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IN TEMPORE HOUSTONIAN 2013

A MAGAZINE FOR GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON


CONGRATULATES OUR Spring 2013 Graduates! Good Luck & Best Wishes for the future! From the Dean, Faculty & Staff

MAJORS ART* Art Art History Studio Art -Graphic Communications -Painting -Photography/Digital Media -Sculpture COMMUNICATION Advertising Corporate Communication Health Communication Interpersonal Communication Integrated Communication Journalism* -Broadcast -Print Media Media Production Media Studies Public Relations COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS* American Sign Language Interpreting Communication Sciences and Disorders COMPARATIVE CULTURALSTUDIES Anthropology Liberal Studies ECONOMICS ENGLISH* Creative Writing Literature* HEALTH AND HUMANPERFORMANCE Human Nutrition and Foods Kinesiology -Exercise Science -Sports Administration -Fitness and Sports

HISPANIC STUDIES Spanish* HISTORY* MODERN & CLASSICALLANGUAGES Chinese Studies French* Italian Studies* World Cultures and Literatures MUSIC* Composition Education* Marketing Religion Theory APPLIED MUSIC Brass Keyboard Percussion Strings Woodwinds Voice PHILOSOPHY POLITICAL SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY SOCIOLOGY THEATRE & DANCE Dance* Theatre -Acting -Design and Technology -Playwriting and Dramaturgy -Stage Management -Theatre Education

*Teacher Certification Available. Please consult the Department Advisor for more information

CLASS Academic Affairs • AH 320 • 713.743.4001

www.uh.edu/CLASS

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MINORS AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS

AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP

MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

ART* Art History Studio Art

MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC)

COMMUNICATION Corporate Communication Film Studies Health Communication Interpersonal Communication Journalism* Media Production Media Studies Public Relations/ Advertising COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS COMPARATIVE CULTURAL STUDIES Anthropology Global and International Studies India Studies Religious Studies ECONOMICS ENGLISH* HEALTH AND HUMAN– PERFORMANCE Human Nutrition and Foods Kinesiology HISPANIC STUDIES Spanish Spanish for Business Professionals HISTORY* American Cultures History Latin American Cultures HONORS COLLEGE Creative Work Medicine and Society Phronesis, Politics, and Ethics

MODERN & CLASSICALLANGUAGES Arab Studies Chinese Studies Classical Studies French* French for Business Professionals German* Greek Italian Studies Jewish Studies Latin* World Cultures and Literatures MUSIC* Music Literature/History Music Theory NAVAL SCIENCE (NAVY ROTC) PHILOSOPHY POLITICAL SCIENCE National Security Studies Quantitative Social Science Values, Law and Policy PSYCHOLOGY SOCIOLOGY THEATRE & DANCE Dance* WOMEN’S, GENDER & SEXUALITYSTUDIES PROGRAM Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies Women’s Studies


Class of 2013

Division of Student Affairs Supporting Student Success

A. D. Bruce Religion Center Campus Recreation Center for Fraternity & Sorority Life Center for Student Involvement Children’s Learning Centers Counseling & Psychological Services Dean of Students Office Health Center Student Housing & Residential Life Student Publications UH Forensic Program UH Wellness University Career Services University Centers Urban Experience Program

uh.edu/dsa

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CONGRATULATIONS! May success and happiness shine upon you always NAME

PROGRAM AREA

Chris Arredondo Oppong Hemeng Chukwunonso "Ofili" Ofili Ross Andrea Richelle Hepler Kimberly Lewis Stephanie Balbin Victoria Magee Katie Keene Nadia Dosal Jordan Haywood Nick Levine Anthony Munoz Brannon Beasley Oliver Sac Jayda Washington Shyonda Adams

Intramurals Intramurals Official OA OA OA OA Office Staff Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Marketing

For more information,contact us at: 713-743-7529 uh.edu/recreation M. Vyckie Avila, M.Ed. Assistant Director, Marketing and Membership Division of Student Affairs | Department of Campus Recreation | University of Houston mavila2@uh.edu ~ 713-743-9501

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Some are dreamers, some are talented.

YOU ARE BOTH May you achieve more success ahead. Congratulations on your UH graduation! Urban Experience Program,

University of Houston, 250 G Oberholtzer Hall Houston, TX 77204-3025 Office 713.743.6032 | Fax: 713.743.6039

Connect with us

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African American Studies Minors

Graduating Class of Spring 2013 Techlesha Blanchard Monae Carter Lanetta Dickens Jason Holiday Bradford Howard Danielle Joseph Natosha Nunn Ryan Rockett

628 Agnes Arnold Hall, Houston, TX 77204–3047 Call 713.743.2811

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Congratulations to our graduates!

O

HON Our Mission The Honors College is a community that cultivates excellence in teaching and learning. We believe that a university education should offer more than the acquisition of skills for the workplace.

Gaudeamus!

212 M.D. Anderson Library - University of Houston Houston Telphone: 713.743.9010 - Fax: 713.743.9015 http://www.uh.edu/honors/

Our Vision The Honors College at the University of Houston is a nationally recognized, intellectually stimulating learning community. As a vibrant, leading presence within the University, the Honors College attracts highly talented and motivated students and educators to a collegial environment where tradition is honored and possibilities are both realized and created.

RS

Summer/Fall 2012 - Spring 2013 Graduates Jaime Alanis Scott Aldridge Elizabeth Ambs Elspeth Bacher Xavier Balleza Hillary Bartlett Robert Beavers Stetson Begin Megan Berti Bryan Bilocura Fredy Bonilla Garrett Brodeur Catherine Calvert Robert Cappa Sarah Carter Patrick Chappell Mi Wha Choi Hsin-Yu Chung Simon Coffman Chelcy Cotton Hope Cowan Marianne Crispin Caitlin Dalton Nicholas DeMeo Alex Denton Timothy Dueppen Andrew Dugas Phillip Elder Dominique Estevez Jose Falcon Carter Frederick Ambarly French Walter Ryan Frenk Dennis Gallagher Christopher Garcia Melissa Givens Paulo Gomes Victor Gomez Brandon Grimes Cristian Guajardo Francisco Alfonso Hernandez Jose Hernandez Omar Herrera Arizmendi

