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National Science Foundation

NSF WORKSHOP:

2020-21 PROGRAM

NEW FRONTIERS OF THERMAL TRANSPORT

Dec. 14-16, 2020 • Jan. 4-6, 2021 UCF • PURDUE • CARNEGIE MELLON

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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National Science Foundation

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS Yoav Peles, Ph.D. Professor and Chair Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida Yoav Peles is a professor and the chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Central Florida. Prior to joining UCF, he was the director of the mechanical engineering program and the associate department head for graduate studies at the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at RPI.

Xiulin Ruan, Ph.D. Professor of Mechanical Engineering Purdue University Xiulin Ruan is a professor of mechanical engineering and the director of graduate recruitment and admissions at the Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering. Ruan is an NSF CAREER Award recipient as well as a three-time Air Force summer faculty fellow. He earned his Ph.D. and master’s degree at the University of Michigan — Ann Arbor, and his bachelor’s degree at Tsinghua University in Beijing.

Jonathan Malen, Ph.D. Professor of Mechanical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Jonathan Malen is a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a recipient of the Benjamin Richard Teare Teaching Award and the David P. Casasent Outstanding Research Award at CMU. He is also a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award and the Army Research Office Young Investigator Award. He joined CMU in 2009 after earning his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering.

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WORKSHOP AGENDA Dec. 14, 2020 — Artificial Intelligence, Quantum Computing and Data Science 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 - 11:10 a.m. – Welcome and Opening Remarks 11:10 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. – Panelist Presentations 12:10 - 1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1 - 2 p.m. – Panel Discussion Dec. 15, 2020 — Thermal Management 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. – Panelist Presentations 12:30 - 1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1 - 2 p.m. – Panel Discussion Dec. 16, 2020 — Health and Sustainability 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. – Panelist Presentations 12-1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1-2 p.m. – Panel Discussion

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WORKSHOP AGENDA Jan. 4, 2020 — Manufacturing 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. -12 p.m. – Panelist Presentations 12-1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1-2 p.m. – Panel Discussion Jan. 5, 2020 — Energy 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. – Panelist Presentations 12:30-1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1-2 p.m. – Panel Discussion Jan. 6, 2020 — Program Managers Panel, Reports from Moderators and Discussions 11 a.m. to 2:40 p.m. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. – Program Managers Panel 12-1 p.m. – Virtual Networking 1-2:30 p.m. – Reports from Moderators, and Discussions 2:30-2:40 p.m. – Closing Remarks

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Panelists: Jeff Snyder, Amir Barati Farimani, Peyman Givi, Simon Phillpot, Austin Minnich Moderators: Matteo Bucci and Yan Wang Schedule: Dec. 14, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

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Jeffrey Snyder, Ph.D. Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Northwestern University G. Jeffrey Snyder is a professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. His interests are focused on engineering of electronic and thermal properties of materials, and he is well known for his work on thermoelectric materials. He has developed new methods of electron band structure engineering, microstructure engineering of thermal properties developing simple models for complex materials and microstructures. His interdisciplinary approach stems from studies of solid state chemistry at Cornell University and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, as well as applied physics at Stanford University and thermoelectric engineering at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Amir Barati Farimani, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University

activation mechanism and pathway.

Amir Barati Farimani received his Ph.D. in mechanical science and engineering in 2015 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His dissertation was titled “Detecting and Sensing Biological Molecules using Nanopores.” He extensively used atomistic simulations to shed light on the DNA sensing and detection physics of biological and solid state nanopores. Right after that, he joined Professor Vijay Pande’s lab at Stanford. During his post-doc, he combined machine learning and molecular dynamics to elucidate the conformational changes of G-Protein Coupled Receptors. He specifically was focused on Mu-Opioid Receptors to elucidate their free energy landscape and their

Barati Farimani’s lab, the Mechanical and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, is broadly interested in the application of machine learning, data science and molecular dynamics simulations to health and bio-engineering problems. The lab is inherently a multidisciplinary group bringing together researchers with different backgrounds and interests, including mechanical, computer science, bio-engineering, physics, materials engineering and chemical engineering. The mission is to bring a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm to mechanical engineering. Traditional mechanical engineering paradigms use only physics-based rules and principles to model the world, which does not include the intrinsic noise/stochastic nature of the system. To this end, the lab is developing the algorithms that can infer, learn, and predict the mechanical systems based on data. These data-driven models incorporate the physics into learning algorithms to build more accurate predictive models. They use multi-scale simulation to generate the data.

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Peyman Givi, Ph.D. James T. MacLeod Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Petroleum Engineering Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh Peyman Givi is a Distinguished Professor and the James T. MacLeod Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Petroleum Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Previously, he held the position of Distinguished Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University at Buffalo. He has also worked at Flow Research Company, and has had frequent visiting appointments at the NASA Langley and Glenn centers. Givi is currently the deputy editor of the AIAA Journal, a role he has served in since 2010. He has also served as the associate editor of the AIAA Journal and the Journal of Applied Fluid Mechanics. He is also an editorial advisory board member of Combustion Theory and Modeling and Computers & Fluids, and previously served on the board of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science. He received a Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University and his B.E. from Youngstown State University.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Simon Phillpot, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida Simon Phillpot is a distinguished professor and the Vladmir A. Grodsky Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. From 2010 to 2015, he was chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and from 2011 to 2014, he was also the director of the nuclear engineering program. He received his B.S. from Oxford in 1980 and his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1985, both in physics. He spent 16 years at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago prior to joining the University of Florida in 2003. He is the author and co-author of over 290 peer-reviewed publications, which have garnered more than 27,000 citations. He has given more than 100 invited and plenary technical presentations at international meetings and at major research institutions. His current research is focused on phonon-mediated heat transfer in ceramics, deformation behavior of metals, sequestration of radionuclides, nuclear fuel, pyrolysis of ablative heat shields and simulation methodology development. He is a 2017-2019 University of Florida Term Professor and was a 2010-2013 University of Florida Research Foundation Professor. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Physics, and the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. In 2011, he was identified as No. 56 in the Top 100 most influential materials scientists worldwide for 2000 to 2010 by Thomson Reuters. He is a deputy editor of the Journal of Applied Physics. He was a member of the board of reviewing editors of Science from 2009 to 2013. He is a member of the editorial committee of the Annual Review of Materials Research, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Nuclear Materials.

