Ultra Journal - vol 4

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ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV ral volume IV


To contact the editors: ultra.jrnl@gmail.com All images presented in this volume of Ultra are collected from the student body of the School of Planning, Architecture and Landscape at the University of Calgary. University of Calgary 2500 University DR NW Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 ISSN-2561-648X Paperback ISBN13-978-0-88953-436-0 ISBN10-0-88953-436-5 PDF ISBN13-978-0-88953-437-7 ISBN10-0-88953-437-3 Ultra Journal is an annual publication. This edition includes student work from the 2019 calendar year.

acknowledgements Dr. Brian R. Sinclair School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape University of Calgary Western Canadian Digital Imaging

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letter from the editors In Barcelona’s Santa Caterina Market, there sits a sculpture bench by artist Lawrence Weiner. It reads:

PLACED UPON THE SAME PLACE AS ITSELF. FOREVER & A DAY Here nor There exists in the middle. It considers the place between tangible and intangible, definite and indefinite, corporeality and ethereality. The material world is changed through our intangible ideas and imaginations. Drawings and visual representations act as tools of a non-linear, iterative process that help shape and define something beyond our physical limits. Ultra Journal Volume IV aims to capture a moment in time by showcasing one year of student work, events, and imagination within the Faculty of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at the University of Calgary. It is a piece of a larger time capsule of the activities, ideas, events, and circumstances during the 2019 academic year. The role of design is to imagine the intangible future conditions of tomorrow, or twenty years from tomorrow. We as design students exist in the middle condition needing to understand the world that came before us in order to create a sustainable future. Ultra Journal: Here nor There attempts to showcase work beyond what is ordinary, real, and beyond our physical range of time and space through drawings, material explorations, and visual representations. As we look back on the last year, curating this edition of Ultra Journal posed many unexpected challenges with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. We like to think that this year’s theme, Here nor There, is quite fitting given the uncertainty and insecurities we are all facing. The circumstances that quickly unfolded put us in this in-between space that made us, the editors, feel at often times unsettled and unsure how we were going to put a publication together. However, like the design process often goes, this uncomfortable in-between space gave us the tools needed to be innovative, generate new ideas, and put together a publication that we are proud of. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our community of fellow students and faculty for helping us create this year’s edition of Ultra Journal during this unprecedented time. We hope you, the reader, enjoy it as much as we did creating it. Taylor Crozon, Lauren Fagan & Alexis Valentine

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table of contents

Here Interview

Hanna Poulsen

Kitchen, Garden. Hanna Poulsen

Rouleauville Hills Zhenshi (Dexter) Lu

Mohkinstsis Indigenous Cultural Centre + Research Hub

NOR 13

Rebecca Cey, Dinesh Sharma 14 16

18

Jonathan Monfries

De Sommet Vue Anil Yadav

Alexandra

Madisen Killingsworth

20 22

Fisica

Cassidy Westrop

The Suburban Subversion Jesse Siegle

24

26

Elevate

Maria Grygoryeva

Constructed Community Ashley Ortleib

Collaborative Morphology 10

Kim Tse

Ho-Tai Wong

Eminence

Connectivity Workshop GO

Machine Garden Lealyn San Juan

Moh-kins-tsis Centre for Environmental Stewardship

Charlene Karl, Ross Ricupero 28 30

Genero(city) Fiona Ramsay

32

The Age of Digital Craft Nicolas Hamel

34 36

38

40

42

44

Transitioning Arezoo Khalili

Building Community Alexandria Pankratx

68 70

Convergence 46 48

Inderjit Pabla, Rajat Verma, Bhurgu Gohil

On the Fringes Ugonna Ohakim

Christopher Green, Norika Yue

52

Raval Horticultural Hub

54

Komorebi

Christopher Green Neal Borstmayer

Kakushibori 56 58

Josie Kaip, Ellen Lee

Spatial Mnemonics Vivian Ton

Open Canvas Ashley Hu

60

The Boardwalk at Crescent Road Darby-Marie Henshaw

62

Niistsimii

Danielle Callan, Lauren Fagan

Coalesce Alana Kerr 64 66

72 74

Interviews

50

Centre for Contemporary Art + Performance Taylor Crozon, Alexis Valentine

Interactive Building Envelope Design and Fabrication Youness Yousefi

Istawa’si Center for Indigenous Culture Rochelle Greenberg, Rosemary Joseph

Tsukuru

Charlene Karl, Seanna Guillemin

Remake: A Recovery Housing for Drug Addiction

Brendan Kawa, Danny Roy

Kaibatsu

Christiaan Muilwijk, Tania Castillo-Pelayo

Kiran Rai, Jayleen Chivers

Raiyan Ul Momin

Ohkana’pssi Cultural Alexandria Pankratz, Michelle Bootsma

The Floating World (Ukiyo)

Marshall Evans

Mosaic

Neal Borstmayer, Frédérick Méthot

Centre for Storytelling

78

80 82 84 86 88

90 92 94

Carapace

Tania Castillo-Pelayo, Emily Epp

Autonomo(us) Bushra Hashim

96 98


There Playing by the Railroad Tracks Aleksandra Simic

Interview

Ellen Odegaard

El Raval’s Alley Ellen Odegaard

Community of None Vienne Braux

Sugi

Emily Epp, Ran Zhang

Site Planning Tina Dadgostar

Tenchisouzou

Vivian Lee, Piotr Tomanek

Interface Danielle Kim

Penrose Panels Kristin Forward

100 105 106 108 110 112

Nitsitsinksinaa

Bushra Hashim, Marc Yap

Alberta Bound

Jennifer Comrie, Liyang Wan

Building Stories Lauren Fagan

Remanence: Landscape of Decolonized Learning

Danny Roy, Hannah Song

116 118

136 138

140

Moh-Kins-Tsis Community Wellness Ellen Lee, Kelsey Parker

114

134

142

Gridshell

SAPL Students in association with LID

Transience

Caleb Hildenbrandt

144 146

Fracture | SSIK

Elliott Carlson, Alexander Semegen

Restitute Matt Walker

Passageway Obinna Ekezie

Drawing as Theory Mohammad Moezzi

The Perch Lookout & Cafe Elie Jahshan

The Veil, the Vault and the Promise: The Broad Museum Pamela Haskell

The Ec(___) House Carter McHugh

120 122 124 126

128

130 132 11


he


ere


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Interview Hanna Poulsen M.Arch Graduate, April 2020

How has the Master of Architecture program changed your outlook on the past/the present/the future? I admire that the profession is inherently optimistic, and that design is often curated for an ideal future. How has COVID-19 transformed your work and your experience of architecture school? Iterative design with no model making was a challenge, especially in a studio based on digital fabrication. Although we produced some cool projects, it would have been interesting to see what we would have produced without the virus. What is your definition of reality? Going with the flow How do you make sense of the world? By zooming in How far into the future do you like to imagine? The weekend W h a t

lessons will you take with you from

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Kitchen, Garden. Hanna Poulsen M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

Kitchen, Garden, is an affordable housing project that addresses issues of connection in Barcelona’s Raval through food, and food cultures. The intervention welcomes recent immigrants and the elderly, two demographics with a complicated and fluctuating relationship with food. By embracing the notion of sharing through collective kitchens, the project aims to offer security and stability to recent immigrants, provide an outlet of socialization for the aging population, and help with feelings of isolation for both.

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=? +

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Rouleauville Hills Zhenshi (Dexter) Lu M.Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Graham Livesey

This project is located in the historic quarter of the French Canadian settler - the Rouleauville area in Mission, Calgary. Featuring Lindsay Park and Elbow River, the site enjoys a very nice view and relaxing context. Hence, this project intends to highlight the pleasing living environment enriched by nature through opening the courtyard to introduce direct sunlight access to each unit, through terracing to create lush green spaces, and through an intimate relationship with vegetation. How do humans & nature live commensally? What is the possibility of human intervention & artificial landscapes? What is the best solution for urban dwelling? This project is an attempt to answer these questions, and also a exploration to quest for a better example of modern urban dwelling, trying to create a realxing, healing, and welcoming living enrivonment.

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Mohkinstsis Indigenous Cultural Centre + Research Hub Jonathan Monfries M.Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Nicholas Dykstra

open to below

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open to below

Inglewood is full of history. However, much of the history prior to what we see in historical buildings is for the most part hidden – but not forgotten. The Indigenous cultures of the area (primarily Blackfoot) used the term Mohkinstsis to identify what we now know as Calgary – directly translating to the confluence of the Bow and Elbow rivers. This point was identified as a highly spiritual area with a sacred meaning. With Fort Calgary on the other side of the Elbow river, this site intends to dedicate an Indigenous cultural centre based on Mohkinstsis, with a variety of rotating galleries, community programming, and researchers-in-residence to establish an awareness of Inglewood’s history prior to 1883. An essential feature of this project is defining a vista from the site to the confluence of the rivers with both linear connectivity across the site towards the rivers, as well as a flagship room that looks out onto the rivers that would be open to the public to view the enrivonment.


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De Sommet Vue Anil Yadav M.Plan, Site Planning Studio Instructor: Tomasz Sztuk

This project seeks to analyze site by locating two building elements with specific footprint, while desiging a series of public spaces around it. It was important to consider the immediate and larger context of the site views, flows of people, sun exposure, topography, and landscape elements during the design process.

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Alexandra Madisen Killingsworth M.Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Marc Boutin

A mixed use development in the Inglewood neighbourhood in Calgary, Alberta. The intent of the project is to foster social interactions and attachment to place through the revival of the historical social presence of the site. Architecture and program as the agent of this revival. The provision of publicly accessible multifunctional recreational space, greenhouses and retail units that will operate for extended hours and seasons will provide space for social interactions and engagement with place. These amenities alongside new residential units will support and facilitate the intensiďŹ cation of Inglewood while being cognizant of the rich history and character.