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Samuel Hunter Desmond Ikegwuonu Andrew Ingalls Bethany Johns Ashley Johnson Katherine Johnson Kaneesha Jones Ryan Kersey Rebecca Kidnie Catrina Kim Chohee Kim Do Hee Kim Jacob Kincaide Eduardo Knob Cameron Kubos Kirsten Leslie Chenchen Li Nina Lickwar Nien Ly Nicholas Madden Erik Malmer Trevor Martin Christopher Mauldin Brittany May Lisa McCarroll Zachary Miller Ryan Mohney Ellis Reyes Montes Kevin Moody Jacob Moore Stephen Mulvahill Benjamin Muths Jessica Myers Kasumi Nakashima Thomas Neal Ashly Neumann Justin Neumann Man-Khoi Nguyen Kirstie Norman Mauricio Oliveros-Romero Geraldine Bin Hui Ong Jose Reyes Ortiz Sophie Parker

Charnele Pendarvis Phillip Phares Mary Price Suzy Protteau Martin Quiroga Jaime Ramos William Nathan Reeves Kevin Richardson Jose Rocha Steven Rosario Tyson Ruhmann Phillip Sammons Cruz Sanchez Amanda Sauceda Serzhio Savitski Stephanie Saxer Amanda Sellers Steven Shannon Inna Smith Rachel Smith Rajesh Soodeen James Stovall Sean Stultz Robert Sturdy Camilla Sung Nicole Taylor Arlecia Taylor Steven Thomas Christopher Trapani Tyler Tucker Chad Tumminello Matthew Turner Rebecca Walters David Ward Marissa Watkins Molly Weeks Robert Wolf Brian Wood Nicole Woodward Karen Young Alejandro Zapata Russell Zavalla

Best wishes for your continued success!

BEST WISHES

SPRING 2013

Graduates!

We have enjoyed watching you learn and grow. Dean of Students Office

252 University Center 832-842-6183 www.uh.edu/dos


CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES! Here to serve International Students, Research Scholars and Faculty. Provides services and information pertaining to: US Immigration law Counseling & Advising Orientation Arrival Services Financial Assistance International Friendship Program Intercultural Training International Student Counselors also serve as cultural guides for international students and scholars by connecting students with appropriate offices and resources both on and off campus. 302 Student Service Center 1 713.743.5065

www.issso.uh.edu www.facebook.com/UH.internationalservices

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CONGR ATULATIONS

\to the greek men graduating in the class of 2013 Delta Upsilon: Alborz Davood Mehdi Alpha Epsilon Pi: Matthew Boutin-Bloomberg Micheal Brown Yuval Klein Lambda Phi Epsilon: Austen Chang Anthony Nguyen Viet-Tu Nguyen Daniel Vu

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Kappa Sigma: Jason Merritt Dante Saunders Matt Thompson Matt Malonson Tau Kappa Epsilon: Matt Lines Andres Assef Adrian Perez Trey Pruitt Gustavo Chamusca Joseph Sarabia Timothy Abbot

Pi Kappa Phi: Travis White Eric Huebner Aaryn Joseph Mcdonald Brian Llwellyn Stephen Pitmann Arthur George Formas III Sigma Chi: Eric Anderson Preston Gray Nick Buchanan Alex Wilkins Sean Jaehne Gabe Salazar Octavian Pritchard

Sigma Pi: Joshua Boadi Sigma Phi Epsilon: Samuel Charles Jacobi Luis Edgardo Canul Triangle: Steven Zakharia Alex Korovin


&RQJUDWXODWLRQV*UDGXDWHV Need help finding a job? Writing your resume? Planning your career? We can help! Free services for UH Alumni during the first semester after graduation! Alumni Career Fair & Mixer: June 20th from 5-7pm, Athletics/Alumni Center For more information: Please contact Lauren Moore at 713-743-5098 or lmoore@uh.edu

University Career Services 106 Student Service Center 1 www.career.uh.edu (713) 743-5100 | ucs@uh.edu

9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHIRUGHWDLOV

Congratulations

to all the

2013 GRADUATES. from: Stay in touch! THE DAILY COUGAR.COM

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DEDICATION For ushering UH into a golden age of success, fostering student growth and enrichment, and embodying the heart and soul of our University, we dedicate this publication of the Houstonian Magazine to President Renu Khator. PHOTO COURTESY OF UH DIGITAL LIBRARY

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FROM THE EDITOR Above a winged hourglass, the University Seal bears the Latin phrase “In Tempore,” which translates to “In Time” — a profoundly simple combination of words that perfectly encapsulates the heart and vision of UH. In its 85-year history, the University of Houston has seen tremendous growth and success. Founded as Houston Junior College in 1927 and becoming a four-year university in 1934, UH has long been an institution that provides outstanding education to citizens of an outstanding city. Since its infancy, UH has been a place that encourages its students to wonder and grow, and every mind educated here adds a unique facet to the gem of a university we know today. It instills in its community the thirst for a lifetime of learning, both inside and outside of the classroom; improvement upon what’s already been improved; and excellence in achievement. Riding on the coattails of a banner year in 2012, the University has seen a number of changes this year. In August, we welcomed new students, a new dining hall, and several buildings on campus. In December, we said goodbye to Robertson Stadium — and parking spaces — to begin the construction of a new stadium. Out of Houston Junior College came a Carnegie-designated Tier One research university. With every passing year, students, faculty and staff have left the University a better place, and we can only expect to continue on the path to greatness — in tempore. A huge debt of gratitude is owed to Julie Heffler, Matt Dulin and Justin Schneewind, without whom this publication would not have been possible. Thank you all for offering insight, encouragement and time to this process — all the hard work that you put into making this happen is sincerely appreciated. It is with much joy that I present to you the year in stories and photographs. As you walk across the stage as so many have before you, feel the magnitude of the motto embroidered into your gown. Take with you the spirit of the University of Houston — always remember that with time, all things are possible, regardless of the starting point or destination. To the graduates of the class of 2013, I wish you only the best in your future endeavors.

