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WINTER 2018 CONNECTING ALUMNI, FRIENDS AND COMMUNITY JACOBS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO

UB Medicine

THE DOORS HAVE OPENED . . . ON A NEW ERA OF MEDICAL EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND CARE IN BUFFALO

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I AT R O EM E M SSU OM I

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Welcome to the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ new building! Join us as we explore this extraordinary building and the potential it holds as students, faculty, staff and administrators begin to settle in and make good on a promise that can only be fully realized with the continued support of those who value what a state-of-the-art medical school provides for our community, now and into the future.

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Four years of construction came to fruition on December 12, 2017, when the 628,000-square-foot facility officially opened, followed by the first day of classes on January 8, 2018.


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S UB MEDICINE MAGAZINE, Winter 2018, Vol. 6, No. 1 In this special issue of UB Medicine, we celebrate and commemorate the realization of a vision: to move the 172-yearold Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences into a new state-of-the-art building in downtown Buffalo, steps away from its historic home at Main and High streets and in close proximity to its health care and research partners. Come with us as we retrace this journey from finish to start —a journey that is testimony to what can be accomplished when a community comes together to support an institution that has played a pivotal role in improving the health and well-being of its citizens for almost two centuries.

UBMEDICINE

Michael E. Cain, MD Vice President for Health Sciences and Dean, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Eric C. Alcott Senior Associate Dean, Executive Director Medical Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement Editorial Director Christine Fontaneda Assistant Dean, Senior Director Medical Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement Editor Stephanie A. Unger Contributing Writers John DellaContrada Ellen Goldbaum Copyeditor Tom Putnam Photography Douglas Levere, Sandra Kicman, Joe Cascio, Nancy J. Parisi Art Direction & Design Karen Lichner Editorial Advisers John J. Bodkin II, MD ’76 Elizabeth A. Repasky, PhD ’81

4 With the snip of a thin blue ribbon, it was

official: After nearly a decade of planning and four years of construction, the new home of the Jacobs School officially opened on December 12, 2017.

8 Generous donors who made leadership

gifts to the Build the Vision Campaign gathered a few weeks earlier to preview their named spaces and to be thanked for their support.

Affiliated Teaching Hospitals Erie County Medical Center Roswell Park Cancer Institute Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System Kaleida Health Buffalo General Medical Center DeGraff Memorial Hospital Gates Vascular Institute Women and Children’s Hospital of Buffalo Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital Catholic Health Mercy Hospital of Buffalo Sisters of Charity Hospital

Correspondence, including requests to be added to or removed from the mailing list, should be sent to: Editor, UB Medicine, 916 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY 14214; or email ubmedicine-news@buffalo.edu

12 The long-awaited move to the new

building began in November and is still in progress, involving many story-worthy logistical feats.

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A floor-by-floor tour of the new building reveals stunning architecture that creates light and space aimed at fostering collaboration, innovation and connectivity, supported by the most advanced educational technologies available today.

COVER IMAGE: The new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ building, Main and Allen streets. Photo by Sandra Kicman.


22 The seventh floor is home to the UB RIS E 2

(Research, Innovation, Simulation, Structure, Education) Center, which is specially designed to fulfill a new vision for studying the human body.

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At the same time, faculty and staff stepped up to support this effort with unprecedented generosity, including a $4.5 million bequest from a beloved professor.

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All was made possible by the many skilled laborers who had a hand in constructing this new Buffalo landmark, starting with a 45-footdeep hole and some 7,300 tons of steel.

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Not to be forgotten, the South Campus— home to the Jacobs School prior to its move—is undergoing a revitalization that is transforming UB’s historic Main Street campus. And we reserved the Inside Back Cover for describing how teamwork, ingenuity and the meshing of art and science led to the discovery and restoration of a 19th century lantern that lighted the Jacobs School at Main and High streets from 1893 until 1953 and now graces the lobby of the new building—a beacon of pride and craftsmanship, powered by LED lights.

In tribute to the past, we delved into the archives to find images of the Jacobs School’s former homes, dating back to 1846. UB Medicine is published by the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB to inform alumni, friends and community about the school’s pivotal role in medical education, research and advanced patient care in Buffalo, Western New York and beyond. Visit us: medicine.buffalo.edu/alumni

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Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

Cutting the ribbon to officially mark the opening of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ new building are, from left: Mayor Byron Brown, Jeremy M. Jacobs Sr., Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, President Satish Tripathi, Dean Michael E. Cain, MD, and Laura Reed, Class of 2020.

New

DOWNTOWN HOME OFFICIALLY OPENS JACOBS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES RETURNS TO MAIN STREET 4

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BY ELLEN GOLDBAUM

S

ixty-four years after moving to the University at Buffalo’s South Campus, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has returned to downtown Buffalo.

The massive $375 million, 628,000-square-foot building officially opened December 12 at 955 Main St., just steps from where it was located from 1893 to 1953. “Moving the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences downtown is a major milestone for the University at Buffalo that has been a decade in the making,” said UB president Satish K. Tripathi. Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences at UB and dean of the Jacobs School, said the opening “marks a long-awaited reunion for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It reunites our faculty conducting research, who have been located on the university’s South Campus, with those involved in patient care in our partner institutions. This building fully integrates medical education into Buffalo’s growing academic health center, emphasizing interdisciplinary collaboration and strengthening our relationships with our clinical partners. “A medical school that is just steps away from UBMD Physicians’ Group at Conventus, John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital, Buffalo General Medical Center, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and all of our other partners will foster synergies that will expand and improve health care in Western New York,” he added.

