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2018–19 ESSENTIAL SERIES

TEXAS PERFORMING ARTS

Bowie Symphonic: Blackstar NOV 1 | BASS CONCERT HALL

Jordi Savall

The Routes of Slavery NOV 8 | BASS CONCERT HALL

Pavel Urkiza y Congrí Ensemble NOV 9 | MCCULLOUGH THEATRE


in this issue

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Pavel Urkiza y Congrí Ensemble “Pavel Urkiza has mapped an intricate musical network that spreads from the Middle East to Spain to Africa to Cuba and Latin America.” —Miami Herald

Welcome to Texas Performing Arts

5 What’s Next 6 Theatre Etiquette 10 What Should I See

We are thrilled you could join us this evening. Should you require any assistance, please speak to the nearest usher or visit Guest Services.

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If you would like to provide feedback about your experience, you can share your thoughts with us in the post-event survey emailed to the ticket purchaser.

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We look forward to hearing from you!

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Next? Share Your Experience 5 Things to Expect from this Essential Series Season Word Search

Making Tracks

UT alumna Cassie Shankman shares her experiences as a Biomedical Music™ composer.

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Student Spotlight Photo by Bruce W. Palmer

Sophmore Brenda Stanfill discusses the affect of performing arts on Human Development. texasperformingarts.org

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Bowie Symphonic: Blackstar Cellist Maya Beiser joins composer and conductor Evan Ziporyn and his Ambient Orchestra for a performance of David Bowie’s final album.

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Jordi Savall

The Routes of Slavery “Jordi Savall conjures joy out of misery in an ambitiously conceived evening.” —Limelight 3


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C!RCA Humans NOV 13; Photo by Sarah Walker

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2018–19 Season

WHAT’S NEXT SEP

Reduced Shakespeare Company Sep 13 & 14 | MCT

Fred Hersch Trio Sep 21 | MCT

Taylor Mac Sep 27 & 28 | MCT

OCT

Yekwon Sunwoo, piano Oct 5 | BRH

Ragamala Dance Company Written in Water Oct 18 | BCH

The Play That Goes Wrong Oct 23–28 | BCH

NOV

Blackstar An Orchestral Tribute to David Bowie Nov 1 | BCH

Jordi Savall The Routes of Slavery Nov 8 | BCH

Pavel Urkiza & Congrí Ensemble Nov 9 | MCT

C!RCA Humans Nov 13 | BCH

The Merchant of Venice* Nov 14–Dec 2 | OBT

Private Peaceful Nov 16 | MCT

Love Never Dies Nov 27–Dec 2 | BCH

Texas Performing Arts Essential Series MCT McCullough Theatre

BRH Bates Recital Hall

Lexus Broadway in Austin

BCH Bass Concert Hall

OBT Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

*A Texas Theatre and Dance Production. Subscriber discount not available. texasperformingarts.org

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Please silence or turn off all electronic devices upon entering the hall and refrain from using your phone during performances; the glow from your device is distracting.

Take care of personal needs before the performance or at intermission to avoid disturbing your seat neighbors. Please sit in the seat you are assigned to avoid confusion.

Outside food or drink is not allowed in any venue. Food purchased within the venue must be enjoyed in the lobby. Drinks are allowed in the hall. We encourage you to take selfies in our lobbies before the show. Photography of any kind is not permitted inside our venues unless approved by the artist or tour.

If you need assistance during the performance, please go to the nearest usher. We understand the need to shift around, but please try not to do so constantly. You will disturb the view of those behind you. Go easy with perfume and cologne. Many people are highly allergic. Please refrain from talking, humming, or singing along with the performance, except when encouraged to do so by the artist or show. Please wait for an appropriate moment to dig something out of your pocket or bag. If your child becomes restless, frightened, or loud, please take them to the lobby. Remember, our lobby is not soundproof.

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Photo courtesy the Library of Congress

E R T A THE TTE E U Q I ET

The sound system for shows is provided by the touring production. Unfortunately, many variables may occasionally hinder sound quality. Please let an usher know if you are having trouble hearing.


LOEWY LOEWY LAW FIRM LOEWY LOEWYLAW LAW LAWFIRM FIRM FIRM


Making Tracks Former Texas Performing Arts student employee (’13) Cassie Shankman has always been a busy woman with many talents and interests. As a young girl, Cassie loved the arts. She frequented the theater, was an active jazz band member, and loved going to the movies. Simultaneously, she enjoyed learning about science. Her early interest in different sound frequencies resulted in qualifying for the state science fair competition, earning her the attention of multiple universities. Now, as a leading Biomedical Music™ composer, she combines both her passions of music and

Our student employment program is made possible thanks to the support of our generous donors and Texas Inner Circle members. 8

science to help others learn to walk again with the Movement Tracks Project. Together with an amazing team of music therapists, patients, musicians, and engineers, Cassie creates music that integrates with biomedical systems and devices that makes walking possible for patients. Many of these patients include people that have Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, children with cerebral palsy, and other neurologic conditions. “As a musician, it’s amazing to know that every day I am helping people get better with my music,” said Cassie. “I feel incredibly lucky for this opportunity.” With Executive Producer Hope Young’s vision, the Movement Tracks Project creates pieces for patients with neurologic conditions that are helping people move better through texasperformingarts.org


Patterson at Texas Performing Arts who taught her the skills necessary for working in event and program management, Cassie feels lucky to have had so many great mentors.

“As a musician, it’s amazing to know that every day I am helping people get better with my music.”

Photo by Alexandra Galewsky

Cassie Shankman conducts a small orchestra for a churchhouse recording.

much research and testing. This ground-breaking project has also caught the attention of SXSW, where Cassie recently spoke on the topic and her team became an Official 2018 SXSW Interactive Innovation Awards Finalist. It’s an honor that she credits hard work as well as her education at The University of Texas at Austin. “While at UT, I met a lot of people, learned professional skills, and was consistently inspired! I had access to visiting artists and shows that I still can’t believe, and I went to several performances a week,” she said. “This allowed me to listen, learn, and connect with so much music.” Cassie also attributes much of her success to her professors and mentors outside the classroom. From her first composition mentor Ian Dicke, who opened her mind and ears to the writing process, to Cynthia texasperformingarts.org

“My most-influential mentor was my professor Yevgeniy Sharlat. He inspired me to get a Bridging Disciplines Program (BDP) certificate in film studies and study film, which led me to meet so many people that I still collaborate with today,” said Cassie. She gained confidence with speaking film lingo with film and music professionals through her internship in the BDP program with composer Hanan Townsend, which in turn led her to make connections with other industry professionals. “The best part of my job, whether it be scoring music to the human body or to film, is continuously learning and collaborating with other professionals,” Cassie said. “I love creating a new industry and seeing results with the patients!” When she isn’t working on The Movement Project, Austinites can find her DJ’ing at local events under the stage name DJ CASS&RA. She considers herself fortunate to be able to be a part of multiple projects and stresses new graduates to be flexible with their career journey. “Don’t be afraid to go with what life throws at you,” she said. “I assumed I’d get a job doing film music but it’s been a wild trip to get to this career. I wouldn’t have it any other way.” 9


What Should I See Next?

BEGIN HERE

The music and movement elements were the most memorable.

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT THE PERFORMANCE?

WHICH EXPRESSION OF ART IS YOUR FAVORITE?

Dance is amazing!

I loved the storyline! I love music! C!RCA

WHAT KIND OF STORIES DO YOU LIKE TO HEAR?

Ragamala Dance Company

Culturally Diverse

Blackstar

Taylor Mac

Pavel Urkiza

*Join us for these Private Peaceful

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Jordi Savall

upcoming Essential Series performances! texasperformingarts.org

Photos by Pedro Grieg, ioulex, David Arenal, Little Fang Photography, Tom Lawlor, and Bruce Palmer

Yekwon Sunwoo

Historically Rich


Student Spotlight At Texas Performing Arts, we professionally involve students in every aspect of our organization. Having the opportunity to show, connect, and inspire our students to be the next generation of arts leaders is one of the most important things we do.

PROFILE NAME YEAR JOB MAJOR

W

MINOR

Brenda Stanfill Class of 2021 Texas Performing Arts Receptionist Human Development & Family Services (HDFS) Sociology

e sat down with Brenda Stanfill to talk about the performing arts, her studies in Human Development, and her time as a valued student employee. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT & FAMILY SERVICES SOUNDS LIKE AN INTERESTING MAJOR. TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT THAT.

We’re a small group with just over 550 students which is about 1% of the total number of undergrad students at the university. We study every form of development across the lifespan such as emotional, social, and relationship development. Some students also study biological and psychological development. 12

Our goal is to improve the lives of individuals, families, and communities from infancy to old age. I’m really enjoying learning about everything so far.

AS A STUDENT OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, HOW DO YOU FEEL THE PERFORMING ARTS IMPACTS STUDENTS IN THE AUDIENCE?

As students, we can get caught up in our routines; classes, work, homework, and hang outs with

texasperformingarts.org


friends. And as time goes on, it’s just more of the same—stressing about papers and tests. The performances on campus offer a chance for students to decompress and see something out of the ordinary. It’s almost something personal because the actor, actress, dancer, or comedian is right there on the stage, giving a unique artistic performance each night. It allows us to make a personal connection with something new and lowers our stress level.

WHAT ABOUT THE GENERAL PUBLIC? HOW DO YOU FEEL THE ARTS IMPACT OUR SOCIETY?

I think the arts are important for both the artists and the audience. Art is an expression of what it means to be human and it reflects our lives. The artist expresses important issues or personal experiences. For the audience, it can connect us through emotion and bring us together in times of uncertainty.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT THE PERFORMING ARTS?