MAGAZINE STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR LEAD DESIGNER PHOTO EDITOR

Mary Baak Julie Heffler Farah Hasnie Nichole Taylor

WRITERS  Zachary Burton, Darlene Campos, Julie Heffler, Amanda Hilow, Channler Hill, Evelyn Hurtado, Jessica Portillo, Christopher Shelton, Andrew Valderas PHOTOGRAPHERS Aisha Bouderdaben, Mary Dahdouh, Minh Dam, Shaimaa Eissa, Hannah Laamoumi, Mahnoor Samana, Rebekah Stearns, Nichole Taylor, Justin Tijerina ADVERTISING 

Michelle Hernandez, Gabriela Padilla, Paul Vilchez

PRODUCTION 

Andres Garcia, Farah Hasnie

COVER DESIGN 

Farah Hasnie

COVER PHOTO 

Nichole Taylor

ABOUT THE MAGAZINE

This magazine was produced by students at the University of Houston in the Department of Student Publications. The first copy is free to graduates. Each additional copy is $2, including postage. To request a copy, call (713) 743-4350 or email stupub@uh.edu

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DEAR UH

OUR UNIVERSITY PAST AND PRESENT

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YEAR IN 16


REVIEW 2012–2013

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Museum goes mod After a year of renovations, the Blaffer Art Museum opened the doors of a significantly improved building in the fall. Renovations included the addition of a student lounge, a new entry canopy and improvements to the Fine Arts courtyard. PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

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Opening bash The annual Cat’s Back celebration had to be relocated in the fall because of the construction of the new University Center. This, however, did not stop students, and faculty and administration from coming out to enjoy the festivities. PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

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UH gets a piece of

HISTORY

by Zachary Burton

PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

During the years, the University has become home to many antiquated rare books. Of these is Holocaust Torah No. 1518, which UH obtained in 1976 through efforts of the UH faculty, and that has only been open for viewing during Jewish holidays until this fall semester. The scrolls that make up the Torah are housed in a new Plexiglass case, which was ordered by UH faculty, alumni, students from the Epsilon Pi fraternity and Houston’s Jewish community, specially created with the Torah in mind. UH English professor Irving Rothman began the efforts to create this display case in 2012. “I wrote letters in March 2012 to Jewish faculty on campus and others I thought would be interested in making donations for the construction of the display case. Responses were quick,” Rothman said. “The Torah is really an impressive thing for students to see. They are able to see what a book would look like before printing when people had to inscribe each letter by hand.”

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Many Torahs, the religious text of the Jewish people, were destroyed during the Holocaust. The scroll was pieced back together by the Memorial Scrolls Committee of the Westminster Synagogue of London, which has an agreement with UH about the protection for the 80 panels of parchment. While Holocaust Torah No. 1518 earned its name from its survival through World War II, its history dates back approximately 2,000 years and is said to be from the Pinkas Synagogue in Prague. A dedication ceremony was held on Sept. 13 to commemorate the Torah’s induction into the Evans Room of Special Collections of the M.D. Anderson Memorial Library. The dedication was given by UH alumna Celina Fein, a Polish Holocaust survivor. An author, she shared memories and stories of the Holocaust during the dedication ceremony.


Professor John Lienhard researches, writes and hosts each segment of “The Engines of our Ingenuity.” Since its inaugural broadcast in 1988, the program has aired almost 3,000 episodes on KUHF. PHOTOS BY MAHNOOR SAMANA

The Engines of our

INGENUITY First airing in January 1988 on National Public Radio’s member station KUHF-FM Houston, “The Engines of Our Ingenuity” radio program celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. Hosted and written by John Lienhard and other contributors, the series can be heard five days a week nation-wide. As of April 30, 2,899 three-and-a-half minute episodes have been aired and posted on the program’s website. “Engines” tells its listeners how human creativity has shaped our modern day culture. Topics range from cable cars to Civil War submarines and from the connection between Romantic poets and Victorian science

to the invention of the barcode. The radio show has also been incorporated into the classroom as its website provides information, episodes and reading material for the course of Women in Science, Technology, and the Life of the Mind in addition to other topics. “I hope that it has given greater plausibility to the idea that technology and science are chief formative agent of our culture and that they are intimately linked to other aspects of our culture — literature, music, theatre,” Lienhard said. “I hope that it has encouraged people to go into engineering, math and the sciences.” BY EVELYN HURTADO

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The renovation of the University Center began in earnest in fall 2012 after a groundbreaking in April. This photo shows substantial structrual completion of the north and east additions. PHOTO COURTESY OF TELLEPSEN BUILDERS

UC gets a

FACELIFT Students arrived on campus in the fall to find the University Center surrounded by construction fencing and equipment. The restaurants, game room and UC Underground were off limits, but the bookstore, administration offices, fee-funded organization space, and most of the meeting rooms remained open during the year. According to the UC website, the transformation was scheduled in two phases. The first involved the closing most of the first floor and the lower-level arbor. In the second phase, these floors will partially re-open, but the second floor will close. Phase 1 of the Transformation Project will be completed Jan. 2, 2014. With the completion of Phase 1, a new wingnwill serve as a home for student involvement and will provide studios, office space and workrooms for student organizations. Also as part of Phase 1, an addition to the original UC building will include a 450-seat theater and expanded conference spaces. BY ZACHARY BURTON

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Jessica Grono (left) and Rani Ramchandani show their Cougar pride after leaving their mark at the UC North topping ceremony in April. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY CENTER


Meals on the move To compensate for the loss of dining options in the University Center, UH brought in some of Houston’s finest food trucks, including The Waffle Bus, Bernie’s Burger Bus and Bare Bowls. PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR AND AISHA BOUDERDABEN

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Into the Woods The new dining hall, Cougar Woods, opened fall 2012, replacing Oberholtzer Dining Hall. PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

Students line up to be served in the new eatery (left); Cougar Woods had a delayed opening in fall 2012 (right). PHOTOS BY JOSHUA MANN AND HANNAH LAAMOUMI

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Despite losing her vision to an autoimmune disorder, graduate student Christine Ha took home a book deal and $250,000 for winning “MasterChef” last summer. PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

The sweet taste of

VICTORY Creative writing graduate student Christine Ha was featured on the Fox cooking competition show “MasterChef ” last summer. She made history on the show for being the first legally blind chef to compete and win. Ha was diagnosed with a rare condition called neuromyelitis optica and lost her vision, the use of her hands and had difficulty walking. With treatment, Ha’s physical mobility improved, but her vision worsened. Despite her disability, Ha won the grand prize of $250,000 and the chance to write a cookbook. “I can’t believe that I’m the MasterChef,” Ha said during the show’s broadcast. “After all the obstacles I’ve been through, going up against such awesome, amazing cooks — this has been the most amazing experience.” A native Houstonian, Ha has been pursing her master’s since 2008 and will graduate in May.