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What was your favourite lecture of the year at SAPL? Housing Design Excellence: European Narratives Whose work is currently on your radar? Leckie Studio


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9

Mosaic

8

Neal Bortsmayer Frédérick Méthot M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Philip Vandermey

8 5

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MOSAIC

2

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

3

SPACE FOR PROTEST

4

OUTSIDE FORUM - SPACE FOR DEBATE

5

UNIVERSITY DRIVE

6

NATURAL OUTSIDE LECTURE HALL

7

SPACE FOR POW WOW

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Prior to the colonization of North America by European interests, Canada’s Indigenous thrived under independent systems of governance uniquely tailored to their cultural identities and way of life. However, following Canada’s confederation in 1867, these Indigenous communities lost the right of self-governance to the Indian Act of 1876. Although a small number of Indigenous communities, through a land claims process, have re-attained this right, the majority of Canada’s First Nations continue to be regulated by the government. Mosiac is an Indigenous cultural centre, envisioned to be only one in a greater network of similar centres spread across Canada. These types of Indigenous cultural centres would serve to coalesce thousands of smaller voices into a more definitive political and public presence, advocating for and bringing attention to shared Indigenous rights. Additionally, Mosaic provides a middle ground for different cultural groups to come together to discuss and debate issues which may be important to some, but not shared by all. Finally, Mosaic creates a stage for dialog between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities on the University of Calgary campus, and the greater Calgary area. Sitting on the border of the University, acting as a gateway from the East and facing the University of Calgary administration building to the West, Mosaic becomes a focal point for important Indigenous issues, creating ripples that spread out across campus affecting and being affected by its surroundings. The interplay between these ripples creates space for a dialog between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples on campus and in the community. Mosaic is organized around a central Forum, meant to house large gatherings for discussion or debate, but also large performances, and cultural exhibitions. The Forum opens axially from East and West onto the rolling steps of the central gathering circle which all other pavilions are organized around, akin to the tipi ring of the Indigenous peoples of the Plains. While the Forum is designed to host Indigenous cultural groups from all of Canada, seven smaller pavilions are included to provide more bespoke spaces for seven overarching cultural groupings: The North West Coastal Peoples, the Plateau Peoples, the Plains Peoples, the Eastern Woodland Hunters, the Eastern Woodland Farmers, the Subarctic Peoples, and the Arctic Peoples.

8

REUNION CIRCLE - INTERACTION WITH STUDENT

9

CROWCHILD TRAIL

10

SPACE FOR ALL-NIGHTER


2 A4.0

E.A

2 A5.0

E.B

E.C

4000

D.D

4000

4000

W3

D.1

9280

F.C

4000

F.D 4000

F.E

F.F

4000

3220

2010

2370

1140

15930

111 63 m²

W5

F.3

Room

1660

Concrete Floor 300mm

F.2 3500

4660

1140

NORTH WEST COASTAL PAVILION

8240

W3

W3

112 86 m²

2370

W3

660

4000

F.1

110 82 m²

E.4

108 94 m²

1500

4000

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

D.4

F.B

7290

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

W4

4000

7990

4000

E.3

P5

D.3

W3

F.A

21220

1490

PLATEAU PAVILION 107 50 m²

109 49 m²

920

7990

4000

12000 1510

5 A9.01

1200

PLAINS PAVILION

W5

D.2 12000

8390

E.2

W3

2870

1500

4000

1150

W6

2 A9.01

4000

E.1 2700

4000

800

D.C 12000

4000

D.B 4000

E.D

12000

8220

D.A

F.4

5930

C.A

4000

C.D

3770

105 6 m²

G.A

G.B

G.C

P2

W4

CAFE

1540

3260

2760

STAIR/ELEVATOR LOBBY

DN

106 56 m²

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

3600

G.1

P1

C.2

2860

114 42 m²

1440

1440

1440

P4

WASHROOM 113 29 m²

3750

980

500

7500

3750

W3

3600

W5

W3

W3

102 34 m²

B.I

G.D

10800 3600

C.1 W5

2140

104 6 m²

P2

G.2

1590

1540

7500

WASHROOM

3750

3750

103 5 m²

P2

WASHROOM

3770

2000

P2 W3

W3

G.3

2140

C.3

W3

P1

G.4

1150

W5

8030

W4

1760

A.1

6870

B.H

C.C 7530

W5

STORAGE

3600

14020 4000

4000

B.G

10800

B.D

1540

B.C

3600

B.B

3600

B.A

8090

9210

7520

H.1 1130

W4

4000

4770

A.2

A.3 W6

H.2 3

12000

4000

1120 A4.0

115 58 m²

H.3 FORUM

101A 164 m²

101 453 m²

A9.01

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

A5.0

116 86 m²

4000

GALLERY

1

1060

1

8790 ARCTIC PAVILION

8790

4770

1080

4770

A.4

24900

A5.0

H.4

4770

H.A

H.B

H.C

H.D

5710

A.5

2400

A.6

3820

3820

3820

3820

3820

1780

1150

A.B

A.C

A.D

A.E

A.F

A.G

A.H

3770

3260

1540

W3

3770

J.2

J.3

3770 7530

J.A

J.B

J.C 1510

P.1

1500

SUB ARCTIC PAVILION

2480 1320

118 45 m²

4000

K.2 4000

6820

8310

1360

W3

123 54 m²

18780

1340

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

2770

1230

K.3 M.1

W3

P.4

W3

4000

M.2

N.1 SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE 129 100 m²

EASTERN WOODLAND HUNTERS PAVILION

N.2

750

K.B

K.C

K.4

K.D

120 39 m²

W6

P3

KITCHEN

EASTERN WOODLAND HUNTERS PAVILION

121 10 m²

EASTERN WOODLAND HUNTERS PAVILION

W6

M.4 STORAGE

860

122 15 m²

128 11 m²

W3

580

N.4 4000

1980

M.3

124 11 m²

127 11 m²

W3

4000

13980

K.A

125 11 m²

W6

N.3

9760

DINING ROOM

2080

12000

W6

4000

W3

EASTERN WOODLAND HUNTERS PAVILION

590

P.E

770

3990

P.D

4000

3990

P.C

4000

3990

P.B

4000

4400

4000

4000

12800

P.3

P.A

W3

119 98 m²

W6

130 86 m²

980

1360

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

131 98 m²

W5

EASTERN WOODLAND FARMERS PAVILION

8280

3150

K.1

SEMI-CONDITIONED SPACE

1230

W3

P.2 10300

A.A

DN

2760

24950

3770

1780

7530

117 56 m²

1150

3150

1 A9.01

W3

7870

1760

STAIR/ELEVATOR LOBBY

1150

A.7

J.1

W4

12000

1 A4.0

4000

4000

W5

M.5 4000

11210

P3

4000 8000

12000 2 A5.0

N.A

N.B

N.C

M.A

N.D 4 A4.0

M.B

M.C

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AEROGEL INSULATED UPPER PANELS

266mm STRUCTURAL GLULAM SUB-BLEAM

950mm STRUCTURAL GLULAM

TRIPLE LAYER ETFE

190 mm EXTERIOR GLULAM BEAM

152 mm EXTERIOR GLULAM BEAM

190 mm BOTTOM PERIMETER HIGH-TEMP

GLULAM BEAM

HOT WATER RADIATOR

WATERPROOF MEM. CLIPS INTO ETFE FRAMEWORK

Ohkana’pssi Cultural Centre Alexandria Pankratz, Michelle Bootsma M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Keir Stuhlmiller

Sport is deeply rooted in aboriginal culture. It cultivates connections, encourages playfulness, and provides an opportunity to socialize and connect. The Ohkana’pssi Cultural Centre creates a space on campus for traditional Indigenous sporting events and games to take place, open to all who wish to join and learn. The building is made of two main nodes. The larger is focused around a grand hall which has the ability to facilitate indoor lacrosse games (a more modern term for Baggataway). The other side of the building hosts a gym for practising Okichitaw, a traditional plains combat art. The two areas are connected via an underground gallery celebrating Indigenous sport through art and exhibitions. This dark, intimate space contrasts the bright, action-filled courts and allows time for reflection and appreciation of the history of Canada’s Indigenous sports.

The expressive structure of the building is also a reflection of Indigenous sport, taking inspiration from the traditional plains Baggataway (or lacrosse) stick. Large arched glulam beams span across the entirety of the roof and ceiling, with an ETFE panel system that imitates the woven system of the lacrosse basket. The ETFE panels are treated with light filtering coatings and filled with aerogel help to reduce glare inside while still allowing ample sunlight to filter through into the lacrosse courts and okichitaw gym.

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One of the Brigde Walls down: More controlled flow of people onto rentable spaces

Auditorium Bridge Walls Up: Separate events

Kaibatsu Christiaan Muilwijk, Tania Castillo-Pelayo M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

A highly adaptable events center in industrial Shin Kiba that engages the water. It uses Shin Kiba’s underutilized waterways to create a dynamic events center that is at the heart of a network of connectivity. The site is somewhat isolated, but it stretches out into its surroundings. Connectivity is 3D rather than 1D. People are not contained to the land surface in the center, which confronts people with water usage. This project seeks to Celebrate the history of Shin Kiba and its typologies while critically addressing its future. Be an exemple for the possibilities of re-purposed space. Provide a new structure that humanizes an industrial character. It challenges the conventional notion of a ‘Shin-Kiba shed’ by morphing it to take on a new function within an old structure/system.

What was your favourite lecture of the year at SAPL? Graham Livesey in Professional Practice, ammirite.

Sheds Reconfigured to Extend the Site itself

What is happening right now that is affecting your work (current event, issue etc.)? Floating sheds for a floodable city. Tokyo floods easily due to earthquakes and typhoons.

ALL Bridge Walls of Auditorium Down: Auditorium Space Connected to Rentable Lots. Buildings connected on the south end 31


4.67

UNIT A

9.62

7.23

14.00 1

FĂ­sica

UNIT A AXO

Cassidy Westrop M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

UNIT E

5

1 : 100

0

1

2

GRAPHIC SCALE: 1:100

32

Sports are universally thrilling, everyone can participate, everyone will have fun, and everyone can be involved. Age limitations, height requirements, and other concerns simply aren’t part of the equation. Those who are more active are far less prone to suffering from depression and loneliness. Sport encourages people to reclaim their fundamental right to public spaces and regenerate demoted, hostile or forgotten areas. The idea of combining sport with social affordable housing is the basis of this project. 10

3

4

5

5

UNIT D AXO


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The Suburban Subversion Jesse Siegle M.Arch, Senior Research Studio Instructor: Joshua Taron

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With autonomous cars, public transit and alternative modes of travel, huge amounts of transportation infrastructure will eventually be rendered useless, this project asks the question; what happens with this space? In suburban communities that dominate our urban fabric, front-drive homes with massive garage fronts make up your average streetscape. The Suburban Subversion looks at a methodology where prefabricated and modular elements can be used to transform existing homes both internally and externally. By reevaluating suburbia, we can have denser, walk-able, mixed use communities. This project looks at answering a set of subsequent questions, each of which produces a set of iterations that could be employed through various circumstances.


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Tsukuru

Charlene Karl, Seanna Guillemin M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

In Japanese cuisine, there is an inherent order and rhythm to eating and enjoying a traditional Japanese meal. However, patrons are often served a meal with many small dishes but are given little explanation of how or when to eat from each dish. Similarly, there is an entire system in Japanese culinary arts that informs the pottery selected based on the food prepared, the ingredients selected, and the seasons within which they are enjoyed, and yet this knowledge too is rarely passed on to its patrons. Tsukuru, or “to make� in Japanese, celebrates the 36

hand crafts of both pottery and Japanese cuisine uniting both in an educational and formal Kaiseki experience. Tsukuru shines a light on the traditional methods of Japanese ceramics and cuisine, embraces chef and artist interaction, and celebrates how pottery and food collide.


