Two Row Times, September 21, 2022

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THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY September 21st, 2022 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

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SIX NATIONS - On Tuesday, September 20, the first inaugural Indigenous Golf Championship held at MontHill Golf and Country Club finalized with unique father-son wins in the top mens categories. John Monture Jr., (pictured) of Six Nations seized the gold for the Men's Overall Division, which decided that the tournament will again be held on Six Nations next year. His father, John Monture Sr., won gold in both the Net Men's and Senior Men's Divisions, earning the duo three gold pieces and a tournament trophy. TRT STAFF

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LOCAL

TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

keeping you informed.

Six Nations closer to high-speed Internet DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The high-speed Internet of the future is at Six Nations’ doorstep. On Oct. 3, the first part of a long-awaited fibre optic installation project will go live. First Nations Cable owner Jeff Thomas, who spearheaded the project, said the fibre optic cable installation will see Six Nations well into the future. “We’re pretty excited about that. That’s a hundred gigabyte length we’ve established. That’s a phenomenal feat. I know there are municipalities that are crying for something like this. It’s a link to the future. It’s not just a band-aid or just enough to suffice what our needs are now. What we’re building is something for the future.” Fibre Internet uses a network of fibre optic cables to deliver highspeed data over greater distances. The data travels down the cables in what experts say is literally at the speed

Fibre optic cables will bring high speed internet to the Six Nations reserve soon, with the first batch of homes to see high speed connectivity by Christmas. FILE

of light, meaning customers are more likely to get faster download speeds and a more reliable connection to the Internet. Thomas told Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council at a meeting last week that the pandemic highlighted the dire need for faster Internet services on Six Nations, when everybody was working from home and holding meetings via Zoom. “One thing Covid did

is it identified all the problems on the network. It doesn’t matter who they are…everybody had trouble with their networks and Covid proved that to everybody. This link we’re building is something out of the future. It’s something that is needed here and will sustain what our needs are for the future.” The technology has been years in the making during Thomas’s quest bringing fibre optics to Six

Nations, from the planning, set up, proposals, mapping up to the actual installation, which was just completed this summer. The cable is installed from Middleport to First Nations Cable’s office on Fourth Line Road. “The actual fibre is in the ground. We did the testing. It’s all passed. We’re waiting on Hydro One. They ran into a problem with some of their hardware and they needed an upgrade.” He said he had hoped by the beginning of this week, they’d be testing the system. The final step of the project, which Thomas calls the last mile, is the actual fibre to feed all of Six Nations. “The government has really given us a hard time with getting this contract signed.” But he’s confident it should be signed within the next two weeks. “Once that’s in place, we’ll be able to start our project.” This line that’s already been installed, at a cost

of $1.4 million, is what Thomas refers to as the backbone of the fibre optic project. “This last part is the actual grant that we’re trying to establish.” The design for the project is done, he said, which involves fibre optic cables running throughout the reserve. “We’re waiting. I’m hoping in the next week or so we should have good news.” Thomas is concerned about financing as he works to complete the project and he asked elected council to co-sign a loan application to the bank. “Trying to get $11 million out of the government is going to be a chore and a half,” he said. He says it will take about two to three years to get high-speed Internet to all the homes on the reserve. Elected council agreed to advocate on Thomas’s behalf. They want to go live with the first cable on Oct. 3.

Store robbed at gunpoint By TRT Staff SIX NATIONS — Two employees of a business at the corner of Onondaga Road and Sixth Line were shaken after the store they were working at was robbed at gunpoint. Six Nations Police responded to an armed robbery by three suspect on Tuesday, September 13 at around 4:49 p.m.. Police say the suspects are described as: a black male approximately 6'-3", 160 lbs, with thick hair, early 20's dressed in black clothing; a black male approximately 5'-4", 140 lbs, dressed in black; and a white male approximately 5'-3" 135 lbs, dressed in all black clothing with an under armour sweater on. All left westbound in a small grey foreign Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV). Police are asking the public with any information to contact police at 519-445-2811 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or online at www. crimestoppersbb.com.