“She took a nonfiction workshop with Nick Flynn, who encouraged her to work her material into a memoir,” said Honors College professor Laurie Lambeth. “Now that there is so much interest in her life story, she is writing that memoir. It will focus not only on her experience of NMO, but it will also intersperse in between her own story and her mother’s experience with lung cancer in the early 1990s.” Ha’s excellence has made her the epitome of a student for those in UH’s Creative Writing Program, said Alexander Parsons, English professor. “Christine, in her optimism, work ethic and talent, is a model of the writers that define the creative writing program at UH,” Parsons said. BY DARLENE CAMPOS

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Cougars in

CONGRESS UH alumna Elizabeth Warren has taken her passion for politics and education to the next level, becoming the first woman to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate. Warren graduated from UH in 1970 with a degree in speech pathology and audiology and graduated from Rutgers School of Law at Newark six years later. She went on to teach at the Rutgers School of Law at Newark, the UH Law Center, the University of Texas School of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School and Harvard Law School. Once one of Warren’s students at Harvard University, UH law professor Douglas Moll said Warren was an excellent, professional instructor. “She was funny, interesting and very good at getting students to focus on the material,” Moll said. “Her hardworking nature as a professor will transfer well to the Senate, I am sure.” Along with being an author, professor and

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researcher, Warren can now add Senator to her long list of accomplishments. Women’s Resource Center director Beverly McPhail said that Warren’s achievements are a great example of former students making an impact on society. “She’s a role model for UH students, showing that they too can make a difference in the national stage,” McPhail said. Warren came from humble backgrounds, working her way up to her current senatorial seat. Her hard work is not only inspirational, but a key to her success, Moll said. “She is going to be excellent because she is extremely driven, hard working and personable, which I think is probably necessary,” Moll said to The Daily Cougar. “Some teachers have energy that is contagious and are very good in the classroom. Her energy is, in fact, contagious.” BY EVELYN HURTADO

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren graduated from UH in 1970. PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON


Robertson’s last days After the close of the 2012 football season, UH said goodbye to Robertson Stadium, which was demolished in December. In February, Cougars gathered to celebrate the groundbreaking for the new stadium, which is slated to be complete in 2014. PHOTOS BY EMILY CHAMBERS AND COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT

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D.J. Hayden (right) makes a 95-yard interception for a touchdown in a 45-35 victory against UTEP. PHOTO BY REBEKAH STEARNS

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Matters of the

HEART by Christopher Shelton

Cornerback makes a stunning recovery after sustaining a lethal injury After sustaining a life-threatening injury in practice, there was a lot D.J. Hayden couldn’t do when he returned home, so his mother moved in to help out; she cooked, cleaned and helped Hayden complete the simple tasks he couldn’t accomplish on his own. But there was one thing that Hayden had to do. He had to be a counselor to guilt-ridden sophomore defensive back Trevon Stewart, with whom he collided in November. Stewart blamed himself when Hayden was seconds away from death. “They told me he was crying at the hospital. My mother was consoling him,” Hayden said. “She told him that everything happens for a reason.” Hayden and Stewart leaped to catch a routine jump ball when Stewart’s knee connected with Hayden’s sternum, causing a tear of the inferior vena cava, which is the large vein that carries blood from the lowerhalf of the body back to the heart. The injury is most associated with high-speed car crashes and carries a 5 percent survival rate. Hayden and Stewart were closer than just members of the same defensive backfield — Hayden identified Stewart as a talented

player from their first 7-on-7 drills together and took Stewart under his wing. By week three, both players were pushing each other to get better. Hayden told Stewart that the injury made him a better person because he doesn’t take anything in life for granted anymore. He and Stewart don’t talk about the collision much anymore, but many across the nation have taken notice of his journey from being on the brink of death to making the first round of the NFL draft. From an ESPN SportsCenter feature to stories from CBS.com and the Houston Chronicle, most local and national outlets have profiled Hayden’s unprecedented recovery. Six months after evading death, Hayden is back to full strength, but soon after the injury, he thought he would never play football again. “I wasn’t worried about life after football. I wasn’t worried about life after college,” Hayden said. “I was just worried about walking.” Hayden lost 30 pounds in the first month after the injury. Now he has gained it all back and added some extra muscle. There are no restrictions on what he can do, and he trains several times a week so he can fulfill his dream

of becoming a great NFL player. Hayden had to prove himself to NFL teams that were initially skeptical about using a high draft pick on a player who dealt with an injury that serious, but the film and measurables showed a first-round prospect. At UH’s pro day in March, Hayden answered all of the questions. He ran the 40-yard dash in 4.33 seconds, a moment that brought tears to head coach Tony Levine’s eyes and secured his spot in the first round. “There are different ways you could lead,” Levine said. “Some lead by example, some do it by performance. He did both. His work ethic was a great example for our younger players. He was the complete package.” NFL Draft analyst Mike Mayock said Hayden opened some eyes at UH’s pro day. “I think most of the teams have come to the conclusion that it was a once-in-a-gazillion situation that has no more chance to be replicated than it did in the first place,” Mayock said in a pre-draft conference call. “The two big issues were speed and medical, and I think they’ve both been erased.” The Oakland Raiders sure took notice, picking Hayden 12th in the draft and making his dreams come true.

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UH experienced a wave of robberies and assaults on campus this year, one of which occurred in the bathroom of Agnes Arnold Hall. The increasing instances of crime forced UH Police Department to improve its security measures across campus. PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

Cracking down on

CAMPUS CRIME by Amanda Hilow

Police work to ensure student safety After a string of robberies and assaults across campus in the last year, UH Police Department had to significantly increase its security measures University-wide. “UH police have been trained to respond as effectively as possible when something specifically threatens the welfare of our campus community,” said Executive Director of Media Relations Richard Bonnin. “While no campus can be perfectly secure at all times, every effort is being made to ensure that the University of Houston is as safe as it can be.” After several robberies at gunpoint in the fall and cell phone thefts in the spring semester, students said the risk of threat culminated with the alleged assault of a student in a

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second-floor restroom of Agnes Arnold Hall in late January and three assaults in the M.D. Anderson Memorial Library in the following weeks. “I kept getting emails from the campus police. All I heard about were robberies and crimes,” said art senior Matthew Lee. “It’s been quiet lately, though.” In January, UH Police Department initiated the UH Department of Public Safety AntiCrime Team, an investigative street crime unit, as part of a continuing effort to increase the level of security on campus, officials said. According to a press release, the campus has non-stop video monitoring in all parking lots and high-traffic areas, and the University is increasing the amount of light-

ing and emergency call boxes throughout campus. UHPD Chief of Staff Lt. Bret Collier said campus security is constantly evaluating risks at UH, across the city and at other universities to keep ahead of wider trends in crime. “Being adaptive is a key strategy of the department and continues to be to successful crime prevention,” Collier said. The crime rate is remaining relatively low as a result of the University’s continuing crime prevention efforts, Bonnin said. “We’re subject to the same amount of crime any community faces,” he said. “However, statistically speaking, the University remains as safe and secure as most areas of Houston and safer than many.”


