urban condition. Why do people water their lawns with potable water? Why do people have lawns? Could lawns be replaced with small urban farms? How does society consume products? What would happen to a city like Calgary if the limits, as they are today, became permanent – no more sprawl? The urban ecology needs to be conscience of what it does with space, how it utilizes recourses, and how urban relates to natural conditions. These responsibilities are not independent of each other. Sustainability is just as much about the human condition, history, and technology. For example, creating complete communities can destroy class segregation – amenities that were once available only to citizens with cars now become inclusive. HISTORY & TECHNOLOGY. “Architecture stands with one leg in a world that’s 3,000 years old and another leg in the 21st century. This almost balletlike stretch makes our profession surprisingly deep.”12 Architecture (and urbanism) is uniquely situated at the nexus of past and present. History and technology can be considered together. Urban design has an obligation to preserve and understand the past. Not only the built environment but the cultural history of places. A criticism of historic visionary urbanism such

as Le Corbusier’s Contemporary City, Wright’s Broadacre City, and even of the New Urbanism, is that these self-proclaimed ‘better’ designs do not fix systematic problems of the city.13, 14 Urban citizens need to preserve and build within existing complexities. It is in these complexities where local, previous cultures, and knowledge and creativity exist. What would happen if Paris were replaced by Le Corbusier’s “Plan Voisin”? No history. No vernacular. With one foot in the past, the other foot must be at the forefront of technology. Urbanism demands innovation. Architecture must be bold, challenging, and innovative to overcome the social, environmental, and historic and cultural facets of the urban ecology. Architects have a responsibility to the people that inhabit the built environment. Architects have a responsibility to the environment – built and natural. Sustainability should no longer be just a fraction of the profession, but rather the only way forward. Architects have a responsibility to history and culture. Cities are rich in diversity. Architects must resist a single model of urban development and standardization. Lastly, architects have a responsibility to be bold – to use, research, and understand the latest technologies to broaden all these responsibilities. However, urbanism is a collective effort. All members of the urban ecology – the urban citizens – need to invest in the path forward, for cities are not simply scaled up architecture, they are living and dynamic in nature, and involve challenges beyond the individual.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Kingsley Davis, “The Urbanization of the Human Population,” 22. Brent D. Ryan, “The Largest Art,” 9. “Charter of the New Urbanism,” 411. David Harvey, “Cities or Urbanization?” 66. Gordon Pask, “The Architectural Relevance of Cybernetics,” 70. Brent D. Ryan, “The Largest Art,” 7. “Charter of the New Urbanism,” 411. Jonathan Simon, “Gimme Shelter,” 184. Brent D. Ryan, “The Largest Art,” 8. David Harvey, “Cities or Urbanization?” 58. “Charter of the New Urbanism,” 412-13. Rem Koolhaas, “Delirious Philadelphia.” Le Corbusier, “A Contemporary City.” Frank Lloyd Wright, “Broadacre City.”


22

23

detourism: museum of journey alfred gomez m.la 1 land 700: regional landscape systems studio instructor: kris fox

DETOURISM is an alternative tourism service located within your journey on the road, typically on routes to popular tourist destinations. In this case, it is located between your journey from Calgary to destinations in East Alberta such as Drumheller or the Dinosaur Provincial Park. DETOURISM includes a curated road museum that showcases unheard Alberta narratives and experiences hidden within the landscape. Stories and narratives are infused within typical road signages that unravels the deeper identity of Alberta.


24

25

streets as playful places lucia blanco celia lee m.la 2 research, summer 2020 instructor: dr. noel keough

Streets as Playful Places explores the value of creating everyday access to play for children in their built urban environments and suggests how we can accomplish this in Calgary through design. Equity is central to the theory and practice of Play Streets: priority is given to underserved neighbourhoods. Actionable strategies are necessary, particularly in these areas, to create healthy and inclusive neighbourhoods. As such, both temporary and permanent solutions are explored, showing action can be taken in the short and long-term on a spectrum of budgets. This publication includes a design proposal to transform a residential street into a playful streetscape in the most populated block of the Manchester neighbourhood.


26

inter-city danielle kim m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: alberto de salvatierra

Despite the disastrous effects of the 2005 flooding of the Bow River, the current urban form of the city of Calgary is still ill-equipped to receive the river’s next inevitable flood. INTER-CITY speculates on the potential of using landscape design as a driver for flood mitigation, urban form, and urban agriculture

27

through the re-design of a large parcel of the city at approximately 7.5 km2. The performative qualities of plants were used as an inspiration for the design. Just as many plants have multiple defense mechanisms - providing multiple routes of survival for themselves - so too does the city. Using a collection of parts to create a patterned and highly articulated landscape creates both barriers and new fluvial networks for the river. Urban settlement and agricultural areas are interspersed throughout the city, blurring the lines of traditional land use planning and creating more localized supply chains that will sustain citizens. Through these strategies, the city allows urbanites to have a connection to their food and to the landscape. By using landscape as a foundational design driver, the Bow River is transformed into an intriguing, dynamic, and temporal element of the city; rather than an obstacle or a force of destruction.

13 origin shapes high risk of flooding

in

ba

isl

an

ds

an

dj ett i

ier

wi

th

po

nt

ati

on

wi

in th

rid

ge re

ol ba

es

landform genealogy tree

site flooding simulation

rr

de

low risk of flooding

rr

ier

wi

th

po

gu

lar

ba

rr

de

nt

ati

on

wi

ex th

rid

ex

ge

ier

ol

ex

ter

resultant genealogies

ra

ce

de x

tru

sio

n

tru

sio

nw ith

tru

mo

at

sio

nw i

th

rid

ge

po

ols

tru

sio

n


28

29

high level city alana kerr, brennan black, dustin dodd, faezeh yousefi, john baziuk, jonathan monfries, vijul shah m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructors: dustin couzens and michael rivest

High Level City is a masterplan exploring an alternate method of city organization. As a studio, we explored concepts of hyper density and diversity in relation to the immediate context of Edmonton’s High Level Line. The area surrounding this underutilized rail corridor is dense and urban and split at the midway point by the North Saskatchewan River Valley. As a starting point to think about the High Level Line we came to two key conclusions about the line: 1. High Level Line is a circulation and transportation corridor connecting North & South Central Edmonton. Circulation and connectivity must be lateral as well as linear. 2. The High Level Line is composed of fixed spaces. A network of spots, locations, parks, shops, etc. Ultimately, we came to understand this masterplan as the development of a deeply networked and integrated area of diverse programming, a city within the larger city. We developed rules as the basis of the organizing logic of the masterplan, and applied them to the formation of micro districts along the line. The colossal volumes of the city within a city concept represent a change in the way that we traditionally approach urbanization, rethinking the organization of space and the growth of cities.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Whyte Avenue Farmer’s Market Strathcona Residences 109 St & 89 Ave Int Entrance to Bridge High Level Line Bridge

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Ezio Faraone Park 109 St & 99 Ave Int 100 Avenue Jasper Avenue Senior Residences University Gateway


30

31

Aerial view TsuuT’ina Administration office

TsuuT’ina Reserve145

T’ina

Tsuu

Trail

g

(Rin

City of Calgary

N

150M

The Tsuut’ina Nation has been developing strategic sections of their land building an economic basis, workplaces and business opportunities for Nation members and neighbors alike. After signing Treaty 7, the current Tsuut’ina Reserve neighboring Calgary was established in 1877 and has been home to the Nation for several generations now. The proposed design incorporates elements from Tsuut’ina culture and facilitates the required infrastructure for economic growth. Mixed-use low rise development integrated with blue and green infrastructure is to support people centric urban spaces where everything is reachable withing 10 minutes of walk.

kuniya anil yadav m.plan 2 plan 616: urban design studio instructors: dr. fabian neuhaus and hal eagletail


32

circularity: from voids to obsolescence alana kerr m.arch 2 arch 675: urban systems instructors: dr. brian sinclair and alberto de salvatierra

33

The approach for this manifesto comes in a two part thesis: the first being about the senseless division between what is necessary and what is desired in urbanization, and the second being what happens to that which is undesirable in our cities. These two topics both play a large role in circular design, and have significantly shaped my mindset around the idea of intentionality in design and considering the consequences of our designs through their entire life-cycle. I am often struck by the stark physical division between infrastructure and people. We go to great lengths to hide essential services - power lines, communication towers, electrical conduits, plumbing, sewage - underground and out of sight, and build rail yards, factories and other industrial spaces in the fringes of our cities. This has always seemed counterproductive to me, as these services are necessary for the development of urban centres, yet we do everything we can to exclude them from the urban fabric. These industrial spaces and objects are considered eyesores, and as cities expand around them, they become undesirable voids that businesses and residences have traditionally avoided. These voids perpetrate harmful phenomena such as urban sprawl and planned obsolescence in technology, each a manifestation of the human tendency to avoid and discard that which is undesirable. Yet, we cannot deny that these services and processes are necessary to urbanization; while we may be able to invent a more beautiful, efficient or desirable way to carry out these processes, in most cases we do not have the time or capital to do so. Thus, we are left with undesirable technology powering the advancement of our cities, but not participating in the city itself. We are in the midst of an extremely exciting and unprecedented period of advancement, one that I think will continue to flourish increasingly rapidly. We live in an age where as soon as one thing is created it expires and a new, better version must be created. Each upgrade to our systems and technologies is replaced increasingly quickly with a new and improved version, creating an insatiable cycle of frenzied iteration and production. Growth begets growth. Humans have an extraordinary

gift in being such an intelligent species, capable of innovation and conscientiousness that allow us to continue to make advancements exponentially. But I also think that it is this capability to advance at astronomical rates that will be our downfall if we let it continue unhindered by reality. As a species with such tremendous intelligence, we have an obligation to our future generations and to our planet to conduct our growth as sustainably as possible, an obligation which we are currently failing. Cities grow in size and complexity far faster than anyone can control, yet their growth is powered by those who cannot control it. I do not believe in halting our growth, but rather ensuring that growth is limited to that which is necessary, and is not just a product of progress for the sake of progress. Growth can mean improving what already exists and filling the voids that exist in our cities. Fully integrated urban centers would not leave their undesirable networks to the fringes. These essential pieces of infrastructure would not only be integrated into the urban fabric, but welcomed and loved for what they provide to our cities. Instances of this are beginning to take shape in some pockets of our cities. Projects such as the High Line in New York City, which took an obsolete railway track and turned it into a public park, show us that all that is needed to meet these circular demands for sustainability is a positive reframing of what these things could be. By embracing what we already have or repurposing it so it can continue to contribute to society, we can reduce our waste and our impact on the planet, while allowing for more meaningful urbanization and growth.