ADDRESSES PHYSICIAN SHORTAGES, BENEFITS THE REGION The new building allows the Jacobs School to expand its class size by 25 percent, from 144 to 180 students, training more doctors to address local and national physician shortages. This year, the Jacobs School admitted its first class of 180 students; by 2021, the school’s enrollment will reach 720 students. That expansion boosts UB’s ability to recruit and retain world-class faculty with medical expertise in specialties that the region currently lacks. This, in turn, will provide Western New Yorkers with expanded treatment options and preempt their need to leave the area for specialty care. The move of the Jacobs School to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus also bolsters the city’s biomedical sector as a catalyst for regional economic development. Deliberately positioned as a “gateway” to the medical campus, the new building features a pedestrian walkway from Allen Street and the vibrant Allentown neighborhood to Washington Street. A casual café is located on the second floor, but for full-service dining options, faculty, staff and students are encouraged to patronize local businesses.

The building’s sustainable features include bicycles available to rent in the walkway and the NFTA Metro station, located beneath the building and facilitating public access to the medical campus from the Allen/Medical Campus station. A 32-foot tall, two-story light tower at the Main and High streets entrance functions as the building’s signature feature, which architects intended as emblematic of the school’s return to its downtown roots.

STATE-OF-THE-ART LEARNING AND RESEARCH SPACES The building design was produced by HOK, a global design, architecture, engineering and planning firm that was selected for the project by UB in 2012 after winning an international competition to develop the best design concepts for the new Jacobs School building. Through its classrooms and open spaces, called learning landscapes, the Jacobs School’s new building promotes collaborative interactions among faculty and students. Its huge, open seven-story, light-filled atrium, comprising more than 19,000 feet of glass, fosters collegiality and a strong sense of community. A key educational attribute of the building is its emphasis on active-learning classrooms, which contain triangular tables that are fully electronic so that every student, even in a class of 180, can present data to the entire group with the touch of a button. Small classroom and study spaces are available throughout the building, all with optimal technology connections. State-of-the-art laboratory spaces on the building’s third, fourth and fifth floors are modern and light-filled. The sixth floor includes expanded facilities where students hone their clinical skills. This includes the Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center, where they train with interprofessional teams using life-like mannequins in realistic medical scenarios; and the Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center, where they interact in scripted clinical scenarios using standardized patient volunteers. Students, medical residents and professionals also have access to the building’s surgical and robotics suites, where they train in the newest surgical and robotics skills. In addition to the traditional gross anatomy training using cadavers, students have access to visualizations of the cadavers, providing far more detailed anatomical information.

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Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

“Moving the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences downtown is a major milestone for the University at Buffalo that has been a decade in the making.” —President Satish K. Tripathi


Photo by Sandra Kicman

Members of the Class of 2020 celebrating the official opening of the new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ building on December 12, 2017 are, from left: Alexandra Marasco, Laura Reed, Jacob Milling and Chelsea Martin.

HISTORIC SUPPORT AND GENEROSITY The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building was the first to receive NYSUNY 2020 Challenge Grant funding through NYSUNY 2020, legislation that was signed into law by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in 2011. The initiative has spurred economic growth across the state and strengthened the academic programs of New York’s public universities and colleges. The mission of the NYSUNY 2020 program is to elevate SUNY as a catalyst for regional economic development and affordable education. “This defining and transformative moment would also not have been possible without the incredible support and generosity of Jeremy Jacobs and his family, for whom the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is named,” said President Satish K. Tripathi. “Mr. Jacobs and his family are committed to our vision because they know that the students we educate here and the discoveries and treatments generated here, will save lives and improve the quality of life for people around the world. Their belief in our institution has transformed the dream of a world-class downtown medical school building into a concrete reality.” “My family is thrilled to join UB and our elected officials at today’s ribbon-cutting ceremony,” said Jeremy M. Jacobs, UB Council chairman, whose family’s historic $30 million gift was critical to the medical school’s move downtown. “The new medical school building fulfills the collaborative and innovative vision of the medical campus, which will have a transformative impact on health care in Western New York. By moving the school downtown, UB is enhancing its role in the fabric of our city and furthering its commitment to our community.” In addition to the support provided by Gov. Cuomo and the Jacobs family, the new building was made possible through state and UB capital appropriations and support from the UB Foundation, as well as the generosity of alumni, community leaders, corporations and foundations who gave to a $200 million Build the Vision Campaign for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (see story on page 8).

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Donor Leaders anked at Exclusive Building Preview On November 28, generous donors who made leadership gifts to the Build the Vision Campaign gathered for an exclusive preview of the newly completed Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ building located downtown at Main and High streets.

Photo by Douglas Levere

The evening—hosted by UB president Satish K. Tripathi and Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the school—was a celebration to thank donors associated with a named space for their loyalty and support of the campaign. A highlight of the celebration was the opportunity the donors were given to tour the spectacular, 628,000-square-foot facility and preview their named spaces with their family and friends. Also during the evening, they enjoyed locating their names on the Circle of Visionaries and Circle of Leaders donor walls, in the James Platt White Society Learning Landscape and on the Signature Learning stations in the Main Auditorium. The program kicked off with a video that celebrated donors’ generosity to the Build the Vision Campaign, after which opening remarks were made by Drs. Tripathi and Cain and Tricia Mathew, Class of 2020. Guests were then treated to a heartfelt song of gratitude from the medical student a cappella group, Docapella. As a finale to the program, the donor walls were unveiled, balloons floated down from the seventh floor of the atrium and the festivities and tours began, with refreshments provided at stations throughout the school, hosted by grateful medical students, faculty, staff, members of the Campaign Steering Committee and Drs. Tripathi and Cain. The evening was capped by each donor receiving a specially commissioned commemorative poster of the new school illustrated by local artist Michael Gelen.