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Elevate

Maria Grygoryeva M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Mauricio Soto Rubio

One of the projects during Studio 1 required students to design an intervention on a site located on the corner of Inglewood at 1100 11 ST SE. After an extensive site analysis, it was concluded that the chosen site functions as an ‘island’ due to the lack of proper circulation routes to the site, the intimidating appearance of the site, and the lack of lighting surrounding the site. To mitigate the ‘island’ effect present on the site, a bridge seemed to be an appropriate solution. The pedestrian overpass is placed such that it connects two green spaces surrounding the site. The bridge itself becomes an extension of the green space, acting as a public space for people to gather. Residents and visitors of Inglewood can meet and socialize here, enhancing the sense of community in the area. Benches and sculptural ‘tuning fork’ installations were integrated into the structure. The giant ‘tuning forks’ vibrate as the train goes by, creating a melody that shakes the surroundings. Visually and auditory, the ‘forks’ become a focal point in the neighborhood.

What or who influenced this project? Zaha Hadid, Paper architecture What was your favourite lecture of the year at SAPL? Daniel Libeskind’s Micromegas lecture presented by Dan Hapton What are you reading? Poetics of Space by Gaston Bachelard

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Constructed Community Ashley Ortleib M.Arch, Senior Research Studio Instructor: Marc Boutin

Our society’s increasing trend towards individualism is in direct opposition with our innate need to belong to a deeply connected community. Once seen as a community constructor in the Canadian fabric, religious institutions have become enshrouded in human controversy and remain to serve an exclusive community. Through spaces of co-creation, vulnerability between the individual and the institution can catalyze a de-mystification of these pieces of Canada’s urban fabric through the development of new rituals.

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topography

vertical ripple

horizontal ripple

diagonal ripple

slumped

pocked

Collaborative Morphology As a case study in a self-renewable building system capable of continuously adapting to change, Collaborative Morphology takes glass as a starting and idealized system that can be formed, deployed, and reused without the typical down-cycling disadvantages of other materials. To begin an understanding of how a glass system could perform, a few basic typologies were designed. This typology consisted of a pocked, striated, and hybrid topological system, each evaluated on their relative performance in a series of key building performance attributes as potential interior and exterior surface 42

Kim Tse Instructor: Jason Johnson

assemblies. Due to the inability to work with glass in this studio, plastic was used as a proxy to create prototypes of these surface typologies given its similar elastic qualities under heat. These tests were first tested by hand then formed using robotic arms as a proof of concept for how robotic technology could be used to extend the capability of the architect to prototype such a system at the 1:1 scale.


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U/S OF CLG 11785

TYP. 50 ALUM. COMP. PANEL

RIGID STL FRAME

25 METAL DECKING

C/W GLAZING &

MIN. R30 POLY ISO INSUL.

ALUMINUM PANEL

ALUMINUM SUBSTRATE

INSERTS

GWB P&P EXPOSED STRUCTURE SOFFIT @ U/S OF EXTERIOR O.H.

TYP. 50 ALUM. COMP. PANEL 25 METAL DECKING MIN. R23 ROCKWOOL INSUL. ALUMINUM SUBSTRATE

ELDERS

CIRCULATION

T/O RAMMED EARTH WALL

GWB P&P EXPOSED STRUCTURE

3200

HSS STL RING BEAM TO RUN PERIMETER OF RAMMED EARTH

GRAND HALL TYP. RAMMED E. WALL

600 BACKFILL SOIL

T/O FLOOR

R12 RIGID INSUL.

200 P.CONC. SLAB

GRADE

200

VAPOUR RETARDER

FOR VEGETATION

25 AIR SPACE (BOTH SIDES)

GRADE 0

U/S CLG -600

POLISHED P.CONC. FLR SLAB 100 P.CONC. SLAB C/W FIBER MESH REINF. 38 GYPCRETE OVER POUR FOR

PARKADE

IN FLOOR RADIANT HTN'G (BY OTHERS) 50 RIGID INSUL.

CISTERN

35 MTL DECKING

T/O PARKADE -3200

600 CAVITY FOR HVAC SUPPLY STL STUD @ 410 O.C. 200 STRUCT. P.CONC. SLAB T/O PILE -4000

MIN 610 GRANULAR FILL 100 Ø WEEPING TILE C/W FABRIC SOCK

U/S OF PILE

Centre for Storytelling

-7800

Rebecca Cey, Dinesh Sharma M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

The basic concept for the site redevelopment defines two primary axis that represent two key relationship-based narratives. The long axis runs roughly north-south, extending through most of the green and less developed areas of the site. Its purpose is to strengthen intergenerational relationships among Indigenous people, where culture is kept alive as stories are passed down through tradition. Spaces for ceremonial and spiritual practices are aligned to this access, connected by winding paths. The short axis runs roughly east-west, extending from the centre of the university’s administration building perpendicular to Crowchild Trail. This axis addresses relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on the idea that we are all treaty people. It is an area of interface and exchange between people of different backgrounds and traditions, where their shared histories and destinies can be made evident. The Centre for Storytelling sits at the convergence of these axes, tying both narratives together.

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0

The Floating World (Ukiyo) Kiran Rai, Jayleen Chivers M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

Floating World (Ukiyo) is an arts and culture center which aims to bridge the generational gap that exists between the youth and seniors as vulnerable groups in Japanese society. This is accomplished through arts and cultural programming that allows for the crossgenerational flow of traditional and contemporary artistic ideas. We seek to create a “floating world� in which new applications of knowledge are encouraged, creating a safe haven which accepts and makes room for all users. 46

5

15m


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Remake: A Recovery Housing for Drug Addiction Ho-Tai Wong M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

Affordable housing is arguably one of the greatest architectural concerns of the twentyfirst century. In dense urban landscapes such as Barcelona, this concern is exacerbated by the growing spatial impacts of tourism and foreign investment; a significant pressure on urban dwellers in the city. Restitute seeks to acknowledge this paradigm by bringing forth Lefebvre’s 1991 concept of “the right to the city” through establishing an agencybased social housing project within existing infrastructure. Through integrating a mixed-use program, an interplay between public and private spaces, and providing custom-operated building features, the project is one which seeks to bring restitution to social agency in dwelling; the inherent urban right.

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Eminence Marshall Evans M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Catherine Hamel

Creation of habitat was formed on the idea of hosting the Best of “Brew�, to come and showcase their product or story. This temporary habitation would host a continuously revolving door of the best of industry to create a public attraction and hub. This story telling form is both an iconic shape to capture the publics imagination, and a public space to host discussions, public presentations and a narrative to help Calgary become a hub for craft drinks and products. `

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Connectivity Raiyan Ul Momin M.LA, Studio I Instructor: Tawab Hilmi

The purpose of this project was to do a thorough analysis of a centrally located waterfront site and identify the major opportunities and constraints in order to address them through a design intervention in an urban scale. The site has great significance to the city for being adjacent to the Bow River, for its central location and historic value with the location of the Pump house theatre (Built in 1913) which was once the main intake and pumping station to serve the city. This area once had a wood preserving plant which led to creosote contamination in the ground, thus turning it into a brownfield site. Although this site has a historic significance and is adjacent to the Bow river, public accessibility is lacking and unwelcoming due to the CP railway that divides the community around the 10th Avenue South-West and the site. There are opportunities to transform this area into an active public realm. A framework was thus designed which led to a master plan and focus to address these issues through a design intervention. The analysis of the project started with some sketches to get an initial perception of the site. Apart from solving the issues discussed above, the main focus was to transform the site into an active public realm providing better accessibility and connecting the surrounding community to this historic site. The site already has a wastewater management system. A constructed wetland was proposed along the storm water drainage pipes for a natural and cost-effective process which would also act as a remediation for the contaminated area. The soil from the wetland and contaminated area was used to create the berms on either side of the CP railway which acted as a sound buffer for the surrounding community, used as a pedestrian and bike path and a wildlife movement corridor. A lightweight pedestrian bridge connects all these proposed elements for better accessibility in and around the site, and retains the historic axial pathway towards Bow River. As a result of this design proposal, this waterfront and brownfield site could be turned into an active public realm with better connectivity to the surrounding community and the river edge.

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Workshop GO Brendan Kawa, Danny Roy M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

Workshop GO houses five distinct educational concepts addressing the missing gaps and opportunities in the cultural and urban life of Tokyo. The five concepts (athletics, culinary, tech, arts and craftsmanship) each house several programs that provide access to unique hands on experiences. The overarching form flows together with specific programmed blocks surrounded by open, flexible areas where students and the rest of the community can gather, collaborate and learn together.

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Machine Garden Lealyn San Juan

For decades, Inglewood fought vigorously to preserve its residential fabric. This spirit weakened upon the period of World Wars and the Great Depression that perpetrated a decline in the community. The advent of suburbanization further aggravated the situation when the City began planning for middle-class suburban development leaving a working-class area such as Inglewood overlooked. As an antidote to prolonged unemployment and homelessness, the community accepted the intrusion of heavy industrial activity. The lack of income and limitation to residential growth did not translate into a poverty spirit. Lower-income residents made ends meet with large gardens and animal farms to supplement their families’ food supply. Inglewood’s first grocery store, Jenkins Groceteria, has a significant event in history for being the first self-service grocery in Canada. Ironically, the community has incessantly suffered from a lack of proper grocery stores.

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The community’s serious effort for self-sustainability has a vast disconnect from the lack of food market in the neighbourhood. It is crucial to link and create a self-sufficient cycle to recalibrate residential activity and reinforce Inglewood’s independence. The situation demands a Community Food Centre that considers the entire food system; a community garden (production, processing, and preserving), a supermarket (distribution and access), a communal kitchen (consumption and celebration), and a composting facility (waste absorption). Its social, ecological, and economic agency addresses Inglewood’s food insecurity, revitalization of post-industrial brownfield, and appropriation of urban spaces for horticultural activities.


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Moh-Kins-Tsis Center for Environmental Stewardship Charlene Karl, Ross Ricupero M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Keir Stuhlmiller

The project’s concept pulls from Canadian Indigenous people’s instrinsic connection to nature and how they are taught to be stewards of the land. Unifying the human connection and flow of nature, the architecture provides this place of connection and engagement where this tradition of stewardship can continue forward. Here these two flows reach a confluence that informs the building, program within, and the surrounding site. The Centre incorporates environmental practices that also continue to bring this stewardship forward by: • Bring together the flows of nature and humanity such that an opportunity for connection and confluence is made. • Providing opportunities for people to dwell, rest, and engage in a space that provides connection to nature, culture, and each other.