34

35

nisk’a-hi nathan stelfox mitchell stykalo m.plan 2 plan 616: urban design studio instructors: dr. fabian neuhaus and hal eagletail

Nisk’a-hi, meaning about the land, was conceived from a process of ethical engagement and understanding of Tsuut’ina culture. Being about the land means transcending boundaries of western thought in an attempt to design as stewards, not users. Respecting the culture, people, and land of the Tsuut’ina Peoples was key in developing a vision for two distinct 2. FOOTHILLS SECTION + ATMOSPHERE COLLAGE communities. Foothills to the West and Grasslands to the East are not just places for people, but represent an all encompassing design that prioritizes the natural environment. These places do not create boundaries, rather, they connect natural flows and people.


36

37

agrihood

Tackle Urban Sprawl by using Agricultural Lands | A global crisis rages around a shortage of healthy food, clean water, clean energy and waste to resource management, as the ‘big city’ economic model struggles to support the health and happiness of those within it. The Agrihood Master Plan seeks to set a precedent in envisioning a self- sufficient agricultural community at the fringe of a developing city.

NIC

PO UA AQ

REY

G

mina rahimi tina dadgostar asawari modak m.plan 1 plan 610: community planning studio instructor: kris fox

TER WA TINA DADGOSTAR

GA

RD

EN

USE

HO

TER WA

E AG

R STO

LIV

ES TOC

K

SOL

DIE

RF

LIES

AR

CC

I CTR ELE

H FIS RID

E

ST WA

G RT MA

S

S

GA

BIO

ASAWARI MODAK


38

39

Using an academic article and what we heard from the community as inputs, our team developed a design process to help us focus on areas of interest in the Crossroads neighbourhood. We called these areas of interest, “hearts” and we set out to transform their potential. In the bridge heart, we connected Nose Creek to the community; and, in the laboratory heart, we created a vibrant, testingground for activity and social connectedness near the City’s airport. In Crossroads’ Hearts, members of the Crossroads’ community rediscovered old pathways, natural areas, their neighbours, and lake fun. Through our design, we learned that the four hearts equaled one vision. The sum was greater than its parts. It was a community rediscovered.

crossroads hearts jennifer comrie reza bacchus arvind gopalakrishnan

m.plan 1 plan 630: professional planning studio instructor: dr. fabian neuhaus


40

drownosaurs weijian li (llewellyn) m.la la2 land 700: regional landscape systems studio instructor: kris fox

This project location is in a historical town called Drumheller, Alberta. The town has a rich history of Dinosaur, and it is a tourism town as well. Due to the town’s location is within Red Deer River Valley, the town suffers serious flooding almost every year. My project intention is to apply the landscape-engineering flood control approaches on-site, which uses the diverted channel and large dinosaur shape constructed wetland to minimize the flood impact. As well as providing a functional and meaningful sense of place to the residents who live in the town of Drumheller.

41


42

partonomy matt walker m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: joshua taron

PARTONOMY, a manifestation of mereological understandings of part-to-whole relationships, is a mixed-use project which pathologically addresses absurdities of conventional construction methods and explores the potential of mass timber. The project undergoes an investigation of contemporary building materials and begins to critique the outcomes of which these materials dictate construction practices. The project asks; why are we still using steel and concrete as principle building materials when there exists alternatives with mass timber? It does this by first questioning the conventional use of predisposed functions of building parts, such as those that are fabricated or constructed with an intended function or purpose within an overall building assembly. It then proposes the idea of using element-androgyny and modular construction where building elements have the capability of having multiple functions depending on location, orientation, and adjacency in a building composition. Finally, it predicates the possibility of using mass timber as a medium for the serial production of discrete parts and ordered assemblies to develop its architecture.

43


CONNECTIVE

45

Vignette / Moments

CONNECTIVE SPACES CONNECTIVE SPACES

44

Exploring connectivity, private-public thresholds, and how form and materiality contributes to the social, cultural and environmental aspects of the project.

3 bedroom unit

Vignette / Moments

Exploring connectivity, private-public thresholds, and how form and materiality contributes to the social, cultural and environmental aspects of the project.

cascade: southview housing caleb hildenbrandt ugonna ohakim mojdeh kamali john amiel rivera m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: jeff lyness

The spaces we inhabit deeply affect every aspect of our physical, mental, and emotional being (as unfortunately highlighted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic). With that in mind, we sought to design a sustainable community that encourages interactions, promotes walkability, and fosters inclusivity and diversity. Located in the community of Southview in Calgary, Alberta, our project focuses on diversity and intergenerational interaction.

Occupants produce their food and are served to Vignette / Moments Exploring connectivity, private-public thresholds, and how the community through a market, while waste is form and materiality contributes to the social, cultural and environmental aspects of the project. recycled to assist in the production of a circular economy.

The massing was driven by the surrounding typologies, while the elevated path connects each building while merging public and private. The programming not only responds to people’s needs but also provides opportunities for growth.

Cascade Housing is a project that seeks to bring people together via the built environment, all while creating a model community that can inspire the future of housing.

Mixing of unit type encourages interaction between people of different ages and backgrounds, leading to a healthier social life for occupants, creating ‘mini-communities’ within the larger whole.

2 bedroom unit

loft


46

cafe with a view madiha mehdi m.la foundation plan 606: site planning studio instructor: dr. beverly sandalack

Located on McHugh Bluff, the site offers stunning views of downtown Calgary and a beautifully sun-lit south facing slope. These have been captured by creating interesting outdoor stay areas including a bosque in the midst of a large plaza, seating steps interspersed with native shrubs and bushes facing the view and a viewing deck around the watch tower in the south east corner. Varying degrees of sun exposure in different parts of the café space ensure that it can be enjoyed at all times of the day and in all seasons.

47


48

49

northwest goldberg, detroit revitalization elizabeth cook m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructors: wil d. marquez and michael mondo

ARCH 700 | Senior Research Studio-Detroit Urban Revitalization | Mondo & Marquez

ARCH 700 | Senior Research Studio-Detroit Urban Revitalization | Mondo & Marquez

Located in Detroit, MI, Northwest Goldberg is a neighbourhood suffering from an abundance of blight and abandonment. The project imagines how the NW Goldberg community can be redeveloped to create a vibrant, walkable, and inclusive urban environment. A combination of mixed-income residential and commercial programming populates the perimeter of the public spaces. The public spaces seek to promote placemaking, health, and well-being for users. A large lake activates the neighbourhood and invites users to gather, reflect, and unwind. NW Goldberg Refresh attempts to create a mixed-use public center that reinforces the connections to the surrounding neighbourhood and invites users to repopulate the area.

COOK | 18

COOK | 11


50

51

socializing industrial landscapes lucia blanco m.la foundation land 604: landscape architecture studio i instructor: tawab hlimi

Within the industrial area of Mayland, Calgary, there are special areas that demonstrate that people are displaying agency in their industrial surroundings. Those specific spaces or appropriation points are located along the abandoned path of the rail tracks surrounded by beautiful wild vegetation. Socializing Industrial Landscapes is a design proposal that aims to create a new linear experience to connect all those areas and transform them into new outdoor rooms. The objective of the project is to potentiate existing natural and cultural conditions without losing the industrial aspect of the area. Through the integration of new planting modules with intermingled complex and structured native grasses and green ashes, visitors have the opportunity to walk or bike above paths made by perforated weathering steel. The proposal includes the design of three nodes, a walkway, a pedestrian crossing between the new path and 19th Street and a phasing transformation of an underused parking lot into a public space. The design of the third node is developed in phases. The first phase of the design includes low-cost interventions that create a pop-up park/market. The new space has ephemeral elements as planter boxes, wooden platforms that people can use to do performances or workshops. The second phase modifies permanently industrial terrains into spaces for culture, recreation and art. Changing land uses and forms of the existing industrial buildings into new libraries, local businesses, galleries, coffee shops, museums, outdoor spaces to work, etc. Creating new landscapes for contemporary values.


52

53

sanguine shift peter tomanek m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: joshua taron

While digital fabrication has presented us with many new manufacturing possibilities, it has also given us the responsibility of using these new tools to reduce the impact we have on our environment. This project aims to alter conventional construction paradigms to align with consumer wants and needs of sustainable practices. How can a building catalyze the construction industry’s commitment to lower carbon emissions as well as inspire carbon transparency? We can create a harvesting, manufacturing and assembly logic that is driven by digital tools and research. Standardization through connection homogeneity paired with novel robotic fabrication creates a streamlined assembly process, eliminating excess waste as well as reducing traffic in the construction area.