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September 21st, 2022

TWO ROW TIMES

3

Chedoke Creek dredging resumes without HCCC agreement in place DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Clean-up work on the sewage-polluted Chedoke Creek is expected to resume today (Wednesday) almost a month after it was paused to consult with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council. Representatives for the HCCC had sought to have its own environmental monitors on site before clean-up work continues but spokespeople for the City of Hamilton’s watershed management department said it has yet to negotiate an agreement with the HCCC regarding the clean-up. “The city is hopeful to reach an arrangement with HDI and HCCC to have environmental monitors during the dredging project at Chedoke Creek,” the city said in an email to the Two Row Times. The city said the same conversations are hap-

pening with Six Nations and Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation with regards to environmental monitors during the dredging project at Chedoke Creek. The city has also reached out to the Huron-Wendat but has not heard back and added that both Six Nations and MCFN are “anxious to see the work commence.” As part of the City of Hamilton’s Chedoke Remediation plan, preparatory work will start Wednesday, with in-water dredging to begin four to five days later. The targeted dredging work is anticipated to take four months to complete, wrapping up by Dec. 31 or sooner, in alignment with the deadline specified in an order issued to the city by the Ministry of Environment, Conservation, and Parks (MECP). Construction mobilization, including the construction of the Dredge Material Management Area and other ancillary

There has been a month-long delay in cleaning up raw sewage polluting the Chedoke Creek watershed in Hamilton by the Haudenosaunee Development Institute. HAMILTON

works began in late July. The arrival and set up of the dredge machine began on Aug. 17. The city paused the work when Six Nations man Trevor Bomberry and HDI lawyer Aaron Detlor visited the work site on Aug. 18 amid concerns the HCCC was not consulted on the project.

On Sept. 14, city council agreed to begin negotiations with First Nations stakeholders who have been part of city consultation efforts with regards to environmental monitoring agreements during the dredging process. The city says it consulted with First Nations communities on the project,

including the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, the Huron-Wendat Nation, Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council and the HDI. “The city has taken all necessary steps to ensure wildlife and species at risk located within Chedoke Creek and Cootes Paradise are protected throughout the remediation process,” the city noted in a press release. “The dredging plan has received input from the MECP, Hamilton Conservation Authority, Ministry of Transportation, Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Royal Botanical Gardens.” In-water work will take place seven days a week between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. The city said excess noise, dust or smells are not expected as part of this work. However, the city said over the coming weeks, residents may notice an increased level of truck traffic along Macklin St.

North and temporary construction sites at the base of Longwood Road South near the Desjardin Trail as well as Macklin St. North across from Kay Drage Park. Kay Drage Park will remain closed for public access for the duration of construction activities. Also, the access trail located behind Nicholas Mancini Centre will remain closed for the remainder of dredging activities. “The City of Hamilton continues to be committed to the health of the watershed and to ensuring members of the public receive regular updates on the city’s efforts,” the statement said. “Given the significance of this project, the city has launched a dedicated project website to share timelines, permitting status details, a construction schedule and information on each offsetting remediation/ mitigation project identified in the Cootes Paradise Workplan.”


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TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

Prepare for a family day at the fair

Cannabis sales sign up despite caution from MCFN Council

STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Local fairs dot the landscape in late spring, summer and fall, offering fairgoers plenty of attractions and rides to fill warm days and evenings. Families who plan ahead for the festivities may be able to improve their experiences. Purchase passes in advance. Some fairs enable visitors to purchase entry tickets, parking passes and even game vouchers online. There are advantages to doing so, such as bundling discounts. Buying tickets in advance also cuts down on time spent waiting in line. Devise a basic plan. Look over the list of attractions and activities to gauge what you want to get out of the fair. Some fairs post their calendars online. With kids in tow, you’ll likely want to check out any children’s rides or animal exhibits and interactions. Create a general-

Families who plan ahead for the fair may be able to improve their experiences. TRT

ized plan, but be flexible, especially when going with other families. Think about safety. Fairs attract thousands of people and that can lead to confusion if children become separated from their parents. Write your mobile phone number down and put it in your child’s pocket or bag, so he or she doesn’t have to memorize it. Consider finding the tallest attraction at the fair, maybe the ferris wheel, and make that the meeting point if anyone becomes lost. Snap a photo of youngsters when you arrive so that you’ll have a recent

image and know exactly what they are wearing if you need to engage law enforcement. Time your visit. If the fair runs during the week and into the weekend, weekdays are likely to be much less crowded. Also, while not ideal, a cool day or one with a slight drizzle will cut down on crowds and improve the ability to see more things and get on more rides. Factor in food. Fair food is an indulgence to enjoy when fairs come around. Rather than go overboard, pick one meal or item that the family will enjoy. Bring a backpack, if permitted,