I’m a really big fan of stories—written or heard. I love the stories that performances tell with dialogue, music, and the combination of storytelling through music. Considering my major, I love seeing cause and effect interactions, especially in a production. We watch a story unfold because the actions of one character affected another character in a certain way. Real life is a lot harder, but the idea of chaos from miscommunication is the same. The way we communicate can affect another person’s emotions and how they feel about themselves. texasperformingarts.org

TEXAS INNER CIRCLE Take your Texas Performing Arts experience to the next level by becoming a member of the Texas Inner Circle. Your membership supports our educational engagement programs, the student employment program, and last season, thanks to donors like you, Texas Performing Arts was able to provide 14,000 $10 Student Tickets to the Central Texas community. Memberships start at just $150 for the year and include: • Free Parking • Behind-the-Scenes Tours • Access to our members-only Texas Inner Circle Lounge with pre-ordered drink service and express elevator To Join call 512.232.8567, or email support@texasperformingarts.org

“I’M A REALLY BIG FAN OF STORIES—WRITTEN OR HEARD. I LOVE THE STORIES THAT PERFORMANCES TELL WITH DIALOGUE, MUSIC, AND THE COMBINATION OF STORYTELLING THROUGH MUSIC.” 13


Nov 1, 2018

Bass Concert Hall

Bowie Symphonic: Blackstar Maya Beiser, solo cello Evan Ziporyn, conductor Dave Cook, sound design The Ambient Orchestra

featuring musicians from Boston Conservatory at Berklee

Presented in partnership with the Butler School of Music and KMFA-FM

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Flute & Piccolo Sarah Brady Flute & Alto Flute Caroline Shaffer Oboe Alexis Mitchell Oboe & English Horn Leo Ziporyn Clarinets Shannon Williams Clarinets & Bass Clarinet David Angelo Horns Maria D’Ambrosio Ryan Fossier

First Violins Gabby Diaz (concertmaster) Alec Norkey Second Violins Shaw Pong Liu Brian Stuligross Violas Amelia Hollander Roselyn Hobbs Cello Leo Eguchi Roselyn Hobbs Bass Gillian Dana Chris Janson

Trumpets Jonah Kappraff Brian Voelz Trombone Justin Coyne Bass Trombone Steve Filippone Keyboard Kevin Madison Percussion Christopher Gunnell Daniel Reifsteck Nicholas Stevens

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Program Blackstar Concerto David Bowie (1947–2016) Conceived and adapted for orchestra by Evan Ziporyn Blackstar ‘Tis a Pity She Was a Whore Lazarus Sue (or In a Season of Crime) Girl Loves Me Dollar Days I Can’t Give Everything Away

ABOUT THE PROGRAM David Bowie released Blackstar on January 8, 2016; he passed away two days later: in characteristic fashion, he had written and staged his own eulogy! Blackstar was his parting gift to the world—dark but luminous, richly textured and deeply moving. It sounded this way even in the two days before he died; afterwards, as the world realized what he’d been trying to tell us, the album’s poignancy became overwhelming. Blackstar is a concept album, but the concept itself is unnamed, perhaps because it is the Unnameable itself, death, how to face it, and how to celebrate life—his and ours—even in its shadow. Unlike Bowie’s 2015 musical Lazarus (which shares similar concerns and one song), Blackstar has no clear story line; unlike many of his earlier albums, there is no single alter ego—no Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, Major Tom, Thin White Duke. Rather a collection of characters, some of whom may remind us of all of the above, taking us through 16

aspects of their lives, then returning to the deathbed and the final passage. The two videos Bowie made for the album also provide clues with images of hospital beds, death masks, possession, and trance. I am not alone in having come to regard the album as Bowie’s personal guide to the ultimate career move, his own personal Book of the Dead. Bowie spent his life playing with personae, but the character in the first song, the title track ‘Blackstar,’ is beyond anonymous. He is ‘somebody else’ who ‘took his place.’ A lot of time is spent telling us who he’s not (‘I’m not a film star, I’m not a gangster, I’m not a porn star, I’m not a wandering star”), and very little telling us who he is (only the enigmatic ‘blackstar’). The ‘spirit’ who ‘rose a metre, then stepped aside’ in the first song checks back in with us two songs later, in ‘Lazarus.’ He’s ‘in heaven,’ or ‘so high It makes my brain whirl,’ or possibly both. In either case, he’s gone, beyond reach, having ‘dropped my cell phone down below.’ These songs alternate with tales from the ‘bardo,’ the point between texasperformingarts.org


life and death, where worldly images are retained but gradually slip away. Bowie jump-cuts from the ethereal death-bed scenes of ‘Blackstar’ and ‘Lazarus’ to images from lives fully lived. ‘Tis Pity’ and ‘Sue’ are intense soliloquys of passion and violence, while ‘Girl Loves Me’’s profane, singsong refrain (‘where the f*ck did Monday go?’) is couched in the menacing argots of Nadsat, the made-up language of Clockwork Orange and Polari, a London street slang. The final two songs take us back to the point of departure. In ‘Dollar Days’, the character struggles to let go (‘I’m trying to…I’m dying to…’); in ‘I Can’t Give Everything Away’ he does exactly that, flying away, ‘seeing more and feeling less, saying no but meaning yes, this is all I ever meant, that’s the message that I sent.’ Tonight’s orchestral version is without lyrics (short excerpts are printed below, and full lyrics can be found online), but the words and their meaning—this tale of Death and Transfiguration—are very much in our minds. They hover over the music; like Blackstar’s ‘spirit’ figure, they ‘rose a metre and stepped aside.’ We made our Blackstar to honor Bowie and his influence, but also to immerse ourselves in this amazing music, to live inside it, explore it, embody it. Also to transform it, in the spirit of Bowie and of the record itself. In making these arrangements, Jamshied Sharifi and I followed Bowie’s breadcrumbs, keeping closely to the paths of the original songs, but never trying to imitate or replicate his original ‘sound and vision.’ As it turns out, Bowie’s music, which so radically transformed the ecosphere of the

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recording, is vibrant enough to thrive in a very different one, the acoustic and live biome of the orchestra. Bowie’s 4-octave vocal range matches that of the cello almost exactly; I knew immediately that Blackstar would be a cello concerto, with Maya Beiser as soloist. Bowie’s voice is unique and inimitable, and his range was matched by his stylistic breadth. Over his career, from album to album, but also within a single song, sometimes a single phrase, Bowie would shapeshift while always remaining himself. He could be a brooding rocker one moment and an English music hall star the next; he could start a phrase bel canto and end it like a blues man. He could be a jazz crooner, soul stylist, folk singer, sprech-stimmer, and always sound expressive and authentic. Maya Beiser does similar things on the cello: she transforms the instrument with each performance, whether she’s playing Bach, Dvorak, Piazzolla, or Janis Joplin. In Blackstar she is vocalist one moment, lead guitarist the next, she evokes Bowie’s spirit while never ceasing to be herself. —Evan Ziporyn

ABOUT THE ARTISTS Maya Beiser Avant-garde cellist and multifaceted artist Maya Beiser defies categories. She has captivated audiences worldwide with her virtuosity, eclectic repertoire, and relentless quest to redefine her instrument’s boundaries, passionately forging a career path through uncharted territories. Praised by Rolling Stone as a “cello

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rock star”, she has been hailed by the The New York Times for her “stirring emotional power” while the Boston Globe described her as “a force of nature.” Raised in the Galilee Mountains in Israel, surrounded by the music and rituals of Jews, Muslims, and Christians while studying classical cello repertoire, Maya is dedicated to reinventing solo cello performance in the mainstream arena. A featured performer on the world’s most prestigious stages including Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, BAM, Kennedy Center, London’s Southbank Centre, Royal Albert Hall and the Barbican, Sydney Opera House, Beijing Festival, Barcelona’s L’auditori, Paris’ Cité de la Musique, and Stockholm’s Concert Hall, she has collaborated with a wide range of artists including Tan Dun, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, Steve Reich, Louis Andriessen, Shirin Neshat, Bill Morrison, Robert Woodruff and Lucinda Childs, among many others. Her discography includes ten solo albums and numerous feature appearances on film and TV soundtracks; her 2016 album TranceClassical debuted at No. 1 on the Apple Music classical chart and her acclaimed album Uncovered also topped the classical music charts making the number one spot on both Amazon and Apple Music. Maya Beiser is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT. Her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people, and she was recently a Presenting Artist at the inaugural CultureSummit in Abu Dhabi. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University. 18

Evan Ziporyn Composer/arranger Evan Ziporyn’s music has taken him from Balinese temples to concert halls around the world. He has composed for and collaborated with Yo-Yo Ma, Brooklyn Rider, Ethel, Anna Sofie Von Otter, the American Composers Orchestra, BMOP, Iva Bittova, Terry Riley, Don Byron, Wu Man, and Bang on a Can. In 2017, his arrangements were featured on Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s The Vietnam War, and on Silkroad’s Grammy-winning album Sing Me Home. Recent conducting appearances include LA Opera (Keeril Makan’s Persona), Hamburg Elbsphilharmonie (Julia Wolfe/Bill Morrison’s Fuel), the Barcelona Symphony, and the Cleveland Museum of Art. At MIT he is Distinguished Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Art, Science and Technology. He studied at Eastman School of Music, Yale, and UC Berkeley with Joseph Schwantner, Martin Bresnick, and Gerard Grisey. He received a Fulbright in 1987, founded Gamelan Galak Tika in 1993, and has composed a series of groundbreaking compositions for gamelan and western instruments, as well as evening-length works such as 2001’s ShadowBang, 2004’s Oedipus Rex (Robert Woodruff, director), and 2009’s A House in Bali, which was featured at BAM Next Wave in October 2010. Awards include a USA Artist Fellowship, the Goddard Lieberson Prize from the American Academy, Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship, and commissions from Carnegie Hall, Kronos Quartet, Rockefeller Multi-Arts Program, and Meet the Composer. From 1992-2012 he served as music director, producer, and arranger for the Bang on a Can texasperformingarts.org