54

55

nw agriculture commons thomas acheson m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructors: wil d. marquez and michael mondo

This project is a template for redevelopment of a section of NW Goldberg, Detroit that looks to provide a new community infrastructure based on urban agriculture. This urban agriculture foundation will be used as a base for healthcare, senior housing, smallbusiness, and community programming. In that, this project will look to leverage the power of existing neighbourhood medical institutions while creating a level of street activation and vibrancy that can empower both NW Goldberg’s existing form and fuel its future development.

use rules

patient/senior + agri. business • centre laneway agriculture production

community uses

• east-west long-axis • consistent sun • service access • wind protection

• wayfinding • day/night activity

• mix farm/garden areas • mix food/retail uses

community + business • centre laneway

patient/senior therapy + housing

agriculture-based business

• nature views • accessibility

• visibility • multiple frontages

• indoor/outdoor rehab • close to activity

• outdoor areas • agriculture agacent

patient/senior + business • centre laneway

use aggregations

patient/senior + community

community

• rear laneway

• rear laneway

agriculture based-bus. • block entrance

patient/senior + office • centre laneway


56

57 Conceptual Design Research

PRIMITIVE CASE STUDY

/JOINERY

PRIMITIVE CASE STUDY /WASP COMPONENT AGGREGATION

COMPONENT CONNECTION

PRIMITIVE CASE STUDY /ELEFRONT

Prototype Tender

designing out the standard: a guide to mass customization in architecture

Fabrication Hand over Operation & Maintenance

AMENITIES

CIRCULATION

CIRCULATION

PRIVATE

STORAGE

GATHERING

PRIM

Renovation Higher efficiency New equipment Improve Sustainability Aged Materiality Scale up/down Incorporate ergonomics Include universal design

jessica adamson shelby christensen gurkaran dhaliwal xuefei wang

INPUT

-Modular Component -Connection places and type -Rules for aggregation

OUTPUTS

-Aggregation of modular component used in -combination with site bounding box

USE

Demolition

6

m.arch 2 /WASP COMPONENT arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: sumer singh

-Discrete design tool -Used for aggregation

-Good forand taking intoare revit -Connect populates with preset Exports as Dwg. 3dm connections

AGGREGATION

USE

14

PG# -Used for assigning attributes to components -Easier interaction between rhino and revit -Manage model data and components

PG#

OUTCOMES

Separation of components

This studio is a work integrated learning studio with Sumer Singh at Mercedes and Singh. Research was done by Jessica Adamson, Shelby Christensen Gurkaran Dhaliwal, Xuefei Wang. “Designing out the standard, a guide to mass customization in architecture”, is a semester-long research project which has created a framework for digitizing prefabricated hybrids and utilizes technology to develop mass customization in architecture. This research and design of a digital toolkit is to demonstrate the potential of mass customization and its ability to flatten disciplines; creating a stronger connection between fabrication and design. This project is important as it uses various scales, aesthetics, and develops a framework for an adaptable digital toolkit.

NETWORK OF DISCRETE DATA AS ATTRIBUTE GEOMETRY

SAVE LOCATION

Outcomes OUTPUTS -Aggregate Modular Components within bounding

-Separation limitations and organizing components

RULES

POINTS OF ATTACHMENT AND

PROCESS & DEFINE GEOMETRY

BAKED COMPONENT

FILTER

CONNECTION TO TIM


58

59

the space in which we are all naked lauren fagan m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: jessie andjelic

Today we live in a digital panopticon. Our personal information is worth more than land or oil, and we have become the commodity. Data from our online activity is evaporating into digital traces of ourselves, producing a trillion-dollar industry of information. We are giving away everything for nothing. THE SPACE IN WHICH WE ARE ALL NAKED constructs a new reality that challenges systems of power and data monopsony. This oceanfront heterotopia is a gift from the digital economy to a society that has reordered its pursuit towards more equality. Speculating a world where technology enhances a dignified data system and power is mediated through reconciling a new order.

Nominated Student Award of Excellence – Canadian Architect


60

61

Inner City Prairie - Site Plan

i

c inner city prairie

J

jay heule

c

m.plan 1 plan 606: site planning studio instructor: tawab hlimi

p

in Inner City Prairie is a project that aims to restore the beauty and function of the Foothills Fescue Grasslands for Calgarians to enjoy, on a prominent viewpoint overlooking the city. Located between the communities of Rosedale and Sunnyside, the site will serve as an active public space combining new public amenities within the context of a natural area along the McHugh Bluff. The design seeks to place the ecological function at the fore, communicating human intentions of preservation through an orderly framed raised boardwalk traversing the site. Through cultural values and landscape language, the built form of the site informs users of the ecological value of indigenous ecosystems within a recognizable cultural context.

d

0

20 10

40m


62

Basement floor plan

reclaiming public ground cassidy westrop m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: marc boutin

63

Upper floor plan

What does it mean to have a truly public space in an increasingly privatized world? Many urban areas have become places of spatial inequity where we have normalized our lack of compassion and our perceptions of freedom have been reformed. Our cities are meant to be a collection of places and spaces that are connected to create a foundation for communal living but have become urban wastelands devoid of social infrastructure or ownership. Located between the Bow River and the Calgary Drop-In Centre, this project creates a new urban commitment that strives to rewrite social and environmental contracts, and to move towards

spaces where interconnectedness and empathy can thrive. Lifting the landscape and creation connections begins to connect the existing greenscape towards the downtown core. This interconnectedness begins to take this site out of isolation and becomes inclusive. This equitable space within a city provides options and choices with the ability to move from an environment of avoidance to a climate of trust in an unbiased public ground.


64

65

phase iii lookout

phase ii lookout

phase i lookout

anti social social club marshall evens m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: joshua taron

The anti social social club is proud to present, after a fifty-six year history, a look back on the project though the form as magazine (issues). Content will be provided as the cover page and content topics. The publication explores what the environment was like and how the architecture addressed the unhealthy subject to activate the site and create a healthy environment. The premier exhibit showed off a collection of old and new products as the exhibit was

a storyboard of futuristic possibilities where technology can free the designer and the laborer. Looking at cases like Detroit’s urban blight it is important to look at the early small scale intervention that was activated in Calgary 56 years ago, 2020. It is this early activation and ability to pivot which has allowed the anti social social club to implement itself at the forefront of product design.


66

crescent hill park mona meschi m.la foundation plan 606: site planning studio instructor: dr. beverly sandalack

67

Design objective: A local park on top of the Crescent Hill at the north of Calgary with a great view to the downtown Calgary and Bow river. Designing limitations were one storey 25m2 Cafe and Washroom plus a 25 meter long tower. The main approach of the concept is making the entrance of the site more exciting and surprising the audience through closure and gradual openness. The view from the main entrance is closed with Aspen trees as a native plant. Next the plaza comes with long benches and Cafe. The

benches are in two directions with medium height shrubs at the back of them providing them some privacy. Steps at the front edge connect the park and plaza to the surrounding topography and make it possible to be in contact with the steep slopes of the hill and makes it possible for those who climb up the hill to enter the park. Steps provide an ideal place for social gathering and spending leisure time. The viewing tower with the porous shell provides different levels and various angles of viewing the surrounding area.


68

69

VAN(IS)HING(E): A Phenomenology of Architectural Drawing mohammad moezzi phd research history and theory of architecture supervisor: professor graham livesey

Architectural drawing as a historical medium has been affected by different inventions such as pencil, ruler, compass, paper, ink, drawing board, the perspective machine, perspective construction methods, orthographic projections, screen, pixel, 3-D modelling, CAD, animations, and BIM. Since the 1990s, with the emergence of computer interfaces in architectural firms, many theorists questioned drawing’s effectiveness. The phrase “the death of the drawing” was used by William J. Mitchell in 1989, and reflected on David Ross Scheer’s book, The Death of Drawing: Architecture in the Age of Simulation in 2014. Later, this phrase transformed into the “demise of architectural projection” in Mario Carpo’s book, The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence in 2017. In summary, they argue that pre-digital architecture’s primary subject was matters of form, while post-digital processes are based on the performance of the building. As a result, drawing as a generative medium does not work anymore, and it is more like a by-product of design. Drawing may be assumed an output, not input in the digital era. Using phrases “input” and “output” leads us to think of design media as a system, factory or machine. Therefore, we can think of design tools as rollers in the machine

of architectural design. We can assume digital interfaces as the fastest rollers creating the illusion that we do not see any drawing while working with them. We can understand it if we look at a slow-motion of the screen of an architect’s computer. As a result, drawing is still an input, and its role as an input has become even more significant, to the extent that some theorists may deny its presence. Like a fastpaced roller, a digital interface lets us be aware of the drawing only when we reduce the speed at the end for exporting a two-dimensional image. If the drawing was dead in each of the abovementioned periods, then talking about its death over and over has several meanings. Drawing might not have died in the first place. It may be a phoenix with different life cycles; when it dies, it will be born in a new version. Alternatively, perhaps drawing is in an ongoing process of dying. As part of my PhD research on the phenomenology of contemporary architectural drawing, I created this open-to-interpretation hybrid drawing. I chose the words “hinge” and “vanishing” for showing how various drawing tools, manual or digital, act as historical turning points leading to the disappearance of previous tools. In a metaphorical language, design media

tools work as joints on which the discipline of architecture swings. I expressed verbal tools, visual tools, plan, perspective, orthographic, image-making, and digital information in a nested network. Historical turn as “hinge” usually is not a complete change, yet it is an ever-shifting concept.