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Austin J. Minnich, Ph.D. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Physics Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology Austin Minnich is a professor of mechanical engineering and applied physics at the California Institute of Technology. He received his Bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley in 2006 and his Ph.D. from MIT in 2011, after which he started his position at Caltech. His research focuses on developing low noise microwave instrumentation for applications in radio astronomy and quantum information science. He is the recipient of a 2013 NSF CAREER Award, a 2015 ONR Young Investigator Award, a 2017 Director of Research Award from the Navy, the 2017 Junior Prize from the International Photothermal and Photoacoustics Association, the 2017 Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award and a 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

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Panelists: Samuel Graham, Mark Spector, Ajit Roy, Evelyn Wang, Tim Fisher, Sumanta Acharya Moderators: Damena Agonafer, Xiaojia Wang and Justin Weibel Schedule: Dec. 15, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

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Samuel Graham, Ph.D. Eugene C. Gwaltney Jr. School Chair and Professor The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology Graham began at Georgia Tech in 2003 as an assistant professor. Prior, he was a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Graham’s research focuses on the fabrication, packaging and reliability of electronic devices. In this work, his group has expertise in the thermal analysis and reliability of GaN-based, wide-bandgap semiconductors used in radio frequency communications, solid state lighting and power electronics. His group develops experimental techniques to measure the temperature and stress distribution in these devices down to the individual transistor level. In addition, they investigate the thermophysical properties and thermal interface resistance between the wide bandgap semiconductors and their substrates such as SiC, Si, and diamond. Coupled electro-thermal and thermomechanical modeling of these devices are used under both DC and transient timescales to understand the performance of these devices. Finally, methods to effectively remove the heat from these devices using single phase and two phase cooling are under investigation. His group has strong industrial and DoD ties in this area of research. In addition to wide bandgap devices, the Graham group is also working on packaging and reliability of organic electronics and flexible electronic devices. His group has developed expertise in the creation of ultra-barrier film technology based on vacuum deposited thin films for the hermetic sealing of electronics which has industrial relevance to next generation displays and wearable devices. His group is investigating the mass transport through barrier films along with the mechanics of the films (fracture, adhesion, etc.) and chemical resistance is important for the fabrication of thin film and flexible electronics for harsh environments. The Graham group regularly collaborates with the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics in this area of research and is part of the NextFlex Consortium. Graham also holds a joint appointment in the Energy and Transportation Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National laboratory where he works jointly with ORNL staff on energy related research. This includes the fundamental studies of the properties of nano materials and how they can be exploited in building energy systems, materials for energy storage, and the improvements to energy efficiency in thermodyanmic cycles. The goal is to exploit the unique properties of materials to advance the energy efficiency and effectiveness of buildings and transportation systems.

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Mark Spector, Ph.D. Program Manager Office of Naval Research Mark S. Spector is a program officer in the Advanced Naval Platforms Division at the Office of Naval Research where he manages programs in thermal science, metamaterials and energy conversion. In addition, he sits on the steering committee of the Department of Defense Energy and Power Community of Interest and the NATO applied vehicle technology power and propulsion systems technical committee. Previously, he worked as a research physicist in the Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering at the Naval Research Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his A.B. in physics and applied mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Ajit Roy, Ph.D. Principal Materials Research Engineer Air Force Research Laboratory Ajit Roy is a principal materials research engineer at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory. His expertise is in the structural, electronic and thermal materials design of nano materials, 3D porous nanostructure, 3D composites, carbon foam and carbon-carbon composites. Prior to AFRL, he was affiliated with the University of Dayton Research Institute for 10 years. His current research focus is in multifunctional materials, laser-materials interaction, strain resilient electronics, energy transport in nanomaterials, behavior and failure mechanism in nano materials and hybrid graphitic foam. He has published over 270 articles in journals and proceedings, numerous invited lectures, and co-authored three book chapters on thermal materials and composites, of over 19,500 citations. He serves on various panels, advisory boards, and editorial boards for journals. He served in the executive committee of the French-U.S.-Japan carbon-carbon meeting to foster research collaboration in carboncarbon composites between U.S. and French scientists. He served as chair of the ASME aerospace division, which has over 6,000 members; the chair of ASME Nano Engineering for Energy and Sustainment; and as a member of the executive committee of ASC. He is a fellow of AFRL, AIAA, ASME, and the American Society for Composites. He is also an adjunct faculty with Rice University, the University of North Texas, Case Western Reserve University, Purdue University and Wright State University.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Evelyn Wang, Ph.D. Gail E. Kendall Professor and Department Head Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Evelyn N. Wang is the Gail E. Kendall Professor and the department head in the mechanical engineering department at MIT. She is the associate director of the Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, a DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center. She received her B.S. from MIT, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. From 2006 to 2007, she was a postdoctoral researcher at Bell Laboratories. She joined the MIT faculty in 2007. Wang teaches and conducts research in the area of micro/nanoscale heat and mass transfer. Wang’s research program combines fundamental studies of micro/nanoscale heat and mass transport processes with the development of novel engineered structures to create innovative solutions in thermal management, energy, and water harvesting systems. Her group leverages state-of-the-art micro/ nanofabrication and synthesis, unique measurement, and model prediction capabilities to perform in-depth studies and enable mechanistic insights into complex fluidic and thermal transport processes for these applications. Meanwhile, this approach has also led to the discovery of novel flow and transport phenomena, which offers great potential to realize new and important functionalities. Wang has published over 140 archival journal papers in prestigious journals including Science, Nature Materials, Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Communications, Nature Energy, Nano Letters, ACS Nano, Journal of Heat Transfer, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, and numerous conference papers. She has advised 28 master’s students, 16 Ph.D. students and 20 post-doctoral associates now pursuing successful careers in industry, national labs and academia including faculty positions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Michigan, Rice University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Drexel University, Syracuse University, the Indian Institute of Technology Patna, and Kyung Hee University. Wang’s research has been honored with awards including the 2008 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2011 Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award, the 2012 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the 2012 Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer, the 2017 ASME Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award, the eighth Prince Sultan bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water, and she is also a fellow of ASME. She served as the associate director of the Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. She is the co-founder of the first 2015 Gordon Research Conference on Micro and Nanoscale Phase Change Heat Transfer and has been extensively involved as a committee member and organizer of national and international conferences. | 16


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Tim Fisher, Ph.D. John P. and Claudia H. Schauerman Endowed Chair in Engineering Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles Timothy S. Fisher joined the UCLA faculty as a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering after spending 15 years in Purdue’s School of Mechanical Engineering, and several previous years at Vanderbilt University. In 2018, he was named department chair and received the John P. and Claudia H. Schauerman Endowed Chair in Engineering at UCLA, as well as the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award. He is an adjunct professor in the International Centre for Materials Science at the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, and co-directs the Joint Networked Centre on Nanomaterials for Energy. From 2009 to 2012, he served as a research scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s newly formed Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch of the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate. In 2013, he became the James G. Dwyer Professor in Mechanical Engineering at Purdue and founded a startup company. In 2014, he became the founding director of the Center for Integrated Thermal Management of Aerospace Vehicles, involving five universities, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and six leading industry members including Boeing, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and Rolls-Royce. He has authored more than 250 papers in peer-reviewed journals, and made a similar number of contributions to conference proceedings and presentations. He is an active member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers through a variety of responsibilities, and is a former co-editor of the journal Energy Conversion & Management and currently serves as the specialty chief editor for thermal and mass transport in the journal Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering.