Allstars, winning Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year award in 2005. He has also recorded with Paul Simon, Christine Southworth, and the Steve Reich Ensemble (sharing in their 1998 Grammy for Best Chamber Music Performance). Ambient Orchestra Evan Ziporyn started the Ambient Orchestra in 2016 to create living orchestral versions of great ambient recordings such as those of Fripp, Eno, and Terry Riley. David Bowie’s untimely death impelled him to launch the ensemble with two tributes to this seminal figure. “We wanted to do something now, in the present moment, while our thoughts and feelings about David Bowie and what he represents are still all too present. Brian Eno defined ambient music as ‘an atmosphere, a surrounding influence, a tint…pieces for particular times and situations.’ Ambient also means ‘of or relating to the immediate surroundings.’ The Ambient Orchestra is devoted to both.” In its debut performance on January 29, 2016, just two and a half weeks after Bowie’s death, the 80-member ensemble performed Philip Glass’s symphonic tributes to Bowie: Symphony No. 1—Low Symphony and Symphony No. 4—Heroes Symphony in a fundraiser for cancer research. The following March, the ensemble reconvened to premiere Blackstar, with Maya Beiser as soloist. This program also featured a new ambient-ized version of Erik Satie’s Gymnopedies and Ziporyn’s own Frog’s Eye. Ziporyn and Beiser have since performed Blackstar with the Barcelona Symphony and with the LPR Ensemble at texasperformingarts.org

SummerStage in New York’s Central Park. Tonight’s performance is the debut of the 26-member Ambient Orchestra, in which our principal soloists are joined by wonderful faculty and students of the Boston Conservatory’s Contemporary Classical Music Program. We are deeply grateful to this visionary institution for the embrace and support of this program. Boston Conservatory at Berklee The Boston Conservatory at Berklee provides a progressive learning environment where students are challenged to realize their potential as artists and inspired to pursue their dreams. Long recognized for its specialized training in dance, music, and theater, the Conservatory’s merger with Berklee now combines this rigorous, focused instruction with unparalleled access to a broad range of academic and creative opportunities. Set in the cultural, historical, and educational hub of Boston, this extraordinary institution represents the future of performing arts education. Credits All compositions by David Bowie, ©RZO Music; Sue by David Bowie, Paul Bateman, Bob Bhamra, Maria Schneider; ©Music Sales Corporation, Tintoretto Music All arrangements by Evan Ziporyn; Lazarus & I Can’t Give Everything Away arranged by Jamshied Sharifi & Evan Ziporyn

Acknowledgments Alex Rigopulos and Sachi Sato Boston Conservatory at Berklee Cathy Young, Executive Director Michael Shinn, Dean of Music Sarah Brady, Director of Contemporary Classical Music Ryan Fossier, Chief Ensemble Operations Coordinator MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology MIT Music & Theater Arts

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Nov 8, 2018

Bass Concert Hall

The Routes of Slavery Memories of Slavery 1444–(1865 USA) 1888

There will be one intermission. In memoriam of Kassé Mady Diabaté (1949–2018)

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Photo by Teresa Llordes

This performance is made possible in part by the Topfer Endowment for Performing Arts Production. Presented in partnership with the Butler School of Music and KAZI-FM

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USA

René Marie, voice Donnie Ray Albert, narrator MALI

Mohammed Diaby, voice Ballaké Sissoko, kora & voice Mamani Keita, Nana Kouyaté, Tanti Kouyaté, chorus & dance

Tembembe Esamble Continuo COLOMBIA

Leopoldo Novoa, marimbol, marimba de chonta, tiple colombiano & voice MEXICO

Ada Coronel, vihuela, wasá, dance & voice Enrique Barona, vihuela, leona, jarana, quijada de caballo, dance & voice Ulises Martínez, violin, vihuela, leona & voice BRAZIL

Maria Juliana Linhares, soprano Zé Luis Nascimiento, percussion

La Capella Reial de Catalunya Arianna Savall, soprano David Sagastume, countertenor Víctor Sordo, tenor Petter Udland Johansen, tenor Yannis François, baritone Pieter Stas, baritone

Hespèrion XXI

Pierre Hamon, flutes Béatrice Delpierre, flute & shawm Daniel Lassalle, sackbut Jordi Savall, treble viol Xavier Puertas, violone Xavier Díaz-Latorre, guitar Andrew Lawrence-King, Spanish Baroque harp David Mayoral, percussion

Jordi Savall, direction

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ABOUT THE ARTISTS Jordi Savall For more than 50 years, Jordi Savall has been one of the most versatile musical personalities of his generation. He has rescued musical gems from the obscurity of neglect and oblivion and has resurrected them for all to enjoy. A tireless researcher into early music, he interprets and performs the repertory both as a gambist and a conductor. His activities as a concert performer, teacher, researcher and creator of new musical and cultural projects have made him a leading figure in the reappraisal of historical music. Together with Montserrat Figueras, he founded the ensembles Hespèrion XXI (1974), La Capella Reial de Catalunya (1987) and Le Concert des Nations (1989). With these ensembles, he explores and creates a world of emotion and beauty shared with millions of early music enthusiasts around the world. Through his essential contribution to Alain Corneau’s film Tous les Matins du Monde (César Best Soundtrack winner), his busy concert schedule (140 concerts per year), his recordings (6 albums per year) and his own record label, Alia Vox (founded with Montserrat Figueras in 1998), Jordi Savall has proved that early music does not have to be elitist as it can appeal to increasingly diverse and numerous audiences of all ages. As the critic Allan Kozinn wrote in The New York Times (2005), Savall’s vast concert and recording career can be described as “not simply a matter of revival, but of imaginative reanimation.” Savall has recorded and released more than 230 discs covering the 22

medieval, renaissance, baroque and classical music repertories, with a special focus on the Hispanic and Mediterranean musical heritage, receiving many awards and distinctions such as the Midem Classical Award, the International Classical Music Award and the Grammy Award. His concert programs have made music an instrument of mediation to achieve understanding and peace between different, and sometimes warring, people and cultures. Guest musicians appear accordingly with his ensembles from many places including the Arab states, Israel, Turkey, Greece, Armenia, Afghanistan, Mexico, as well as North American musicians. In 2008, Jordi Savall was appointed European Union Ambassador for intercultural dialogue and, together with Montserrat Figueras, was named Artist for Peace under the UNESCO Goodwill Ambassadors program. He has played a seminal role in the rediscovery and performance of Una Cosa Rara and Il Burbero Di Buon Cuore by the composer Vicent Martín i Soler. He has also conducted Le Concert des Nations and La Capella Reial de Catalunya in performances of de Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo, Vivaldi’s Farnace, Fux’s Orfeo ed Euridice and Vivaldi’s Il Teuzzone. Jordi Savall’s prolific musical career has brought him the highest national and international distinctions, including honorary doctorates from the Universities of Evora (Portugal), Barcelona (Catalonia), Louvain (Belgium) and Basel (Switzerland), the order of Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur (France), the Praetorius Music Prize awarded by the Ministry of Culture texasperformingarts.org


Photo by TK

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and Science of Lower Saxony, the Gold Medal of the Generalitat of Catalonia and the prestigious Léonie Sonning Prize, which is considered the Nobel prize of the music world. “Jordi Savall testifies to a common cultural inheritance of infinite variety. He is a man for our time” (The Guardian, 2011). Donnie Ray Albert Louisiana native and 1972 Louisiana State University graduate, Donnie Ray Albert began his operatic career after completing his masters degree in Vocal Performance from Southern Methodist University in 1975. For 13 years, Mr. Albert performed as a Bass-Baritone before switching to Baritone in 1988. Mr. Albert’s 43-year career has taken him to some of the world’s greatest opera houses and concert halls. Highlights include Tosca (Scarpia) in Portland, Atlanta, Giessen and with the New York City Opera; Aida (Amonasro) in Washington, DC, Köln, Boston, Montreal, and in the Stade de France; Nabucco in Vancouver, with the Florentine Opera, and at La Scala; Rigoletto in Miami, Mannheim, Vancouver and with the New York City Opera; Otello (Jago) in Sacramento and Hamburg and with the New York City Opera ; Un Ballo in Maschera (Renato) in Los Angeles and with the Lyric Opera of Chicago and; The Flying Traviata in Austin, Köln, and Arizona; Macbeth in Columbus, Ohio and Köln; La Traviata (Germont) at the Metropolitan Opera in the Park in New York City; Die Walküre (Wotan) in Austin and Tokyo; Siegfried (Wanderer) in Tokyo; Tales of Hoffmann (Villains) in Houston and Köln, and 24

at the Prague National Theater, and Covent Garden. Orchestral engagements include Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, Jerusalem, London, Cleveland and New York. Mr. Albert has collaborated with notable conductors: John DeMain, James Conlon, Paavo Järvi, Riccardo Muti, Zubin Mehta, Alexander Joel, John Fiore and Karel Mark Chichon. Mr. Albert’s recent performances included soloist in the opera John Brown, the 4 villains in the Tales of Hoffman (Dresden, Germany); Germont in La Traviata (Dresden, Germany). Upcoming appearances include the Doctor in Vanessa, Glyndebourne Festival Opera, Great Britain. Mr. Albert can be heard on RCA’s Porgy and Bess (Grammy 1977—Best Opera Recording and the Grand Prix du Disc); The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (two Grammys: 2008 Best Opera Recording and Best Classical Album) conducted by James Conlon; EMI’s Eine Florentinische Tragodie, also conducted by James Conlon. For the past 5 years, Mr. Albert has been Senior Lecturer in Voice at The University of Texas at Austin’s Butler School of Music. Tembembe Ensamble Continuo Ensamble Continuo is dedicated to exploring, recreating, and promoting the musical connections between the Hispanic baroque period and traditional music from Mexico and Latin America. This overlapping breaks the imaginary musical wall dividing them by opening new possibilities for enjoying, expanding, and understanding music. Continuo blends baroque guitar music pieces texasperformingarts.org


gathered from Spanish and Mexican tablatures, and links them with contemporary Mexican and Latin American sones. By exploring commonalities in terms of musical practices and instruments, it puts together a music, singing, and dancing show which revives the festive spirit of 17th century and contemporary fandango gatherings (popular festivities with live song and dance). Their show is a fandango-concert exploring subtlety and contrast in music, dancing, and singing. The program includes Spanish and Mexican baroque music for guitar and tiorba linked together with sones from Mexico and Latin America. These include sones from Veracruz, Tixtla (Guerrero), the Huasteca region, Michoacan and Jalisco, as well as Bambuco and Joropo music from the plains of Colombia and Venezuela. This musical interweaving aims at showing how 17th century baroque music and traditional contemporary Mexican and Latin American music are two faces of the same coin, distant in time and close in spirit. They can be blended together in one single festivity and one single fandango. Ensamble members are: Enrique Barona, Eloy Cruz and Leopoldo Novoa. They studied music at the National School of Music in Mexico City, as well as in many other music institutions in Mexico, Colombia, the U.S.A., and France. They currently teach at UNAM, Morelos Center for the Arts, and Ollin Yolistli Center. They also organize and direct workshops on building and playing traditional instruments in the state of Morelos (Mexico). Regular guest artists often collaborating with Tembembe include: texasperformingarts.org