Rooftop PV

Operable north facade to allow air circulation

Vented Clerestory Open centre space for ventilation and air circulation

FSC Local glu-lam wood structure

FSC local CLT deck

Interior glazing to daylight interior rooms

Extensive south glazing to capture sunlight Concrete + stone main floor at glazed open areas to act as thermal mass

Rainwater collection cistern. Drains through solarium planting and out to rain garden or used for toilets.. TO RAIN GARDEN

FSC wood facade system to shade and limit sunlight into building

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Geothermal couple for heating and cooling, supplemented by radiant flooring with high energy boiler and ventilation ducting. East side of building partially buried


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Genero(city) Fiona Ramsay M.Arch, Senior Research Studio Instructor: Marc Boutin

Generos[city] intends to reimagine urban, infrastructural, and built spaces and places as an opportunity to create a generous cityscape. The project utilizes and extends its built forms to allow for its inhabitation by users and passersby. By creating inhabitable spaces, different kinds of people are given the opportunity to cross paths, slowly beginning to break down socially isolated barriers of our daily lives. The agency that governs Generos[city] is modelled after an understanding of ecology as “being of, or relating to, the relationships between living things and their environments.� This socially driven agency returns us to our interconnected and interdependent nature, with each other and with our environments. By allowing for inhabitation of one collective space, Generos[city] brings many different people into proximity with one another. This proximity offers moments where two people who might never have crossed paths otherwise, might be given the chance to see humanness where they may not have before. 60


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Wood Nailer or Metal “Z” Bars Vertical

Rigid Insulation

Metal Base Flashing Engineered Soil with Planting

Continuous Bituminous Flashing over Parapet

Filter Fabric

Continuous Membrane over parapet, lapped and sealed

Resevoir Layer Mositure Retention Layer

Slotted Block Ties with Insul. Support and V-tie

Aeration Layer Rigid Insulation

Rammed Concrete

Metal Studs

Steel L Bracket

Triple Pane Glazing

Drainage Layer

Level 2 4000

Green Roof Waterproofing Membrane Pre-Cast Concrete Hanging Wood Slat Ceiling

Glass Holder Thermally Broken Seals Profiled Silicone Seal IGU Spacers

200mm Glulam Column Steel Anchor Aluminum Breakshape Starter Angle Aluminum Curtain Wall Frame Flashing

Gypsum Board

Metal Furring Site Cast Concrete Metal Meshing Rammed Concrete Raised Floor With Polished Concrete Finish Raised Floor Stands

Slope Earth 2% Away From Foundation Tie A/V Barrier to Window

Rigid Insulation Metal Decking

Rigid Insulation Concrete Slab Waterproof Membrane

Reinforced Concrete Beam

Reinforced Concrete Foundation Wall

Reinforced Concrete Column

Concrete Slab

Weeping Tile

Grade Beam

Pile Cap

Pile Pile

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Istawa’si Center for Indigenous Culture Rochelle Greenberg, Rosemary Jospeh M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

To begin this project, we studied the history of Western invasion onto the lands of the Indigenous People in Canada, and began to understand how this led to the shattering of Indigenous cultures and values; therefore, we decided to steer our project in the direction of healing. We characterized healing as a threefold process. First, growth as a person. Second, as a community that comes together to share and lean on one another. Lastly, as a society coming together and walking as one in the face of adversity. Formally, our architecture strives to blend into the surrounding landscape. Our green roofs rise and fall mimicking the rolling foothills common within our prairie landscape. We hope that Istawa’si is able to provide a space where we are able to grow at a personal, communal and societal level.

What advice would you give to your past and/or future self? Rochelle: Use your peers for advice and to bounce your ideas off of! An extra perception always helps. Rosemary: Sleep More!!! Or don’t leave stuff for last minute.

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The Age of Digital Craft Nicolas Hamel MEDes Case Study Instructor: Jason Johnson

As the Anthropocene moves into a greater acceptance of robotically controlled industrial processes, a new relationship between the human and the machine is being developed. The designer is solely responsible for the reinforcement and development of this relationship through a relentless drive to question its potential. At the core of this questioning process, the designer will find that the topic of craft is reemerging through the way ornament is drawn from desired function. In this age, the designer is no longer focused on craft born through the interface between craftsman and material but rather the three-pointed interface between craftsman, material, and machine. As discussed by Benjamin Bratton in his book The Stack, this relationship will remain in its three pointed form because our apprehensions to separate “computation from computers” and to let them remain as a tool for humans requiring “algorithm crunching abilities” (Bratton, 2015, p. 79). Digital craftsman already involved in this contemporary take on craft and ornament include Gregg Lynn, who believes that ornament can be drawn from the most necessary components of built form (Lynn, 2004), or Farshid Moussavi and Michael Kubo who take direct interest in justifying the “Function of Ornament” (Farshid Moussavi, 2006). In the age of the digital craftsman, the question of architectural affect becomes the most important component in creating form. As described by Moussavi and Kubo in the book The Function of Ornament, craft and ornament become the “figure that emerges from the material substance” and correspondingly, “the expression of embedded forces through processes of construction, assembly and growth” (Farshid Moussavi, 2006, p. 8). In correspondence to this narrative, the digital craftsman must push forward the following points in design for digital craft: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Reach Overlap Digital Capability Built Artifact Mindful Economy Cataloged Aesthetic

The age of the digital craftsman is one that fully accepts and manages the interface between the human and the machine. It is through this management that a new type of craft will be developed that is formed from the expression of designed “affect” (Farshid Moussavi, 2006, p. 8). The barriers that have prevented this emergence are being removed as we shift from the design of industrial part to the contingent industrial process.

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Centre for Contemporary Art and Performance Taylor Crozon, Alexis Valentine M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: John Iwanski

One time Napi was walking about when a great storm came up. The strong wind began to blow him all over the place. He grasped at the branches of trees and bushes as he went by, but they all broke off in his hand. Finally, he clutched at a birch tree. The flexible birch tree bent, but did not break and Napi was able to stop. Then the storm died down, Napi climbed out of the tree and began beating it with a stick. “Why did you stop me? I was having such fun being blown about by the big wind!� The marks left by the beating are still visible on the striped bark of birch trees. We learned from this story that black birch makes good tipi pegs and will always hold our lodges down in a wind storm. Courtesy of the Glenbow Museum

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Transitioning Arezoo Khalili M.LA, Studio II Instructor: Enrica Dall’Ara

Ramsay and Inglewood located in Calgary are bounded by the Elbow and Bow Rivers. The landscapes consist of large parks along the river, residual parks and open spaces within the communities, major mobility infrastructure including the Canadian Pacific Railway, and historical places, breweries, and galleries which are mostly located along 9 Ave SE in Inglewood. The goal is to collect people and activities by creating hubs of various activities and connect them to the natural parks, open spaces and other tourism destinations such as breweries and food hubs. The presence of the railway has left significant fragmentation of green space since its establishment in 1883 along its corridor. The aim is to revitalize these linear fractured spaces along the railway, form a green corridor, and connect them to the existing Elbow River pathway system. The proposed green corridor along the railway is approximately 1 km long, starting from the confluence of the Bow & Elbow River and ending at the future Inglewood Ramsay Green Line Station. A motional landscape is generated by changing colors of plants implemented by planting strategies. This image is captured by people who are traveling on the new Green Line light rail train passing between Ramsay and downtown. The planting strategy is based on the fact that it takes 20-30 seconds for short memory to store an image, and in this proposal the image is combinations of plants’ colors, textures and heights. Finally, this designed corridor provides a unity and coherency to this fragmented landscape and generate a memorable image from Ramsay for the travelers and local people.

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Cultural Historical Hub Future Residential Hub

Nature Hub

Brewery Hub

Entertainment Hub Activity Hub Food

Nature Hub Historical Nature Hub


East Village

Calgary Zoo

Fort Calgary

Bow

Rive

r

Inglewood

iver

8 st

11 s t

Pearce Park 9A ve

Mission

Description Description Alyth I Bonny Brook Description

Manchester Industrial

0.5

Bird Sanctuary

CPR

0

Description Description Description Inglewood Wild lands

Green Line

Union Cemetery

Ramsay 11 st

El bo w R

Stampede Park

1 Km

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Interactive Building Envelope-Design and Fabrication Youness Yousefi M.Arch Instructor: Khalid Omokanye

In our daily life, people are continuously influenced by their surroundings even without knowing it and react in a subconscious or conscious way toward the environment. Everything constantly interacts with each other while there is some logic in the way they interact. We wonder, what if the rigid, lifeless and impersonal built environment can actually react and interact dynamically based on external stimuli and occupants’ needs instead of passively complying to people’s command. This project offers distinct definition for building envelope and its components such as window through a pixelized material system. Each pixel in the envelope can be solely an orifice or a part of bigger window in order to provide dynamic view or/ and natural ventilation. Furthermore, with controlling the solar energy that passes through the envelope, the system can impact building energy performance and inhabitants’ thermal comfort. The system of this design project works as an aggregation of units. Each unit as a 3-dimensional diaphragm, is mainly divided into two parts: electronics and mechanicals. Its function comprises two steps. One is measurement – the input, and another is performance – the output. Then each unit actuates dynamically and independently with opening the aperture by a degree based on the distance to the approaching person. Furthermore, the envelope can also be programmed to actuate based on external environmental stimuli. 70


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Building Community Alexandria Pankratz M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Rafael Gomez-Moriana

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Located just south of La Rambla, a reconstructed three-story building rests between the tall ash trees of Barcelona. The encircled rectangular building is focused on rehabilitating communal housing that thrives to interconnect multiple generations in order to achieve shared support and active communication. The steel and concrete structure lays out a continuous grid between all floors that are used to develop three unique housing typologies. These typologies are designed for multiple family situations and elderly needs. The typologies are situated beside one another in an alternating pattern. This allows diversity in communal living to be enhanced in order to create interaction between neighbors and other residences, while maintaining large private balconies for personal space.


BIKE ROOM

DAYCARE

STORAGE ROOM

FLEX SPACE

PASSAGE

GYM

LAUNDRY ROOM

PHYSIOTHEROPY ROOM

DOCTORS ROOM

-

-

STORAGE SPACE

DOCTORS ROOM

COURTYARD

PARTY SPACE

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

VISITOR DORMS

CLASSROOM

FLEX SPACE FLEX SPACE

LAUNDRY ROOM LAUNDRY ROOM

STORAGE SPACE STORAGE SPACE

PARTY SPACE PARTY SPACE

VISITOR DORMS VISITOR DORMS

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Convergence Inderjit Pabla, Rajat Verma, Bhurgu Gohil M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Philip Vandermey

The core intention of the project is to condense the sporadic exhibit format of information into a more future-proof digital space that humanizes the experience through in-person Elder interaction; all to allowing the knowledge to be passed on through generations. Archaeological sites and museums provide credible sources of cultural practices, land-based practices and land titles across the country. This static mode of information is losing touch with the influence of digital media around the globe, which is at an all-time high. Fueling this disconnect is the lack of personal interaction with the community. The archives will become the physical embodiment for a National Cloud service for the Indigenous community with a regimented database of filtered and authentic audio, video and photographic content. In the efforts of proposing an archive, it is essential to answer the Indigenous way of acknowledging land. Does the concept of a living landscape relate to the micro-cosmos of a metropolis? The contemporary times have seen a surge of aggressive close-quarter adjacencies of building silhouettes, and, consequently, this dominates the natural undulations of the land. Taking clues from the architectural highlights of the Indigenous, we chose a conic shape derived from a teepee that is inserted within the landscape. The conic form provides a sense of architectural iconism. The overarching result of iconism and land conservation lead us to establish a sunken plaza of Indigenous living.