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Sumanta Acharya, Ph.D. Professor and Department Chair Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology Sumanta Acharya is a professor and department chair of mechanical, materials and aerospace engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. From 2010 to 2014, he served as the program director of the Thermal Transport Program in the Directorate of Engineering at the National Science Foundation. From 2014 to 2016, he was the Ring Companies Chair and department chair of the mechanical engineering department at the Herff College of Engineering at the University of Memphis. His academic career prior to 2014 was at Louisiana State University, where he was the L. R. Daniel Professor and the Fritz and Francis Blumer Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He was the founding Director of the Center for Turbine Innovation and Energy Research, which focused on energy generation and propulsion research. His research activities are centered around computational and experimental heat transfer, fluid mechanics and combustion with an application focus in gas turbines and heat exchangers. His scholarly contributions include mentoring nearly 85 post-doctoral researchers and graduate students, and publishing nearly 200 refereed journal articles and book chapters and over 300 conference/proceedings papers. Acharya was awarded the 2015 AIAA Thermophysics Award, the 2014 AIChE Donald Q. Kern Award, the 75th ASME Heat Transfer Division Medal and the 2011 ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in the science category. He served as the chair of the Heat Transfer Division at ASME from 2016 to 2017 and currently serves ASME as a member of the engineering sciences segment. He has served as the associate technical editor of the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, ASME Journal of Energy Resources Technology and the ASME Journal of Validation, Verification and Uncertainty Quantification. He also serves as a member of the board for American Society of Thermal and Fluids Engineers

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Panelists: John Bischof, Mehmet Toner, Esther Beltran, John Lienhard, Howard Stone, Cynthia Hipwell Moderators: Fatemeh Hassanipour and Dion S. Antao Schedule: Dec. 16, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

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John C. Bischof, Ph.D. Distinguished McKnight University Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota John C. Bischof works in the area of thermal bioengineering with a focus on biopreservation, thermal therapy and nanomedicine. His awards include the ASME Van Mow Medal and fellowships in societies including the Society for Cryobiology, JSPS, ASME and AIMBE. He has served as the president of the Society for Cryobiology and as the chair of the bioengineering division of ASME. Bischof obtained a B.S. in bioengineering from U.C. Berkeley in 1987, an M.S. from UCB and U.C. San Francisco in 1989, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UCB in 1992. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard in the Center for Engineering in Medicine, he joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1993. Bischof is now a Distinguished McKnight University Professor and the Kuhrmeyer Chair in the departments of mechanical and biomedical engineering, and the Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair and director of the Institute for Engineering in Medicine at the University of Minnesota.

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Mehmet Toner, Ph.D. Professor Center for Engineering in Medicine & Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Mehmet Toner was born in Istanbul, Turkey, in July 1958. He received a Bachelor of Science from Istanbul Technical University in 1983 and a Master of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1985, both in mechanical engineering. He subsequently completed his Ph.D. in medical engineering at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology in 1989. Toner joined the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School as an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in 1989, and was promoted to associate professor in 1996, and to professor in 2002. Toner has a joint appointment as a professor of health sciences and technology at the Harvard-MIT Division of HST. Toner serves as a member of the senior scientific Ssaff at the Shriners Hospital for Children. He is a co-founder of the Center for Engineering in Medicine & Surgery, and founder of the NIH BioMicroElectroMechanical Systems (BioMEMS) Resource Center at the Mass General. He is also the director of the Biomedical Engineering Research and Education Program for physicians at Mass General. He is a member of many national and international professional committees, and serves on the editorial board of many scientific journals including Cryobiology, CryoLetters, Cell Preservation Technology, Annual Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, and Nanomedicine. He has served on many national and international panels and review boards, including the National Institutes of Health Study Sections, National Science Foundation CAREER Award panels, the NSF nanoscience panel, the NIH nanotechnology and tissue engineering panel, and several DARPA strategic planning panels. In 1994, he was recognized by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers with the YC Fung Faculty Award in Bioengineering. In 1995, he received the Whitaker Foundation Special Opportunity Award. In 1997, he won the John F an.d Virginia B. Taplin Faculty Fellow Award given by Harvard and MIT. In 1998, Toner was selected to become a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of multiple biotechnology and medical device companies, and has been involved as a scientific founder of multiple startup companies.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Esther Beltran, Ph.D. Chief Scientist Florida Space Institute, University of Central Florida Esther Beltran is a medical doctor and an expert on humans living and working in extreme environments. Beltran currently serves as the chief scientist for human space exploration at the Florida Space Institute at UCF. She is also the deputy director of REVEALS, a NASASSERVI program aiming to study novel composites, their integration of radiation effective shielding materials, and thermal protection for spacesuits, by using novel integration approaches and newly developed polymers that could minimize or eliminate the LEEs effect. She is applying her skills and knowledge as a physician to the specific distribution of these polymers according to radiation organ sensitivity and risk mitigation priorities for radiation protection, thermal, hypoxia, and all the integration systems for space surface operations in planetary bodies. In addition to the new polymer composites, REVEALS is adding active real-time dosimeters detectors. These dosimeters are created by using nanoparticles and 2D metamaterials to generate effective warning systems that will significantly increase efficiency of risk mitigation strategies, thus enhancing crew safety. These materials and dosimetry systems will be integrated into spacesuits, life support systems, mobility units to enhance extravehicular activities safety, and new surface exploration concepts as well. She has developed educational and service programs promoting the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics at different educational levels ranging from K-12 to doctoral programs.