Shaking things up A flashmob of students gathered in February to do the Harlem Shake, which became a YouTube sensation after Baauer’s single was released in January. PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

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Building on up Cougar Village II will increase the number of beds at UH by more than 1,100 and will open in fall 2013. Another dorm, Cougar Place II will also open its doors in fall 2013, offering 800 additional beds. PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

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Construction continued throughout the year on CV II (above); the new Molly and Doug Vision Institute opened and will offer medical services on campus (opposite page); The C.T. Bauer College of Business opened a new classroom building in the fall (left). PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR, MARY DAHDOUH AND MINH DAM

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Professional actors Adam Harrington and Karish Danish from “Hit Lit” pose (left); Robert Wuhl (front) poses with cast members (right). PHOTOS COURTESY OF ROBERT WUHL

Alumnus workshops

A BIG HIT Alumnus, director, writer and producer Robert Wuhl debuted his play “Hit Lit” at UH before debuting in Queens, New York. A screwball romantic comedy, “Hit Lit” takes place in the modern publishing world of New York City. The show was a massive success — selling out every seat in the Jose Quintero Theatre. “I was thrilled with the response,” Wuhl said. “If we’re as well-received in New York, I’ll be a happy Cougar.” Wuhl said he began his career as a standup comic and wrote material for Rodney Dangerfield, an actor well known for his roles in “Caddyshack,” “Easy Money” and “Back to School.” Wuhl has also won two Emmys for co-writing the 1990 and 1991 Academy Awards; however,

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he said this is his first time writing a play. Media productions senior Karla Rodriguez said she had no idea this was Wuhl’s first play. “Everything was well written and flowed so well that I thought he had been doing this for a lot longer,” Rodriguez said. If the occasion arises, Wuhl said he would be more than happy to workshop another play at the University, if UH will have him. Until then, he said he is happy with how everything turned out. “Just to add a sincere ‘thank you’ to all the people who either worked on the play, reported on the play and, most of all, came to see the play,” Wuhl said. “It was one of the best experiences of my career.” BY JESSICA PORTILLO


Cullen Distinguished Professor and acclaimed pianist Abbey Simon performed alongside Inon Barnatan and Larissa Dedova in February for the 30th annual International Piano Festival. PHOTO BY SAMMY CHRIS

Tickling the ivories for

30 YEARS The International Piano Festival celebrated its 30th year of providing the University with a weekend of musical performances and classes on Feb. 1. Spanning three days, the festival was a landmark anniversary and featured performances by world-renowned pianists Abbey Simon, Inon Barnatan and Larissa Dedova in the Moores Opera House and the Dudley Recital Hall. Simon is a Cullen distinguished professor at the Moores School of Music, where he has taught since 1977. “I think I am one of the luckiest people in the world because I knew from the moment I was conscious that all that interested me was the piano and that I was going to be

a pianist,” Simon said in an interview with UH. The festival was created by Simon in 1984 as a way to expand the UH piano program, said Alan Austin, International Piano Festival director. “When he first came to UH, his goal was to build up the piano program and bring international notoriety,” Austin said to The Daily Cougar. “His idea was to create a weekend festival where he would invite two of his internationally renowned colleagues to come to the festival, and each person would play a recital.” BY JULIE HEFFLER

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March Madness Fans cheer after the 73-72 victory against UT (above). Joseph Young (left) makes a shot over UT’s Ioannis Papapetrou. J.J. Richardson (below) cheers by the bench with his teammates and coaches. PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TIJERINA

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Cougars sweep rivals in

WINNING WEEK It was a memorable two days for UH Athletics as the men’s basketball and baseball teams squared off against Texas. On March 19, the Cougars baseball team hosted the Longhorns, a team they haven’t played since 2008. The Cougars built a 4-0 lead in the fifth inning and secured a 4-3 victory. The next day, the men’s basketball team hosted the Longhorns, their first meeting in 12 years, at Hofheinz Pavilion for the College Basketball Invitational. The Cougars opened their first possession of the game when sophomore guard Joseph Young found freshman forward Danuel House for an alley-oop dunk on a fast break. With the dunk, the crowd of more than 4,400 arose to its feet and ignited the home

team. After the Cougars possessed a 33-22 lead early in the second half, the Longhorns sparked a comeback and eventually took a 57-51 lead with eight minutes remaining in the game. UH started a rally of its own and took a 73-72 lead when House sank the game-winning 14-foot jump shot with just 17 seconds remaining. It was a memorable moment for the program as the crowd was in frenzy and the players celebrated in the student section. It was also head coach James Dickey’s first playoff win since 1996. This rivalry dates back from the Southwest Conference days from 1976 to 1996 and lives on to this day. BY ANDREW VALDERAS

Out of the park Sophomore shortstop Frankie Ratcliff rushes to the third base, securing the Cougars’ victory in their first game against UT since 2008. PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TIJERINA

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Students and alumni helped set up and celebrate Frontier Fiesta despite making a change from its traditional location. PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR AND SHAIMAA EISSA

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Student and alumni volunteers worked together in building and operating booths at Frontier Fiesta. PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR

Fiesta explores a new

FRONTIER Dating back to 1939, Frontier Fiesta is one of the University’s oldest traditions. Though it was displaced because of the demolition of Robertson Stadium. At its new location adjacent to the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center and the East Parking Garage, the celebration did not suffer. Instead, it raised $11,500 in scholarship funds. In the past 15 years, Fiesta has awarded more than $100,000 in scholarships to incoming freshmen and current students who display academic excellence and an interest in community service. Fiesta, which ran from March 21 to 23, partnered with UH Advancement to create an online program in which alumni and interested parties made donations, raising twice the amount of last year’s contributions. While Fiesta has had a history of garner-

ing most of its support from the campus Greek community, more than 50 student organizations at UH participated in the 2013 festivities. Throughout the weekend, students exchanged dollars for Fiesta Bucks upon admission to enjoy food, karaoke, talent shows, variety shows, multiple activities and five free concerts during the three days. Featured artists were Lights, Xperimento, VerseCity and the Justin Van Sant Band. Though Fiesta City was at a different place on the campus map this year, the tradition was carried on with ease and UH has no plans to change that in the many construction-filled years to come. BY CHANNLER HILL

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Graduate fellows sat in the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building in protest of their $11,200 annual stipend. They hung up posters to advertise their cause and pressed the administration until they were heard. PHOTO BY SHAIMAA EISSA

Fellows take a seat to

MAKE A STAND After 20 years without an increase to their stipend amounts, the UH English teaching fellows decided they’d had enough. On April 2, the fellows held a sit-in in the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building, eventually meeting with Interim Provost Paula Short, Chief Financial Officer Carl Carlucci and College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Dean John Roberts and eventually had a deal brokered with President Renu Khator the following week. The issue began when the fellows discovered that they were being charged an extra $121 in fees from which they were told they would be exempted. The national poverty line rests at $11,490 with the doctoral candidates receiving approximately