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On the Fringes Ugonna Ohakim M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Marc Boutin

What or who influenced this project? The project was influenced by people who are alienated and the socially disenfranchised in Calgary Do you have an artist or artwork that influenced your work? Lina bo bardi

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no


or


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Interviews Christopher Green M.Arch Graduate, April 2020

Norika Yue M.Arch Graduate, April 2020

How has the Master of Architecture program changed your outlook on the past/the present/the future? Do I have to answer this? I think it’s changed my outlook on who people are more than anything. How we use space, how we try to govern it, and all the weird nuances of life!

How has the Master of Architecture program changed your outlook on the past/the present/the future? I realized the significance of “the rite of passage” in the program. That people I looked up to at various stages have/is/will experience the things that I have experienced. That the thought of being incapable of certain tasks isn’t limited to a lack of growth, but that we are capable, just needing the experience.

How has COVID-19 transformed your work and your experience of architecture school? It’s forced me to be more self-motivated and adapt to a new routine. It’s been a different experience mixing my free time and work more interchangeably, in a good way. What is your definition of reality? To me, reality is made up of the circumstances we can’t escape. The non-optional aspects of life we subscribe to. How do you make sense of the world? I don’t think I do? How far into the future do you like to imagine? It’s been changing over time. I used to only think months, or a couple years ahead. Now as I’m leaving school I suddenly have 5 and 10 year aspirations! What lessons will you take with you from your time at the University of Calgary into the future? Most things in life are subjective. There may be the illusion of right and wrong at times, but ultimately we always have a choice. When you were a kid, did you want to be an architect? Not particularly. Although when I look back at my interests and hobbies it all starts to make a little more sense now.

How has COVID-19 transformed your work and your experience of architecture school? I’ve always been appreciative of studio, and my studio crew. The COVID-19 events made it hard to interact with my friends and colleagues in the same way which proved difficult. The silver lining would be a greater appreciation of those who made the past 3 years great. What is your definition of reality? 1 second in the future, 2 seconds ago. How do you make sense of the world? Points, Lines and Vectors. How far into the future do you like to imagine? So distant that I can’t plan for it, then so imminent that I can’t do anything about it. What lessons will you take with you from your time at the University of Calgary into the future? How to work with others, how to stand up for your ideas, how to spend time with your friends and how to cut out the noise. When you were a kid, did you want to be an architect? Not that I remember. I wanted to be a fireman. I’m thankful for Halloween. It’s been changing over time. I used to only think months, or a couple years ahead. Now as I’m leaving school I suddenly have 5 and 10 year aspirations! What lessons will you take with you from your time at the University of Calgary into the future? Most things in life are subjective. There may be the illusion of right and wrong at times, but ultimately we always have a choice. When you were a kid, did you want to be an architect? Not particularly. Although when I look back at my interests and hobbies it all starts to make a little more sense now.

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Raval Horticultural Hub Christopher Green M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

Raval Horticultural Hub is a project about raising the standards for affordable housing by dignifying the users with quality living. With the current social, political and environmental climate, there are many considerations towards building a sustainable future. However, every design must begin somewhere. The story of this one begins in the neighborhood of El Raval, Barcelona. Historically, El Raval has a reputation for its nightlife, prostitution and crime. However, in recent years the neighborhood has progressed toward being known for its diversity, eclectic charm, and unique dining. In fact, almost 50% of the population was born abroad. With such a diverse population, the area struggles to lock down an identity. Therefore, the introduction of new affordable housing provides a unique opportunity to define the neighborhood.

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Komorebi Neal Borstmayer M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

KOMOREBI, is to create higher density within a site that is not currently being utilized to its full potential. While adding new mass is the primary strategy to intensifying the site, an important secondary strategy is to move all circulation infrastructure to the outside of the building, creating an exoskeletal system connecting between the four building masses. This system of circulation allows the maximum amount of interior floor area to be dedicated to housing. During a visit to the project site and surrounding area, the number of trees around Cesire Aulatec stood out; unlike many urban areas in Barcelona dominated by buildings overhead, Av. de les Drassanes was completely overtaken by a canopy of trees lining the street. The afternoon sun shone through the foliage creating soft, dappled light all around the site. This quality of light through the trees informed one of the central features of the project, the perforated paneling system. These panels are essential to the exterior circulation of the building, as they ensure that the units and passages still have access to natural light, albeit in more intriguing patterns.

EXISTING BUILDING

NEW BUILDING

NEW CLT STRUCTURE

SLIDING PRIVACY SCREEN

GLULAM POST AND BEAM CIRCULATION EXOSKELETON WITH PERFORATED PANEL WALKWAY

PRIVATE SEMI-ENCLOSED RESIDENTIAL SPACES

COMMUNAL ROOF-TOP GREEN HOUSE

COMMUNAL ROOF-TOP GREEN HOUSE

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

PRIVATE SEMI-ENCLOSED RESIDENTIAL SPACES EXISTING BUILDING

EXISTING BUILDING

POROSITY CREATED THROUGH BUILDING

MASS REDUCED TO PROVIDE EXTERIOR SPACE FOR RESIDENTIAL UNITS

CENTRAL “STREET” CLEARED THROUGH CENTRE OF SITE BUILDING MASS REDUCED AT GROUND LEVEL

REMOVE EXISTING VERTICAL CIRCULATION REMOVE CENTRE PORTION OF EXISTING PODIUM TO FREE UP SPACE AT GROUND

ADD NEW CENTRAL MASS OFFSET FROM EXISTING BUILDINGS TO BOOST DENSITY AND INCREASE SPACE FOR HOUSING

VERTICAL CIRCULATION RE-LOCATED

NEW MASS ORIENTED REDUCEIMPACT ON EXISTING BUILDING

ADD NEW MASS TO FRONT COURTYARD TO BOOST DENSITY AND INCREASE SPACE FOR HOUSING

PUBLIC PLANTER AND BENCH SEATING PUBLIC “STREET” NEW CLT STRUCTURE

NEW MASS ORIENTED TO ALIGN WITH SITE PROPERTY LINE

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PRIVATE RESIDENT’S COURT YARD PLAY EQUIPMENT FOR COOP DAYCARE PERFORATED PANEL WALL SEPARATING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE


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Kakushibori

隠し彫り

Josie Kaip, Ellen Lee M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

Kakushibori means hidden carvings. Japanese irezumi (tattoo) flows deep from the cultural history that has made Japanese society what it is today And yet, this visualization of Japan-ness remains hidden in the underbelly of Tokyo. What would it mean to society if this practice was revealed from underneath, no longer hidden? The project looks at sensitively creating a place to celebrate the history, craft, and evolution of Japanese tattoos. The centre invites Tokyo-ites and tourists to discover and experience the beauty of the practice, beginning as a tattoo-friendly place in Japan. The architecture is bold but hidden, an intricate flow of curves veiled with a bamboo curtain-like facade as a nod to irezumi $B!G (Bs history of being concealed). Sitting on the canal, the building feels as though it is floating with the curtain gently touching the water. The move is a play on ink settling in the skin.

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Spatial Mnemonics Vivian Ton M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Vlad Amiot

Spatial Mnemonics for Everyday Practice is an intervention that attempts to construct an apparatus for reconceptualizing the spaces of infrastructure through guided manipulations of light. It aims to bring delight to everyday thresholds through explorations with optics and spatial memory. The intervention re-interprets the experience of the underpass into a sort of three-staged processional experience that burrows into the skin of the earth, into a dark underground pit that is lit through a system of fresnel glass placed out in the landscape

and channeled through by mirrors. In the manner that the structure is orchestrated by external conditions of site, it too attempts to intervene in the experience of exigent conditions by repeating the experiment of directing light with parabolic mirrors into the underpass. Metaphorically, it is simultaneously a camera and photographic darkroom — and the visitor is the sheet of film on which images of site and of intervention are planted and reproduced.

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Open Canvas Ashley Hu M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Jessie Andjelic

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In the speculative city, data collection and sharing often has negative connotations, notably the loss of privacy. On the other hand, data sharing provides immense opportunities for open collaboration projects which can benefit society, with examples including Wikipedia and YouTube. Open canvas celebrates data by allowing the public to share their digital art on the led faรงade of the building and its surrounding site through a mobile application. The artwork on the expansive canvas creates dynamic and immersive experiences for the daily commuters moving between downtown Inglewood and the future Ctrain station located just south of the site.


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The Boardwalk at Crescent Road Darby-Marie Henshaw M.Plan, Site Planning Studio Instructor: Tomasz Sztuk

The Boardwalk at Crescent Road was a final studio project completed for the Site Planning portion of the Master of Planning program. This project required a thorough analysis of a barren site, just down the road from McHugh Bluff. The task was to incorporate a cafe, open space, washrooms, and a viewing tower. The incorporation of these elements were in conjunction to appropriate landscape elements. This project allowed my personal creativity to flourish. I wanted to create a destination for visitors, while also creating a community hub. Thus, I created a boardwalk experience that allowed the user to have seamless movement throughout the site.

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TRANSLUCENT CONCRETE PANELS

TRIANGULATED STEEL FRAME (EXTERIOR)

TRIANGULATED STEEL FRAME (INTERIOR)

OAK INTERIOR PANELING

CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

Niistsimii Danielle Callan, Lauren Fagan M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Keir Stuhlmiller

Nisitsimii is a cultural intervention implemented on the University of Calgary campus which aims to precipitate awareness of Indigenous issues through the evocation of emotion. Through form, materiality, and the dilution of program, Nisitsimii creates moments of tension and release and disorientation and clarity – energies which are reflective of the past, current, and future interactions between Indigenous and latent populations. Throughout history, Indigenous populations in Canada have been subject to countless injustices, mistreatment and ignorance. While efforts have been made to make amends in recent history, it is widely understood that wounds have not healed, and reconciliation remains a work in progress. At the core of Nisitsimii is the acknowledgement of this reality and the commitment to viewing historical and current Indigenous issues as the raw and unfiltered - the commitment to approach these issues with humility and honesty over naivety.