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John Lienhard, Ph.D. Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Water Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology John H. Lienhard V is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor and the founding director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Water and Food Systems Lab at MIT. During more than three decades on the MIT faculty, Lienhard’s research and educational efforts have focused on heat and mass transfer, water purification and desalination, and thermodynamics. As Director of J-WAFS, he coordinates MIT’s research in food security and water supply for a growing population on a changing planet. Lienhard’s received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in thermal engineering at UCLA from the chemical, nuclear, and thermal engineering department. He joined MIT immediately after completing his Ph.D. in the applied mechanics and engineering science department at UC San Diego. Lienhard’s research on water purification includes humidification-dehumidification desalination, membrane distillation desalination, forward and reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, electrodialysis, solar-driven desalination, bubble columns, scale formation and membrane fouling, salinity gradient power, management of high salinity brines, thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of desalination cycles, remediation of wastewater from oil/gas operations, and energy-water nexus issues. Lienhard has also done research on high heat flux engineering, liquid jet impingement cooling and electronics thermal management. Lienhard has directly supervised more than 90 graduate theses and postdoctoral associates, and is author of more than 250 peer-reviewed publications. He holds more than 40 U.S. patents and pending applications, most of which have been commercialized through several startup companies. Lienhard is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a recipient of the 1988 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1992 SAE Teetor Award, a 1997 R&D 100 Award, the 2012 ASME Technical Communities Globalization Medal, the 2015 ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award and the 2019 ASME Edward F. Obert Award. Lienhard and his students received 15 best paper, poster or presentation awards at national and international conferences and from journals for their desalination research during 2011-2019. Lienhard is a registered professional engineer in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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Howard Stone, Ph.D. Donald R. Dixon ‘69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor and Chair Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University Professor Howard A. Stone received the Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of California at Davis in 1982 and the Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Caltech in 1988. Following a postdoctoral year in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, in 1989 he joined the faculty of the (now) School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he eventually became the Vicky Joseph Professor of Engineering and Applied Mathematics. In 1994, Stone received both the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Award and the Phi Beta Kappa teaching Prize, which are the only two teaching awards given to faculty in Harvard College. In 2000, he was named a Harvard College Professor for his contributions to undergraduate education. In July 2009, he moved to Princeton University where he is the Donald R. Dixon ’69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Stone’s research interests are in fluid dynamics, especially as they arise in research and applications at the interface of engineering, chemistry, physics and biology. In particular, he developed original research directions, using experiments, theory and simulations, in microfluidics, multiphase flows, electrokinetics, flows involving bacteria and biofilms, etc. He received the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and is past chair of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the APS. For 10 years, he served as an associate editor for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, and is currently on the editorial or advisory boards of Physical Review Fluids, Langmuir, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, and Soft Matter, and is co-editor of the Soft Matter Book Series. Stone is the first recipient of the G.K. Batchelor Prize in Fluid Dynamics, which was awarded in August 2008, and he is the 2016 recipient of the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the APS. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2009, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2014.

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Cynthia Hipwell, Ph.D. Oscar S. Wyatt, Jr. ’45 Chair II and Director of INVENT Lab J. Mike Walker ‘66 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University Cynthia Hipwell has been working in the area of technology development based upon nanoscale phenomena for over 20 years. She received her B.S.ME from Rice University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Upon graduation, she went to work at Seagate Technology’s Recording Head Division in Bloomington, Minnesota, to develop test equipment to characterize the interface between the head and the disk in hard disk drives. During her time at Seagate, Hipwell held various individual and leadership positions in the areas of reliability, product development and advanced mechanical and electrical technology development. In these various roles, she established new business processes and an organizational culture that focused on developing innovative solutions from root cause understanding, improved pace of learning, and discipline in experimentation and configuration management. She was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2016 for her leadership in the development f technologies to enable areal density and reliability increases in hard disk drives and was elected a National Academy of Inventors Fellow in 2018. Hipwell is currently the Oscar S. Wyatt, Jr. ’45 Chair II at Texas A&M University, teaching classes on innovation and technology development as well as leading the INVENT Lab (INnoVation tools and Entrepreneurial New Technology).

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Panelists: Karen Thole, Yung Shin, Kirk Rogers, Michael Ohadi, Bill Obricht Moderator: Edward Kinzel and Saniya LeBlanc Schedule: Jan. 4, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

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Karen Thole, Ph.D. Department Head and Distinguished Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Karen A. Thole serves as the head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University and also holds the title of Distinguished Professor. At Penn State, Thole founded and now directs the Steady Thermal Aero Research Turbine Lab. Her area of expertise is turbine cooling and using additive manufacturing to develop innovative cooling technologies. She has published over 220 archival papers and advised 75 dissertations and theses. She and her students have been recognized numerous times by ASME with best paper and best presentation awards. Thole has provided service leadership to numerous organizations as a member of ASME’s Board of Governors. She has also served as the chair of the Board of Directors for ASME’s International Gas Turbine Institute. She has been called upon by the National Academies to lead and contribute to two study committee reports, one on low carbon aviation and the other on the future research needs for gas turbines. In her roles as an educator, researcher and mentor, Thole has received numerous awards. The most notable awards include being recognized by the United States White House as a Champion of Change for STEM. She was recognized in 2016 by receiving ASME’s Edwin F. Church Medal and the ASME’s George Westinghouse Medal. In 2017, she received ABET’s Claire L. Felbinger Award for her work in diversifying engineering. In 2019, she received AIAA’s Air Breathing Propulsion Award for her contributions to promoting diversity and for her technical work in gas turbine cooling. Thole holds two degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Yung Shin, Ph.D. Donald A. and Nancy G. Roach Professor of Advanced Manufacturing School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Yung C. Shin is the Donald A. and Nancy G. Roach Distinguished Professor of Advanced Manufacturing in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin — Madison in 1984. He worked as a senior project engineer at the General Motors Technical Center in Warren, Michigan, from 1984 to 1988 and as an assistant professor at the Pennsylvania State University from 1988 to 1990. He joined the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University in 1990 and was promoted to full professor in 1997. His research areas include laser processing of materials, intelligent and adaptive control of manufacturing processes, machining of advanced materials, process monitoring and automation. He has published over 400 refereed papers including over 275 archived journal papers, and has authored chapters in several books, co-edited two books, and authored a book titled “Intelligent Systems: Modeling, Optimization and Control.” He also holds 10 U.S. patents. He has organized or co-organized many conferences and symposia in his areas of research. He was the host and chair of the 30th North American Manufacturing Research Conference in 2002 and also served as the organizing chair of the 2009 ASME International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference. In 2010, he co-organized the NSF sponsored summer short course, “Principles of and Recent Advances in Laser Micro/Nano Manufacturing Processes.” For several years up to 2019, he has organized workshops on laser-based manufacturing and additive manufacturing with many industrial companies participating. He has delivered a number of plenary and keynote speeches to large audiences and has given numerous talks at various conferences and lectures at different universities, research institutions and industrial companies. He established the Center of Excellence for Laser-Based Manufacturing in 2003 and serves as its director. He served as chair of the systems, measurement and control area in the School of Mechanical Engineering between 1999 and 2010, as an associate editor for the ASME Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, and serves as the editor-in-chief for Lasers in Materials Processing and Manufacturing, an international journal, published by Springer, and serves, on the editorial board of several other journals. He has received numerous awards, including the 2007 ASME Blackall Machine Tool and Gage Award, the best paper awards at the 2011 and 2017 ASME MSEC, the best paper of the year award from the Journal of Laser Applications in 2012, the SME Frederick Taylor Research Medal in 2015, the SME/NAMRI 2016 S.M. Wu Research Implementation Award, and College of Engineering Faculty Award of Excellence in Research in 2018. He is a fellow of ASME and SME, and a senior member of ASM, TMS and LIA.