Build the Vision Campaign Steering Committee members, from left, Charles Niles, MD ’83; Nancy Nielsen, MD ’76, PhD; Rose Berkun, MD ’92; and John J. Bodkin II, MD ’76, enjoying the program finale with Dean Michael E. Cain at podium and guests.

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Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

Photo by Douglas Levere

Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

Family members finding a disc on the Circle of Leaders wall memorializing Fred M. Outside the Sol Messinger MD ’57 Active Learning Center, Charles Niles, MD ’83, Snell MD, PhD. Two faculty named a study suite on Level 2 in Snell’s honor. left, toasts and thanks Sol Messinger for his generous support of the campaign.

Ronald I. Dozoretz, MD ’62, center, joined by family outside the 200-person auditorium he named on Level 2 of the building.

From left: John R. Oishei Foundation Trustees Edward F. Walsh Jr., James M. Wadsworth and Florence M. Conti, with students outside Oishei named space.

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Photo by Joe Cascio

Photo by Joe Cascio

Russell J. Salvatore, center, with Rose Berkun, MD ’92, Circle of Leaders’ chair to his left, celebrating with friends and students the Student Commons he named.

At Joyce Learning Landscape, from left: John J. Bodin II, MD ’76, Dean Michael E. Cain, MD; Peggy Cain, Herbert E. Joyce, MD ’45; President Satish Tripathi.

Circle of Visionaries members Gail and Daniel Alexander, MD ’99, with Micha Gooden, Class of 2021.

Photo by Joe Cascio

Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

Donors to the Class of 1960 Student Study Suite toasting the occasion with Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean.

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Photo by Joe Cascio

Photo by Douglas Levere

Arlyne and Harold Levy, MD ’46, center, in the dean’s conference room they named, joined by son Sanford Levy, MD ’86, his wife, Betsy, and their son Aaron.

MAA Classroom lead donors, from left: Jared C. Barlow, MD ’66, Barbara Barlow, Susan Cardamone, Joseph Cardamone, MD ’65, with Brendan Plotke.

Donors, Alumni, Faculty, Students, Community . . . Come Celebrate Our School’s New Building SAVE THE DATES: Friday, May 4, 2018 and Saturday, May 5, 2018 If you haven’t yet seen the new building for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, please join us on Saturday, May 5. FRIDAY, MAY 4, 2018 • Class of 2018 Graduation • Reunion Weekend Kickoff reception and dine-a-rounds SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 This special day of activities—which expands on the school’s premiere annual alumni event, Spring Clinical Day—includes: • Panel discussion by area health-care leaders: “Boldly Transforming Western New York’s Health” • Tours of the new Jacobs School building and the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus • Distinguished Alumni Awards and reception honoring James Platt White Society, Circle of Visionaries, Circle of Leaders, and reunion classes For more information call (716) 829-2773 or visit: http://medicine.buffalo.edu/alumni.html and click on Events.

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The Long-Awaited Move Is a Complex Operation INSTRUCTION IS THE PRIORITY AS SCHOOL TRANSITIONS TO DOWNTOWN By EllEn GoldBaum

Photos by Meredith Forrest Kulwicki

Six years after the decision was made to move the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences into a new building at 955 Main St. on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, the relocation began in a series of carefully coordinated stages. The first phase took place in November and involved more than 50 administrative offices. Additional phases are planned through March. 12

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Alan Lessing, MD, senior associate dean for medical curriculum, welcoming students on January 8, the first day of classes in the new building.


Photos by Sandra Kicman

PREPARING FOR THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS This has been “a thoughtfully coordinated move,” says Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the medical school. “We designed it to take several months on purpose. It’s a complex transition, and we couldn’t interrupt classes once they started.” For that reason, the 180 students in the Class of 2021— the largest in the school’s history—started their studies on the South Campus in August and transitioned downtown in early January, when all classrooms and instructional facilities became operational. “Our number-one priority has been that the building be ready for students when classes started on January 8,” says Alan J. Lesse, MD, senior associate dean for medical curriculum and professor of medicine.

This means that highly specialized educational facilities also had to be ready, such as the Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center, where students work on lifelike mannequins, and the Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center, where they interact with standardized patients, individuals trained to portray actual patients. Moving the equipment and mannequins into these facilities was a carefully timed, multi-stage process that ensured instruction proceeded without disruption between the two semesters.

RESEARCH LABS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE While the need to have the instructional facilities up and running on time was pressure enough, the bigger logistical

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Photo by Sandra Kicman Photo by Douglas Levere

Student computer labs, Level 6

Surgical Skills Suite, Level 7

puzzle has been that posed by the school’s many biomedical science research labs, which are located on floors three, four and five in the new building. “Moving research labs is a very challenging process, involving many different factors,” explains Anthony A. Campagnari, PhD ’84, senior associate dean for research and graduate biomedical education and professor of microbiology, immunology and medicine. “All research labs are not the same. There is often specialized, very expensive equipment that must be disassembled, packed, moved and reassembled by specific vendors to ensure proper functioning in the new lab and sometimes to maintain the warranty.” Campagnari says the immense range and quantity of items—from refrigerators to test tubes—that need to be custom packed and handled poses challenges. Furthermore, all chemicals and reagents have to be labeled, and hazardous materials specially packed and

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transported by authorized personnel. In addition, cell lines, microorganisms and other such items have to be stored and moved at very cold temperatures (-80 degrees Celsius), again requiring special packing and handling. “There also is the issue of timing, as most of the research labs have ongoing experiments that can’t be stopped at some random point to move the lab,” Campagnari says. “The whole process has to be carefully coordinated with each individual researcher in order to minimize downtime.” Suzanne Laychock, PhD, senior associate dean for faculty affairs and facilities, professor of pharmacology and toxicology, and faculty liaison for the move, says that staggering the time between the moves of labs is giving researchers and movers “some breathing space.” It also allows for some of the larger equipment, such as freezers and fume hoods, to be installed and up and running before investigators move.