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$11,200 a year and the Master’s of Fine Arts students getting $9,600 annually. Of this, an average of 20 percent and 16 percent goes toward paying for fees for doctoral candidates and master’s students, respectively. “You look at Cornell, for instance, and that annual stipend is $26,000 per year — and that’s in Ithaca!” said Beth Lyons, one of the fellows, to the Houston Press. “Denver’s at $18,000, Athens is $15,000; USC and UCLA are $20,000. And most of these places also have a lower cost of living, too.” The Office of the President does not control individual salaries, Khator said in a statement, but she has the power to allocate money to the

deans who will handle the matter. She also affirmed that a task force would be created to monitor graduate teaching assistant success. She finished her statement by saying that the provost asked for an external review of the English department for the first time in nine years. “The review will help the dean and provost evaluate competitive information, learn best practices, get advice from aspirational peers, show accountability to the public and help rectify not just the wage issue, but all issues related to the learning and working environment of the teaching fellows and teaching assistants,” Khator said in a statement. BY JULIE HEFFLER


Starting at UH in 1956, former basketball coach Guy V. Lewis led the Cougars to 592 victories in his 30-year career (above). In April, it was announced that Lewis would be inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame in September (right). PHOTOS BY NICHOLE TAYLOR AND COURTESY OF UH

Legendary

LEWIS

UH basketball fans can exhale — their guy is in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Former UH head coach Guy V. Lewis will be inducted into the Hall of Fame in September, 27 years after he patrolled Hofheinz Pavilion for the final time. Lewis had a history of winning, taking 592 games from 1956 to 1987 — including 27 consecutive winning seasons. Lewis engineered 11 20-win seasons and two 30-win seasons. Lewis also helped college basketball grow into the sport it is today. He convinced legendary University of California at Los Angeles head coach John Wooden to participate in the “Game of the Century,” which was the first nationally televised game in college basketball history. The

Cougars defeated the Bruins 71-69 in front of more than 50,000 fans at the Astrodome in 1968, which snapped UCLA’s 47-game winning streak. UH President Renu Khator said it was hard to put into words what Lewis’ induction into the Hall of Fame meant to the University. “When I found out, I just decided I would come for a brief second just to congratulate Coach and what he has done for this community, this city, for the University is incredible,” Khator said at Lewis’ press conference. “It’s a golden moment — it feels like we’ve gone back to our golden days — and hopefully we can find inspiration from this energy and build an outstanding program here.” BY CHRISTOPHER SHELTON

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Losing University

LEGENDS Remembering Sidney Berger The University of Houston lost one of its longest-serving and most influential faculty members this year. Sidney “Doc” Berger, former director of the UH School of Theatre and Dance, died Feb. 15 at the age of 76. Berger was in charge of the school for 38 years and is remembered fondly by those who knew him. The current director for the school, Steve Wallace, said Berger was more than just a director to him. “Sidney was larger than life,” Wallace said. “He loved teaching, Shakespeare and his students. He was a friend and mentor to so many and a strong and powerful advocate for the UH School of Theatre and Dance and the Houston Shakespeare Festival.” Berger’s passion was theater, and his work reflected that. In the 38 years he taught, he transformed the almost-unknown department into a nationally recognized theater program. Some of his students include Jim Parsons, Dennis and Randy

42

Quaid and Robert Wuhl. His love for theater and teaching can also be seen in his founding, producing and directing of the Houston Shakespeare Festival in Hermann Park. He also cofounded the Children’s Theatre Festival and Shakespeare Theatre Association of America in 1991. Wallace said Berger’s contributions to UH will be long-lasting. “His legacy is pursuing a higher level of teaching, working with students to build careers and fostering a love of Shakespeare’s language,” Wallace said. “He took that love and created the Houston Shakespeare Festival. This year will be the 38th year of the festival. Due to his planning and hard work, the festival now plays to approximately 30,000 people every summer.” Berger is survived by his wife of 49 years, Sandra, and their son, Erik. BY JESSICA PORTILLO

SIDNEY BERGER 1936–2013


Remembering Jack Pardee UH lost a football legend when former coach Jack Pardee died in April. Pardee fought a lengthy battle with gall bladder cancer that began in November; he was 76. In conjunction with the UH Athletics Department, the Pardee family established the Jack Pardee Memorial Scholarship Fund after his death, which will award one walk-on player each season. Pardee coached the Cougars from 1987 to 1989 and oversaw some of the most memorable events in University history. He became the first coach in NCAA history to have an African-American quarterback win the Heisman Trophy

when Andre Ware claimed the award in 1989. In a game against SMU, Pardee’s Cougars became the first major NCAA team to produce more than 1,000 yards in offense in a 95-21 victory. Head football coach Tony Levine said Pardee was a special person who meant a lot to the program. “When you talk about the University of Houston, coach Pardee is a name that comes right to the forefront of everybody’s mind,” Levine said. “His family is very close, and his extended family is very close to our program.” BY CHRISTOPHER SHELTON

JACK PARDEE 1936–2013

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IN TEMPORE

44


IMAGINING UH AT 100

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UH at 100: Words from

THE PRESIDENT AN It’s June 2027, and I have just received an invitation to UH’s centennial celebration. Even though my husband Suresh and I are happily retired here in Houston — yes, we love this city so much we decided to stay — we will certainly be there. When we come back, we will see a University of 50,000 students, of which nearly 15,000 are living on campus. Much of student life revolves around a vibrant University Center and a neighborhood filled with shops and restaurants. We will see a University reaching out to 100,000 students worldwide through online programs and a robust Energy Research Park that has become a premier innovation hub. Back in 2013, who would have thought that UH would draw its electricity from solar panels and wind turbines in the ERP, carried to campus via flexible, superconducting wire invented by our researchers? We will see a University working closer

RENU KHATOR PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

46

than ever with the Texas Medical Center and with companies, professional firms and arts organizations, giving students unlimited opportunities for internships, real-life experiences and jobs. America’s efforts to improve college completion rates have succeeded, and 40 percent of U.S. adults now have a college degree. Our nation is more ethnically diverse than ever, and UH is at the top of the list as a model of success, preparing students who are ready for life — not just the marketplace. Physically, UH is a very different place than the one I knew during my presidency, with more buildings, research labs, parking garages and a light rail line. But at its very heart, the University of Houston is still — 100 years after its founding — the place where the dreams of a productive life are realized for generation after generation of students. BY RENU KHATOR