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National Science Foundation

Kirk Rogers Senior Advisor The Barnes Group Kirk Rogers has used additive technologies to solve manufacturing, repair and supply chain problems for the past 10 years. He began consulting full time in 2018 after leading the technical team of a $40 million additive manufacturing research and development center. The majority of Rogers’ nearly 20-year career at GE was in medical device manufacturing. Rogers has 25 years of experience in materials processing, metal additive manufacturing, powder metallurgy and ceramic matrix composites. He has authored and co-authored nearly 50 publications and has been invited to speak on advanced manufacturing topics numerous times. Rogers obtained his Ph.D in materials science and engineering from Purdue University.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Michael Ohadi, Ph.D. Program Director Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Michael Ohadi currently serves as a program director for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy. His focus includes heat and mass transfer enhancement and process intensification utilizing innovative designs, materials and manufacturing techniques. Ohadi is on leave from his role as a professor of mechanical engineering and co-founder of the Center for Environmental Energy Engineering at the University of Maryland in College Park. During a previous leave from UMD, Ohadi served in various positions at the Petroleum Institute in Abu Dhabi, including as the founding chairman of the mechanical engineering department, provost and acting president. Ohadi’s research involves active and passive process intensification of single phase and multi-phase fluid and thermal systems utilizing innovative designs, materials and manufacturing techniques. His research has been sponsored by both government and industry. For more than 20 years, he has led an industrial consortium in advanced heat and mass exchangers, and process intensification techniques, with member companies from the U.S., Europe and Asia. Ohadi earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota. He is a fellow member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers. He has won numerous awards from both societies. He is the 2014 recipient of the UMD System Board of Regents Excellence in Innovation Award and is a recipient of the 2016 ASHRAE E.K. Campbell Award of Merit.

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National Science Foundation

Bill Olbricht, Ph.D. Program Director National Science Foundation William Olbricht is a program director at the National Science Foundation in Alexandria, Virginia. He directs the particulate and multiphase processes program in the chemical, bioengineering, environmental and transport systems division of the engineering directorate. Olbricht is also involved in the cross-directorate future manufacturing program and in the NSF-CASIS collaboration for transport phenomena research on the International Space Station. Olbricht is a professor emeritus in chemical and biomolecular engineering and biomedical engineering at Cornell University. He received his B.S. degree from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology, both in chemical engineering. He started in chemical engineering at Cornell in 1980 and joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering when it formed in 2004. During his time at Cornell, he served as director of the School of Chemical Engineering and interim chair of biomedical engineering. His research deals with fundamental fluid dynamics and its application to problems in biology and medicine. He is the scientific cofounder of Alcyone Lifesciences, a company that develops neurosurgical catheters for treatment of glioblastoma. Olbricht served as the faculty co-chair of the Federal Demonstration Partnership, a consortium of universities and federal agencies working to streamline research administration. He is a threetime recipient of an Excellence in Teaching Award from Cornell’s College of Engineering.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Panelists: Ravi Prasher, Sven Mumme, Gang Chen, Matthew Bauer, Pramod Reddy, Terry J. Hendricks and Peter DeBock Moderator: Zhiting Tian, Iryna Zenyuk and Kareem Ahmed Schedule: Jan. 5, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

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National Science Foundation

Ravi Prasher, Ph.D. Associate Lab Director Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Ravi Prasher is the associate lab director of the Energy Technology Area at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. ETA with a staff of more than 400 people conducts research in a wide variety of areas, including building technologies, energy storage, renewable energy, manufacturing science and technology, and sustainable transportation technologies. He is also an adjunct professor in mechanical engineering at UC Berkeley. Prior to joining LBL, Prasher was the vice president of product development of Sheetak Inc. a startup developing thermoelectric energy converters. Prasher also worked as one of the first program directors at ARPA—E. Prior to joining ARPA—E, Prasher was the technology development manager of thermal management group at Intel. Prasher has published more than 100 archival journal papers and holds more than 35 patents. He is an ASME fellow and a senior member of IEEE. Prasher obtained his B. Tech from IIT Deli and his Ph.D. from Arizona State University.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Sven Mumme, Ph.D. Envelope Technology Manager Department of Energy Sven Mumme is a technology manager in the Building Technologies Office at the U.S. Department of Energy. In this role he manages the Envelope subprogram within the Emerging Technologies program. He also leads BTO’s Technology-to-Market Initiative, Small-Business Vouchers Program, and Small Business Innovation Research Program. Mumme originally joined the Department of Energy in 2012 as an ARPA-E Technology-to-Market Advisor, where he helped transition breakthrough energy technologies from lab to market. He was responsible for leading the commercialization strategy for the Methane lOpportunities for Vehicular Energy (MOVE) program and a variety of building energy efficiency, energy storage, and gas to liquids projects from the Open 2012 and OPEN 2015 programs. Prior to joining DOE, Mumme worked for the specialty chemicals and materials company W.R. Grace from 2006 to 2012. In his most recent role as a global marketing manager for incubator technologies, part of Grace’s New Business Development department, he was charged with developing high-risk / high-reward businesses in energy storage, alternative feedstock conversion, and drug delivery and leading the new product development stage-gate process to advance step-out technologies to market. From 1999 to 2005, Mumme was a project engineer at Underwriters Laboratories (UL), where he designed laboratory systems and equipment for UL’s test facilities across Asia, Europe and North America. Mumme earned a B.S. with honors in mechanical engineering from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and an MBA from The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

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National Science Foundation

Gang Chen, Ph.D. Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Gang Chen is the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as the department head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT from 2013 to 2018, and as the director of the Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center — an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy from 2009 to 2019. He obtained his Ph.D. from the mechanical engineering department at UC Berkeley. He was a faculty member at Duke University and UCLA before joining MIT in 2001. He received an NSF Young Investigator Award, an R&D 100 Award, a Heat Transfer Memorial Award and the Frank Kreith Energy Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is also the recipient of a Nukiyama Memorial Award by the Japan Heat Transfer Society, a World Technology Network Award in Energy, an Eringen medal from the Society of Engineering Science, and the Capers and Marion McDonald Award for Excellences in Mentoring and Advising from MIT. He is a fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, ASME and the Guggenheim Foundation. He is an academician of Academia Sinica, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Matthew Bauer, Ph.D. Technology Development Manager Solar Energy Technologies Office, Department of Energy Matthew Bauer is a technology development manager for the U.S. Department of Energy. For the past five years, he has worked in the DOE’s Solar Energy Technologies Office, advancing concepts for concentrating solar thermal power, solar process heat and grid thermal energy storage. In this capacity, Bauer works with research teams from academia in fields ranging from corrosion science, high temperature material science, thermochemical systems, advanced power cycles and optical collectors. Prior to joining the DOE, Bauer’s research focused on developing measurement to integrate thermal transport and structural behavior in two-phase material systems.