SPECIAL DELIVERIES In addition to the critical scientific and educational infrastructure, the move also has included items of sentimental value, such as the baby grand piano that had been located in the Lippschutz Room in the Biomedical Education Building on the South Campus. “We couldn’t leave the piano behind,” Laychock says. “Some of our medical students and faculty are very accomplished musicians, and they derive a lot of enjoyment from it. Our monthly Music Is Medicine lunchtime series in the school atrium will also benefit from having it.” The piano was moved in November in time to add to the festivities at the building’s donor reception on November 28 and the grand opening on December 12.

For the faculty and staff who have already moved, the experience has been positive. “It is a really spectacular building, with lots of natural light everywhere and easy to navigate,” says Nancy Nielsen, MD ’76, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy. “Everything was delivered in good shape. The movers executed flawlessly, and my computer, printer and phone worked immediately. We need to thank the many, many folks who are making this momentous move possible.” In addition to the medical school staff, and staff from University Facilities and Environmental Health and Safety, those who are making the move a success include move consultants Vargas Associates Inc., and the moving company Corrigan Moving Systems.

Photo by Meredith Forrest Kulwicki

Andrew Kelly, Class of 2021, enjoying time at the piano

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A TOUR DE FORCE . .

On the following pages, we invite you to view highlights of the new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ building, which contains 628,000 square feet of

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Allen-Medical Campus metro station on the buildings’ ground level

LEVEL 1

Circle of Visionaries donor wall

Photo by Douglas Levere

Photo by Douglas Levere

The state-of-the-art building strengthens medical education by integrating clinical and basic sciences education n promoting active and team-based learning n emphasizing cross-disciplinary collaborations among physician-scientists, faculty and students n and fostering learning and training in an innovative modular teaching environment. It also strengthens health care in the community by addressing local and national physician shortages by expanding class size some 25 percent, to 180 students n attracting world-class physician-scientists and medical specialists dedicated to pioneering new treatments n increasing access to new, groundbreaking medical treatments and therapies n and anchoring the region’s academic health center, composed of research, teaching and clinical partners centrally located on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus.

Photo by Nancy J. Parisi

classroom and lab space, equivalent to about 11 football fields or 14.6 acres.

Two-story light tower at the Main and High streets entrance

The Allen-Medical Campus metro station is encapsulated beneath the building, allowing the public easy access to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. As riders ascend the elevator to Main Street, they are greeted by the 17-foot high Gut Flora a public art installation designed by Shasti O’Leary-Soudant, clinical assistant professor of art at UB. The Sol Messinger MD ’57 Active Learning Center reflects a change in pedagogy from lecture-based learning to interactive group learning. Twenty four groups of 6 to 9 students can be accommodated in this space, which features tables fixed with computer access ports for each student. Groups work together to study, problem solve, prepare presentations, examine cases, etc. Instructors (1 to 3) move about the room and project students’ work on the big screens for discussion.

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Level 1-2

Photo by Douglas Levere

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Photos by Meredith Forrest Kulwicki

Sol Messinger MD ’57 Active Learning Center

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Swivel seats in M&T Bank Auditorium promote collaborative learning.

LEVEL 2

Photo by Douglas Levere

Photos by Douglas Levere

Russell J. Salvatore Student Commons

Medical Library/Castellani Family Reading Room

The Russell J. Salvatore Student Commons features kitchen, dining and recreation space with comfortable booths, sofas and chairs where students can unwind and socialize. M&T Bank Auditorium, the school’s main lecture hall, accommodates 444 students. Microphones are at each seat so students can ask or answer questions. The depth of desktops alternate to promote collaborative learning, and seats swivel so students can work with the person seated behind them. Circle of Visionaries donor wall (gifts totaling $100,000 or more to the Build the Vision campaign) and Circle of Leaders donor wall (gifts totaling $25,000-$99,999 to the campaign). Medical Library/Castellani Family Reading Room is wired to allow for optimal technology use. Ample seating promotes both private- and smallgroup study.

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Photo by Douglas Levere

Levels 3-5

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Small meeting rooms are equipped with smart-board technology.

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Learning Landscapes on each floor provide informal gathering spaces.

LEVELS 3-5

Wade J. Sigurdson, PhD, confocal microscopy facility director, John R. Oishei Foundation Core Laboratories Suite

There are 10 laboratory neighborhoods on levels 3, 4 and 5 each, for a total of 30. Lab neighborhoods include 2 to 5 researchers, with space determined by the type of research being done, financial support, staffing, etc. On Level 3, three of these neighborhoods are devoted to The John R. Oishei Foundation Core Laboratories Suite—shared facilities that serve as a hub for scientific exploration and collaboration in support of studies conducted by UB faculty and their research partners at affiliated institutions. Each Core Lab—Histology, Confocal Microscopy, and Stem Cell—features state-of-the art laboratory equipment, is staffed by a highly trained director and provides data analysis, training and grant-writing consultation. Unlike traditional laboratories, office space in all labs is separate from the laboratory/bench space. Each department has write-up stations adjacent to the laboratories. These are open divided cubicles with seating to allow trainees, students and staff to work independently or collaboratively.

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Levels 3-5

Each department has state-of-the-art laboratory spaces.

Photos by Douglas Levere

Every floor features a large, 30-person conference room located to the left of the central staricase.