AND A PROFESSOR I came to UH 15 years ago. It was a University with a wonderful athletics history, strong graduate and professional programs and an undergraduate student body who were predominantly Houstonians rather than Cougars. UH is now a Tier One university with a great athletics presence, even stronger graduate and professional programs and an undergraduate student body comprised of at least 50 percent Cougars, some of whom are also Houstonians. Given what has happened in the last five years, one would expect UH in 2027 to have several more national championships and Olympic medalists, many more members of the various National Academies and a generation of undergraduate alumni who pledge their hearts forever to UH. I have little doubt that much of this will happen. How it happens, however, is uncertain in a changing landscape

of higher education. State and federal budget difficulties mean that universities have to look elsewhere for funding as well as critically examine every aspect of campus life for value. Access to online courses and programs threatens the traditional campus way of life, and the non-classroom education is so essential to the development of young people. Under the leadership of Dr. Khator, however, we can be sure that UH will make it through these uncertainties. The number of students who live on campus will continue to increase. Their in- and out-of-class education will continue to develop to become world-class. Our graduation rates will increase until we are at least the equals of every university in the state. The University of Houston will be a wonderful representation and representative of this great city of ours. BY SIMON BOTT

SIMON BOTT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

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PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR 48


IN TEMPORE... We asked UH students to send us their predictions of what UH might be like in 2027 on its 100th birthday. Here are a few glimpses. The University of Houston will have more out-of-state and international students! ASIT SHAH, FRESHMAN, CIVIL ENGINEERING

UH will probably be expanded so much that we will have to have our own computerized monorail system so students can get to class on time. WESTON HODGE, FRESHMAN, COMPUTER ENGINEERING

At 100, UH will be Tier One in everything. When asked “Why UH?,” we can just say we are awesome. Everything will be bigger and better at UH. JEFF SYPTAK, SENIOR, POLITICAL SCIENCE

UH will be the premier university in Texas. The sports program will be the envy of all major universities. Alumni participation will increase. ROBERT GRAHAM JR., FRESHMAN, LEADERSHIP IN TECHNOLOGY

Definitely a bigger, redder campus with plenty of Cougar traditions. Parking will still suck, but that’s because everyone will want to go here. GEMRICK CURTOM, JUNIOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS

UH will be a Tier One research university with 50,000 students, $500 million annual research budget and a billion-dollar endowment fund. SAI THANGIRALA, MBA STUDENT

We’ll be seen as Texas’ third-greatest public university, distinctly more urban than UT or A&M. It’ll feel more like a university, with more campus and local life.

When UH turns 100, I predict that UH will be one of the top schools in the nation.

CLINT KIRCHHOFF, JUNIOR,

ISAIAH COLIN, SOPHOMORE,

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

PRE-BUSINESS

UH will be recognized as the first Texas university to take the first steps in adapting its courses to the current generation in 2027. KEVIN KUO, SENIOR,

We’re going to beat UT and A&M off the charts. Those two have been hogging all the press for far too long. It’s our time to shine! Go COOGS!

MEDIA PRODUCTION

JAMES WANG, SOPHOMORE, HISTORY

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UH BY THE

Fall 2008

NUM B

Fall 2012

AVERAGE TOTAL

SAT SCORE

1061 1133 AVERAGE COMPOSITE

STUDENTS ENROLLED TOTAL

36,104 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

2,969

ACT SCORE

MEN ENROLLED

21.76 24.20

WOMEN ENROLLED

NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES AVAILABLE

16,371

19,647

17,733

18,371 TOTAL

40,747 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

3,614

MEN ENROLLED

20,588

WOMEN ENROLLED

20,159

50


M B3RS FULL-TIME, ANNUAL, IN-STATE UNDERGRAD TUITION

TOTAL FACULTY

$ 6,658 $8,094

3,079

TOTAL AMOUNT IN SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED BY UH

$23,763,031 $34,153,080 PERCENT OF FRESHMEN LIVING ON CAMPUS

3,622

11

FACILITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS IN FALL 2012

46% 25%

COST:

$377.7M GRAPHICS BY ANDRES GARCIA 51


PHOTO BY NICHOLE TAYLOR 52


HONORING THE

CLASS OF 2013 She did all right,Got “ good grades, The

You’ve got brains in your head and feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself any direction you choose!

future’s so bright, She’s gotta wear shades! Congratulations, Saralinda Martinez for a job well done. Proud of you we are! Love, Mom & David

Stephanie Romero “ has worked so very hard for this honor. Her family is very proud on her accomplishments! GO STEPHANIE!

Congratulations “Alexa! We are proud of you, you will do great things!

Love, Mom & Dad

53


Alejandro, “A Great Husband

and Father! You have come a long way and accomplished so much we are so proud of you. This is the beginning to a wonderful life that will be filled with happiness and joy. You did it!” Love Cecilia, Alejandro Jr. and Adrian Villegas Go Coogs!

Dear Nick,

“I am so proud of your many accomplishments! At

only 20 years of age, you are receiving your Bachelors of Science degree and have the opportunity to attend one of your four desired law schools next fall. You have exemplified selflessness and a deep care for others through serving as President of two Alumni Associations on campus. As Acts 22:10 states, “You will be told what awaits you in the years ahead” when you walk closely with Him. Continue to give all the glory to God in all that you do and everything will fall perfectly into place. Congratulations on finishing Magna Cum Laude at the University of Houston’s Honors College, and God Bless your time in law school. I love you!

Your number one fan, Mom

54


Jillian, “We have watched you

grow and are proud of the incredible young lady you have become. You were determined to prove wrong those who doubted you. We know you will do your best as you take on your next challenge. Congratulations on your graduation!” Love, Mom, Dad and Justin

“Congratulations Jessica!! You

have amazed so many with your dedication, hard work and accomplishments! You are an inspiration to all, and a family could not be more proud than we are of you! Today, be proud of your devotion to your life.” We love you, Mom and Steven

“Congratulations

Shaunte, on your many accomplishments thus far! May God be with you always as an enabler to guide you to make good decisions as you move forward in life.” Love, Mom