W BO

70 TOPOG R A PHY MASS

RI

VE

R

BENCH

BENCH

SOL AR PATH

R OC KY M OU NTA IN V IE W S D OW NTOW N V IE W S M A IN PE D E S TR I A N R OU TE S

71 SIT E B O U NDARY TREES E XIST ING B E NCHE S

1 PE R SO N’ S MOVE ME NT PAT H LO CAT IO N O F PAU SE

E XIST ING GAR B AGE B IN

common ground

MARCH SHADOW STUDY

Common Ground embraces the diverse S I T E P H O T O S existing user group of the McHugh Bluff site in the Crescent Heights community and offers opportunities to expand and create an inclusive NORTHEAST CORNER environment for all. Tasked with incorporating a tall 25m viewing tower, a café, covered open allison davelaar space, and washroom within a public open space. I incorporated these four elements into m.plan 1 a cohesive design by strategically placing each plan 606: site planning studio component to frame unique aspects of the instructor: tomasz sztuk site including a central plaza, downtown and Rocky Mountains views. The placement of these elements was also informed by ‘comfort and control’ and responding to the environmental conditions of an open site. Existing site features including a local toboggan hill were enhanced to ensure this site provides a common ground for engagement, activity, and those daily or extraordinary moments for all.

M

M

AR

A

CH

H RC

21

2 -1

21

PM

PM

-4

NORTH VIEW

NOVEMBER SHADOW STUDY

PLAN VIEW

SECTION A SC ALE 1 : 2 00

NO

VE

NO

NO

SOUTH EAST PLAZA VIEW

A -9

N O R TM AH E A S T C O R N E R

M

NORTH VIEW

21

H RC

SECTION B

SECTION C

SC ALE 1 : 2 00

SC AL E 1 :1 0 0

WEST ENTRY SEQUENCE

SOUTH EAST PLAZA VIEW

M

VE

VE

N

M

M

ER

M

B

BE

ER

21

R

A -9

21

21

M

2 -1

-4

PM

PM


72

73

symbiome: an intervention in the fringe rebecca cey m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: jessie andjelic

We may think of urban and rural spaces as separate territories with opposing or disconnected qualities, including the scales at which space is divided, circulation patterns, activities, and lifestyles. While sharply contrasting urban and rural spaces do exist, a new kind of fabric is emerging between them. Its development is haphazard and contentious, characterized by sprawl, NIMBY mentalities and real estate-hungry projects. Can this trajectory be interrupted? Can the fabric of the rural-urban fringe be woven differently? My project questions how an intervention in Calgary’s rural-urban fringe might adapt typical fringe-space characteristics into a more intentional and sustainable order. The proposed architecture re-characterizes the rural-urban fringe as an inhabited place of transition, interface, and flow, with a focus on the food and waste systems that link the two territories.


74

75

three below caleb hildenbrandt madisen killingsworth m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: kier stuhmiller

An architecture museum on Stephen Avenue that contributes to the cultural heart beat of Calgary. The project draws the public in to create opportunities for encounters with designers, engagement with the process, and contemplation of designs relevance in society. Exposure to the inner workings of the process will provide a new lens for which the public will experience space and help inform future design for the betterment of Calgary.


76

77

equilibrium abir birani m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: graham livesey

Equilibrium is a wellness centre exploring the interplay of our natural and built environments. The construct designed on the basis of biophilia and the instinctive connection we as humans have towards our natural environments. Natural elements evoke feelings to connect to our environment, to each other, but most importantly to ourselves. An interconnection

of organic and rigid found separately in both environments provides a juxtaposed form for the users to explore. Influencing elements such as gardens, art, and materiality local to the ecology, interpolated with the concept of wellness exposes mechanisms that aid in providing users emotional, social and physical relief.


78

79

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE STREET CORNER

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE METROPOLIS

ON THE FAR SIDE OF ONE’S BODY


80

81

central area [open to below]

trail paths for pedestrian traffic

Roof-Top Garden

roof -top garden

trail paths for pedestrian traffic

public seating cafe

n

art gallery reading room individual pods w.c team reflection pods

9th ave. vehicle traffic

library

art workshop team reflection pods

Ground Level

individual pods individual pods

central outdoor area path leading to building entrance

central area

program & site | 3D diagram

n

fractal sweta shah m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: immanuel seyi arole

‘Fractal’ aims at exploring the extent to which the design of physical learning spaces can be enhanced with biophilic design and can contribute to the reduction of student stress and therefore lead to an improvement in learning outcomes. Research findings have shown that Attention Restoration Theory, or ART, popularized by Stephen and Rachel Kaplan, suggests that mental fatigue and concentration can be improved by time spent in, or looking at nature. Our brain’s capacity to focus on

a specific task or stimulus is restricted and therefore results in ‘directed attention fatigue’. Through ART, exposure to natural environments thus encourages more effortless brain function, thereby allowing it to recover and replenish its directed attention capacity. Thus, ‘Fractal’ looks at transcending boundaries by fostering productive and positive environments to stimulate cognitive growth and reduce stress through biophilia, with a secondary focus on views and natural light.

Ground Level

program & circulation | 3D diagram


82

83

Continuous gesture from landscape to architecture

Continuous gesture from landscape to architecture

N

Formal Strategy Diagram Landscape & Artscape Connection to Audiences

Gesture continues within the interior, creating the artscape

Gesture continues within the interior, creating the artscape

Gesture pulls audiences

Tectonic Model - Representational NTS

Gesture pulls audiences

Tectonic Model - Representational NTS

gallery of discovery shelby christensen alea reid m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: marc boutin

The concept behind this kunsthalle gallery aims to enhance the process of discovery through curating sightlines and movement to empower choice for all levels of passive and active users. The architecture addresses audiences moving through Downtown Calgary within 3 modes of movement (LRT, vehicle, and pedestrian) to augment the typical 30 second observation period. It elongates it through glimpses and a

N

Formal Strategy Diagram Final Form

layered experience of interactions, increasing engagement and understanding. The characteristics inform the architecture’s form, landscape design, facade design, circulation and interior elements. The spatial planning coupled with the datums, detailing, and glimpses with movement creates an interior cascading art landscape.


84

85

aqueous monolith obinna ekezie m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: graham livesey

Aqueous Monolith culminates my research on wellness, the therapeutic qualities of water and how water can influence architecture. It intersects water and design to provide a phenomenological experience by exploring the idea of water and the garden. The formal qualities of the architecture were partly driven by the idea of the Chora. It poses the question- how can a piece of architecture in serving as a host and receptacle for water allow itself to get deformed willingly? The site strategically borders 11th street, 16th and 17th avenue, I responded with what I believe is a unique piece of architecture that offers spaces for play, renewal and relaxation. The floor plans were designed to ease vertical circulation between dry and wet areas. The formal explorations considered transparency, void spaces, deformations on the building skin as inspired by water and the various water activities. The circulation plan recognizes the traffic incidence on 17th avenue. The problem was solved by routing vehicular pathways to the 16th avenue facing side of the building while maintaining pedestrian access through all sides of the building.


iv.

i.

v.

ii.

3

1

vi.

86

87

4

5

i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi.

stairs . elevator i. washrooms . kitchen exhibit portrait exhibit . fire exit

stairs elevator iii. washrooms kitchen portrait exhibit fire exit iv.

A

C

B

E

D

1

1m

10

0

i.

ii. iv.

i.

2

5

v.

ii.

v.

2

3

1

3

4

5

B

A

1m

C

1m 5

B

10

0

D

C

E

D

F

E

G

F

H

n

10 5

G

n

1

vi. 4

0

H

iii.

vi.

A

1 G

F

5

H

n

the drift of eastern gray gurkaran dhaliwal vikram johal m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: john iwanski

1m 0

10 5

East elevation

The proposed project is a portrait gallery that explores how ones perception of identity can be revealed through the inhabitance of space and time. How do these interactions between space and time bring forth the true essence of identity? Our goal with the portrait gallery is to remove the user from ‘the real world’ as they pass through the different layers of the architecture and slowly strip back all surrounding context in the space to a realm of nothingness. Ultimately the user ends in a gallery space fully stripped of all external context, leaving just the user and the artwork.


88

encompass melissa amodeo m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: dr. brian sinclair

89

Encompass is an urban infill health and wellness center focused on the concept of Salutogenesis and nutrition. Located at the intersection of 14. St NW and Kensington Rd. NW in Hillhurst, Calgary, the site has a strong connection and history of community and culture. The program intends to work with all members of the community including the low-income residents that make up 12% of the population in Hillhurst. Through a Salutogenesis institute that focuses on the concept of cooking and nutrition, the program attempts to mend the community and bring cultures together through the commonality of food, cooking and learning together. Cultivating good health through food. The building will act as a catalyst in the community through a core

that brings people together through the various programs and concepts of growing, healing, and nutrition. A whole system design that builds a relationship between the built form, users, and society. The parti and form were derived from the idea of synergy between health, space , and society. How can the built environment break the link between health and social status and allow for synergy instead? The core of the building acts as this place of synergy where all spaces radiate from. The design also works with and showcases the semi-historic two storey brick building that exists on the site, respecting its relationship to the neighboring historic buildings and community.


90

91

forest lawn mosaic jason ip lilian wang m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: farhad mortezaee

No one story in Forest Lawn is the same. Therefore, the pavilion embodies the shared experiences of the community by providing a design solution and space that is permanent, yet flexible and adaptable, for the community to connect. The pavilion consists of two main structures: a permanent outer shell and a deployable inner shell that encapsulates a detachable table. Attached to the structure of the outermost cover are a series of polycarbonate panels lined with holographic PVC sheets that change the lighting conditions of the interior as time passes throughout the day. Panels are engraved with community names and symbols to impart an inclusive and commemorative action that directly involves the public.