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National Science Foundation

Pramod Reddy, Ph.D. Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan Pramod Reddy received a B. Tech and M. Tech in mechanical engineering from IIT-Bombay in 2002, and a Ph.D. in applied science and technology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. He was a recipient of the NSF CAREER award in 2009, the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2012 and the Young Alumnus Achiever Award from IIT Bombay in 2017. He is currently a professor in the departments of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Terry J. Hendricks, Ph.D. Project Manager NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Terry J. Hendricks is a project manager, an ASME Fellow, and an IEEE senior member in the Autonomous Systems Division at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, where he is responsible for designing spacecraft solar power systems, radioisotope power systems, thermal management and thermal energy storage systems critical to NASA missions. Among his numerous awards, he was recently inducted into the University of Texas at Austin’s Mechanical Engineering Academy of Distinguished Alumni. He has also been nominated for the Eni 2020 Energy Frontiers Award in Italy for his innovative work in terrestrial energy recovery. During his tenure at JPL, among his many duties, he was the project manager on a complex, multi-disciplinary project to develop a thermoelectric power system design for unmanned aircraft engine energy recovery applicable to different UAV platforms, and to characterize and quantify pyroshock-driven dynamic effects on readioisotope thermoelectric generator power output, thereby reducing risk on Mars 2020 spacecraft. Prior to JPL, he was the energy recovery program director at Batelle Memorial Institute and the senior program manager at the U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where he managed U.S. DOE and Army projects in hybrid power system development, automotive and industrial waste energy recovery, and advanced heat transfer. Hendricks received his Ph.D. and master’s degree in engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and his bachelor’s degree in engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. He has over 39 years of professional expertise in thermal and fluid systems, energy recovery, energy conversion and storage systems, terrestrial and spacecraft power systems, micro electro-mechanical systems and project management. His extensive expertise is cited in three book chapters published by Taylor and Francis and Elsevier. He has published over 90 reports and journal articles in the Journal of Electronic Materials, the Journal of Materials Research, and the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, to name a few. He holds nine patents and is a registered professional engineer in California and Texas.

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National Science Foundation

Peter de Bock, Ph.D. Program Director ARPA-E Peter de Bock currently serves as the program director at the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. His focus at ARPA-E includes electronics thermal management and aviation propulsion systems. Prior to joining ARPA-E, de Bock spent nearly 18 years with GE Research, holding various research and development positions and recently completing a focus on a system perspective on electrification of aviation. At GE Research, de Bock served as a principal engineer and platform leader for power and thermal management systems, and principal investigator on advanced programs in the areas of additive heat exchangers and advanced propulsions systems. De Bock also serves as the chair of the ASME K-16 committee on heat transfer in electronics equipment and holds about 40 patents. Raised in the Netherlands, de Bock received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Cincinnati and holds degrees from academic institutions in the Netherlands, U.S. and the UK.

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

Panelists: Michael Ohadi, Sven Mumme, Peter de Bock, Matthew Bauer, Ying Sun Moderators: Shannon Yee, Amy Marconnet and Subith Vasu Schedule: Jan. 6, 11 a.m.-2:40 p.m.

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Machine Learning-Assisted Discovery of Thermally Conductive Polymers Based on HighThroughput Molecular Simulations Ruimin Ma, Notre Dame University Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live Prediction of Boiling Heat Flux with Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) and Convolutional Long Short-Term Memory (ConvLSTM) Connor Heo, University of Arkansas Artificial Intelligence | Recorded Spatial Density Neural Network Force Fields with First-Principles Level Accuracy and Application to Thermal Transport Alejandro Rodriguez, University of South Carolina Aiken Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live Neuromorphic Image Sensor Inspired by the Human Visual Recognition System SungWoo Nam, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Artificial Intelligence | Recorded AA’ and AB Stacked WS2 Homobilayers Kyungnam Kang, Stevens Institute of Technology Artificial Intelligence | Recorded Leverage Electron Properties to Predict Phonon Properties via Transfer Learning for Semiconductors Zeyu Liu, University of Notre Dame Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live Deep Learning to Enhance Transient Performance of Phase Change Material (PCM) based TES System Debjyoti Banerjee, Texas A&M Artificial Intelligence | Recorded Characterizing Phonon Dynamics in Nanostructures: Data Driven Approaches Sanghamitra Neogi, University of Colorado Boulder Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live Enabling Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Monolayer MoS2 via in situ Iron-doping Shichen Fu, Stevens Institute of Technology Artificial Intelligence | Recorded

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Machine Learning Methods for Discovering Unexpected Thermal Transport Behavior in Aperiodic Superlattices Prabudhya Roy Chowdhury, Purdue University Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live Thermal Control of Laser Powder Bed Fusion using Deep Reinforcement Learning Francis Ogoke, Carnegie Mellon University Artificial Intelligence | Recorded Machine Learning Enables New Thermal Transport Studies Yoonjin Won, University of California Irvine Artificial Intelligence | Presented Live

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Scalable Porous Polymer Paints for High-performance Passive Daytime Radiative Cooling Yuan Yang, Columbia University Thermal Management | Recorded Extended Passive Subambient Cooling with an Evaporation-Insulation Bilayer Zhengmao Lu, MIT Thermal Management | Presented Live Probing Nanoscale Heat Transfer Using the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope Geoff Wehmeyer, Rice University Thermal Management | Presented Live Enhanced Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Its Application in Condensation Lenan Zhang, MIT Thermal Management | Presented Live The Influence of Leg Shape on Thermoelectric Performance Under Constant Temperature and Heat Flux Boundary Conditions Bengisu Sisik, George Washington University Thermal Management | Recorded Predictive Understanding of Thermal Transport From 1D- and 2D-Confined Nanostructured Heat Sources: Strategies for Thermal Management at the Nanoscale Joshua Knobloch, University of Colorado Thermal Management | Presented Live Local Study of the Evaporation Mass Flux in Thin Liquid Films Using Both Experiment and Simulation Xiaoman Wang, Carnegie Mellon University Thermal Management | Recorded A Fundamental Study Toward Innovative Plasma-Based Anti-/Deicing Strategies for Aircraft Icing Mitigation Haiyang Hu, Iowa State University Thermal Management | Presented Live Liquid Metal Based Passive Heat Switch Patricia Weisensee, Washington University St. Louis Thermal Management | Recorded