and fill it with bottled water and other light snacks so that you can tame hunger pangs and not bust the budget at the food court. Upcoming Fall Fairs in the area September 20-24, 2022. International Plowing Match and Rural Expo. 2510 Befell Road; Kemptville, ON. September 22-25, 2022. Ancaster Fair. Ancaster Fairgrounds; 630 Trinity Rd S.; Jerseyville, ON. September 29-October 2, 2022. Caledonia Fair. Caledonia Fairgrounds; 151 Caithness St E.; Caledonia, ON. October 4-10, 2022. Norfolk County Fair and Horse Show. Norfolk County Fairgrounds; 172 South Dr.; Simcoe, ON. October 6-10, 2022. Rockton World’s Fair. Rockton World’s Fairgrounds; 812 Old HWY 8; Rockton, ON. October 7-10, 2022. Burford Agricultural Fair. Burford Fairgrounds; 6 Park Ave; Brant, ON.

DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

A business on Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation is advertising cannabis for sale despite a recent statement from council advising that it does not endorse any cannabis operations while leaders work on developing its own cannabis regulations. A sign on Townline Road is advertising cannabis for $50 an ounce, just two weeks after MCFN issued a notice stating its opposition to the sale of cannabis until their own laws and regulations are in place. MCFN Chief Stacey Laforme spoke with the Two Row Times and said, “it’s being dealt with” but could not get into detail. “Our position is that

anybody who opens up is operating without the authority of council,” he said. Council had issued a public notice in early September stating, “Any facility or storefronts currently in business are doing so without the consent of the First Nation Council and is an illegal operation.” MCFN has been working on creating its own cannabis control law but work was derailed during the pandemic, Laforme said. They’ve drafted cannabis regulations that still need to be finalized, he said. The law would involve the creation of a commission and any community members wishing to create a cannabis business on-reserve would apply to the commission to obtain a license for that purpose.


September 21st, 2022

TWO ROW TIMES

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Celebration of Nations 2022 Outstanding Achievement Award Winners STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The sixth annual Celebration of Nations showcased its fourth annual Outstanding Achievement Awards. These awards were designed to reflect the artistic and intellectual programming that has come to define and distinguish this innovative Indigenous expressive culture event. "To ensure the objectivity and strengthen the credibility of the Outstanding Achievement Awards, this year the process transitioned to peer group nominations and selections," explained Celebration of Nations Artistic Producer Tim Johnson. "As a result, previous recipients made the nominations and voted for the award recipients. And they did an extraordinary job. It gives us great pleasure to announce the 2022 Celebration of Nations Outstanding Achievement Awards." The 2022 Outstanding Achievement Award

Winners are: Outstanding Achievement Award for Visual Arts - Christi Belcourt The Celebration of Nations Outstanding Achievement Award for Visual Arts is bestowed upon Indigenous artists who produce culturally based and inspired art that reveals thoughtful conceptualization, explores meaningful subject matter, evokes feelings and emotions, resonates with appealing aesthetics and composition, and is exemplary of technical skill. As one of the most prominent Indigenous artists in the country, Christie Belcourt's paintings are housed in the permanent collections of the Gabriel Dumont Institute, National Gallery of Canada, Canadian Museum of History, the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, and in the Parliament. Outstanding Achievement Award for Performing Arts - Tom Wilson As a musician and songwriter whose work goes back to The Florida Razors in the early 1980s

and Junkhouse and the Rodeo Kings in the 1990s, to the solo albums Planet Love and Dog Years in the 2000s, to taking on the fictional moniker of Lee Harvey Osmond for the production of his 2020 JUNO Award- winning album Mohawk, in the category of Contemporary Roots Album of the Year, this artist has earned his credentials many times over. Perhaps it is synergistic, his taking on a new character and name for his last album, given that it wasn’t until mid-life that he learned the parents who raised him were not his birth parents, but that, in fact, he was adopted and his biological parents were Mohawk from the Kahnawake Territory. “My music and my art is a continuation of my long way home. It is my way of showing honour and respect to a culture that I’m just shaking hands with," says Tom Wilson. Outstanding Achievement in Intellectual Advancement - Kahente Horn-Miller