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CONCRETE PANELS

STEEL FRAME

CENTRAL RAISED FLOOR AND RAMPS

COLUMN GRID

CONCRETE SLAB

FOUNDATION WALL W/ LINEAR FOOTINGS

CONCRETE SLAB

FOUNDATION PILES


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Coalesce Alana Kerr M. Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Yves Poitras

Industrial spaces create uninviting boundaries between residential areas; however, they are a necessary aspect of urban development so are inherently unavoidable. Opportunities to end this separation should be created, to reclaim lost space and bridge gaps created by industrial spaces. If industrial spaces exist to provide services necessary for urban development, the space itself should also be usable to the public; there is an opportunity for them to coalesce.

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TECTONIC SECTION FACADE MATERIALITY interlocking polycarbonate panels arrayed around entire building to create a textured, translucent facade. attached to vertical mullions of curtain wall

glazing curtain wall double facade approach amplifies translucency by increasing distance between polycarbonate and interior, without overly obscuring the workshop


WORKSHOP FRAMEWORK steel girder framework s p a n ni n g b e a m f r a m e w o r k steel rods c o n n ec t s u s p e n d e d r e s i de n t i a l u n i t s t o s p a n ni n g b e a m s a n d b e l o w s u p p or t s p a n n i n g steel beams s u p p or t s p a n n i n g beams a t t a ch e d t o s t e e l r o d s o n e it h e r s i d e o f r e s i de n t i a l u n i t

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B 101 Roof 26000

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6000 Level 2

Ceramitex Aspen Grey Ceramic Panel 1” Air Space Anodized Aluminum Cladding System Frame Infill Strip Aluminum Clip Aluminum J-trim Adjustable Galvanized Z-girt (Thermally Broken) 3” Semi Rigid Insulation Air/Vapour Barrier Concrete Structure

4000

Level 1 0

B 102 Parking -6500

Floor Assembly 1

Carapace Tania Castillo-Pelayo, Emily Epp M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

Floor Covering Concrete with Embedded Radiant Tubing Insulation Subfloor

A 101

Level 3 6000

Level 2 4000

Wall Assembly 1

Carapace embraces its history and is formed form from the creation myth held by many First Nation groups - Turtle Island. Although it varies from different locations, the legend tells stories of a turtle that holds the world on its back. These stories connect the origin of the world to beings (often animals) that dove into ancient waters to retrieve soil used to create (or recreate) the world as we know it. By taking soil and putting it on a willing turtle’s back, Turtle Island, the centre of creation was born. By tracing history and going back to the origin, Carapace celebrates the rebirth of Indigenous music in a Western dominated world.

Curtain Wall System 1600 SS from Kawneer Thermally

A 102

Level 1 0

Foundation Assembly 1 Friction Pile System

Parking - 6500

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Autonomo[us]

Bushra Hashim M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

This project revolves around the key term of autonomy; autonomy not only over the realm of domesticity but also to the urban community. The proposed cohousing project targets various differently deprived groups of people who have lost their right to the city, and need not only a place to call home, but also spaces of support and integrative socialization back into a collective. The goal is to not only convert the existing building into affordable social housing, but to do so in a manner that transforms the space into a meaningful place of community engaged public space. As such, social and environmental sustainability are key drivers from the conceptualization of this project through to its material and tectonic actualization. Complete autonomy over one’s space is achieved through a flexible program, its manifestation into the floor plan, and its expression onto the façade. 100

"A rundown apartment can exacerbate a child's asthma, which leads to a call for an ambulance, which generates a medical bill that cannot be paid, which ruins a credit record, which hikes the interest rate on an auto loan, which forces the purchase of an unreliable used car, which jeopardizes a mother's punctuality at work, which limits her promotions and earning capacity, which confines her to poor housing.� - David K. Shipler


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Playing by the Railroad Tracks Aleksandra Simic M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Catherine Hamel

Located on top of the CP railroad tracks in Calgary’s historic neighbourhood of Inglewood, Playing by the Railroad Tracks is a phenomenological investigation into creating joyful experiences in post-industrial landscapes. By taking a playful approach to the massing through the use of spheres, the structure becomes a bubbling land bridge that connects both sides of the railroad that defines Inglewood’s border. With Inglewood’s past reputation as an industrial hub, the material palette of the neighbourhood is mainly rusted metal, brick, and stone. By using new materials like iridescent and translucent ETFE for the bubbling mass, the project speculates on using translucence, colour, and playful geometry to seduce users with a unique sensory experience within this post-industrial landscape.

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Interview

Ellen Odegaard M.Arch Graduate, April 2020 How has the Master of Architecture program changed your outlook on the past/the present/the future? This program has changed my outlook on almost everything. How has COVID-19 transformed your work and your experience of architecture school? I really missed making models in the shop and working in studio with my peers. What is your definition of reality? The here and now is all we can assume is reality. How do you make sense of the world? I don’t, I’m a nihilist. How far into the future do you like to imagine? Right now I daydream and dream about post-Corona times but I don’t know how far into the future that is What lessons will you take with you from your time at the University of Calgary into the future? Watch out or you’ll get sued and Tang Lee will be the professional witness. When you were a kid, did you want to be an architect? When I was young yes, then I lost the dream (and got it back in my 20’s).

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El Raval’s Alley Ellen Odegaard M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

This project gave me an opportunity to better understand Barcelona, the needs of the city, and how to design for a place and population that I was not inherently familiar with. The project site was in the lower Raval, a historically seedy neighborhood with dense housing; due to the port-side location, el Raval has always been home to transient people, like immigrants and sailors. The project was to adaptively reuse a 4-storey educational building and turn it into a muchneeded social housing project. The site is between two streets that are atypical in the neighborhood: Passatge de Gutenberg and Av. des Drassanes. My initial observation was that Gutenberg was quiet and empty in comparison to other nearby streets in the Raval. After spending time on site, I determined that the lack of activity is largely due to the existing building treating this street as an alley; the façade that is along more than half the length of Gutenberg is impermeable, inanimate, and even hostile. My design strategies were to activate the ground plane by opening up the building, in turn animating Gutenberg, and to drastically alter the existing monolithic, institutional building while recycling the existing concrete structure. From studying the Barcelona-specific solar shade typology, a contemporary system was designed for the exterior of the building, allowing for prefabrication, modularity, and the façade to be animated by the occupants. This project understands the importance of indooroutdoor and street life in Barcelona, and especially in el Raval.

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Community of None Vienna Braux M.Arch, Senior Research Studio Instructor: Joshua Taron

This design proposal is about subtracting cars and making use of the new open space; producing a great spatial demand, and development demand in other areas. The exploration and manipulation of Calgary’s current zoning bylaws has produced an interesting critique as to what might need to change in order for the city to densify without pushing past the existing city limits. Once 2D zoning has been surpassed, it is not unrealistic to think that 3D zoning and 4D zoning will become important in due time. However, it also might mean freeing ourselves from conventional formal typologies. The underlying idea is that there is something super important between community form and transportation infrastructure; a deep core relationship. A transformation in transportation and the delivery of things can necessitate a transformation in the urban environment.

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Sugi DW

Emily Epp, Ran Zhang M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

DN

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Sugi is a child daycare and senior day home that encourages positive intergenerational socialization and education. While the seniors can teach and guide the children, the children reciprocally can rejuvenate a lively and energetic quality to the seniors. Through strategic programming/ scheduling and open floor plans inspired by traditional Japanese homes, Sugi allows for new forms of ‘hybrid’ spaces and identities to occur while functioning as a filter stimulating new creative potentials. By reconnecting with the neighborhood and celebrating the beauty of life, healing, and education, both the elderly residents and children can find purpose while living in harmony. 113


Site Planning Tina Dadgostar M.Plan, Site Planning Studio Instructor: Tomasz Sztuk

In this assignment we were tasked to design a public open space. First, we had to place three buildings (cafĂŠ, covered open space and viewing tower which had specific dimension) and consider them as simple boxes. After finding the best location for building we started designing public open space. The site is located in the Crescent Heights community. First, I analyzed the grid pattern of the neighborhood and the way they have been organized. This gave me indication to offset the grid at the specific distance, 5m by 5m, due to of the dimension of buildings. This gave me an opportunity to create a pattern on the site to locate the buildings. Then, I considered the view of residential buildings in order to not block their view. I did not put the buildings along the northern edge, and thus organized them linearly from north to south to maintain the views from the residential areas. At the same time, the view of 3 major buildings (cafĂŠ, covered open space and viewing tower) was vital. I organized them in a way that all of them have the view of south, east and west.

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Tenchisouzou Vivan Lee, Piotr Tomanek M.Arch, Study Abroad Tokyo Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

The project is one that encompasses Tokyo’s movement, stillness, play and work. The creation of a Yokai Centre and Sento integrated into a train station will serve as an educational and societal catalyst in making implicit that which is explicit in everyday life. The role of the artist in modern democracy is described by Chantelle Mouffe as playing an important role in challenging the established hegemony of any given system (Mouffe, 99). The latent potential of art is multifaceted; its ability to be a carrier of meaning, its role in questioning an established order as well as being an outlet for human expression create a critical role in positioning the public within any dominant social sphere. Our intent with the tattoo friendly sento is to provide an opportunity for interaction with a living form of art. We believe that through exploring the roots of this art form which has ties to painting, printmaking as well as predominantly story-telling, we will be able to re-invigorate a suppressed art form. In a hegemony buttressed by media, journalists often give us a reading of current events influencing our perception of the world around us. This parallels with the way that yokai and yurei are commonly perceived, but it is with further discovery that one can begin to understand and appreciate the intricacies and complexity of their nature.

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Interface Danielle Kim M.Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Philip Vandermey

The project INTERFACE is about the movement of goods through cities; how cities act as infrastructural framework for the massive transport of goods as well as gigantic repositories for these goods. Communities used to settle next to major lines of transport on purpose for efficiency and prosperity – the history of the Canadian Pacific Rail and the neighborhoods of Ramsay and Inglewood is an example of this. But now cities are so entrenched in functioning for the movement of goods that civilization needs to develop and grow around the infrastructure that exists for good transport, and the structures which are birthed from these systems are often relegated to the edges of the city – this is mostly true in Calgary’s case. In addition, the infrastructure itself or the structures it produces as points of connection, waiting, and destination can be characterized as “non-spaces” – places that discourage humans from settling in or feeling at home. These landscapes are ultimately non-human. However, while infrastructure (whether it be physical, digital, or labor) for good transport exists all around us and is integrated into our daily lives, it is not something that is ever really visibly revealed to us as an average city dweller. Truck beds and box cars on trains are opaque. Warehouses and repositories are non-descript masses of buildings that are used for that purpose only and would not be visited by someone other than an employee. These structures often have large footprints and are a missed opportunity to incorporate mixed use architecture.

humans and robots work together to keep your produce clean and delicious!

picking bots bring produce to the sorting and washing stations

human workers clean the produce and send it back into the robot circulation core to be delivered to customers!