92

93

vaha 12

8

11

mehakpreet sidhu yagmur yurtbulmus

9

7 15 15

6 7

m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: philip vandermey

14

17

1

14

10

1

Exterior Courtyard

2

Outdoor Pool

3

Mud Bath

4

Flower Bath

5

Sauna +Steam Room

6

Cold Pool

7

Hot Pool

8

Deep End

9

Salt Therapy Room

10

Yoga Studio

11

Mens Change Rooms

12

Womens Change Rooms

13

Mechanical Room

14

Seating Rest Areas

15

Universal Bathrooms

16

Service Elevator

17

Janitor Room

16

5

The studio was based on the museum of truth concept. The studio began with the premise that a museum focused on secular morality and ethical imperatives might serve as a forum for the exploration of timely issues and inspire debate. Our interpretation started with studying the meaning of truth and how each individual experiences truth in a different way and is mostly reliant on the truth of our senses.

16 4

3

13 2

2

below ground level plan

11

12 10

5

7 6 2

3

6

VIEW OF HOT POOLS

Light is another factor that was given a lot of precedence throughout the design process. Small skylights are placed above the pool spaces to create a unique and contemplative experience. The landscape around the building and in the plaza allows various trees to create a forest-like feeling with the light filtering through the canopy.

8 14

6

VAHA is an urban sanctuary with a cultural space overlaid in an urban environment. It means to perceive or awaken the truth that inherits ones life. The architecture will provide a place for psychological cleansing; allowing spaces for contemplation that would reveal the nature of the true self. It is an oasis centered in middle of a dense urban environment.

9

4

15 1

Meditation Courtyard

2

Classroom 1

3

Classroom 2

4

Flower Courtyard

5

Viewing

6

Storage

7

Mechanical Room

8

Entrance

9

Secondly Entrance

10

Staff + Admin

11

Mens Washrooms

12

Womens Washrooms

13

Service Elevator

14

Entrance Courtyard

15

Janitor Room

13 1

4

5

13

6

ground level plan

5

3

2

1

7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Cold Pool Salt Therapy Hot Pool Entrance Hallway Parking Mechanical Room


94

95

u adam majer m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: seyi arole

“U” sets the mind free of stress and anxiety through proximetric design and a reduction of unwanted noise. The term “noise”, in this case, does not only refer to the concept of sound but visual distractions or even the presence of other people. The further we bring our minds from noise, the easier it becomes to think clearly, be creative and also to be able to channel emotion. This is best achieved through privacy, which is important for rejuvenating the mind and creating balance in our lives. The surrounding nature and wildlife of the bird sanctuary serves as the perfect getaway for individuals who suffer from stress and anxiety.

single directional view protrusions offer privacy and surface for items


96

97

bridging the divide kristen mei megan asbil m.plan 1 plan 616: urban design studio instructor: dr. fabian neuhaus

The historic signing of Treaty 7 left traces of physical, emotional, and mental trauma, leading to broken relationships between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous peoples. Bridging the Divide addresses the relationship between these communities, while rethinking Western planning practices. Taking place on the western and eastern edge of Tsuut’ina Nation, our project addresses issues set by Western planning practices and challenges the boundaries imposed on

Indigenous communities. The design seeks to serve as a place where tradition and modernity meet; forming equal partnerships for mutually beneficial solutions between Tsuut’ina and its neighbors. Bridging the Divide, focuses on the relationship between communities by emphasizing partnerships and identity. Through design and collaboration, the project begins to foster a sense of belonging, while bridging cultural differences for future generations to come.


99

98

gaze ryan austin destiny kirumira

2

3

4

5

6

2

1

3

5

4

6

A STORAGE ROOM 9 m² DN

VESTIBULE 21 m²

SEMINAR ROOM 73 m² SEMINAR ROOM 52 m²

ADMIN 34 m²

OFFICE 30 m²

SEMINAR ROOM 77 m²

SEMINAR ROOM 67 m²

OFFICE 13 m²

B

C UP

UP

WASHROOMS 25 m²

RELIEF AREA RECEPTION 271 m²

RELIEF AREA VESTIBULE 22 m²

SEMINAR ROOM 82 m²

RESOURCE AREA 333 m²

DN

D

GALLERY 500 m²

BOOKSTORE 116 m²

CAFE 181 m²

RELIEF AREA

E

VESTIBULE 22 m² UP

DN

STORAGE ROOM 12 m²

F

m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: john iwanski

After being provided Olympic Plaza, Calgary as a site, in conjunction with a portrait gallery as a program, creating an architectural medium between these variables was explored. Many of the buildings around Olympic Plaza embody a sense of concealment in which their exteriors do not reflect their program thus creating a separation between experience and expression. This building thus seeks to become the antithesis of the site. allowing it to create a symbiosis between program and architecture. Therefore like a great portrait, this gallery captures one’s gaze and directs their path.


100

Famville challenges discomforts which may deter us from a multi-generational lifestyle, which includes the need to move houses to accommodate changing family sizes and the lack of privacy. To make multi-generational living more desirable, the units are designed to be combined or separated as necessary. This allows families to age in place and adjust privacy levels as desired. Also, this mixed-use building optimizes opportunities offered by having a mixed generation community, through its seniorrun daycare and multiple active living programs, including a gym, yoga studio, glazed walkways, and numerous walking paths around the site.

101

famville ashley hu m.arch foundation evda 582: studio ii in architecture instructor: matthew parker

N

E

N

E

S

N

W

S

E N

exterior cladding - white fiber reinforced concrete panel

W

E

S

W

Exterior Cladding - White Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panel

Exterior Cladding - White Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panel Elevations


102

103

Our site is situated at a prominent location, in the heart of downtown Calgary. Due to the Winter Olympics in 1988, the ‘Olympic Plaza’ was built to portray Calgary to the world, which is adjacent to the site. Being from a different country, we perceived our own image of Calgary in our minds through time.

SOUTH ELEVATION

“Calgary’s portrait is curated by the bow river, vein of the city, holding it together. The city’s image is best rendered through the centre of downtown, capturing Calgary from its kernel.” Stepping into a new city, you look through its built and inbuilt, tangible and intangible environment to paint its portrait. For us the image is rendered best through the center of downtown where there is an opportunity to capture moments of great architecture, the journey of people through transit, the hustle through City Hall, the joyful noise of the plaza and the boldness of performing arts - framing Calgary.

portrait of calgary anagha patil rejwana rahman m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: john iwanski


104

105

MODEL STUDIES

EXPERIENTIAL MODEL | 1:25

southview community pavilion joshua tebokkel m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: farhad mortezaee

The design for the pavilion is a celebration of place, drawing inspiration from Calgary’s natural setting. It features seven canopies, abstractions of the mountains and pine forests on Calgary’s west horizon, and representative of the seven communities in Greater Forest Lawn. A bench that meanders through the pavilions like the Bow River through Calgary’s communities, creating pockets of intensity and gathering; and a dynamic façade that flutters in the wind like the grasses of the escarpment, where it is sited. Inspiration for the project came from

the etymological roots of pavilion – papilio, or butterfly, whose scaled wings lend themselves to a delicate and dynamic architecture. The living nature of the pavilion, and its unique location, create opportunities to reconnect with nature, each other, art, and public space.

Individual material elements in the bench and the facade come together. Space is created for small gatherings and conversation but also solitude and personal reflection. Light and sound filter through the facade.

Josh TeBokkel ARCH 700 Senior Research Studio in Architecture Work Integrated Learning| FarMor Architecture


106

107

mnemonic blend dania shahab m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: seyi arole

Space can become place through experiential qualities, but these are limited for populations suffering from dementia or memory loss. Transitions between programs scatter memory and the initial parti of the project is to create associations and connections in this threshold space using programs that invigorate the senses. The Mnemonic Blend connects users to their space through an ongoing therapy using alternative nature-based stimulating activities as transition spaces. The main programs include short term memory recovery care facility, a greenhouse focused on herbal remedies, and an art therapy that deals with memory recall in the form of art.

6 1.2

5.3

5.

5.2

1.4

1. 1.1

5.1 1.5

7

4

3.2

2. 3.

Mnemonic blend addresses the needs of the user to form a simple organization, accessibility, and wayfinding for this specific user group. Additionally, transition programs were places of stimulation of senses such as smell and vision by incorporating an aquaponics, butterfly conservatory and aromatherapy space. Each space plays a role in stimulating the minds of patients, and this design brings the entire treatment back full circle. The focus area to be developed is the transition between the therapy and herbal greenhouse, where the aquaponics mediates between. These programs allow for a constant feedback to memory as an ongoing subconscious therapy.

1

wellness center 1.1 individual therapy 1.2 scan room 1.3 research lab 1.4 dining / activity room 1.5 patient bed / bath

2

aquaponics

3

greenhouse 3.1 cafe / coffee shop 3.2 gardening area

4

butterfly conservatory

5

cognitive art therapy 5.1 gallery space 5.2 studio space 5.3 bathroom

6

meditation / aromatherapy

7

lost / found calm center

8

birdwatching pavilion

9

outdoor gardens

3.1 8. 9.

5

10

20


108

109

ripples of change rosemary joseph m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: dr. brian sinclair

This project tackles the idea of educating and informing young children about their rights and the importance of voicing their rights. Children’s rights and how it is managed has a direct impact on the world. We see children as our future, yet they are unaware of their basic rights and are not free to voice their opinions in many parts of the world. The idea of “The Ripple Effect” emerges in understanding this urgency. The programming and function of the Ripples Centre and Museum for Children believes in creating this type of impact on the lives of children. At the centre, they will be able to learn and express their beliefs, form empathic friendships and learn from each other. The programming includes a n educational centre that includes learning spaces of different scales and characters. The massing on site incorporates the urban

landscape and how it would become part of the city itself. The façade is developed to encourage the play of light and control private and public functions. The museum is designed to include the public in the programming of the building and be able to learn with the children. Performances and exhibitions curated by the children at the centre become the ripples that reach out to the public. The landscape design aspires to add to the playful nature of the building . It is designed to be a giant playground and encourages children and adults to interact and play . The interiors are filled with colour and light and want its inhabitant s to be able to move freely and explore . The spaces encourage flow and interconnect playfully as ripples formed by the rain in water.