Patricio Hidalgo (composer, improviser and jarana player) ; Zenén Zeferino (composer, improviser and jarana player): Ada Coronel (singer), Donají Esparza (dancer), Ulises Martínez (violin), Miguel Cicero (harpsicord), Hille Perl (viola da gamba) Lee Santana (Theorbo) and Steve Player (guitar). Tembembe has performed in Mexico’s main concert halls as well as performances in United States, France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Colombia, Malasya, Singapore and Korea. To date, Tembembe has recorded CDs with important labels such as Urtext Digital Classics, Sony, BMG-Deutsche Harmonia Mundi, Alia Vox (Catalonia). Tembembe has performed in several festivals and chamber music seasons, such as: International Early Music Encounter in Mexico City; National Encounter of “Jaraneros” in Tlacotalpan, Mexico; International Cervantino Festival; Gateway to the Americas (N.Y, USA); Early Music Festival in Gijón, Spain; Eldkirch Festival (Austria); Singapore Arts Festival; Chamber Music Festival in Bogotá, Colombia; Hi Seul Festival in Korea; Recently, Tembembe has developed a strong collaboration whith maestro Jordi Savall and Hesperión XXI, performing in several tours accross Europe and the U.S.A. Hespèrion XXI Ancient music’s most important value stems from its ability as a universal artistic language to transmit feelings, emotions and ancestral ideas that even today can enthrall the contemporary listener. With a repertoire that encompasses the 25


period between the 10th and 18th centuries, Hespèrion XXI continuously searches for new points of union between the east and west. Hespèrion XXI has a clear desire for integration and for the recovery of international musical heritage, especially the Mediterranean basin and with links to the New World. In 1974 Jordi Savall and Montserrat Figueras, together with Lorenzo Alpert and Hopkinson Smith, founded the ancient music ensemble Hespèrion XX in Basel as a way of recovering and disseminating the rich and fascinating musical repertoire prior to the 19th century on the basis of historical criteria and the use of original instruments. The name Hespèrion means “an inhabitant of Hesperia”, which in ancient Greek referred to the two most westerly peninsulas in Europe: the Iberian and the Italian. It was also the name given to the planet Venus as it appeared in the west. At the turn of the 21st century, Hespèrion XX became known as Hespèrion XXI. Today, Hespèrion XXI is central to the understanding of the music of the period between the Middle Ages and the Baroque. Their labors to recover works, scores, instruments and unpublished documents have a double and incalculable value. On one hand, their rigorous research provides new information and understanding about the historical knowledge of the period, and on the other hand, the exquisite performances enable people to freely enjoy the aesthetic and spiritual delicacy of the works of this period. Hespèrion XXI set out on a clearly innovative and artistic course that would lead to the establishment of 26

a school in the field of ancient music because they continue to conceive ancient music as an experimental musical tool they seek the maximum beauty and expressiveness in their performances. Any musician in the field of ancient music will have a commitment to the original spirit of each work and has to learn to connect with it by studying the composer, the instruments of the period, the work itself and the circumstances surrounding it. But as a craftsman in the art of music, he is also obliged to make decisions about the piece being played: a musician’s capacity to connect the past with the present and to connect culture with its dissemination depend on his skill, creativity and capacity to transmit emotions. Hespèrion XXI’s repertoire includes, amongst others, the music of the Sephardi Jews, Castilian romances, pieces from the Spanish Golden Age, and Europa de les Nacions. Some of their most celebrated concert programs are Les Cantigues de Santa Maria d’Alfons X El Savi, La Diàspora Sefardí, the music of Jerusalem, Istanbul, Armenia and the Folías Criollas. Thanks to the outstanding work of numerous musicians and collaborators who have worked with the ensemble over all these years, Hespèrion XXI still plays a key role in the recovery and reappraisal of the musical heritage, and one that has great resonance throughout the world. The group has published more than 60 CDs and performs concerts for the whole world, appearing regularly at the great international festivals of ancient music. La Capella Reial de Catalunya texasperformingarts.org


Following the model of the famous Medieval “royal chapels” for which the great masterpieces of both religious and secular music were composed on the Iberian Peninsula, in 1987 Montserrat Figueras and Jordi Savall founded La Capella Reial, one of the first vocal groups devoted to the performance of Golden Age music on historical principles and consisting exclusively of Hispanic and Latin voices. In 1990, when the ensemble received the regular patronage of the Generalitat of Catalonia, it changed its name to La Capella Reial de Catalunya. The newly-formed ensemble specialized in the recovery and performance on historical principles of the polyphonic and vocal music of Spain and Europe from the Middle Ages and Golden Age up to the 19th century. La Capella Reial de Catalunya shares with Hespèrion XXI the same artistic outlook and goals, rooted in respect for the profoundly spiritual and artistic dimension of each work, combining quality and authenticity regarding the style of the period with a careful attention to the declamation and expressive projection of the poetic text. The ensemble’s extensive repertory ranges from the Medieval music of the various cultures of the Mediterranean to the great masters of the Renaissance and the Baroque. The group has distinguished itself in various Baroque and Classical opera repertories, as well as in contemporary works by Arvo Pärt. The Capella Reial de Catalunya played on de Jacques Rivette’s soundtrack of the film Jeanne La Pucelle (1993) on the life of Joan of Arc. In 1992, La Capella Reial de texasperformingarts.org

Catalunya made their opera debut accompanying all the performances of Le Concert des Nations. They have received various awards and distinctions in recognition of their more than 40 CDs. Under the direction of Jordi Savall, La Capella Reial de Catalunya pursue an intense program of concerts and recordings all over the world, and since the ensemble’s creation it has regularly performed at the major international early music festivals.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM Despite the fact that for more than four centuries, from 1444 (the year of the first mass slaving expedition, described in a text from the period) to 1888 (the year slavery was abolished in Brazil), over 25 million Africans were shipped by European countries to be bound in slavery. This period of history—one of the most painful and shameful in the history of mankind—is still largely unknown by the general public. The women, men and children who were brutally deported from their villages in Africa to the European colonies in the New World had only their culture of origin to accompany them on the journey: religious beliefs, traditional medicine, dietary customs, and music—songs and dances that they kept alive in their new destinations, known as habitations or plantations. This evening, we shall try to evoke those shameful moments in the history of humanity through a series of eloquent texts and accounts, accompanied by the emotion and vitality of the music to which the slaves sang and danced. 27


And yet, how could they think of singing and dancing when they were reduced to the condition of slaves? The answer is simple: song and dance, rhythmically structured by music, were the only context in which they could feel free to express themselves - something that nobody could take away from them. Singing was, therefore, their chief means of expressing their sorrows and their joys, their suffering and their hopes, as well as being a reminder of their origins and their loved ones. It was this that enabled all those people with their diverse origins and languages to create a common world and withstand the negation of their humanity. First documented 5,000 years ago, slavery is the most monstrous of all the man-made institutions created throughout history. In fact, its existence only began to be objectively documented when “history” (as opposed to prehistory) began; in other words, with the invention of the earliest writing systems. Its organization is closely linked to the invention of the State in the modern sense of the term, that is, an organ of centralized coercion, supported by an army and a civil service. Indeed both, as pointed out by Christian Delacampagne in his Histoire de l’esclavage (Paris, 2002), “came about five thousand years ago, in the region that historians call the ‘fertile crescent’ [...] There is a simple explanation for this apparently surprising connection between the emergence of writing, slavery and the State: all three became possible when the forces of production of a given social group, in a given time and place, became sufficiently developed to enable 28

them to produce a greater quantity of food than was required for the survival of the community.” As Paul Cartledge explains in his interesting text, in Ancient Greece there were a thousand or so separate political entities, and the principal cities based their social, political and economic relations on slave labor. “Aristotle’s definition of a citizen—that of a man who actively participates in public affairs and sits as a magistrate—corresponds to the perfect citizen of a democratic Athens [...] Thus it appears that there was a mutually strengthened circle or loop between slavery in the mines and democracy—a virtuous circle for free citizens, but a vicious circle for the exploited and harshly treated slaves.” In Antiquity and the Middle Ages, black slaves were a rare, exotic and very costly merchandise for their owners. For more than two thousand years, the majority of slaves were white, originating in Northern Europe and the regions around the Mediterranean Sea. All this changed when a sizable commercial trade, instigated by the Crowns of Portugal and Spain from the middle to the late 15th century was established between Europe, Africa and America. Slavery already existed in Africa before the massive Portuguese and Spanish slaving expeditions began. It was the need to replace the feeble workforce of native Indians, especially when it was recognized that Indians had a soul and had to be converted to Christianity, that the modern trade in black African slaves to the New World began. We know that there were black slaves on board the ships of Christopher Columbus, and also that in the texasperformingarts.org