As associate professor in the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University, Kahente Horn-Miller's works have centred on the development of Haudenosaunee-specific research and pedagogical practices. Her research interests include Indigenous methodologies, Indigenous women, identity politics, colonization, Indigenous governance, and consensus-based decision making. Her governance work and community-based research involves interpreting Haudenosaunee culture and bringing new life to old traditions. Her performance piece, We are Her and She is Us, is a modern telling of the Haudenosaunee story of creation that centres on Sky Woman and her fall to earth. Outstanding Achievement for Language and Culture - Tom Porter For a lifetime of service to the people, of teaching Haudenosaunee philosophy, principles, values,

morals, and traditions, and for being the former director of the Akwesasne Freedom School would have been enough qualification for him to earn this award. However, as an organizer of the historic White Roots of Peace, the traditional Indigenous educational caravan that launched from Akwesasne and traveled to Indigenous communities all across the United States and Canada during the 1970s, Tom Porter became extremely well known and in demand for his compelling and motivational oratory filled with poignant lessons, instructions, guidance, and love. Outstanding Achievement for Empathic Tradition - Diane Longboat Diane Longboat is a professional educator with a graduate degree in education who has lectured and taught at universities across Canada and at national and international conferences on self-healing, personal transformation, and spiritual renewal as the guiding force for achieving

individual health, family health, community health, and responsible nation building. Outstanding Achievement for the Two Row Alliance - Tom McConnell Every now and then there emerges a person who has the ability to evade or overcome the barriers and impediments that prevent peoples of varied cultures and perspectives from engaging in the exchange of knowledge and holding rational conversations. And, of course, when it comes to communicating Indigenous histories and current events; the layers are very deep (their antecedents being distant to most Canadian citizens) and therefore require sustained dialogue to advance cross-cultural understanding and mutual respect. This remarkable communications professional brought to this task not only extensive experience, but an honest recognition of the task and what it would take to make a difference.


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OPINION

TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

editor@tworowtimes.com

Saskatchewan stabbings: Why Myles Sanderson was granted statutory release from prison By Lisa Kerr The violent acts of Myles Sanderson in the Saskatchewan stabbings have raised many questions about why he was in the community of James Smith Cree Nation at all. First, there are questions about the system of statutory release that saw Sanderson leave federal prison in August 2021. Unlike parole, this is not a form of early release at the discretion of the Parole Board of Canada. Rather, statutory release is an automatic system of structured reintegration triggered once two-thirds of a sentence is completed. The purpose of statutory release is public safety: it ensures that inmates do not leave a penitentiary without supervision and structure. When a sentence is over, prison and parole officials are not able to tell a former inmate where to live, whether to abstain from alcohol, whether to communicate with a parole officer and so on. As such, the statutory release period is a critical part of community reintegration through robust supervision tools. Parole Board not the only body involved Focusing just on the Parole Board ignores the other equal partner in this system. The Correctional Service of Canada is responsible for the case preparation and the community supervision.

The only way that inmates can be detained past statutory release — until the end of their sentence — is if prison officials bring an application to the board showing that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the offender is ``likely to commit an offence causing death or serious harm to another person'' before the expiration of their sentence. That is a high bar to meet. No such application was brought in the case of Sanderson. Majority pose no risk Sanderson's actions while on statutory release were, statistically, extremely unrepresentative of how people behave on this form of release. In more than 98 per cent of cases over the past five years, statutory release is completed without a new violent offence. These numbers have been improving over time. The rate of revocation for a violent offence went from 1.6 per cent in 2015-16 to 1.1 per cent in 2019-20. The majority of statutory releases, 65.9 per cent, were successfully completed with no issues at all. A breach of a condition occurred in 26.5 per cent of cases _ not a new criminal offence, but perhaps

a failure to communicate with a parole officer as required. Just 6.4 per cent were revoked with a new non-violent offence. To break these numbers down further: 57 people had their statutory release revoked in 2019-20. These numbers account for a small fraction of violence

questions about the fact that Sanderson's release was suspended in November 2021 because he failed to inform his parole officer that he was involved in an intimate relationship — a special condition of his release. In February 2022, following a hearing on that

injuries he committed on Sept. 4 would have been prevented. The stabbing incidents left 10 people dead and 18 injured. In fact, parole revocation does not mean indefinite prison. It means a recalculation of the statutory release date. The new date arrives at twothirds of the remaining time before warrant expiry. That means Sanderson likely would have been released by summer. It is impossible to know whether a few more months in prison would have changed his path. The difference between suspension and revocation The Parole Board's February 2022 decision to cancel Sanderson's suspension, rather than to revoke his statutory release, is nearly 10 pages long. It provides a comprehensive picture of Sanderson's difficult life and his involvement with the criminal justice system over many years. It describes how his release was suspended when his ex-spouse contacted his parole officer to report that they had been living together and he had