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Thermal Transport in Mechanically Deformed Low Dimensional Heterostructures Baoxing Xu, University of Virginia Thermal Management | Presented Live Accurate Measurement of In-plane Thermal Conductivity using Transducerless Frequency Domain Thermoreflectance Xin Qian, MIT Thermal Management | Presented Live Computational Study of Oscillating 3-Phase Contact Line on Flat Surfaces Joel Plawsky, RPI Thermal Management | Presented Live Effect of Amine Hardener Molecular Structure on the Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resins Guangxin Lv, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Thermal Management | Presented Live Toward Sustainable Liquid Repellency Regardless of Surface Tensions on Quasi-Liquid Surface Jyotirmoy Sarma, University of Texas Dallas Thermal Management | Presented Live Understanding the Non-uniformity of Heat and Mass Transport in Extreme Fast Charging of Li Ion Batteries Divya Chalise, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Thermal Management | Live Nano Materials Hybridization — Thermal Issues and Other Functionalities Ajit Roy, Air Force Research Lab Thermal Management | Recorded Thermal Resistance of Twist Boundaries and Semicoherent Heterointerfaces Ramya Gurunathan, Northwestern Thermal Management | Presented Live Integrating Wide Bandgap Semiconductors With Thermally Conductive Substrates Samuel Graham, Georgia Tech Thermal Management | Live NMR Imaging in Thermal Management Fundamentals Ryan Anderson, Montana State University Thermal Management | Recorded | 44


National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Buried Nanochannels for High Heat Flux Dissipation An Zou, Syracuse University Thermal Management | Presented Live Crucial Effect of Transverse Vibrations on Transport Through Polymer Chains Alexander Burin, Tulane University Thermal Management | Presented Live Quantitative Temperature Distribution Measurements by Non-Contact Scanning Thermal Microscopy in Quasi-Ballistic Heat Conduction Regime Across the Tip-Sample Air Gap Yun Zhang, Purdue University Thermal Management | Recorded Graphene Enhanced Thermal Interface Materials: Percolation Threshold and Synergistic Effects Zahra Barani, University of California Riverside Thermal Management | Recorded Cryo/Neutron Experiments + Multi-Scale Modeling = Accommodation Coefficients Kishan Bellur, Michigan Technological University Thermal Management | Recorded Thermal Diffusivity Characterization of High-Temperature Solids Using Bayesian Statistics Yuan Hu, UCLA Thermal Management | Presented Live Flow Boiling Enhancement and Bubble Dynamics in Interconnected Microchannels Jiaxuan Ma, University of South Carolina Thermal Management | Recorded Experimental and Computational Investigation of Layer Dependent Thermal Conductivities and Interfacial Thermal Conductance of 1- to 3-Layer WSe2 Annie Xian Zhang, Stevens Institute of Technology Thermal Management | Recorded Modeling Thermal Transport in Gas-Particle Flows Using Machine Learning Jesse Capecelato, University of Michigan Thermal Management | Presented Live

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Asymmetric Saw-tooth and Cavity-enhanced Nucleation-driven Transport (ASCENT) Nucleation Vinod Narayanan, University of California Davis Thermal Management | Presented Live Effect of Surface Curvature on Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Nanodroplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces Jiangtao Cheng, Virginia Tech Thermal Management | Presented Live Linear Response Functions for Ballistic to Diffusive Heat Transport Computed Using Molecular-Dynamics Simulation Patrick Schelling, UCF Thermal Management | Presented Live Water Evaporation from Graphene Nanopores Siyang Xiao, Boston University Thermal Management | Presented Live The Effect of the Stiffness of Soft Materials on Hemiwicking Performance Thomas Germain, UCF Thermal Management | Recorded Thermal Chiral Anomaly in Weyl Semimetals & Magnetic Switching Applications Joseph Heremans, Ohio State Thermal Management | Presented Live Optimizing L-Shaped Heat Pipes with Partially-hybrid Mesh-Groove Wicking Structures Guanghan Huang, University of South Carolina Thermal Management | Presented Live Additive Laser Fabrication of Heat Removal Devices for Enhanced Microelectronics Cooling Arad Azizi, Binghamton University Thermal Management | Recorded Wick-Free Vapor Chamber Heat Spreader Constantine Megaridis, University of Illinois at Chicago Thermal Management | Presented Live

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS High Performance Computing Extension to the FD-PML Method for Phonon Transport Simulations Joseph Feser, University of Delaware Thermal Management | Recorded Surface Engineering for Next-Generation Phase-Change Heat Transfer Soumyadip Sett, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Thermal Management | Recorded A Single Micro Jet Impingement with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Stephen Adeoye, UCF Thermal Management | Recorded Enhanced Flow Boiling in Microchannels by Incorporating Multiple Micro-Nozzles and Micro-Pinfin Fences Wenming Li, Georgia Tech Thermal Management | Presented Live Local Heat Transfer Behavior in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Neil Sullivan, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Thermal Management | Recorded In-Plane Thermal Transport Measurements of Thin Films and Nanostructures with Si-N Membrane Thermal Isolation Playforms Barry Zink, University of Denver Thermal Management | Presented Live Understanding Thermal Transport in Porous Crystals Christopher Wilmer, University of Pittsburgh Thermal Management | Recorded Tree-Network Versus Radial Laminar and Turbulent Cooling of a Heat Generating Disk Derli Amaral, Southern Methodist University Thermal Management | Recorded Development of a Numerical Solver for Phase-Change and Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Mustafa Hadj-Nacer, University of Nevada Reno Thermal Management | Presented Live Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Heat Transfer Inside Microchannels – CFD Study Uday Manda, UCF Thermal Management | Recorded | 47


New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Nanoscale Phonon Transport From Atomistic Modeling Davide Donadio, UCSB Thermal Management | Presented Live COVID-19: Effects of Environmemtal Conditions on the Propagation of Respiratory Droplets Lei Zhao, UCSB Thermal Management | Recorded Vortex Induced Oscillating Jet Impingement for Heat Transfer Enhancement Karthik Krishna, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Thermal Management | Recorded Novel Pin Fin Design for Improved Gas Turbine Blade Cooling Anish Prasad, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Thermal Management | Recorded Studying Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transport With Transient Thermal Gratings Alexei Maznev, MIT Thermal Management | Presented Live Early Stage of Infiltration and its Impact on Two-Phase Heat Transfer Hari Pandey, University of Arkansas Thermal Management | Recorded Flow Boiling on Homogenous and Gradient Wick Structures Sajjad Bigham, Michigan Technological University Thermal Management | Recorded Two-Step Phonon Transport Modeling for Nanoporous Thin Films Qing Hao, University of Arizona Thermal Management | Presented Live Two-Step Phonon Transport Modeling for Nanoporous Thin Films Anatoly Parahovnik, UCF Thermal Management | Recorded Liquid Metal-Bridged SiC in Multiphase Composites for Enhanced Thermal Transport Wilson Kong, Arizona State University Thermal Management | Recorded