Photo by TK

years immediately after 1500, King Ferdinand I sent instructions for the purchase and transfer of black slaves to the island of Hispaniola, where they were sent to work in the gold mines. Alonso de Zuazo, appointed judge in residence on the island by Cardinal Cisneros, recommended in a letter dated January 22, 1518: “Dar licencia general que se traigan negros, gente recia para el trabajo, al revés de los indios naturales, tan débiles que solo pueden servir en labores de poca resistencia.” (To issue a general authorisation to import Blacks, who are strong and can withstand hard work, unlike the native Indians, the latter being so weak that they are only useful for tasks that do not require much stamina.) It was on this same island that the first revolt of black slaves took place in the New World in 1522. The French began to trade in black African slaves in the 1530s at the mouths of the Senegal and Gambia Rivers. From the beginning of the 17th century, the English arrived in the Caribbean, first in the Bermudas (1609) and then in Barbados, while the Dutch were the first to unload twenty African slaves (August 20, 1619) in the port of Jamestown in the English colony of Virginia, which became the center of the tobacco-growing industry. It was the first time that Blacks had set foot as slaves on the soil of the future United States. It was also the beginning of a particularly painful history: the history of today’s Afro-Americans. Paradoxically, it was during the “Age of Enlightenment” (1685–1777) that the Black slave trade reached its apogee. Like texasperformingarts.org

Christian Delacampagne, we ask ourselves the questions: “Are light and shadow truly inseparable? Was the progress of reason incapable from heralding the age of justice? Are reason and evil inextricably linked? Such would appear to be the lessons of European history. But it was to be another two hundred years, dozens of wars and several attempts at genocide later, in the aftermath of 1945, before this bitter lesson was explicitly expressed by the philosophers Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno (Dialektik der Aufklärung, 1947).” With the presentation of the concert The Routes of Slavery and the accompanying CD/DVD book from ALIA VOX, featuring the live audio and video recordings of the concert at the Festival of Fontfroide Abbey in France on July 19, 2015, we aim to present the essential facts surrounding that terrible history, thanks to the extraordinary vitality and profound emotion of this music, preserved in the ancient traditions of the descendants of slaves. The music lives on, etched into the memory of the peoples concerned, from the coast of West Africa and Brazil (Jongos, Caboclinhos paraibanos, Ciranda, Maracatu and Samba), Mexico, the islands of the Caribbean, Colombia and Bolivia (songs and dances from the African traditions), together with the traditional Griot music still found in Mali. The music is performed by musicians from Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Mali, Morocco and Madagascar in dialogue with Hispanic musical forms inspired in the songs and dances of slaves, native Indians and racial mixes of all kinds based on African, Mestizo and Indian traditions. The contribution of the more or less forced collaboration 29


of slaves in the Church liturgy of the New World is represented in this recording by the Villancicos de Negros, Indios, and Negrillas, Christian songs by Mateu Flecha the Elder (La Negrina), Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (Puebla mss.), Roque Jacinto de Chavarría, Fr. Filipe da Madre de Deus, etc., performed by the vocalists and soloists of La Capella Reial de Catalunya and Hespèrion XXI, together with musicians from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, Mexico, Spain and Catalonia. For the first time, they come together in a triangular relationship, linking the three continents of Europe, Africa and Latin America, and the heritage of Africa and America with borrowings from the European Renaissance and the Baroque. This resulted in a disturbing and deeply hope-inspiring record of a musical heritage which is the positive, reverse side of a culture of conquest and forced conversion. There could be no starker contrast than that which exists between the striking beauty and mysterious power of this music and the brutal accounts and detailed descriptions that our selection of chroniclers and religious figures of the period (texts recited in the book/CD/DVD by Bakary Sangaré) and this evening by Montreal actor Jean Fayolle gave concerning the expeditions to capture men and women in their African villages. We are given an insight into those accounts through the studies, historical research and reflections on the subject contained in the excellent articles in the book The Routes of Slavery contributed by our formidable team of experts: Paul Cartledge, José Antonio Piqueras, 30

José Antonio Martínez Torres, Gustau Nerin and Sergi Grau. Through the music of the descendants of slaves, we also wish to pay a moving tribute as we remember that dark period, and appeal to each one of us to recognize the extreme inhumanity and the terrible suffering inflicted on all the victims of that heinous trade. It was an ignoble enterprise perpetrated by the majority of the great European nations against millions of African men, women and children, who for more than four hundred years were systematically deported and brutally exploited to cement the great wealth of 18th and 19th century Europe. Those civilized nations have not yet deemed it necessary to make an unreserved apology, or even to offer any kind of compensations (symbolic or real) for the forced labour carried out by the slaves who were regarded as chattels (nothing more than “tools” without a soul). On the contrary, the four-century-long slave trade, during which they became established on the coasts of Africa, paved the way for the principal European countries’ “colonization” of Africa. In other words, it confirmed them in the belief that the continent was their property. It is as if from the end of the Middle Ages to the end of the 19th century, Europe had relentlessly pursued one common goal: to subjugate, one after the other, all the lands stretching south of the Mediterranean. In view of the extremely serious situation of large numbers of people risking their lives to reach Europe from Africa (so far, more than 3,000 have died since the beginning of 2016) by crossing the sea once known as the MARE NOSTRUM and texasperformingarts.org


now a sad MARE MORTIS, why is it that today, in the 21st century, none of the those responsible for immigration in European countries remember our enormous moral and economic debt to the Africans who are now forced to flee their homelands, currently mired in abject poverty or ravaged by tribal or territorial wars, and frequently abandoned to corrupt dictators (propped up by our own governments) or insatiable multinational companies? The period which saw an official end to slavery (1800–1880) saw the rise—particularly strong in those countries where it had lasted the longest—of another aberrant, inhuman kind of relationship, characterized by a visceral hatred of the other, the foreigner and, above all, of the former slave: racism. Slavery was built on contempt for the other—whether Black, Mestizo, or the native Indian—while racism feeds on hatred of people who are no longer slaves, but different. As Christian Delacampagne writes: “The history of slavery preceded and paved the way for that of racism. Historically, slavery came first. Racism was merely the consequence of a civilization’s long habituation to the institution of slavery, whose victims have always been foreigners.” We also want to draw attention this evening to the fact that, at the beginning of the third millennium, this tragedy is still ongoing for more than 30 million human beings, of whom many are children or young girls subjected to new forms of slavery brought about by the demands of production and prostitution. We need to speak out in indignation and say that humanity is not doing what it should to put an end to texasperformingarts.org

slavery and other related forms of exploitation. Although absolutely illegal in the vast majority of countries in the world, and despite also being officially condemned by the international authorities, slavery still exists today, even in the supposedly democratic developed countries. Again, as Christian Delacampagne writes, “In the face of slavery, as in the face of racism, there is no possible compromise. There is no possible tolerance. There is only one response: zero tolerance.” Against the absolute outrage of the exploitation of child labour and the prostitution of minors, against these endemic ills in human society, which continue to breed new forms of slavery, and against that hatred of the other, which is the inhuman force of racism, the struggle is not over. Through this evening’s concert and the texts and music of our CD/ DVD book, we hope to contribute to that struggle. We firmly believe that the advantage of being aware of the past enables us to be more responsible and therefore morally obliges us to take a stand against these inhuman practices. The music in this program represents the true living history of that long and painful past. Let us listen to the emotion and hope expressed in these songs of survival and resistance, this music of the memory of a long history of unmitigated suffering, in which music became a mainspring of survival and, fortunately for us all, has survived as an eternal refuge of peace, consolation and hope. —Jordi Savall Sarajevo/Bellaterra, 21/23 October, 2016 Translated by Jacqueline Minett

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Nov 9, 2018

McCullough Theatre

Pavel Urkiza y Congrí Ensemble Songs of Cuba: 1851–1941

A Journey of Influences Pavel Urkiza Musical Director & Arrangements, Romantic guitar, Timple, Ukelele, Vocals Daniel Bernaza Bass Baroque Flute, Clarinet, Mute Cornet, Ranaissance Cornett, Pistons Cornet Rigel Pérez Flamenco Cajon, Bandir, Bongos, Darbuka, Ambiance Percussion Manuel Orza Contrabass

Presented in parntership with The Butler School of Music Department of Ethnomusicology, The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, The John L. Warfield Center for African American Studies, The Center for Mexican American Studies, The Department of Mexican American and Latino/a Studies, The Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and KUTX’s Horizontes

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Program La Bayamesa (1851) Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, José Fornaris, Francisco Castillo La Paloma (1861) Sebastián Iradier Tristezas (1883) José Viviano “Pepe” Sánchez La Ausencia (1905) Alberto Villalón Pensamiento (1915) Rafael Gómez “Teofilito” Longina (1916) Manuel Corona Tardes Grises (1926) Sindo Garay

Photo by David Arenal

Olvido/Veneración (1927 & 1929) Miguel Matamoros Juramento (1930) Miguel Matamoros Drume negrita (1941) Ernesto Grenet 33


ABOUT THE PROGRAM Cuban music is a flavorful stew made of myriad cultural ingredients that have seasoned Cuban society during centuries of migration and trade in the Caribbean. Congri is a typical Cuban dish made of red beans and rice; the origin of the word is from the French ‘congrès,” which means a gathering or coming together. The term linguistically reflects the Haitian francophone influence in Cuba of the 19th Century.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS Pavel Urkiza Recognized as a master musician for his contributions to contemporary Cuban music, Pavel Urkiza is considered one the most skilled and innovative popular music composers and performers from Cuba. Pavel has produced over 10 of his own albums and more than 15 of other musicians. He has a strong passion for Ibero-American music and art, which has been the subject of his most recent CD and documentary. Daniel Bernaza Daniel Bernaza graduated in 2000 from Cuba’s National School of Music as clarinetist and professor of chamber music and later studied classical recorder in Spain and cornet in France. He has played and toured with world-renowned musicians and ensembles and under the direction of masters such as Gabriel Garrido, Joseph Cabré, and Shalef Ad-El. Daniel has recorded more than 10 albums. 34

Rigel Pérez Rigel Pérez has a music degree in percussion from the Amadeo Roldan Music Conservatory in Havana. He plays the full spectrum of Cuban percussion, drum set, Flamenco Cajón, and has recently incorporated North African and Middle Eastern instruments into his repertoire. He’s had the honor to play with many modern-day icons of Cuban music and has participated in the Lincoln Center Jazz Band under the direction of Wynton Marsalis. Manuel Orza Manuel Orza finished his studies in Amadeo Roldan Music Conservatory (Havana Cuba) in 1989. Has played with: Terry Bozzio (drums), Roy Hargrove, Arturo Sandoval, Jose Feliciano, Simon Stockhausen (keybords), Michael Riessler, Robby Ameen (drums), Manantiales Band, Gloval Vicion, Vinicio Capocela, Julio Barreto (drums), Ravi Coltrane (sax), Michel Portal, Markus Stockhausen (trumpet), Alfredo de la Fe, “New York All Stars,” Jimmy Bosch, Dave Valentin, El Canario, Giovanni Hidalgo, Guajiro Miraval, Cheo Feliciano, Celia Cruz, Tito Nieves, Rey de la Paz, Ray Sepulveda, Andy Montanez, “Mercado Negro”, Amaury Gutierrez (Latin Granmy 2011), Ayme Nuviola, Richi Flores, Laura Pausini, and many others.