Laboratory neighborhood and adjacent write-up stations.

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Photo by Douglas Levere

Photo by Douglas Levere

Level 6

Stephanie T. Niciszewska Mucha and Joseph J. Mucha Dean’s Suite

Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center

Working with life-like mannequin in Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center

Photo by Douglas Levere

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Harold J. Levy, MD ’46 and Arlyne Levy Dean’s Conference Room

LEVEL 6

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The Stephanie T. Niciszewska Mucha and Joseph J. Mucha Dean’s Suite is located at the southwest corner of Level 6, facing High Street. The Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center is where students interact in scripted clinical scenarios with standardized patients, individuals trained to simulate actual patients with specific conditions. They practice taking patient histories, performing physical exams, communicating disease management and treatment options and discussing the diagnosis of terminal illnesses. The Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center is where students train with interprofessional teams using life-like mannequins in realistic medical scenarios designed to improve performance, reduce medical errors and promote excellent patient care management.

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Photo by Sandra Kicman

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Level 7

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Surgical Skills Suite, currently being equipped

LEVEL 7

Learning Landscape on Level 7, near the entrance to the Human Anatomy Suite

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Photo by Douglas Levere

Human Anatomy Suite, which will be fully functional by fall 2018

The OR of the Future

The James H. Cummings Foundation Structural Sciences Visualization Suite—one of only a few of its kind in the country—offers specialized training in anatomical sciences. The goal is to transform anatomy, cell biology and pathology education and research by bringing them into the digital age. MOOG, Inc. Engineering Suite is a work area for biomedical engineers to meet with clinicians to explore the design of materials to address novel clinical problems and applications. The Human Anatomy Suite is a state-of-the-art facility where first- and second-year medical students work with cadavers and new technology for the preparation of cadavers. The space is designed to provide an optimal learning experience, with research rooms available for special projects. The Robotics Suite focuses on using robotics to perform surgical procedures, as well as on the use of these machines for data collection purposes (clinical and research benefits). The Surgical Skills Suite is a specialized space for physicians and residents training in surgery. This highly advanced technology also will be used for continuing education, allowing surgeons to learn new skills or practice highly complex procedures prior to operating on patients.

U B R I S 2E All of the Level 7 spaces described above—in combination with the Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center and the Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center on Level 6—are part of a new UB initiative called UB RIS2E. To learn more about this initiative, which aims to transform how students explore the human structure, turn to page 22.

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A N ATO M Y O F C H A N G E U B R I S 2 E C E N T E R I S R E TO O L I N G H OW T H E H U M A N B O DY I S S T U D I E D

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Once fully equipped, the Surgical Skills Suite will be a specialized space for surgical residents to train and physicians to receive continuing medical education.

new vision for studying the human body is taking shape in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The transformation is being led by UB pathologists, structural scientists and surgeons who are teaming up to optimize state-of-the-art features designed into the Jacobs School’s building for this purpose. This new initiative—called UB RIS2E (Research, Innovation, Simulation, Structure, Education)— is based on Level 7 of the building, where conversations are already taking place that would not normally occur across disciplines.

CONNECTIONS BY DESIGN “This facility was built purposefully to make these conversations flow,” says John Tomaszewski, MD, the SUNY Distinguished Professor and Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences at the Jacobs School. “It was planned out and driven from concept to construction.” In some ways, the center’s focus on pathology and anatomy puts UB at odds with trends in medical education, explains Tomaszewski, who notes that a number of medical schools have dismantled entire anatomy departments, choosing instead to focus almost exclusively

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on digital approaches. “We think that’s absolutely wrong,” he says. “There’s tremendous and important meaning in human structure.” To develop and execute this concept, Tomaszewski was recruited from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011, and Steven Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery, from Harvard University in 2015. Tomaszewski has been at the forefront of advances in digital pathology and computational modeling, using the data these techniques generate to push the fields of integrated diagnostics and personalized predictive medicine. Schwaitzberg directed an innovation center at Tufts University School of Medicine/New England Medical Center for nearly two decades. During that time, he pioneered minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques and developed a microwave blood warming technology approved by the Food and Drug Administration and now in routine use. Together, they envision UB RIS2E as being a multidisciplinary center that educates learners at every level—from medical students to practicing physicians and surgeons—about the human body in the most comprehensive way possible. “Our facility has this integration of people: surgeons working with

Photo by Douglas Levere

BY ELLEN GOLDBAUM


anatomists working with computational people and engineers,” Tomaszewski says. “It’s a whole team approach.” Under Tomaszewski, pathologists and computational anatomists use experimental methods and digital technologies to generate and analyze biological data. Schwaitzberg and his colleagues apply these data to the development of new or improved procedures, surgical techniques and instrumentation. The approach takes advantage of both hands-on and virtual techniques from advanced imaging and computational methods and phantoms, which are organs generated by 3-D printers and biological materials. UB’s anatomical gifts program, the state’s largest, plays a key role, not just in educating medical students but in providing simulation opportunities for researchers and industrial partners.

VIRTUAL WITH THE PHYSICAL “This is what the future of medicine is all about: integrating anatomy and imaging from the cellular level to the whole body,” says Schwaitzberg. That integration is already happening in ANA 500, the school’s Gross Human Anatomy course. In addition to the cadaver that every first-year medical student works

with, each group also now receives highresolution computational tomography (CT) scans of their cadaver. “It’s all about learning how to use those data,” Tomaszewski explains. “It’s integrating the virtual representation of the body—the CT scans—with the physical representation of the body from human gifts in a very robust and formalized way. To be able to understand something in full 360 degrees, you have to go from visual learning and simulation to phantoms, biological materials and human gifts. The separation of these has been artificial and not good for learning.” It’s not only students who benefit. In the center, clinicians and surgeons are learning new procedures and techniques through simulations with virtual or 3-D printed models generated by computational anatomists who study how musculoskeletal structure affects function. For example, a partnership with the School of Dental Medicine is yielding answers about how the shape of the jaw affects issues related to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ). And orthopaedists and bioengineers at UB are exploring how computational models of the ways humans bear weight can improve implantable hips and knees in an aging population.