What are you listening to right now? Podcast: Where should we begin? With Esther Perel What did your work look like prior to what we see now? I have more confidence behind my ideas and skills now, and I think that shows (hopefully)

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Penrose Panels Kristen Forward MEDes Thesis Case Study Instructor: Joshua Taron

Penrose Panels investigates a robotic fabrication procedure that utilizes reusable, modularized moulds in the production of bespoke concrete faรงade panels. Initiated by an interest in balancing waste reduction strategies with customized aesthetics, the study employed large-scale 3D printing to create lightweight and standardized mould containers to host loose sand for a robotic arm to draw unique patterns into. In this system, flexibility could occur at the level of the sand, while the mould containers remain constant and could be reused for new sand patterns. The procedure also enabled jointing functions to be designed and embedded into the concrete casting process so that the unique panels could be easily assembled. The investigation began with an exploration into image abstraction methods using the Penrose (1974) fractal pattern, which iteratively subdivided an image into a series of symmetrical rhomboids. The two rhombic figures that the pattern operates with were used to define 3D printed PLA mould pieces as well as laser-cut plywood bases upon which the PLA pieces would sit and be clamped together to contain loose sand. The sand offered an adaptable platform for a UR10e robotic arm to draw into using a variety of 3D printed and laser-cut toolbits held by a RobotiQ gripper. The robotic process constantly moved between digital and physical space - digital image

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data defined the initial robotic movement, and material and spatial data modified the toolpath angles, depths, and speed. Once the robotic toolpathing was completed, the moulds were sprayed with liquid latex to solidify the sand and create a smooth, releasable layer for the concrete to be cast upon. Laser-cut plywood jigs were produced to fit on top of the moulds so that bolts could be casted into the back of the concrete in locations that corresponded to a universal connection piece. Once the concrete was set, the moulds were deconstructed, the latex was peeled off, and the sand and mold containers were reused to create more custom panels. Due to the flexible nature of the Penrose Panels process, further investigations could look at the integration of new performance attributes into the concrete formwork such as solar analyses or acoustic data, and the robotic procedure could potentially produce areas for aperture in the panels.


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Fracture | SSIK Elliott Carlson, Alexander Semegen M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Dr. Brian Sinclair

Our project, “Ssik”, Moh-Kins-Tsis Center for Indigenous Culture, is a design proposal for a new University of Calgary campus building. Ssik, Blackfoot for “fracture”, acknowledges the story of Indigenous people in Canada. Ssik aims to provide a place that properly tells the story of the scars and accomplishments of all the Indigenous in Canada. These scars, deep and hidden, are dramatically expressed as gashes in the landscape. The building subtly crosses over the scars and wounds in the landscape, stitching it together and providing a space for healing and community engagement. The building, like many Indigenous people, carries the scars of suffering; however, it also provides a path for healing and growth. Fracture creates an architectural experience that brings people, culture, and landscape together in unity.

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Restitute Matt Walker M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

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Affordable housing is arguably one of the greatest architectural concerns of the twenty-first century. In dense urban landscapes such as Barcelona, this concern is exacerbated by the growing spatial impacts of tourism and foreign investment; a significant pressure on urban dwellers in the city. Restitute seeks to acknowledge this paradigm by bringing forth Lefebvre’s 1991 concept of “the right to the city” through establishing an agency-based social housing project within existing infrastructure. Through integrating a mixed-use program, an interplay between public and private spaces, and providing custom-operated building features, the project is one which seeks to bring restitution to social agency in dwelling; the inherent urban right.


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Passageway Obinna Ekezie M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Cathertine Hamel

A culmination of several stages of design explorations and considerations, studying site context, border transgressions and possible design interventions towards producing a House of Scarcity. Passageway recognizes the history of the Indigenous community and pays homage to such a rich heritage and missing history. It symbolizes a candle light that lights pathways from the past to the future, memorabilia that recognizes, reunites, revives and restores culture through story telling of oral tradition. Passageway as a programme responds to its site context as mixed-use towers for living, recreation and reflection. As a piece of architecture, it recognizes the land and its history as it emerges and floats above the surface as three interconnected unrestrained towers that lay claim to the land it sits on enacting a strong presence for many years to come. Several design considerations were made in response to its strategic position: movement, fluidity, privacy, openness etc. Since the end of the Ice age, Aboriginal people have occupied and walked the foothills and Prairies of Alberta. Travel was mostly on foot which creates a network of trails. Perhaps the most important part of the building is the network of ramps and walkways that connects the three towers to its site context. The ramps speed up and slow down motion while gently meandering the towers. This is a deliberate attempt to create pause and moments of reflection for the visitors. Two of the three towers“Towers of Sound� house spaces for story telling while the larger tower is a residence.

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Drawing as Theory Mohammad Moezzi M.Arch, Introduction to Design Theories Instructors: Rob Birch, Joshua Taron

As part of the assignments in EVDS 621, Introduction to Design Theories, this drawing is my expression of a studio project at SAPL. My drawing is kind of a translation, transfiguration and a transition. It is a personal interpretation which is drawn to enhance critical aspects of the project from a critical approach. Brennan Black, a master student, had designed the project. Moreover, the drawing is my effort to investigate and analysis hidden layers of his project. According to documents provided by the designer, a fundamental concept of the project is connecting and weaving two different zones of the site by creating an artificial topography. This topography covers the old railway with orchards and green spaces. It is supposed to create ecologies inside ecologies. In the drawing, I used the text of the studio brief as a visual element of drawing. I disrupted the sentences visually. Therefore, there are many new spaces between the texts that prevent the reader from understanding the studio brief correctly; this may be translated as a symbol of the modern urban design, in which we disrupted our everyday life by cars, highways and railways. As a result, instead of having integrated cities with public spaces, we have residual space between the density of various, controversy fabrics. However, these blank spaces created new opportunities to revise our connection to the world and to investigate new meanings. New territories can be defined and characterized as it is shown between blank spaces of the text in my drawing. “The city is not a tree”, an essay written by Christopher

Alexander, is used as another visual element to show that the modern technologies have distorted the integrity of our cities. Our cities suffer from a lack of cohesion. This disruption is the direct result of consuming culture, which even wastes the urban space territories. The tree in drawing, in two versions of abstract and concrete, acts as a symbol of the pervasive concept of the modern city. I implemented central manifestos of the designer, “urban mirror” and “enough is enough”, and combined them visually. The urban mirror is presented by layering opaque materials in my drawing. This mirror affects the form by changing the straight lines to dashed lines. It also affects the text “enough is enough” by showing its reflection in a self-referential way. I translated part of the project with dashed lines to show the process of form-finding in nested lines of possible geometries, instead of the final result of his project. This kind of representation enables us to have a different interpretation of the project; it may be understood as echoing the shape of surrounding in the form. The site of the project is rotated to show the artificial topography. As a result, the reader cannot distinguish the precise boundaries of the site because of this geometrical ambiguity. Nested arrows emphasize the geometry of nested public spaces which the designer had designed in the landscape.

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The Perch Lookout & Cafe Elie Jahshan M.Plan, Site Planning Studio Instructor: Tawab Hlimi

We were tasked with designing a site on McHugh Bluff in Calgary that included a cafĂŠ, viewing tower, and washroom. The rest of the site was unconstrained except for a small amount of topography nearing the edge. The Perch Lookout & CafĂŠ is my imagination of the perfect site on McHugh Bluff. My vision for the project was to create a destination that respects current programming and provides additional uses for visitors that wish to stay for longer periods of time. The context of the site was extremely important, and my design is a true response to existing opportunities and constraints.

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The Veil, the Vault and the Promise: The Broad Museum Pamela Haskell M.Plan, Site Planning Studio Instructor: Tomasz Sztuk

The Broad Brand Even before the scaffolding came down in 2015, the architecture of Los Angeles’ Broad Museum had a brand. The museum’s concept was christened “The Veil and the Vault” by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, thus securing a flurry of breathless headlines. Intriguing, mysterious and alliterative – the phrase itself stands alone as a work of art, perhaps equal in creative inspiration to any part of the architectural design. “The Veil and the Vault” cleverly highlights the interdependence of the two critical features of DS+R’s design for the Broad. “The Veil” is the exterior shell of the building, a concrete block punctured by a complex pattern of repeating recessed shapes1. “The Vault” is the actual storage vault of the museum, elevated from a mere functional necessity to “the architectural protagonist”2. The Veil is a standard architectural response to a brief for a new museum – technically complex, flashy and likely to make a splash with the public. The Vault is something different. A surprising design move, The Vault takes a difficult and typically non-public building requirement and makes it the central feature of the architectural response. Without The Vault, The Veil is just a superficial display of software skills. Without The Veil, The Vault is a fortress, inward-looking and wholly resistant to the razzle-dazzle expected of a new museum building. The promise of the Broad - the brand - was in the synthesis. Together, these two elements would create not just a new museum building, but a new typology for public institutions. At least, that was the promise.

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The Public Problem The Broad Museum was commissioned by Los Angeles developer and philanthropist Eli Broad to house and display his important collection of contemporary art. While Broad initially intended to donate his collection to an existing institution, the terms of the donation were onerous. The donation would require all 2000-plus pieces in the collection to be stored together in one location, with a sizable portion on display at all times3. Broad’s stated reason for requiring the collection in one vault was to facilitate loans, scholarly access and more frequent display changes. That is, he wanted to make the collection more accessible for the public. Few museums could take on the practical burdens associated with these requirements. Thus, Eli Broad decided, in the way that billionaires can decide these things, to create his own museum4. But the practical considerations that stymied other institutions were equally difficult for DS+R to resolve. The spot chosen for the museum – a parking lot across from Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall – was not particularly large. As Liz Diller explains “[t]he brief required a huge amount of storage space, which essentially meant putting a big warehouse on a site that was about engaging the public5.” Standard approaches might be to bury this functional section of the museum or shunt it to the side as anonymous appendage. Instead, DS+R decided to build that big warehouse, but make it a spectacular warehouse.


The Vault The centering of the vault signified the Broad was not a building merely concerned with aesthetics, a criticism lobbed at many examples of museum starchitecture. Instead, the vault showed this was an art museum driven by art – artwork is literally its core. Or, in a less forgiving interpretation, the collection (and therefore the collector) is literally the museum’s core6. DS+R’s solution is suspiciously flattering to Mr. Broad. The Broad Museum doesn’t just house and display the Broad collection, it bestows upon it an almost mythical significance. The concept suggests that this collection is not merely significant7, it is so important that it required an entirely new approach to museum design. The architects neatly sidestepped this censorious interpretation by focusing on the increased access this design would afford the general public. Visitors would be able to see the vault, unlike at other museums where it is hidden away from view. This would give the public greater insight into the workings of the museum and a greater connection with the artwork. This is an enticing promise. Increasing public access to collections and subverting the primacy of institutional authority have been among the central concerns of museums and galleries for decades. However, this concern is rarely addressed in the physical form of cultural institutions. Most museums adapt themselves to aging classical structures or fundraise their way into something shiny and achingly contemporary. Neither form is well-suited to the democratization of the institution. Perhaps DS+R’s solution for the Broad would offer way forward. Upon opening, the mode for public access was revealed to be two small windows, punched in walls surrounding the staircases that return visitors to the lobby after viewing the main galleries8.