55


A Trusted

Brand for 30 years

Proudly Supporting the Mission of the University of Houston System UʈÀi]Ê7>ÌiÀÊ>˜`Ê ˆÃ>ÃÌiÀÊ,iVœÛiÀÞÊ-iÀۈVià UÊÓ{ÊœÕÀÊ “iÀ}i˜VÞÊ,i뜘Ãi UÊ,i˜œÛ>̈œ˜Ê>˜`Ê,iVœ˜ÃÌÀÕV̈œ˜ UÊ>ˆ˜Ìi˜>˜ViÊ>˜`Ê>ŽiÊ,i>`ÞÊ,iµÕiÃÌà UÊ ˜ÛˆÀœ˜“i˜Ì>Ê,i“i`ˆ>̈œ˜Ê>˜`ÊL>Ìi“i˜Ì UÊ/ÕÀ˜ŽiÞÊ,œœw˜}Ê-œṎœ˜Ã

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60

KīĞƌŝŶŐĐŽŵƉĞƟƟǀĞƐĂůĂƌLJĂŶĚďĞŶĞĮƚƉĂĐŬĂŐĞƐƚŚĂƚŝŶĐůƵĚĞ͗ DĞĚŝĐĂůͬĚĞŶƚĂůͬǀŝƐŝŽŶ͕ ŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ϰϬϭŬ͕ ƉƌŽĮƚ ƐŚĂƌŝŶŐ͕ ^d͕ >d͕ &^͕ WdK͕ ŇĞdž ǁŽƌŬ ƐĐŚĞĚƵůĞƐ͕ ĂŶĚ ŵƵĐŚ ŵŽƌĞ͕ D ƌĞĐŽŐŶŝnjĞƐ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ĂƌĞ ŝƚƐ ŵŽƐƚ ǀĂůƵĂďůĞ ĂƐƐĞƚ͘ tĞ ŵĂŝŶƚĂŝŶ ŚŝŐŚ ƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚƐ ŽĨ ĐŽƌƉŽƌĂƚĞ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ĐŝƟnjĞŶƐŚŝƉ͕ ďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐ ĞƚŚŝĐƐ͕ ĂŶĚ Ă ĨƌŝĞŶĚůLJ͕ ƚĞĂŵͲŽƌŝĞŶƚĞĚ ǁŽƌŬ ĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ͘ ĚǀĂŶĐĞŵĞŶƚ ŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ ĂďŽƵŶĚ͕ ĂŶĚ ƐŚŽƌƚͲ ĂŶĚ ůŽŶŐͲƚĞƌŵŽǀĞƌƐĞĂƐĂƐƐŝŐŶŵĞŶƚƐĂƌĞĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ͘ D ŝƐ Ă ĨŽĐƵƐĞĚ ƐƵƉƉůŝĞƌ ŽĨ ŚŝŐŚͲǀĂůƵĞ ĐŽŶƐƵůƚĂŶĐLJ͕ ĞŶŐŝŶĞĞƌŝŶŐĂŶĚƉƌŽũĞĐƚŵĂŶĂŐĞŵĞŶƚƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐƚŽƚŚĞǁŽƌůĚΖƐ ŶĂƚƵƌĂů ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ͕ ŶƵĐůĞĂƌ͕ ĐůĞĂŶ ĞŶĞƌŐLJ͕ ǁĂƚĞƌ ĂŶĚ ĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚĂůƐĞĐƚŽƌƐͲͲĞŵƉůŽLJŝŶŐŽǀĞƌϮϳ͕ϬϬϬƉĞŽƉůĞŝŶϰϬ countries.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2013

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Ph: 713.349.9141 Fax: 713.349.9147 www.wrapsofhouston.com

www.langwoodlumberco.com

Gilbert Mitschke Donna Mitschke 3330 Lang Road Houston, TX 77092 (713) 462-6461 

Best Wishes to the Graduating Seniors! ALPA Precision Machine Works, Inc. 1819 Antoine Dr. Houston, TX 77055 713-680-8556

OF HOUSTON 6100 Southwest Freeway Houston, Texas 77057 Tel. (713) 772-3868 Fax (713) 772-1472 www.ferrariofhouston.com 

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Samuel Abraham

The Decorative Center of Houston 5120 Woodway, Showroom No. 180  Houston, Texas 77056  (713) 622-4444 Fax: (713) 622-8928 5002 Westheimer @ Post Oak Blvd.  Houston, Texas 77056  (713) 963-0980 9595 Six Pines Dr.  The Woodlands, TX 77380  (281) 292-2338 E-mail: mail@abrahamsrugs.com  Website: www.abrahamsrugs.com


At ABB, a better world begins with you. Energize your career at ABB. ABB is making a better world. Here, you have the opportunity to touch lives and improve communities. There is a constant focus on your career development. You have the freedom and support to make your mark on a truly multi-cultural, global business that combines leading technologies with the latest thinking. ;QWECPƂPFQWTKPPQXCVKXGVGEJPQNQI[CPFGPIKPGGTKPIVJTQWIJQWV the energy supply chain, from remote offshore oil and gas production platforms to power distribution equipment that keeps the lights on in local homes and businesses. With our industry expertise and pioneering spirit, we are committed to solving the world’s energy challenges in a safe and sustainable way. Check out job opportunities and programs for students and recent graduates at www.abb.com/us.

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You made it! Your tutors at Learning Support Services, Challenger Program and your friends at Learning & Assessment Services

WISH YOU THE BEST IN YOUR ENDEAVORS!

Learning and Assessment Services 2013 Graduates

LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES (TUTORS) Elizabeth Ayala Janhavi Chitale Gowthani Lanka Anam Meraj Penny Montalvan Yen H Nguyen Bhushan Rathi Caleb Jay Rogers Smith Sarkar Ragini Sengupta Santoshi Hemaanjana Sunkara Xiaohan Zhang

MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION CENTER (RESEARCH ASSISTANTS): Olusolape Jemilugba Tara Kurada Lan Ma Alicia Smith

LAS–RESEARCH ASSISTANTS Rohit Nirmal Ravikiran Sarangu

UNIVERSITY TESTING SERVICES Dung Nguyen

CHALLENGER PROGRAM– STUDENT PARTICIPANTS FALL 2012

Ambhar Miranda Jaime Alanis Denisse Coronado (Cum Laude) Sahar Hadwan Julia James Terri Jones Anya Lewis Raquel Medina (Cum Laude) Steve Medrano Hanh Nguyen Christopher Orellana Cecily Smith

LAS.UH.EDU

Joanna Suazo Paike Xu (Cum Laude) IrenCarr Young

SPRING 2013 Dianne Adagbon Jason Adanse Cameron Bailey Quynh-Anh Do Alfred Fails Jillian Harvey Audreyanna Johnson Seante Johnson Thanh Ha Le Yadhira Lozano Reyna Mendez Hoai Nguyen Saharah Pecot Sara Reid Diana Valenzuela Sandra Vazquez Chambliss Walter Andrew Young


Houstonian 2013