SIMULATING THE FUTURE Schwaitzberg points out that the integration of so many approaches gives the UB center major advantages over other facilities striving to do similar things, especially for industries seeking to innovate. “Simulation is an absolute requirement for the future,” he says. “We will be creating anatomical models of the liver and gall bladder so that surgeons can practice their skills, do flexible endoscopy training and become more proficient at screening for colon cancer.” The goal is simple: “When your doctors are better trained, you have better outcomes,” he explains. And industry needs facilities like this, he adds. “Surgeons use tools. Tool users have to be trained on new tools in safe environments before they use them on people. There has to be a feedback loop between the tool user and the toolmaker. That iterative feedback loop has to exist in order to continue innovation. UB RIS2E can deliver it, allowing all the components—research, innovation, simulation, structure and education—to work in synchrony for mutual benefit.”

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U B R I S E — AT A G L A N C E UB RIS2E is located on Level 7, adjacent to facilities devoted to the teaching of gross anatomy, It is co-led by John Tomaszewski, MD, the SUNY Distinguished Professor and Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences; and Steven Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery.

Collaborating facilities include the:

Tomaszewski

UB RIS2E features four simulated operating rooms; 17 surgical tables for cadaver dissection and method development; 21 computer workstations in the surgical skills area for research, teaching and simulations; a 3-D printing facility; the Moog, Inc. Engineering Suite, a facility for engineering and structural scientists to collaborate; and the James H. Cummings Structural Sciences Visualization Suite, which includes a 10x6 ft. high-resolution touch-directed monitor, full videoconferencing equipment and software for working with human structural data.

• Structural Sciences Learning Center • Surgical Skills Simulation Center, which includes the Robotics and Advanced Surgery Suite • Ralph T. Behling Simulation Center • Margaret L. Wendt Foundation Clinical Competency Center • James H. Cummings Foundation Structural Sciences Visualization Suite.

Schwaitzberg

UB RIS2E also partners with UB’s Buffalo Institute for Genomics and Data Analysis (BIG), the Jacobs Institute and the Atlas Lab of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. Funding has been provided by a grants from Empire State Development, the James H. Cummings Foundation and industry partners Athenex and Stryker. Additional opportunities for philanthropic donations, especially from industry, are being pursued. WINTER 2018

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A Landmark in the Making

PHOTOS BY DOUGLAS LEVERE

TH E B EST OF M ATE R IA LS A ND TO O LS IN THE H A N D S OF HI GHLY SK ILLED LA BO RERS At the time of its construction, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ building was the largest medical education facility being built in the country and the largest construction project in UB’s 172-year history. The landmark structure entails two L-shaped buildings wrapped around each other, connected by a central atrium spanning the building’s height from the second to the seventh floors. The second floor will connect directly to the Conventus building, home to 12 UBMD practices, and from there directly to the new John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital.

The first three floors were erected by a giant red Manitowoc crawler crane that was delivered on 27 trucks. Capable of lifting 625 tons, it was later replaced with a yellow tower crane that was fixed in place. The project was complex because of the confined footprint (45-foot-deep hole) and the need to work around the NFTA metro station, which mostly remained open during construction.

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The building required more than 7,300 tons of steel, tens of thousands of yards of concrete, some 23 acres of drywall, 4,000 gallons of paint, 300 windows and 1,300 interior doors.

In the first phase of construction, over 125 workers from various trades, under the direction of general contractor LPCiminelli, worked two shifts from 7 a.m. to midnight.

Six internal bridges were built to span the atrium on five floors.

The project was a boon to local contractors, including minority- and womenowned businesses. Robert Barnett, above, a graduate of the UB School of Architecture and Planning, is head of Eaton Associates, a company started by his grandfather, Clarke Eaton Jr., which does drywall and acoustical tile work and supplies roofing materials.

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A Landmark in the Making

The eight-story building is located atop one of the highest points in the city.

A massive six-story scaffolding was used to construct the atrium, a space designed to invite collaboration and a sense of community.

Facilities mechanical room in the basement.

Construction of the 32-foot tall, two-story light tower at the Main and High streets entrance functions as the building’s signature feature, a beacon, often lit in UB blue (see page 16).

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The building’s 27,000 terra cotta panels were custom-made by Boston Valley Terra Cotta in Orchard Park, N.Y., one of the premier firms in the country that manufactures these panels. The terra cotta was chosen to complement the region’s rich architectural heritage.

Made of aluminum and weighing 800 pounds, the UB logo was lifted about 140 feet for installation. It was manufactured by ASI Signage Innovations on Grand Island, N.Y., which also manufactured and installed the building’s exterior and interior signage, including the name of the school.