The Public Promise That this affordance is so laughably minimal as to undermine the entire concept doesn’t seem to have affected the mythology of the building. “The Vault” is still referenced as a design offering unprecedented access. I was excited to visit the Broad Museum to see how the architecture changed the public experience of the museum. And then I was confused to find that it did not. Or, the vault did not increase the visitor access to the collection in any meaningful way. In fact, it served to make the museum-going experience significantly more infantilizing. This impression partly stems from my expectations that the vault would create a visible storage-type experience for visitors. Visible storage is a museum collection display strategy pioneered by Michael Ames at the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Rather than keeping museum objects hidden away in an inaccessible storage facility, visible storage places them on view – though not necessarily on exhibit9,10. Objects are visible, but not carefully displayed or lovingly spot lit. The aim of visible storage is not just to increase visual access, but to spark questions in the mind of visitors – why is one object displayed as a masterpiece while another sits in storage? Who makes these decisions? The glimpse into the storage vault at the Broad Museum doesn’t facilitate this kind of interaction. In creating the circulation patterns around the physical presence of the vault, DS+R made several choices that discourage independent thought from visitors and force them to be passive receptors. The main gallery, located on the roof of the storage vault, is accessed by a long escalator ride through a narrow passageway sculpted through the vault11. The allusions to birth/rebirth are obvious, but seemingly humourless. What could have been a light-hearted reference to approaching the artwork

without preconceptions instead feels presumptuous, intrusive, and once again, excessively aggrandizing for the museum and the collection. Diller Scofidio + Renfro design for the Broad Museum is innovative and thought-provoking. But by branding it as a new paradigm in museum architecture they created a promise left unfulfilled. They cracked open the vault and allow the public to peer in, but not enough to change their experience as museum-goers. In the end, they created a structure that claimed to serve the public but delivered an undemocratic experience.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Diehl, T., Veil & Vault in Frieze. 2015. Vankin, D., Broad museum’s storage ‘vault’ to offer unique peek beyond the exhibits, in Los Angeles Times. 2015: Los Angeles. Yablonsky, L., The Veil Lifts, in New York Times T Magazine 2011, New York Times: New York. Wyatt, E., Broad Decides to Build His Own Museum, in New York Times. 2008. Wainwright, O., Supersized Cheese Grater Hits LA, in The Guardian. 2015, Guardian Media Group: London. Dobrzynski, J., A Growing Use Of Private Art In Public Spaces, in New York Times. 2011, New York Or as the Guerrila Girls described it “Oh So Significant”. Guerrila Girls, Dearest Eli Broad. 2008. p. Poster with text. Vogel, R., The Broad, LA’s latest museum, remakes the city’s art scene, in UWIRE. 2015. Ames, M.M., De‐schooling the Museum: a Proposal to Increase Public Access to Museums and Their Resources. Museum International, 1985. 66(1-4): p. 98-106. Bohlen, C., Museums as walk-in closets; visible storage opens troves to the public in New York Times. 2001. Ouroussoff, N., Not all sweetness in a honeycomb museum in New York Times. 2011.

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The Ec(_____) House Carter Mchugh M.Arch, Design Thinking Studio Instructor: Vlad Amiot 134

The word “Eco” is readily interpreted as an abbreviation of “Ecology” but more holistically considered it is a root word from the Greek “Oikos” meaning the family and the house and generally carries connotations of the management of household affairs from which sprouted the English word “Ecology” and also the word “Economy”; a semiotic superposition that is all too familiar to those that dwell in Calgary. The EC(_____) House co-opts the prolific structure of the oil tanker train car, itself a symbol simultaneously of ecological disaster and economic prosperity, to frame a

dwelling place for two worldviews: the forward thinking, sustainability concerned beliefs of a child, and the pragmatic presentmindedness of a parent. The house acts as a neutral architectural mediator between these two ways of seeing by both rejuvenating the eyes of the economical adult and developing the understanding of the ecological child.


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Nitsitsinksinaa Bushra Hashim , Marc Yap M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Keir Stuhlmiller

Just as tributaries feed a greater river eroding away to reveal the land beneath, so do the voices of storytellers, each interpretation feeding a single, rich story of an unheard Canadian history. This architecture will allow for the dissemination of Indigenous and non-Indigenous stories alike, providing a platform for oral, written and digital storytelling to be experienced in confusion, clarity, and contemplation through the sequential curation of light, sound and circulation. The programmatic story of the land and architectural space pull from the cardinal orders and site conditions of the sun and wind, to influence the experiential progression throughout the space.

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Alberta Bound

Jennifer Comrie, Liyang Wan M.Plan, Community Planning Studio Instructors: Kris Fox, Teresa Goldstein, Douglas Leighton

Framed by the Bow River, Bow Trail SW, and surrounding residential communities, Shaganappi Point Golf Course and Westbrook Mall serves as an ideal place to densify and diversify. One way to do so is through Alberta Bound, a landscape-oriented community master plan that draws inspiration from and seeks to enhance the community’s and Alberta’s dominant natural landscapes. Using a Landscape-Oriented Development (LÖD) approach, Alberta Bound redefines the greater Shaganappi and Westbrook Mall area into an urban community shaped and defined by its landscapes. The project emphasizes the rich natural features of the site and their likeness to the iconic landscapes of southern Alberta: the Mountains, the Foothills, and the Grasslands. 139


Building Stories Lauren Fagan M.Arch, Study Abroad Barcelona Studio Instructor: Rafael Gomez-Moriana

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COURTYARD TYPOLOGY

This project seeks to renovate an existing building in El Raval, Barcelona, and to respond to housing shortage and gentrification. Currently affordable housing in Barcelona is increasingly scarce. The financial crisis shook the foundations of Catalan society as unemployment skyrocketed and economic growth plummeted. As the city tries to recuperate from this, residents continue to fight against homelessness.

EXISTING CONDITION

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INCREASE POROSITY

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INCREASE DENSITY

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As residents attempt to break the housing bubble, self-organized program creates a model for collaborative “ownership”.This project criticizes architecture’s role in society, as sense of place can not merely be defined by flexibility, beauty or rationale. Space becomes a place as individuals and groups invest in them with meaning. In order to narrow the gap between the demand for housing and access its production, this model attempts to (re)democratize housing typologies ? and production. 140


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Remanence: Landscape of Decolonized Learning Danny Roy, Hannah Song M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Philip Vandermey

Remanence aims to create spaces to carry on oral traditions, sharing of traditional knowledge, and educational learning through an Indigenous lens. The project views education and knowledge sharing as a tool, and specifically, utilizing the perspective of decolonizing educational ways of learning to create spaces focusing on communitybased and Indigenous research methodologies. The main conceptual driver of our building and site is represented through fracturing or fragmentation of the land. This is a symbolism of the fragmentation of culture, language, and families as a result of the colonial history of Canada. We view the fragmentation as an opportunity of moving forward in reconciliation. Through fracturing of the land, these create singular moments throughout the site, in which we emphasize programmatic elements such as outdoor learning settings, land based healing activities including sweat lodges, and public ceremony gathering spaces. The symbolism of fragmentation cultivates within the building where community based and Indigenousfocused research methodologies take place in an educational setting. Instead of creating something new, we are taking pieces of the fragments, remnants of what is broken, and piecing them together with a revised education model.

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Private Ceremony Ground

Memorial Park

Outdoor Classroom & Garden

Public Ceremony Circle

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Moh-Kins-Tsis Community Wellness Ellen Lee, Kelsey Parker M.Arch, Comprehensive Studio Instructor: Philip Vandermey

The Moh-Kins-Tsis Community Wellness Centre provides a location for reconnection with the land and traditional aboriginal healing practices. This project aims to highlight the resiliency of aboriginal people and provide resources for individuals and the larger community to thrive. Aboriginal people across Canada have experienced intergenerational trauma and hardship due to colonization. The loss of culture, livelihood, and land is still affecting aboriginal communities today. Our concept looks at rebuilding and strengthening relationships between the land and the people who live on it. Starting with an untouched piece of land, a chunk was removed by coring out a piece, leaving behind a void and uprooting the surrounding landscape. The land immediately surrounding the void was then carved to create inhabitable spaces. With the central void inaccessible to the public, the idea of loss is placed at the forefront of the design.

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Gridshell

Bhumiet Banthia, Mateo Rodriguez Aguirre, Dhruv Soni, Rochelle Greenberg, Peter Tomanek, Danielle Callan, Ki Joon Zach Sung, Charlene Karl, Ellen Odegaard, Cassidy Westrop, Ran Zhang, Rahman Ismail, Elliott Carlson, Seung Ho Rhee, Sahil Khan KhakharIn In association with The Laboratory of Integrative Design: Josh Taron, Jason Johnson, Guy Gardner, Kristen Forward, Danielle Kim, Charlene Karl, Seyi Arole, Hayden Pattullo, Kim Tse, Christopher Green, Karan Sharma, Darryl Pollock, Madisen Killingsworth

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Transience Caleb Hildenbrandt M. Arch, Intermediate Studio Instructor: Phil Vandermey

The Blackfoot, Indigenous to what is now Calgary, viewed time as cyclical, meaning that travel and movement was a cultural experience used to teach about the past, share stories, sing songs, and place the current within the context of the past. Common stops along heavily travelled pathways held significant meanings which would evoke certain responses and events. One significant site is where Fort Calgary now stands, at the confluence of the Bow and Elbow rivers. Located along a Buffalo migration pathway, this stop on the Old North Trail was a key trading and encampment site. Today, this land is marked by subdivided grids, where transportation and movement typically revolve around getting the traveler from point A to B as fast as possible. What will the future of the site be if this view of the present, driven by profits and convenience, blindly continues? My intervention utilizes this ancient view of movement to bring the community into the building, encouraging cultural exchange between the public and the artists within. Circulation erodes the Architecture and works its way throughout the building, creating a pathway up and down through the structure that winds through public and private space. Abundance of flexible performance space makes performative acts common, encouraging the public to take part and experience the sharing of ideas and culture. By utilizing this aspect of the past that is inherent in the site, this intervention benefits the present and future by encouraging public interaction with artistic expression via movement and circulation. The mixing of historical layers from the far and recent past provide for unpredictable experience and meaning. How do you approach a problem? Like Michael Scott – sometimes you have to just start talking without knowing where you are going. What would your project sound or taste like? Maybe a Ruffle chip. Whose work is currently on your radar? Frank Gehry. Always. And anything by Liam Neeson. Do you have a favourite quote? Not in particular, but I find a lot of Harvey Spectre (Suits) quotes apply to school. “When you are backed against the wall, break the goddamn thing down.” ... “If they think you care, they'll walk all over you.”

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