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Photo by TK

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Texas Inner Circle Texas Performing Arts gratefully acknowledges the financial support of our donors. Each year, thousands of students throughout the region enjoy the performing arts thanks to your generosity.

Donations made as of Aug 13, 2018 Please note that the donor acknowledgment page is updated each semester. Texas Performing Arts values every gift received. However, we regret that limited space does not allow us to list every donor. For information on ways to give, please call the membership office at 512.232.8567 or email us at support@texasperformingarts.org *Denotes Essential Series Subscriber

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BENEFACTOR’S CIRCLE $6,000+ Anonymous Julie and Steve Avery Jannis and Robert B. Baldwin III Dianne and Robert Brode* Virginia and Gilbert Burciaga* Marianne and Mario Davila* Susan and Geoffrey Gay Joanne Guariglia* Dan Jackson and Jeremy Guiberteau* Julia Marsden* Eric and Angie Mischke Kathleen D. Panoff Stephanie L. Perkins* Gina and Don Reese Sarah and Berny Schiff PRODUCER’S CIRCLE $3,000-5,999 Drs. Lynn Azuma and Brian Hall Dinah and Barry Barksdale Thomas D. Barrett Carolyn R. Bartlett* Joe Batson Lori and Tito Beveridge Edwina P. Carrington Suzanne and Bill Childs* Maria and Jeffrey Dwyer* Matthew B. Ely Debi and Tom Etheredge Jessica and Marc Evans Susan and Lee Gammill* Cynthia S. Glover and Dwight C. Williams Susan and Barry Goodman Lisa Harris Mary Ann and Dr. Andrew Heller Mellie and Tom Hogan* Jessica Jansen and Michael Cicchella Dede Kerr Gretchen and Lance Kroesch* Sue and Gary Lowe Janis and Joe Pinnelli Chuck Ross and Brian Hencey* Tahira Sahibzada Dianne and Eugene Schoch, III Carolyn and Marc Seriff Syd Sharples* Carol Ann Shepherd Barry Smith Kathleen and Gilbert Soto Laura and David Starks Shari and Eric Stein Lorri Stevenson Barbara Tocker Carole Tower and Matthew St. Louis Rebecca and Scott Van Den Berg Chris Yost Annie and Brian Zucker DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE $1,200-2,999 Tiffany Andrews Anonymous Kimberly Attallah

Cathi Backor Bonnie L. Bain Becky Beaver and John Duncan* Casey Blass and Lee Manford Robert Bloemhof Tahra and Michael Boatright Kim Britt Kara and Shelby Brown Kim and Thomas Reed Brown* Kay Brumley Renee Butler Lee Carnes Carol and Shannon Casey Farrah and Nathan Chelstrom Linda and Jim Cintron Sue and Kevin Cloud Thomas Crowson Isabella Cunningham Dr. and Mrs. Exalton Delco* Margaret Denena and Cliff Knowles* Beth Domel Susan and David Donaldson Weslie and Stephen Elliott Barbara Ellis and Alex McAlmon* Kevin Espenlaub and John Hampton* Laura Estes and Joyce Lauck Judy and Bill Estes Mr. and Mrs. John W. Fainter, Jr. Richard and Susan Farias Andrew C. Fear Jim Ferguson and Art Sansone* Nanci L. Fisher Pamela and David Frager Clay Francis and Andrew Haver* Sandra Freed Nancy Gary and Ruth Cade Michael Gibertini and Kari Nations Brian Gleason* Sharon and Bruce Golden* Melissa and Rick Gorskie Carolyn and Lino Graglia Karen and Rowland Greenwade Sven and Robin Griffin Juan M. Guerrero, M.D. Richard Hartgrove and Gary Cooper* Gladys M. Heavilin Raje Heyer Anne and Thomas Hilbert Martha Hilley Damon and Ella Holditch Amy and Jeffrey Hubert Frank Ikard Admiral and Mrs. B. R. Inman Donna and B.R. Israel Ben and Jenn Ivester Jo Ann Ivester John Izzo and Deb Tackett* Gary C. Johnson Jacqueline and Eric Johnson* Dr. Peniel Joseph Donna and Edward King Sheila Kothmann Cathy and James Kratz Terri LeClercq and Jack Getman* Calvin and Donna Lee texasperformingarts.org


Sue and Larry Lewellyn* Ellen and Richard Leyh Suzanne Lima* Mr. and Mrs. George F. Littlejohn Thomas and Ashley Loftus Yadira and Delfino Lorenzo Gayle and Scott Madole Liza and Jack Martin Mr. and Mrs. W.F. McCasland Molly McDonald and Chad Hartmann Sheryl and Daniel McNichol Monica and Robert Meadows Leti Mendoza Jennifer and Jim Misko* Mary and Lynn Moak Amy Wong Mok Melissa Moloney and Chris Walk Miriam and Jim Mulva Jennifer Muniz Carol Nelson Meri and Don Nelson Jeffrey Neumann Alan Nicholson Elizabeth and Dustin Norman Jacqueline and Shawn O’Farrell Julie and Pat Oles, Jr. Cathy Oliver Leora Orent and Art Markman Seema Parekh and Neel Segal Connie and Sam Pate* Michele and Roy Peck Shari and John Pflueger Liz and Jon Phelan Leslie Powell Kate and Scott Powers Debbie and Jim Ramsey Sara and Dick Rathgeber Gina Richardson LTC and Mrs. Gerald Risovi Faith Roberts Kenneth and Libby Sandoval Nancy Scanlan Steve and Susan Schaffer Dylan Scott Nina and Frank Seely Tracey Sharples Trish and Brian Sierer Mark W. Smith* Karin and Robert Stern Austin Stitzer Bruce Stuckman Lisa and Gregory Symons Nancy and L. Brent Talbott Martha Talley Louann and Larry Temple John E. Thompson Keith Uhls* Craig Wagener Zahir Walji Mark Weiss and Janet Bray Suzy and Otto Wheeler* Theresa and K.C. Williams Suzanne and Marc Winkelman Jacqueline Wittmuss Dr. Lucas Wong and Dr. Lisa Go Michele and Jud Wyatt

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CENTER STAGE $600-1,199 Dwain Aidala Mark Aitala Eric and Jackie Anderson Anonymous Donna Ayala* Jana and Barry Bandera April Berman Carolyn and Andrew Birge Denis Blake Stephanie and Michael Blanck Kurtis and Katherine Bowman Robert Bracewell Janice and Charlie Brown Aaron Buckholtz Jeanette Cortinas Wilma Dankovich Lorraine and John Davis Courtney and Adam Debower Dr. and Mrs. Ben Denny Lucy Ditmore Sharon Duboise* Susan and David Eckelkamp Sheila Ellwood* Carol and Clint Fletcher Jane W. Fountain Jon and Terece Geld Cheryl and R. James George, Jr. Sharon and Richard Gibbons Glenn and Nancy Gilkey Gabrielle and Gary Grossenbacher Cindy and John Hanly Jennifer and Randall Harris* Matt Hoggle and Austin Rodenbiker Marjorie and David Hunter Diane M. Hurst Pam and Doug James Mr. and Mrs. Michael Johnston Susan and Richard Klusmann Jan and Orion Knox* Melanie C. Lewis Jenny and Luis Lidsky Robin Lieberman Mary and Don Lorenz Nancy and Dale Lowe Vicki and John Meadows Dawn and Jason Melear Frances Ellen and Paul Metzger Pauline and Alfred Meyerson James W. Moritz R. Kent Morrison Brian Neidig Margaret Nilson Jonathan Ninh Augustine Park Robert Pender Kari and Brian Phenegar Suzanne Pickens and Douglas Hoitenga* Eric Rabbanian Dawn and Thomas Rich Karla Roberson Julie and Richard Schechter Betty Schnell Austin Seal Sean P. Sexton Amy Shipherd

Katherine and Dennis Smith Raymond Smith Steven Smith Nancy Whitworth Spong John Stockton Kay Strand Geeta and David Suggs Judy and Jay Tarwater Stacy and Michael Toomey Saradee and Melvin Waxler Marie and Phil Wendell Leslie and Bryan Weston Brenda and Rex White, Jr. Michael Wilen Micka and Richard Ziehr BACK STAGE $300-599 Lani Abbott John Adams Kathleen and Randy Adams Patricia and Steve Adams Laura Agnew Charlotte Alexander Doug Alexander Terri and Rick Allen Charlene Allmon Joann Anderson Anonymous Sandy and Richard Apperley Joel Artzt Carol E. Barrett Sherri Herschmann Battle June and Jim Baumoel Liby and Carl Beck Vicki and Mike Belcher Judy and Bob Benning Sky Benson and James Martin Robin and Martin Berson Carolyn and Jon Bible Kevin Black and William Basinger Bobbie and Billy Bloch Philip Bowden Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Braasch Jeanette H. Bradfield Glenda and Gilbert Bragg Becky and Larry Brenner Linda Broaddus Francesca Brockett and Jim Pedicano* Brook and Gerald Broesche Christopher and Tira Brom Judy and Ronald Brown Kimberly Brown Martha and Louis Brown Peggy and Gary Brown Angela Bryant Kathryn and Christopher Burch Esther Ray Burns Josie and Jim Caballero Cathy and Thomas Campbell Kelly Canavan Mary Jean Cargile Beverly Carr Kristen and Luis Casaubon Sue Chalmers Shane Chambers Rita and William Chapman