110

circadia faith lynch m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: seyi arole

Manifesting a relationship between the mental and physical mapping of spatial interaction through ever-changing external stimuli. As the brain interprets external stimuli, it begins to develop habits that mentally and physically shape how we navigate urban contexts and the world. To challenge this, Circadia mimics neural plasticity and the function of white and grey brain matter to establish ever-changing user interaction and movement through space. Mentally, neural pathways are either strengthened or weakened depending on what habit is being exercised. Likewise, the architecture uses stimuli that persuades this behavior to create an ever-changing condition. As natural light permeates the building, it accepts and uses it to illuminate its internal routes. When natural light is absent, these pathways fall into darkness and lose stimulation, rendering them inaccessible. The architecture decides how inhabitants navigate space, only allowing access to particular routes and rooms at certain times of day. This challenges the ability of the mind to mentally map space. Additionally, channels in the walls carry music from performance spaces into the pathways to further stimulate and activate them.

111


112

113

kunsthalle experience john amiel rivera dexter zhenshi lu m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: marc boutin

“An architecture that fosters cultural interaction facilitated through the exploration of the process of creation.” By foregrounding spaces of creation, the architecture immerses users within the artprocess leading to a greater understanding of the art-product. A telling of the untold story. A Kunsthalle is a non-collecting art gallery with “dissemination of culture” as its mandate. In a traditional Kunsthalle model, art is brought in and presented but in the interface of dissemination, it is only telling half the story. But what does it mean to disseminate culture? What is the role of art in realizing our cultural similarities and differences? How do we foster interaction to create a cultural common ground? Our definition of “cultural dissemination” stems from having a better understanding of the product through exploration of the process of creation. By foregrounding processes of creation, users are engaged with a series of experiences that promotes social interaction and through this interconnection, a synergistic and positive friction with art is achieved and ultimately the realization of common culture.


114

115

Square Log Wall

2x4, Barn Board & Shingle

2x4, Barn Board & D-Log

2x4, Barn Board & Stucco

Integrated Engineered Wood - CLT

Beaver Lodge 1914

er

av

Be

Nail Frame + DLog Cladding

et

e Str

Beaver Lodge Laneway

2020

Nail Frame + DLog Cladding

The Tanglewood 1886

Luxton Residence 1906

recalibrating rustic: a parametric evolution of canadian rocky mountain vernacular nicolas hamel

Log Structure + Nail Frame Additions

Nail Frame Queen Anne Kit Home

MEDes thesis supervisor: joshua taron partnering firm: studio north

Mackenzie Residence 1945 Post War Nail Frame

ea

r ve

B

Ca

rib

oo

Str

y

wa

ne

La

The House of Houses 2025

ee

t

CLT + Dimensional Lumber Cladding

19%

1 | Forest Lease

2 | Log Hauler Transport

3 | Lumber Mill

4 | Dimensional Lumber Cutting

8 | CLT Layup and Pressing

9 | CLT Flatbed Transport

5 | Standard Lumber Drying

12±3 %

6 | Flat Bed Lumber Transport

7 | Drying for CLT Fabrication

10 | CLT Site Instalation

When the intersection of a region’s local construction culture, material preferences and climate are studied, one will often find the presence of vernacular architecture. In the case of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, there lies many historical examples of vernacular, rooted in timber construction in response to a harsh mountain climate. This thesis not only seeks to uncover history of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Vernacular (CRMV) through field investigation, case study and literature review but to discuss its future as well. By looking to contemporary building practice, the thesis starts discussing its future by looking to the promising material supply chain of cross laminated timber (CLT) and exposing what prevents more architecture from being constructed from it right now. Finally, the thesis summarizes the development of a novel yet accessible parametric workflow that aims to guide architectural design towards the creation of cutting edge yet functional forms of vernacular architecture.


116

117

restore sam baril m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: graham livesey

A focus on phenomenology and organicism to contend the rationalized city surface. The project aims to cultivate wellness through the garden space; with its vast sensory capacity enabling a rich natural experience within a synthetic context. The garden also offers inherent ties to the course theme of water, with an opportunity to combine both experiential and functional elements into a cohesive whole. Users may circulate through an array of garden terraces to engage their senses. A series of restaurants harness the produce to create an additional sensory and spatial dimension for users to enjoy. Façade density is managed to ensure specific hourly daylight requirements are met for each floor of vegetation.


118

119

indigenous futures danny roy m.arch 2 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: marc boutin

What do we consider in the fabric of our communities that reflect, authentically, Indigenous values, cultures, and histories? Erasure of Indigeneity has characterized Canada’s relationship to First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities for centuries. Indigenous Futures explores the capacity in which architecture situates Indigeneity not only to be celebrated but its ability to radically transform and collaborate worldviews as it pertains to social, cultural and ecological norms. As a response to a renewed presence and the need to address the climate crisis, the project is situated as an Indigenous Ecological Learning and Community Centre. The spaces become integrated communities of exchange through learning, disseminating and understanding traditional ecological knowledges.

first floor

4

2

UP

4

UP

8

7

16 5

3

15

11 16

9

10

UP

UP

13

6 1

12

13 14

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Outdoor Ceremonial Space Community Kitchen Dining Area Kitchen Storage Cold Storage Foyer/Reception Workshop Storage Shipping/Receiving MakerSpace Tech MakerSpace Assembly Workshop and Assembly Indoor Ceremonial Gallery (Under Lecture Seating) Lecture Stage and Seating Services Gender Neutral W.C.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Research Admin Office Exhibition Space Exhibition Bridge Production Studio Support Video Recording Booth Server Room Informal Classroom Terrace Gender Neutral W.C.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Research Hub Storage Space Informal Gathering Gallery/Exhibition Space Exhibit/Informal Gathering Terrace Production Studio Support Recording Booth Storage Space Gender Neutral W.C. Services

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Research Admin Office Exhibition Space Exhibition Bridge Production Studio Support Video Recording Booth Server Room Informal Classroom Terrace Gender Neutral W.C.

second floor

DN

DN

11

UP

UP

5

6 4

1

8

DN

2

DN

2

7

10

10

open to below 3 9

9

open to below

third floor

DN DN

11

UP UP

10

6

5

3

4 3

UP

DN

DN

1

UP

8

7

open to below

open to below

2 9

fourth floor

DN

9

Open to below

3 2

DN

DN

10

Open to below

4

5

1 7 6

8


120

121

ITINERARY DIAGRAMS ITINERARY DIAGRAMS ITINERARY DIAGRAMS

calgary kunsthalle dalvir nanara joshua tebokkel m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: marc boutin

Dalvir Nanara Josh TeBokkel EVDA 682.04 Comprehensive Design Studio Dalvir Nanara Josh TeBokkel

EVDA 682.04 Comprehensive Design Studio Dalvir Nanara Josh TeBokkel EVDA 682.04 Comprehensive Design Studio

For architecture to act as an engine to disseminate culture, it needs to re-engage the everyday by considering connection, movement, and diversity. The concept uses lightness, transparencies, circulation, and flexibility to define the unifying form of the Kunsthalle that invites in, and radiates out, the flow of the city, art, and culture, through a radically permeable threshold. By encouraging these flows, the Kunsthalle disseminates culture by creating opportunities for public interaction – with the art, with their city, and with each other. The program hinges on three primary interior gallery halls and three transitional exterior exhibition spaces. Interior volumes crash into each other, developing relationships inside the space. Similarly, spaces and ideas can puncture the envelope, emphasizing interior-exterior connections. Strong potential for city-art-public engagement exists in the blurred threshold between outside, mesh, and inside volumes. The site is the northwest corner of Olympic Plaza. It is a site that participates in a gregarious manner with Olympic Plaza, Calgary’s primary ceremonial public space, as well as Calgary’s Civic and Cultural districts. The project becomes a cultural hub at the scale of the city, while also intimately responding to micro-site conditions.


123

2020

ELEVATION 2020

The Users The “Single Family” in 2092

ELEVATION 2044

hanna paulsen ellen odegaard

2044

the new suburbia ELEVATION 2068

The New Suburbia challenges the notion of suburban life in the context of 2020. By exploring possible futures through iterative design, the project proposes new conditions, lifestyles, and perspectives that might emerge over the course of the next 72 years. Existing preconceptions are challenged through a critical understanding of the existing state of suburbia. For example, the project acknowledges that the nuclear family is no longer relevant, cities are growing at an alarming rate, conventional construction methods are inefficient and detrimental to the environment, and architecture must be adaptable to suit many possible, and unknown, futures. A mass timber kit of parts is proposed that begins to rectify worsening climatic conditions and defines a New Suburbia.

2068

m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: joshua taron

ELEVATION 2092

2092

ily” in 2092

122


124

125

wonderland alexandra zabarka m.arch foundation evda 580: studio i design thinking instructor: dan hapton

Wonderland is inspired by the work of abstract sculptor Phyllida Barlow. The project utilizes the language of her sculpture demo to inform the architectural expression of an artist live/work studio. The house is a collection of volumetric objects balanced precariously on a frame of pillars and balconies. Each object serves a specific programmatic function; the building imagines what it would be like to live inside

these found objects. Circulation through the house blurs distinctions between interior and exterior space. The elevation of rooms allows the occupant to experience life among the treetops and provides stunning views over the lake. The project re-imagines conventional architectural forms, producing unique spaces that challenge the occupant’s perception of a typical residential home.