The new home of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

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$4.5 MILLION BEQUEST GIFT FROM FACULTY MEMBER By Mary Cochrane The late Peter Ayers Nickerson, PhD, a beloved faculty member who taught for nearly 50 years in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, has given $4.5 million to the school. The bequest gift from Nickerson’s estate serves two purposes: $3 million of the gift created a dean’s fund in the Jacobs Peter Ayers Nickerson, PhD School in Nickerson’s name. The remaining $1.5 million established an endowed faculty position, the Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Professor and Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences. John E. Tomaszewski, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor, was installed as the first Nickerson chair on November 17, 2017 (see opposite). Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president of health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, says the gift is especially meaningful because it comes from a longtime faculty member who devoted himself to the Jacobs School and its students during his entire career. “Peter was revered by his students, many of whom stayed in touch with him long after leaving UB,” Cain says. “His love of education and his service to students will live on through the department chair and dean’s fund named for him. This gift was his way of helping future students.” That Nickerson gave his estate to UB did not surprise anyone who knew him. Cain said Nickerson was well aware of the importance such gifts have to the success of the $200 million fundraising campaign for the Jacobs School. Reid Heffner, MD, SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor and Professor Emeritus of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, saw how much UB meant to Nickerson during the 43 years he knew him. “His love for UB, the campus, the faculty, the students, the academic life was to define Peter as time went on,” says Heffner. “He was Mr. UB.” Longtime UB colleague and friend Claude Welch, SUNY Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Political Science, said of Nickerson: “Peter gave himself wholeheartedly to his students and colleagues. He had no greater love than for this university.”

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Scott Darling, MD ’03, a student of Nickerson’s who became his colleague in the Jacobs School, said UB is the better for having had Nickerson all those years. “Dr. Nickerson was an invaluable mentor to me,” says Darling, clinical assistant professor of orthopaedics. “I will never forget how much he helped me get to where I am today—a local physician who has worked at UBMD Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine for just over 10 years. His legacy will always live on in those he has touched so dearly.” A native of Harwich, Mass., Nickerson earned a bachelor’s degree from Brown University and a master’s degree and a PhD from Clark University, where he was a NASA predoctoral fellow. Known for his research into high blood pressure, he was recruited to join UB’s faculty in 1967. The list of his service to UB is long: chair of the UB Faculty Senate for five terms; chair of the Medical Faculty Council, the governance body for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, for one term; senator of the SUNY-wide Faculty Senate, representing the health sciences; and president of the Western New York Alzheimer’s Association chapter. Nickerson initiated many innovative programs at UB, including the Jacobs School’s early admission program, and was instrumental in developing liaisons between the Jacobs School and the School of Law. Primarily, he will be remembered for his kindness and love of teaching. Students recall his popular undergraduate honors seminar “What Did They Die From?”, which studied disease by delving into the biographies and deaths of famous people. Perhaps most of all, they remember the snacks Nickerson brought to evening seminars, guaranteeing none of them went hungry while in class over the dinner hour. And with his final act of extraordinary generosity, he will be remembered in perpetuity by the institution he cherished. In September, the UB community held a memorial celebration in honor of Nickerson, who died Feb. 2, 2017 at the age of 75.


TOMASZEWSKI NAMED FIRST NICKERSON PROFESSOR AND CHAIR John E. Tomaszewski, MD, was installed as the inaugural Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Professor and Chair of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences in a ceremony held November 17.

Photo by Sandra Kicman

Internationally renowned for his development of quantitative image analysis tools used in digital pathology and automated cancer diagnostics, Tomaszewski has been professor and chair of pathology and anatomical sciences at UB since 2011. Prior to that, he served as professor and interim chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

From left, Dean Michael E. Cain, MD; John E. Tomaszewski, PhD, inaugural Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Professor and Chair; SUNY Distinguished Professor Reid R. Heffner Jr., MD; Provost Charles S. Zukoski.

Tomaszewski’s work includes more than 300 peer-reviewed manuscripts and more than 40 published reviews, book chapters, editorials and books. Earlier in 2017, he was named a SUNY Distinguished Professor.

IN MEMORIAM

ROBERT G. WILMERS Banking leader and philanthropist Robert G. Wilmers, chairman and CEO of M&T Bank and philanthropist, died December 16, 2017 at his home in Manhattan, N.Y. He was 83. Widely regarded as a leader in the U.S. banking industry, Wilmers also was greatly admired within the Western New York community for his dedicated civic-mindedness. Over the course of his nearly 35-year tenure as head of the Buffalobased M&T Bank Corporation, he played a significant role in health care in Western New York and the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. For more than five years, he served as co-chair of the steering committee for the $200 million Build the Vision Campaign for the Jacobs School, along with Jeremy M. Jacobs, chairman of Delaware North, and Nancy H. Nielsen, MD ’76, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy at UB.

Wilmers was one of the first “Count Me In” supporters of the campaign and served as a catalyst for community giving. From the start, he strongly endorsed moving the Jacobs School downtown in close proximity to its clinical and research partners, with the goal of establishing a vibrant regional academic health center. “We remember Bob for the interest and deep concern he showed for improving health care in our community and for the integral role he envisioned our school playing in this endeavor,” said Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “What Bob gave to our community and our school cannot be replaced, but it can serve as a model as we plan for a future that is much brighter for having had his guidance and vision.” In 2015, UB presented Wilmers its highest honor, the Chancellor Charles P. Norton Medal, during the 169th annual University Commencement. The medal is presented annually in public recognition of a person who has, in Norton’s words, “performed some great thing which is identified with Buffalo . . . a great civic or political act, a great book, a great work of art, a great scientific achievement or any other thing which, in itself, is truly great and ennobling, and which dignifies the performer and Buffalo in the eyes of the world.”

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S O U T H CA M P U S R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N REMAINS A PRIORITY BY JOHN DELLACONTRADA

Now that the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has departed the South Campus for its new building downtown, another priority project has sparked interest and steadily gained attention. UB’s South Campus Revitalization Plan is a major component of the UB 2020 Comprehensive Master Plan for the university’s three campuses. Nearing its 10th year of implementation, the plan is transforming UB’s historic Main Street campus. “It is very important to the university that the South Campus remains vibrant,” says President Satish K. Tripathi. “We’ve made tremendous progress in restoring the beauty and vitality of the South Campus, and we will continue to do so into the future.”