37


Anne Marie and Roger Chenu* Byron Childs Amrish Chokhavatia Beth and Tom Chronister Salina and Bing-Lun Chu Brenda Clayton Amy Clemmons and Mark Clarke Valerie Cline Fredrick G. Cloud III Joann Cocoros Eric and Sharon Cohan Rebecca and Mike Cole Sarah Compton Mary Crouch James B. Crow Jennifer and James Cuddeback* Mark Cunningham Brian and Amy Cussimanio Elaine Daigle Jo Ellen and William Dale Michael Damal Billy Davis Michelle DeWine* Courtney Dickey Richard and Deborah DiMeo Jim Dodrill and Kym Oltrogge Linda and Jim Dufner Patrick Dumont Jody and Robert Durch Karen and Tim Elliott Marsha and Jack Elrod Marilyn and Martin Englander Susan and Robert Epstein Eunice and Carlton Erickson* Debra and Heath Esterak Rosemary and Craig Estes Mary Etheredge Gaye H. Evert Marcia Fagerberg Carol Fahs Jaelene Fayhee and Jeff Smith Barb and Danny Fennewald Dinah and Bill Flood Paula Fowler Drs. Donald and April Fox Susan Gaddis Sara J. Gaetjens Lucy and Gary Gibbs Danny and Harriet Gleason Michelle and Jason Gooch Joy and Cal Gooden Nicola D. Grady Ann Graham* Susie Grandi Cynthia and Michael Gray Jana and John Grimes Beth and David Grimm Janet Grobowsky Bill and Carrie Grove Betty and Neil Gurwitz Maria Gutierrez and Peter Nutson Elizabeth and George Hainsworth Lawrence Hall Tizzle Bizzle Hallock Barbara and Tom Hamff Brenda and Tommy Harper Susan Harris Fran and Jim Hart

38

Sherman Hart Laura Harvey Nicole Heimlich Bryan, Valerie, and Felicity Hesters Ann Heuberger Bette Hines Gabriela and Hector Hinojosa Aline and Alan Hollingsworth Laura and Marcus O. Horton Robbi Hull John Huth Linda Jacoby Linda Jakobeit Kibbie D. Jensen Darlene Jilka Marion and Jim Jirsa* Brian Johnson and Brooke Turner* Katherine P. and Thomas L. Johnson Steven Johnson Anita and Ralph Jones Brenda E. Jones Smruti Joshi Laura and Ronald Kaplan Peggy D. Karstendiek Profs. Kelso and Dart Randy Kemp Kathleen Kennedy Deborah S. and Bill Keyes Kim and Glen Kieschnick Krystal Kincell Mark Kobren Nancy and Henry Kojzarek Bobbi Kommineni and Chakri Gottemukkala Walter Kuenast Paul Lagrone Cyndee Lake Hans Landel* Sheryl and Richard Lane Nadya Laws Rhonda Lawson Jeffrey Lazar Daniel Leeman Gail and Larry Lerche Joan and Moise Levy Dawn and Fred Lewis Phyllis Light Jung Lim Betty Lorch Alaire and Thomas Lowry Maria Luedke Tracey and Steve Luhrs Charles Lupher Russell Lyday Flo and Ren MacNary John Madden and Nikki Le Ramona Magid Richard Maier Jason Mance Pat and John Maniscalco Peggy Manning Michelle and Richard Manson Sarah and Glenn Marcus Joyce Martin Lauren Martin Steve and Roxanne Martin Tonya and Nicco Martinez

Jerry and Cindy Matl Charlotte and Tom Matthews Vicki and W. S. May, Jr. Stephanie Mayes Natalie and John Mazzie Virginia and Donald McAlister Kelli McDonald Suzanne and John McFarlane Ford McTee Bret Meador Hawk Mendenhall Alan Metayer Lynn Meyer and Rick Clemens Mark Miller Tracie Miller Janet Mitchell Janet and Jerry Morford Gwen and Robert Morton Leslie and Ron Munson Radhika Nair Todd Nash Marina Navarrete Catherine and James Nelson Desmond Ng Caleb North Nancy Norvell Mary and David O’Bannon Susan and Robert Oakley Doug Opalka Dr. Susan Orth and Dr. Mark Maunder Betty and Ron Patterson Gene and Karen Payne R. Richard Payne Sally and Doug Pendergras Deborah H. Peterson Barbara and John Pickett Allen and Tonya Place Bonnie and James Pohl Carla and Steve Portnoy Wanda Potts Buck Powers and Greg Sovey Selena and David Procter Sandra and Harry Pruett James Putnam Christina and Steve Quakenbush Sharan Rae and Craig Smith Lisa and Curtis Randa Phil Reeder Elinor and Edwin Reese Colleen and James Reeves Charles Rice Jeanine and Dan Roadhouse Christy and Matthew Robinson Sandra and James Robinson Susan Rodenko Kathleen and Art Rodriguez Duane Rogers Michele Ross Patricia Rotunda Linda and Jerry Roudebush Summer Rydel Terry and Rita Salyer Roberta and Ernest Saulmon Chad Schexnayder Keith Schnell Sandford Matthew Schocket, M.D. Charles Schoepflin texasperformingarts.org


Catherine Scholl David A. Schwendner Suzy and Guss Searcy Jude Sears Kathy and Howard Seitzman Lori Nunan Shaw Ann Silvernail and Judy Tierney Louise Simpson Emily Skeen Carole Smith Debbie and David Smith Rae Smith The Snyder Family Ann and Benard Stafford Barbara and David Staggs Paul Stone Charlie Stover Teri and Alex Suarez Mary and Francis Sullivan Richard Suman Kathy and Daryl Swarts Peter Swartz Kathy and Tom Sweet William Tabbit-Humphrey Johanna Takach Lynn and Gabriel Tellechea Mary Temple Faye Terry Bri Thatcher and Andy Modrovich Carrie Thomas Jodie Thompson Kathy Thompson Carol and Ted Thomson Heather and Jeffrey Tramonte Leslie and Gary Urano Jamie and Thomas Valigura Janet and Jack Van Cleave Stephanie and Stewart Vanderwilt Angela and John Vanston Bruce Vasbinder Ruth Verver Nancy and Michael Voticky Dennis Waley Martha Waller Kate and John Watson Lynmarie Weaver Kenneth R. Webb Steve and Kathy Weiner Chrissie Welty Pamela Werner Tracy Weston Barbara and Daniel Wheat Connie and Scott White Dianne and Leslie White Patricia White* Carolyn Williams Dyanne and Stan Williams Ann and Eric Wilson Susan and Chris Wilson with Bonita Grumme Elise Winchester Jerie Winekauf Nancy and Allen Woelke Christine Wolf Lisa Wyatt Timothy Young Riyam Zreik

texasperformingarts.org

Director’s Council Volunteer Leadership in Action The Texas Performing Arts Director’s Council is a group of dedicated donors, sponsors, and volunteers committed to presenting world-class performances, providing students access to every performance on our stages, and building the next generation of audiences, artists, and presenters. We are grateful for their extraordinary support and dedication.

2018–19 COUNCIL MEMBERS Robert and Jannis Baldwin Becky Beaver and John Duncan Reny Buduan Edwina Carrington Marianne and Mario Davila Laura Estes and Joyce Lauck Joanne Guariglia Rob Hagelberg Dan Jackson and Jeremy Guiberteau Cassie LaMere Julia Marsden Stephanie L. Perkins Rachel Tocker Annie and Brian Zucker

39


“I am truly thankful to everyone who has contributed to the $10 Student Ticket Fund. Thank you all so much!� Ha Bui

Graduate Student, Economics

With your support, the Texas Performing Arts Student Ticket Fund provides $10 tickets to up to 20,000 Austin area students of all ages each season. Go to texasperformingarts.org/support or call 512.232.8567 to make a gift.


Charity Angel Dawson, Desi Oakley and Lenne Klingaman in the National Tour of Waitress; Photo by Joan Marcus

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT / TEXAS PERFORMING ARTS

UT Students: Do you like Broadway, Concerts, and Comedy? You need a BASS PASS. Get 10 Tickets to every show, all year long at Texas Performing Arts. $

Get yours at basspass.org

BASS PASS


The Team Relationships & Revenue Kathy Panoff

Kristi Lampi

Director and Associate Dean

Business Operations Manager

Judy Lister-Patrick

Leigh Remeny

Assistant to the Director

Administrative Associate, Business Operations

DEVELOPMENT

Terri Waddle

Ashley Clarke Member Relations Manager

Rachel Schoen

Senior Departmental Buyer, Business Operations

Ticket Concierge Manager

CAMPUS & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Ann Stafford

Judith Rhedin

Director of Development

Sarah Weidler Young Associate Director for Development HUMAN RESOURCES

Warren G. Whitaker SPHR, SHRM-SCP, Human Resources Manager MARKETING

Gene Bartholomew Director of Marketing & Communications

Morgan Bathe

PRODUCTION

Seb Boone Master Electrician

Scott Bussey

Senior Associate Director

Assistant Stage Supervisor

Dani Pruitt Performance Logistics Coordinator

Hank Schwemmer Rebecca Switzer PROGRAMMING

Cynthia Patterson Program Manager

Will Shirey Talent Buyer

Tim Rogers

Master Electrician

Jeff W. Ellinger

Stage Supervisor

Business Operations, Programming & Production Rachel Durkin-Drga

Travis Perrin

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

Danielle Culp

Marketing Coordinator, Strategic Content

Assistant Scenic Charge Artist

Sarah Cantu

Performance Logistics Coordinator

Selena San Miguel

Ashton Bennett Murphy

Technical Director

Marketing Coordinator, Media Buying & Settlements

Graphic Designer

Scenic Art Supervisor

Prop Shop Supervisor

Program Coordinator, Education & Curriculum Development

Phoebe Greene

Nick Galuban

Karen Maness

Brenda Simms

Laura Bennett

Marketing Specialist, Digital Media

Audio Supervisor

Master Carpenter

Lighting Supervisor

Erica De Leon

Michael Malak

Assistant Director, Campus & Community Engagement

Senior Graphic Designer

Project Administrator

42

BUSINESS OFFICE

Conrad Haden Carolyn Hardin Assistant Prop Shop Supervisor

Jason Huerta Associate Scenic Studio Supervisor

J. E. Johnson Scenic Studio Supervisor

Yvonne Kimmons Assistant Director, Performance Logistics

Kenny Kuykendall Assistant Audio Supervisor

Lindsay Long Performance Logistics Coordinator

Assistant Director, Student Engagement

Patron Experience, Planning & Analytics Tara Vela Associate Director GUEST SERVICES

Sarah Andrews Guest Services Manager

Alec Pasquarella Front of House Operations & Special Events Manager TICKET OFFICE

Susan Griffin Ticketing Services Manager

Shade Oyegbola Assistant Ticketing Services Manager, Broadway & Theatre and Dance

Dianne Whitehair Ticketing Systems Manager texasperformingarts.org


Texas Performing Arts is also proud to acknowledge the hundreds of part-time and volunteer staff who play a critical role in presenting our annual season of world-class performing arts events to the Austin community.