126

127

scandare maria grygoryeva m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: graham livesey

Organization of Geometry N.T.S

In response to the beginning of the COVID19 pandemic, the M1 Fall 2020 semester focused on designing for wellness. While wellness can be defined in many ways, my project examines how a sense of spirituality can encourage mental and emotional wellness. Scandare is a wellness center focusing on evoking transcendence through experiences with water, art, and nature. This project was influenced by Julio Burmudez’s book, Transcending Architecture, as well as by traditional notions of sacred geometry, ritual, and procession. By taking a phenomenological approach to the design of the building, each space considers how aspects of ritual can be established through sensory experiences, and how a sequential journey can be encouraged. Through this journey, your focus is taken away from the stresses of everyday life and towards finding moments of peace and awe.


128

129

hotel royale michael gross isabelle jackson madisen killingsworth m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructors: Kate Allen, Kelly Morrison, and Kristen Lien

The Royal Hotel becomes the Hotel Royale, a living room for the city. The project is a renovation of the historic landmark in Fernie, British Columbia. The strategic push and pull of the existing building structure invites the public realm in and encourages social interaction. Diverse and community-driven hospitality offerings act as a destination that facilitates a symbiotic relationship between locals and tourists. Portions of the building facade are sliced and pushed or pulled different depths. The new facade becomes porous glass, opening up the building to the public.


E PLAN

130

131

billy 2020 harmen verbrugge m.arch foundation evda 580: studio i design thinking instructor: dan hapton

N

1:200

During phase I we were tasked to research and analyze a precedent architectural project to try understand the logic behind the design. My understanding of the logic behind the architectural exterior shell of the SO-IL Mini Living project was based on a rail-line + profile sweep system that would generate the organic form. Phase II looked to change the precedent of looking at an architectural project and begin to look at a sculptural artist to figure out their system that they used to create their work. I was assigned to research and learn about the sculptural work of Tony Smith with the help of my team, Taylor Jackson, Awani Khatu, and Dash Maxwell we produced a program that revolves around the knowledge we gathered from researching the lifestyle of Tony Smith.

The program would be used as a foundation for designing a live-work home for the artist that we each did individually. We collected and produced drawings and diagrams pertaining to site analysis of Nassau County Museum of Art, New York, USA in which our designs would reside. The second part of phase II included the development of our own hybrid system that incorporated the logic derived from our precedent from phase I and a selected sculptural piece of our artist from phase II. From this hybrid system, I created a variety of massing to illustrate the controllability and variation of multiple iterations. Phase III looked to start producing architectural drawings from our selected massing from phase II and to develop it further.


133

132

touch me not anagha patil rejwana rahman m.arch 1 evda 683.06: computational design instructor: guy gardner

In this pandemic, we need a facade that guides us to safety by letting us know if we are defying the 2m physical distancing rule. This “Touch Me Not” facade activates as soon as one comes in its proximity and protrudes spikes to keep us away and prevent us from touching it. The band of spikes on the facade follows us and gives us a warning by changing the colour if you invade someone else’s 2m band, thus keeping us all in check, and yet making us interact with each other and with the building. This façade will make us treat the building not as an element, but as a living thing that will help us to realize the aftereffect of touching in this pandemic. The hustle-bustle around the CBDL, of people entering the building, the train station beside it, and the crossing at the intersection will create a dynamic and interesting mapping on the facade of people’s movement near the building; letting us know the safe and dangerous zones.

FRAME TO HOLD THE PANELS ACRYLIC PANEL

EXISTING WALL

ACRYLIC PIPES

LED LIGHTS THE PIPES

INSIDE

M U L T I - S E N S O R O R I E N T A T I O N TRACKING FOR A FAÇADE


134

135

9 block project canopy shelby christensen raye liu jonathan monfries ji song sun m.arch 2 arch 790.5 directed study (the 9 block project) instructor: mauricio soto-rubio This project is based on the City of Calgary’s 9 Block Program that was launched to quickly pilot initiatives that are aimed at improving the vibrancy and perception of safety in the nine blocks surrounding City Hall. The canopy was fully conceptualized, designed, and built by students under the leadership of a faculty member. After going through multiple iterations for a 60 foot long canopy, the final design serves to provide a visual effect of undulations that change in appearance based on where you are standing or driving by. High and low points of undulations have 3D printed lights inset that are motion-activated so in the evening, a pedestrian’s path will be lit. During the day, there is a one-way mirror in the lamp so you will see your reflection, giving the effect of eyes on the street and providing an overall feeling of safety. The canopy slats respect the existing trees by flowing around them and integrating the trunks into the design. We utilized biodegradable, recyclable filament for the 3D printed lights, weather-resistant parallel strand lumber, for the beams, and marine plywood for the slats that were milled on a CNC router.


136

sculptures in space aliyah dosanjh m.arch foundation evda 580: studio I design thinking instructor: dan hapton

137

Somewhere in space lies a blurred line between sculpture and architecture Sculptures in Space presents a live/work studio for the Pop Art sculptors, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. The form utilized a compositional logic where everyday objects are abstracted through slicing operations with a primitive architectural form, a cube, to produce a variation of solid/void spaces. The void spaces produce pockets and tunnels of light that produce interesting experiences through the intersecting volumes.

Materiality and form defy expectations of construction in architecture to blur the boundaries between architectural buildings and sculptures. Everyday objects are represented with mirror-coated stainless steel and playful colours as an ode to pop artists, Claes Oldenburg and Jeff Koons. The playful shiny coating is juxtaposed by the rough concrete of the flat surfaces produced through the slicing operations of the primitive form. The form’s high reflectance projects images of sculptures on itself as it sits in the midst of the Nassau County Museum of Art sculpture garden.

program 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

entrance garage studio art storage library studio bathroom

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

kitchen dining room living room powder room laundry guest bedroom

13. 13A. 14. 15.

master bedroom master bathroom display area driveway


138

139

exposure michael gross lindsey harbord m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: keir stuhlmiller

This museum of architecture will bring awareness to fundamental design principles such as scale, light, and materiality and how it is used in design and architecture. By highlighting these principles, the project intends to personally connect the user to their environment allowing them to value their surroundings and understand how it influences their own experiences. Through collaborative partnerships with international architects and designers, individuals will also be exposed to global influences of design practice and ideals that will impact the future of local design.


140

141

the conscious society alexis valentine m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research ii instructor: MBAC (various members)

1.

2.

Nik Heynen, Hilda E. Kurts, and Amy Trauger, “Food Justice, Hunger and the City,” Geography Compass 6(5) (May 2012): 307-308, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.17498198.2012.00486.x. Slow Food “prevents the disappearance of local food cultures and traditions, counteracts the rise of fast life and combat people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from, and how our food choices affect the world around us.” (Slow Food, 2015).

Our society is unconscious. Food has been inextricably connected to our diverse Canadian identities and cultures. Food is a constant player in every spectrum of social gathering and connection. Neoliberal ideology has now commodified food, using it as a mechanism for wealth creation.1 The relationship between food production and consumption has been separated by a linear global corporate food chain. This system has worsened our global ecological footprint, has prevented access to decent and culturally appropriate food to marginalized cultures and socio-economic classes, and is blinding us of the origins of where our food comes from. Private developers capitalize on capitalism by scattering intermediate spaces between buildings and the street that see little social, cultural, or ecological benefit. Local food movements have recognized the urgency of providing equitable access to food. Food must be de-commodified and delinked from the corporate global food system to reconnect the urban population to food production and consumption, and revitalize the social, cultural, and ecological benefits that locally grown food can provide. Urban brownfield

sites create opportunities to generate greater social, cultural and ecological impacts to turn an unconscious society into a conscious one by: i.

Demystifying local food production, distribution, and consumption through the design of spaces that are transparent, open, flexible, and accessible year-round. ii. Recalibrating the food production, distribution, and consumption process by structuring the system as a continuous journey rather than one that has an end point. iii. Program that can be self-organized where food production, distribution, and consumption co-exist appropriately in a Canadian urban setting, while simultaneously providing gathering and educational spaces that amplify food production as a humanized process rather than a commodified one. iv. Weaving local food hubs into the urban fabric of communities to disseminate a slow food 2 movement by designing architecture that is easily deployable across a multiplicity of in-between spaces of cities.


UPDATES TO PHASE 1, 2, AND 3 CONTENT 142

143

TNETNOC 3 DNA ,2 ,1 ESAHP OT SETADPU CONCEPTUALIZATION - CONCEPT MODEL 1:200

TNETNOC 3 DNA ,2 ,1 ESAHP OT SETADPU CONCEPTUALIZATION - CONCEPT MODEL 1:200

UPDATES TO PHASE 1 CONTENT

Concept model.

UPDATES TO PHASE 1 CONTENT

CREATING A NARRATIVE Concept Diagram Image Title: Concept Model

fable

Concept model.

CREATING A NARRATIVE

1. Existing program

Concept Diagram Image Title: Concept Model

hannah mousek zachary ward

2. LIFT the exhibition and EMBRACE the ground plane 2. PULL THE SITE into the program

UPDATES TO PHASE 1, 2, AND 3 CONTENT

3. CRAFT the exhibition

Interior render depicting vertical circulation through scoops concept.

Concept diagram explaining spatial strategy.

m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: keir stuhlmiller

1. Existing program 2. LIFT the exhibition and EMBRACE the ground plane 2. PULL THE SITE into the program

ND 3 CONTENT

3. CRAFT the exhibition

al circulation through scoops concept.

Concept diagram explaining spatial strategy.