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The revitalization plan already has resulted in the renovation and opening of Kapoor Hall; transformation of the iconic Hayes Hall, reopened in 2016; and the current renovation of Crosby Hall for the School of Architecture and Planning. In June 2017, the School of Dental Medicine completed the first phase of an $11-million renovation to its preclinical simulation lab in Squire Hall, and in 2018, UB will begin renovating the dental school’s community dental clinic and build a welcome center for the clinic, also in Squire.

CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATIONS AND EXPANDED GREEN SPACE As the Jacobs School transitions into its new building on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, another phase of the South Campus Revitalization Plan will ramp up and is projected to bring 1,500 faculty, staff and students to the campus. The long-term plan is for the South Campus to become home to many of UB’s graduate and professional education programs. Phase 1 of the plan, to be completed by 2020 pending approval of state funding, calls for renovation of Parker Hall to become the home of the School of Social Work and renovation of Townsend Hall for UB administrative units.

Phase 2 of the plan calls for construction of a new building on the South Campus to house both the Graduate School of Education and a new Professional Education Center. In the short term, the Biomedical Research Building, Biomedical Education Building, and Cary and Farber halls will be renovated for use by students and faculty from UB’s other health sciences schools, particularly the School of Dental Medicine and the School of Public Health and Health Professions. Sherman Hall will be demolished to make room for future construction. Over the next five years, the plan also calls for continued renovations and upgrades to Allen Hall and Clark Hall. The campus landscape will continue its transformation as well, adding greenspace and courtyards to complement the $1.8 million renovation of Harriman Quadrangle, completed in 2010, and removing temporary buildings that have existed on the South Campus for decades. The overall objective is to restore the classic collegiate beauty of the South Campus in keeping with the design envisioned by Buffalo architect E.B. Green in his 1930 campus plan.

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A LO O K B AC K FORMER HOMES OF THE JACOBS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

FIRST HOME—1846-1849 The first home of the school was at the corner of Washington and Seneca streets. It was rented for $300 a month and included a lecture room, museum, library, laboratory and amphitheater that accommodated up to 200 students and doubled as a dispensary. The dispensary—used for surgery, medical consultations and the dispensing of medicines—was free to indigent patients and those willing to appear before a class.

SECOND HOME—1849-1893 Three years after its founding, the medical school moved into its own building at the corner of Main and Virginia streets. It cost $15,000 to construct and was the first structure in Buffalo built for the purpose of collegiate instruction. The red sandstone building was Romanesque in style and described as one of the best designed medical school buildings in the country.

THIRD HOME—1893-1953 When the 48th session of the medical school commenced on September 25, 1893, the school had moved to 24 High Street near Buffalo General Hospital. The new building was so tastefully designed and well built, it was considered to be one of the most attractive buildings of any kind outside of New York City.

FOURTH HOME—1953-2017 The new medical and dental school building on UB’s South Campus (Bailey Avenue) opened for classes in September 1953 in Capan Hall (now Farber Hall). It provided much more space and modern equipment for instruction in the basic sciences.

Source: Another Era: A Pictorial History of the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1846-1996

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Photos by Douglas Levere

Brian Koyn, left, and Raymond Dannenhoffer, PhD ‘87

LANTERN RETURNS HOME A PAIR OF HISTORIC UB LANTERNS IS RESTORED AND REUNITED

A long-lost lantern was finally reunited with its mate when the new building for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences opened its doors in December. The two lanterns, which graced the vestibule of the UB Medical School on High Street from 1893 until 1953, took their rightful place together in the lobby of the state-of-the-art medical school building on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. It’s still a mystery how only one of the lanterns made the move to Farber Hall when the medical school moved to the South Campus in 1953. But a bit of happenstance brought the lost lantern back into UB’s fold. Now, after years apart, the pair have assumed their original role. When the 19th-century lanterns illuminated the medical school lobby of yore, they were gaslights. The newly restored pair have been upgraded with modern LED lights that mimic the flicker of gas flames. The one lantern went missing when the medical school relocated to the South Campus. About a decade ago, a tip from now-retired UB employee, Christina Ehret, led to its discovery in a barn in Eden, N.Y. Unaware of its history, the property owners willingly returned it to UB. Raymond Dannenhoffer, PhD ’87, associate dean for support services, assisted by now-retired James Mecca Jr., from UB’s health science fabrication department, coordinated its transfer. Years of exposure to the elements left the formerly missing lantern in disrepair. Using the intact Farber Hall lantern as a template for surface scanning, the restorers—Ewa Stachowiak, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, and Brian Koyn, from UB’s health science fabrication department—painstakingly replaced the missing and decaying pieces of steel with exact plastic replicas created on a 3-D printer in the lab of Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences. The replacement pieces, painted to match the original metalwork, are virtually indistinguishable from the original steel pieces. By Julie Wesolowski; originally published in At Buffalo.


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Moudi Hubeishy knows how critical raising money is to a program’s success. He founded UB HEALS, a street medicine program, as a first-year UB medical student. Hubeishy and his fellow volunteers also had to raise

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long-term funding for the program. Today, with 30 volunteers and a handful of grants, UB HEALS is on solid ground. Now a third-year medical student, Hubeishy knows how much one gift can help ensure the future for those in need, much like your gift to the UB Fund ensures students like him can succeed. “When you support us, you encourage us to make changes for the better,” he says. Gifts to the UB Fund have an immediate impact on students.

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For alumni and friends of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

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