House Managers Dina Black Virginia Bosman Margaret Byron Jan Collinson Carlos Hernandez Chuck Hesse Paige Horton Olga Kasma-Carnes Charlotte Klein

Eric Lee Laura Kojzarek Lee Michael Lee Ryan Monahan Shana Nichols Elisabeth Poigin Kimberly Hans Reaves Jessica Reed Ron Rizzato

Gracie Sanders Robyn Scott Josh Shandera Julie Spruell Andrea Stanfill Debra Thomas Leah Waheed Kyle Walker Sally Zukonik

Photo by TK

Student Employees Laura Baggs Mahaly Baptiste Natasha Cosme Batista Alex Bellon Jacob Brinks Haley Brower Casey Canamar I Gusti Ayu “Tiara” Chikadini Jane Cloninger Madeline Daniell Maddie Dennison Jennica Dombrowski Kate Dopkin Carol Endicott Emily Fernandez Wendy Fernandez Benjamin Galvan Lina Garcia Hunter Gierhart Emily Gitten Jose Guillen Lauryn Hanley Madeleine Hayes David Hernandez

texasperformingarts.org

Hannah Heydinger Hannah Robbins Hopkins Jared Horn Hannah Hurst Alexandra Jereb Taylor Jones Jiajing Qi Mikaela Kelarek Rachel Lai Adriana Lara James “Wyatt” Laster Kelsey Linberg Audre Long Cate Lowry Anna Lu Mila Luna Jenifer Margos Zachary Markizer Diamante Martinez Adam Means Sean Meyers Julio Muñoz Olivia Naworol Brian Nguyen Claire Norris

April Owusu Malyssa Quiles Kelyn Perry Eric Ramirez Alyson Redland Hayley Reese Lisa Resendez Morgan Riddle Alany Rodriguez Jessica Sell Rebekah Singleton Brenda Stanfill Christian Scheller Brisa Shaw Rohit Swaminathan Skyler Taten Taylor Travis George Velasquez Eric Vera Kenneth Wei Henry Wheatley-Ruther Nathan Wilton Christian Wintz Claire Wood Gustavo Zamarripa

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Become a Corporate Circle Member Members of the Corporate Circle enjoy VIP benefits while providing jobs for up to 70 students at Texas Performing Arts each year. With your support, students gain real work experience in every field from accounting to stage management, as well as professional mentoring, résumé and job search support, and a paycheck to help cover the cost of a world-class education at The University of Texas at Austin. The Corporate Circle is a great way to enjoy everything that Texas Performing Arts has to offer today, align your brand with the cultural leader in Central Texas, and help our students build a strong foundation for the future!

ENCORE

OVATION

Audre and Bernard Rapoport Regents Chair in Jewish Studies Dell Computer Corporation Dormady Financial Tito’s Handmade Vodka APPLAUSE

Austin Oral Surgery Michael Iupe, PLLC Jean-Marc Fray French Antiques K Friese & Associates KAH Architecture and Interior Design Live Oak-Gottesman OroSolutions For information on the Corporate Circle contact Ashley Clarke, Member Relations Manager 512.232.8567 | aclarke@texasperformingarts.org 44

texasperformingarts.org


@angelinaashtonrealtor

@s0ulfulfem

Share Your Experience!

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@stamperlady50

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@tpapresents

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@natasha18033

texasperformingarts.org


Work Smarter Ricoh’s innovative business services are empowering Texas Performing Arts, on and off the stage.

Spotlight on Ricoh's Interactive Whiteboard, which encourages innovative, engaging, hands-on collaboration.

Photo courtesy of ©Park Street Photography

Our experience and cutting-edge technology allows the real-time exchange of information and the ability to collaborate whenever, wherever and however—helping Texas Performing Arts to work smarter.

www.ricoh-usa.com

Proud Workplace Technology Provider of Texas Performing Arts

© 2017 Ricoh USA, Inc. Ricoh® and the Ricoh logo are registered trademarks of Ricoh Company, Ltd. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


MAKE THE MEMORIES LAST ALL SEASON T H E S P E L L B I N D I N G S E Q U E L T O T HE PH A N TOM OF T HE OPER A

NOV 27 - DEC 2 ON SALE NOW!

JAN 22 - 27 ON SALE OCTOBER 26

FEB 12 - 17 ON SALE NOVEMBER 9 ”ENTIRELY FRESH.

A REASON FOR CELEBRATION!” –NEW YORK MAGAZINE

APRIL 2 - 7 ON SALE NOVEMBER 30

JOIN US FOR THE BEST OF BROADWAY BroadwayInAustin.com Groups 10+*: 877.275.3804 WAITRESS contains mature content Presented by Texas Performing Arts. Broadway Across America provides production services for Texas Performing Arts. Sales tax exempt pursuant to Texas Tax Code Section 151.3101 (a)(3).


Celebrate as we welcome the collaboration of world-renowned Chef & Restaurateur Richard Sandoval and Chef James Flowers at Four Seasons Hotel Austin. Enjoy 15% off and VIP parking with our Pre-Theatre dinner offer. 98 San Jacinto Boulevard | Austin, TX 78701 | 512.685.8300


Support The 2018–19 Texas Performing Arts Season is made possible by generous support from our corporate and foundation partners. PRESENTING SPONSOR

PLATINUM SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSORS

PROGRAM SUPPORT

As an educational institution committed to the free exchange of ideas, Texas Performing Arts is proud to present a rich array of performing arts for the Austin and Central Texas community. Sponsorship of Texas Performing Arts does not imply endorsement of artists or their performance content by sponsors or their representatives.

For Information on Corporate Sponsorship Contact Ann Stafford, Director of Development 512.471.7583 | astafford@texasperformingarts.org 50

texasperformingarts.org


RARE FORM

IN SUPPORT OF GREAT PERFORMERS Lexus of Austin and Lexus of Lakeway are proud sponsors of the Lexus Broadway in Austin series at Texas Performing Arts. Through this dynamic partnership, Lexus is committed to supporting the cultural life in Central Texas by expanding world-class programming and strengthening the bond between performing arts and the community.

LEXUS OF AUSTIN 9910 Stonelake Boulevard (512) 343 -3400

lexus.com | #Lexus

LEXUS OF LAKEWAY 108 RR 620 South (512) 580 - 0600

Options shown. ©2018 Lexus


5 THINGS TO EXPECT FROM THIS ESSENTIAL SERIES SEASON

1

Bellyaches

Comedy troupes and colorful playwrights will leave you with breathless with laughter.

Photos by Jeff Thomas, Mark Niskanen, John Abbott, and Tom Lawlor

Learn more about our Essential Series artists at texasperformingarts.org/season

3

2

Rhythm

Whether it’s the smooth jazz of Fred Hersch or the harmonies of The Sounds of Zamar, you’ll enjoy this season’s melodies.

Strength

From the athleticism of the acrobats to the grace of Ragamala dancers, this season’s dance performances will demonstrate the art of strength.

4

Storytelling

Photo by TK

This season’s storytelling will transport you through Shakespeare’s Elizabethan era, the heartbreak of WWI, and the historic events of the 1960s.

texasperformingarts.org

5

Culture

You’ll experience a spectrum of cultures that bring perspectives from around the globe to center stage.

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1. The Routes of Slavery program is a unique performance that explores the history and music from the _ _ _ _ _ continents involved in the African slave trade. (5 LETTERS) 2. In 2008, Savall was also named an _ _ _ _ _ _ for Peace under the UNESCO Goodwill Ambassadors program. (6 LETTERS)

3. Jordi Savall plays the _ _ _ _, a bowed string instrument that is played between the legs. (4 LETTERS) 4. Blackstar, David Bowie’s last album, was released on his 69th _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. The British pop star died two days later. (8 LETTERS)

5. For this performance, Beiser joins composer and conductor Evan 54

Word Search

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Ziporyn and a 28-piece orchestra for a performance of Ziporyn’s _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ of David Bowie’s entire last album Blackstar. (11 LETTERS) 6. Evan Ziporyn, who spearheaded this project, is a _ _ _ _ _ Sahin Distinguished Professor of Music at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (5 LETTERS) 7. Cuban guitarist and composer Pavel Urkiza leads his _ _ _ _ _ _ Ensemble through an evening of skillfully interpreted classic Cuban songs composed between 1851 and 1941. (6 LETTERS) 8. Urkiza was born to Cuban parents on an educational mission in the Soviet Union in 1963 and raised by relatives in _ _ _ _ _ _, Cuba. (6 LETTERS)

texasperformingarts.org

1. THREE; 2. ARTIST; 3. VIOL; 4. BIRTHDAY; 5. ARRANGEMENT; 6. KENAN; 7. CONGRÍ; 8. HAVANA

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Word Search


“The greatest scientists are always artists as well.� Albert Einstein

A proud supporter of the healing power of the arts. The Best Is Here.

Blackstar | Jordi Savall | Pavel Urkiza Program  
Blackstar | Jordi Savall | Pavel Urkiza Program  
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