Sanderson had not committed a new

criminal offence and he had turned himself in immediately. He had been sober for the

four months he had been out, confirmed by regular drug tests. He had found work, attended therapy and engaged in

Indigenous cultural activities. Sanderson

had a new plan to live with someone other than his ex-spouse. in this country. In that same year, there were 169,528 adults charged for violent offences. Some may argue that to eliminate the 57 violence offences that occurred in 2019-20, statutory release should be eliminated. If only it were so simple. Without the supervisory safeguards that come with statutory release, releasing thousands of inmates directly from prison each year would make us profoundly less safe. Released with reprimand There have also been

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issue, the Parole Board did not revoke his statutory release. Instead, the suspension of Sanderson's release was cancelled and he was released with a reprimand. He returned to the supervision of Corrections Canada, as well as local police. There have been widespread suggestions the Parole Board should have revoked his statutory release at the February review. Implicit in that view is the idea that Sanderson would have remained incarcerated — meaning the multiple murders and

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failed to report it. The parole officer expressed concern for the safety of his ex-spouse. It seems his risk to re-offend was elevated at that time. Suspension was a reasonable decision. At the revocation hearing three months later, the Parole Board had to undertake a fuller analysis. At such hearings, the board considers more than whether there was a breach of conditions — it had to decide whether there is a real risk of re-offending. This involves careful consideration of numerous factors. Sanderson had not committed a new criminal offence and he had turned himself in immediately. He had been sober for the four months he had been out, confirmed by regular drug tests. He had found work, attended therapy and engaged in Indigenous cultural activities. Sanderson had a new plan to live with someone other than his ex-spouse. The Parole Board opted to allow his return to the community. The board's decision was a reasonable one for that moment in time. It appears to represent careful consideration of the many factors that are in play when assessing risk and broader goals of public safety in the near and long term. It is far from certain that a different decision would have been the key to preventing this tragedy.

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TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

SEPTEMBER 29, 2022 • 6 PM OUTSIDE THE NIAGARA PARKS POWER STATION Join us for an all-new FREE CONCERT event celebrating resolution, recognition, understanding and respect.

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8

TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

Column The Aesthetic Snail

It's OK to sleep: Preparing for your next season of growth

JACE KOBLUN

jace@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Sometimes we forget to take care of ourselves. Sometimes we put ourselves in or find ourselves in an environment that isn’t healthy but we stay because it’s easier than finding a new pot that fits us better. And sometimes, we forget that it’s OK to ask for help in that process, or follow our plants' lead and hibernate when the season changes. Now I know we’re not plants, but I do know selfcare looks different for everyone. Asking for help could look like several

different things. It could look like therapy. It could look like interacting with trusted friends. It could look like fleeing a bad situation. Or it could look like resting. When it gets cold, we do what we gotta do. And it’s starting to get cold. All living things have some sort of biological clock. For people, it's getting weary at the end of the day and needing sleep. According to gardeningknowhow.com, nearly all plants go dormant in winter. Whether indoor houseplants or out in the garden, this period of rest is crucial to their survival to regrow and flourish. While plant dormancy during cold conditions is important, some plants also undergo dormancy during times of stress, such as extreme heat or drought.

Dormant.jpg: Some plants undergo dormancy during times of stress, such as extreme heat or drought. But most all do during winter. ANNIE SPRATT

Most houseplants help each other grow when grouped together.

If plants actively grew during the winter, the water that is stored in their stems, trunks, and leaves would cause them harm when freezing temperatures come, and they will. With winter comes less light which is another reason plants go dormant. The lack of light encourages plants to spend less energy growing at a time they don’t need to be growing. Without this time to recoup, you can count on having a plant that is too exhausted or too damaged to flower, bloom or grow new leaves come spring. And every plant parent knows how awesome it feels to see new growth on a plant. And every person knows how good it feels to

see growth in themselves or celebrate new growth they see in a partner or friend. Side note, plants grow better when they are in groups. Each plant gives off moisture that one beside it can use. One plant may attract the right pollinator for its friend, or keep insects and pests away, and another can help enhance nutrient intake. This goes to show it’s important during these times of rest for us to surround ourselves with people who only have our best interests at heart. For tips on how to care for dormant plants, gardeningchannel.com offers the following tips for certain houseplants and how to care for them