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Flow Boiling in Microchannels Enhanced by Parallel Microgrooves Fabricated on the Bottom Surfaces Congcong Ren, University of South Carolina Thermal Management | Recorded CFD Simulation of Flows over a Large Hollow Cylinder Flare for M 5-7 Sogol Pirbastami, University of Nevada Las Vegas Thermal Management | Presented Live Orientation-Dependent Thermal Properties of Cu3Sn Scott Schiffres, SUNY Binghamton University Thermal Management | Recorded Characterizing Metamaterials with Desirable Optical Properties Chance Brewer, UCF Thermal Management | Presented Live Giant Thermal Conductivity Enhancement in MoS2 under Extreme Strain Yaguo Wang, University of Texas Austin Thermal Management | Presented Live Fluid Prandtl Number Effect on Start-up Sweeping Convection of an Isothermal Channel Jose Lago, Southern Methodist University Thermal Management | Recorded Thermal Transport in Glassy Alloys by Quasi-Harmonic Green-Kubo Nicholas Lundgren, University of California Davis Thermal Management | Presented Live

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Nanoparticle Delivery in PC3 Tumors Implanted in Mice Facilitated by Either Local or Whole Body Heating Liang Zhu, University of Maryland Baltimore Health and Sustainability | Presented Live Infrared Imaging for Breast Cancer Modeling Adolfo Lozano, University of Texas Dallas Health and Sustainability | Recorded Meniscus-Mediated Coarsening Effect for Rapid Water Harvesting on Hydrophilic Slippery Surface Zongqi Guo, University of Texas Dallas Health and Sustainability | Presented Live Mechanism of Enhanced Thermal Transport and Photoacoustic Effect for Silica-coated Gold Nanoparticles Peiyuan Kang, University of Texas Dallas Health and Sustainability | Recorded Partial Leidenfrost Evaporation Assisted Fast Enrichment of Trace Analytes in Water Microdroplet on Nano-Plasmonic Surfaces Jiangtao Cheng, Virginia Tech Health and Sustainability | Presented Live Stretchable Electrodes of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes towards Pressure Sensor and Supercapacitor Anthony Palumbo, Stevens Institute of Technology Health and Sustainability | Presented Live Switchable Solvent Water Extraction from High-Salinity Brines Akshay Desmukh, MIT Health and Sustainability | Presented Live When Will Nanowarmed Organs Crack? A 1-D Heat Transfer Model Lakshya Gangwar, University of Minnesota Health and Sustainability | Recorded Effect of Curvature on the Thermal Interface Conductance Between Nanogold and Water Blake Wilson, University of Texas Dallas Health and Sustainability | Presented Live

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS A Predictive Model of the Thermal Inactivation of Coronaviruses Te Faye Yap, Rice University Health and Sustainability | Presented Live A Comprehensive Review of 4D Flow MRI and CFD in Cardiovascular and Congenital Heart Disease. Debjyoti Banerjee, Texas A&M Health and Sustainability | Recorded Diffusion Limited Cryopreservation of Tissue with Radiofrequency Heated Metal Forms Zonghu Han, University of Minnesota Health and Sustainability | Recorded

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS High Efficiency Distiller for Multi-Effect Desalination Wei Wu, University of Central Florida Manufacturing | Recorded Passive Anti-Frosting Surfaces Using Microscopic Ice Patterns Farzad Ahmadi, University of California Santa Barbera Manufacturing | Presented Live Influence of Processing and Microstructure on the Thermal Conductivity of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel Scott Schiffres, SUNY Binghamton University Manufacturing | Recorded Orthogonally Superimposed Heat Transfer in Rheometry Ruel McKenzie, University of Akron Manufacturing | Presented Live

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Nonreciprocal Thermal Radiation With Modest or Zero External Magnetic Field Bo Zhao, Stanford University Energy | Presented Live Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Thermal Management Titan Paul, University of South Carolina Aiken Energy | Presented Live Understanding the Non-uniformity of Heat and Mass Transport in Extreme Fast Charging (XFC) of Li Ion Batteries Ravi Prasher, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Energy | Presented Live A Thermally Actuated Microvalve for Smart Irrigation in Precision Agriculture Application Alaba Bamido, Texas A&M Energy | Recorded Molecular-to-Macroscale Surface Engineering and Diagnostics for Thermal Energy Processes and Systems Dion Antao, Texas A&M Energy | Presented Live Large Phonon Drag in SiGe Alloys from 150 K to 1100 K Qian Xu, MIT Energy | Presented Live Violation of Kirchhoff’s Law of Radiation in Type-I Magnetic Weyl Semimetals Simo Pajovic, MIT Energy | Presented Live Full Daytime Sub-ambient Radiative Cooling in Commercial-like Paints Xiangyu Li, Purdue University Energy | Recorded Atomistic Insights Into Thermal Transport in Energy Materials From Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Combine With First-Principles Simulations Olivier Delaire, Duke University Energy | Presented Live Dynamic Multispectral Radiative Heat Management for Net-Zero-Energy Buildings Po-Chun Hsu, Duke University Energy | Presented Live | 53


New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Binary Particle Distributions with Significantly Increased Thermal Conductivity for Solid Particle CSP Chase Christen, Boise State University Energy | Presented Live Heat and Mass transport in Porous Media with Lagrangian Scales Dmitrio Papavadssillou, University of Oklahoma Energy | Recorded Radiative Transfer Challenge For Complex Industrial Problems Pinar Menguc, Ozyegin University Energy | Recorded Impact of Radiation Damage on Thermal Conductivity of Ceramics Marat Khafizov, Ohio State Energy | Presented Live Ultrasound-Assisted Regeneration of Adsorbents Hooman Daghooghi, Arizona State University Energy | Presented Live Impact of Electron-Phonon Interaction on Thermal Transport Bolin Liao, UCSB Energy | Presented Live Latent Heat Trapping in Phase Switching Liquids for Exceptional Anti-Ice and Anti-Frost Performance Sushant Anand, University of Illinois Chicago Energy | Presented Live Water Adsorption on Electrically Doped Graphene Morteza Bagheri, Binghamton University Energy | Recorded Comparison of Thermal Performance of 3 D Printed Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger with Commercial Plate Heat Exchanger for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) by Incorporating Phase Change Materials (PCM) Debjyoti Banerjee, Texas A&M Energy | Recorded

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National Science Foundation

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Experimental Study of a Novel Hydro-Cyclone Apparatus for Flow Separation in a Dynamic Flash Evaporation Setup for Desalination and Water Remediation/Purification Debjyoti Banerjee, Texas A&M Energy | Recorded Combustion of Petroleum-Based Transportatiom Fuels and Their Blemds with Oxygenates Songtao Guo, Cornell University Energy | Recorded

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New Frontiers of Thermal Transport

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NSF Workshop Program  

The NSF workshop, New Frontiers of Thermal Transport, was hosted by UCF MAE and featured panelists from across the U.S.

NSF Workshop Program  

The NSF workshop, New Frontiers of Thermal Transport, was hosted by UCF MAE and featured panelists from across the U.S.

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