Image Title: Concept Diagram

redneR poocS rotalacsE :eltiT egamI

Image Title: Concept Diagram

redneR poocS rotalacsE :eltiT egamI

Fable is an architecture museum that weaves together the narratives of the urban context with traveling exhibitions. Through this project we argue that architecture plays a role in the way we experience our surroundings, both as a participant in the urban context and in the narration of curated stories. Our novel “scooping” concept makes use of the ground plane of Olympic Plaza, a public and open space, by separating it from the insular museum exhibit. Scoops extend from the museum, touching down on the site to provide various vertical circulation points through which the visitor can be pulled out of urban reality and placed firmly within the story of the exhibit.


144

145

retreat house for an artist shreya wilson

A home for Judith Scott....retreat house for artists The dwelling, gallery and studio is comprised of a series of objects forming spaces, layered with double facade embedded into the land called home for sculptures, Nassau County Museum of Art, NY, USA. The architecture is reflective of the artists’ lifestyle and sculptures she creates; a space where she can work, store, and exhibit her work, entertain as members of the community, and relax with her sister or alone.

m.arch foundation evda 580 studio i design thinking instructor: dan hapton

The sculptor also wanted to merge her workplace, where the evidence, the errors, the dirt, the process, were seen ... with a small exhibition area. The exhibition area, a spill-out

space, an extension of the studio serves to display these works as an art gallery for the visitors of the museum. To give the necessary background to a workplace where sculptural creation should be the one that has the center of intensity, it was decided to abstract the building form as a layer of fiberglass, keeping an eye on material traces, fund to highlight Judith’s sculptural work full of colors.


146

147

art in the city city in the art

Architectural manifestation: Building experience Flat surfaces

zainab ahmad vijul shah m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: marc boutin

Site Plan

Level: 00mm

2

00 mm

1

4 +150 mm

00 mm

00 mm

3

+600 mm

+600 mm

+150 mm

+450 mm +600 mm LEGEND:

Entrance 00 mm

Building entrance 1. Outdoor seating for Teatro

5

2. Famous three Sculpture 3. Amphitheatre 4. Pick-up/ drop-off 5. Outdoor Exhibiton/ Sculpture plaza

This project is founded on the critical intersection between the city as the inspiration for art making and art as the distillation of the world around us. The proposal aims to create a threshold for people to pause, reflect and ponder while experiencing art and city in an alternating canvas. The Kunsthalle can act as center for art, an incubator for invention, and a podium for public interaction, whilst being catalysts for

positive changes within the city. It is composed of two spaces - one for art display and adjacent programs, the other a public forum - that come together in a choreographed experience involving art and the city, gradually engaging in multiple movements and providing people with a space to learn, inspire and innovate.

The ‘Art’

The ‘City’

Sloped Surfaces


149

148

spike

1 St. SW

Center St. S

vivian lee christiaan muilwijk

0 Scale 1:200

10

20

40m

The form was designed based on opportunities in Canadian climate, optimized to capture water and snow to create icicles.

9 Ave SW

m.arch 2 evds 683.89: gridshell structures instructor: mauricio soto rubio

Spike is a tensile membrane structure that examines how to transform Calgary’s downtown alleyways from forgotten and gritty into places of connectivity, productivity, and value. Calgary is a winter city. By optimizing snow capture to create icicles through a tensile membrane structure, the Canadian urban winterscape can be activated and showcased. In the winter, Spike is an outdoor skating rink featuring giant icicles - a picturesque photo spot that provides shelter from the elements. In the summer, it is a shady place for office workers to take their lunch break, a venue for food festivals, flea markets, and photoshoots.


150

151

shifting perspectives

alana kerr danielle kim

m.arch 1 arch 616: comprehensive studio instructor: erin faulkner

The process of documenting history is inherently biased. Therefore, there is no way to completely and objectively understand the past. Shifting Perspectives is a research and exhibition space located in Calgary’s Olympic Plaza that encourages its users to shift their perspectives and preconceived notions of what deserves to included in history. A series of interactive, moving panels are scattered throughout the site of Olympic Plaza; leading pedestrians down into the plazas that surround the building. The moving panels also continue into the exhibition spaces where they can be populated by material; encouraging visitors to confront others’ perspectives along with their own. The building’s research facilities will be specifically tailored to researchers at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities specializing in areas of history that are new, emerging, or unusual. While research and curation is something that is not typically revealed to the museum-goer, the resource and research space is adjacent and visible to the public areas of the building, encouraging visitors to engage with the researchers.

conceptual gestures of shifting lower level plan

upper level plan


152

canvas de bowness s s anudeep mummareddy m.arch 2 arch 700: senior research studio i instructor: farhad mortezaee

Canvas de Bowness is an ephemeral cultural element of omnipresence, which creates radical opportunities for communal behavior and social transformation by revitalizing the commercial and retail spaces of Mainstreet Bowness. When juxtaposed with different buildings and street edges it adapts and multi-functions as a shelter for pop-up markets, a kiosk for local businesses, a warming hut, or bus-shelter along with disseminating art and culture by functioning as an urban canvas. The playful abstraction and inflatable nature establishes microrelations within the economically diverse neighborhood; standing as the beacon of the historic community.

153


154

155

engrain: a meditation cabin mark popel alexander semegen m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: jason johnson

This project aims to question the entirety of modern-day spas and therapeutic destinations, seeking to elevate every stage of meditation and physical therapy to be just as important as the act itself. The architecture is organized around sensations, providing visitors with a procession of emotional experiences. The composition of these experiences are curated in a way that ensures visitors only progress forward through the building, and never back the way they came. The building contains two entrances; one for the guest, and one for the therapist, each of which serve as exits for the other. This ensures the guest only encounters another person once throughout their spatial journey

curiosity/interest

solitude/contemplation

submission/exposure

clarity/enlightenment


Section YY

156

157

Concept Plan • Creation of a Central Axis. • Establishing of a View Point.

• Building Placement along the axis.

Existing Trees

Section XX

Walkway

10 mt Road

Walkway

Grove

Plaza

25 mt high Tower

Ramp leading to the Viewing Deck

Plaza

Cafe

Tower

revelation

Scale-1:350

0

nilendu bala

10

• Trees placed in grid iron pattern. • Subtraction of certain points creates cozy spaces.

• Trees form a line element that visually guide the visitor toward the tower. • Upon reaching the tower further elements are revealed.

m.plan 1 plan 606 site planning studio instructor: tawab hlimi

The objective of the project the project was to enhance the user experience of the existing space with the value addition of a 25 mt high viewing tower and a Café. The existing thicket on the North East of the site was amplified and a grove has been developed with hidden spaces in-between with the built features revealing themselves as a person explores into the site. The key features are, Universal Accessibility to the Viewing Deck, spill- out around the tower, maple tree groves forming a secondary transition space, and defined edges along the main axis.

5

Walkway

Grove

Open Space (behind the Plaza)

Cafe

Plaza

25 mt high Tower

Plaza

Cafe (behind the Plaza)

Grove

Walkway

Toilet

0

Open Space

10

20

Scale-1:700

N


CHNOLOGY

158

159

I THINK WE NEED MORE MILK.

user centric normal

AGAIN?! LID

LE

ICK

ING

SO

SH

BR

I THINK WE NEED TO MOVE THE WALL.

kiran rai m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: josh taron

2.5 m 2.5 m

Make it mass timber, but mass customized. DIY Dwelling is an architectural system that takes one of Canada’s under-utilized resources, and makes it applicable for use by its diverse population. A modular approach to construction allows for mass timber panels to be deftly combined together or exchanged to provide the desired customization for each resident. The lifetime of the building can see many adaptations of the structure’s footprint and aesthetic quality, allowing for the framework of the house to work with its residents instead of against them.

Y

VIT

CA

K

AN

PL

RE

UV

LO

EN

PE

N

E

ON

ST

R

OU

NT

CO

E FIR

TIO

RA

O RF

OD

WO

RE

SC

N

ER

TT

PA


160

161

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE STREET CORNER

ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE METROPOLIS

ON THE FAR SIDE OF ONE’S BODY


162

163

In the midst of a pandemic, fear and paranoia dictate daily life. Leaving the house to get groceries or to walk the dog causes anxiety. We use our grocery carts as buffers to protect us from other people. We veer off the sidewalk, avoiding others. Every interaction is mediated. It occurs through screens and zoom calls, hand sanitizer and masks. Distant Bodies aims to address this mediation, bringing our consciousness surrounding the pandemic to the surface. Distant Bodies creates understanding of the individual. What we wear is a signal of who we are. This wearable provides an interface for information: recovered, vulnerable, cautious.

vulnerable

distant bodies taylor crozon m.arch 2 arch 702: senior research studio ii instructor: jason johnson

recovered


164

165

fruiting bodies cindy nachareun m.arch foundation evda 582: studio ii in architecture instructor: graham livesey

Fruiting Bodies explores the relationship between us and the everyday table. Derived from the word “excrescence”, it takes a form inspired from the parasitic relationship between cordyceps and insects. The protrusions come through the tabletop, forcing users into placing their objects in different ways, similar to the control a cordyceps has over their hosts. Limited to one 5’x5’ sheet of birch plywood and wood glue, this table was assembled using a simple stub tenon and groove joint, along with several holes cut to fit the “cordyceps” through. The table was finished with oil to bring out the natural colour of the wood.


166

biolume stevia hatzikiriakos m.arch 1 arch 606: intermediate design studio instructor: graham livesey

Biolume is a functioning paper light installation. Inspired by bioluminescent sea anemones, hundreds of paper disks were cut, folded, ripped, and strung through wire. Biomimic research for this project showcased how man-made materials, paper, can capture natures forms. To mimic the iridescent quality of sea anemones, a thin sheet of cellophane was suspended along the interior of the light structure.

167



ISSN 256-648X

9 780889 534476