HUY PHAN

over the winter: For begonias, dahlias, caladiums, cannas, callas, ginger, sweet potato vines and colocasias, store the dormant tubers, bulbs, and corms in a cool, dark place during the winter and reintroduce them into your garden in the spring when the weather becomes warm. For dwarf cannas, brugmansias, and banana plants, bring them indoors and keep the dormant plants in a cool, dark spot. For palms, croton, bamboo, jasmine, cordyline, phormium, allamanda, bougainvillea, hibiscus and citrus, bring them indoors and overwinter them as houseplants. Store in a warm, sunny location, such as a heated

greenhouse or sunroom. For geraniums, coleus, and plectranthus, take and pot up some root cuttings so that you will have some fresh new plants in the spring. For houseplants, the general rule is to stop feeding them but give them access to a sunny location throughout the winter, resuming regular feeding mid-spring. Instead of stressing about how you’re going to grow or how you’re going to afford to grow; take a step back and don’t forget how important it is to just be present and trust that your body might need a season of rest before it can flourish.


TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

Public Safety minister defends RCMP's refusal to say how Sanderson died in custody STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino is defending the RCMP's decision not to release details surrounding the death of the man accused in a mass stabbing rampage in Saskatchewan. Mendicino says he understands the sense of urgency people feel about knowing how Myles Sanderson died after he was arrested on a rural stretch of highway in the province on Sept. 7. RCMP said Sanderson went into ``medical distress'' and died in custody, but they have not released a cause of death. Saskatchewan RCMP Assistant Commissioner Rhonda Blackmore said police won't provide more details until Saskatoon police and a provincial police watchdog have finished investigating. Sanderson was charged with first-degree mur-

Myles Sanderson.

RCMP

der after 11 people were killed and 18 others injured in James Smith Cree Nation and Weldon, Sask. Sanderson's brother, Damien Sanderson, was among the dead. Police named him as a suspect before finding his body near another scene. ``There were a number of significant flaws in the system here that have to be addressed,'' Mendicino said Tuesday. ``The only way that we're going to be able to address that is if we have an independent investigation that is carried out by the appropriate authorities, which is exactly

the process that we are following right now.'' The Correctional Service of Canada and the Parole Board of Canada are launching a joint investigation into Sanderson's case, looking into why and how he was released from prison and whether the proper processes were followed. They say the findings will be made public. Parole documents show Sanderson had a lengthy criminal history, including 59 convictions as an adult. According to court records, that includes a violent incident in 2015 when he was charged with attacking one of the people killed in the recent rampage. Sanderson was released in August 2021 from his first federal prison sentence. He was on statutory release, which requires people to abide by strict conditions and allows them to leave prison after serving two-thirds of their sentence in the hope they will reintegrate into

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society. By May of this year, the Correctional Service declared him unlawfully at large and issued a warrant for his arrest. Speaking in the House of Commons earlier Tuesday, Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre said while he believes in rehabilitation, the system must better protect communities from repeat violent offenders. Poilievre, who during his speech said he made a point not to say Sanderson's name, said sympathy for those left to mourn the victims cannot be enough. ``It's time for these failures to end. It's time for our words to transform into actions,'' he said. Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu said she spent time last week with community members affected by the tragedy at James Smith Cree Nation and pledged the government would be there to assist with their healing.

9

Cree Chief to meet with federal ministers to discuss stabbings CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

JAMES SMITH CREE NATION — The chief of a Saskatchewan First Nation that was the site of a series of deadly stabbings earlier this month is heading to Toronto for a meeting with federal cabinet ministers. Chief Wally Burns of James Smith Cree Nation says his community has been left broken and saddened by the violence. On Sept. 4, 10 people were stabbed to death and another 18 injured in the community and the neighbouring village of Weldon, Sask. The suspects, brothers Damien and Myles Sanderson, also died — Damien from non-self-inflicted wounds and Myles from medical distress while in RCMP custody. Burns wouldn't say which ministers he

would meet with, but the discussions are to include the generations of trauma First Nations in Saskatchewan continue to face, including from the residential school system. He says the community has been dealing with trauma long before the slayings, and he hopes the federal and provincial governments will help them address it. Burns is also calling for community policing and a rehabilitation centre to help people deal with addictions. ``Others (First Nations) are affected with this (intergenerational) trauma,'' Burns said Tuesday, citing the 2016 shootings in La Loche, Sask., where four people were killed and seven others injured. ``I think a lot of this brings us together and we need to look at how do we protect our nation, Canada.''


10

TWO ROW TIMES

Alberta killer appeals The Canadian Press EDMONTON — An Alberta man found guilty of manslaughter in the deaths of two Metis hunters is appealing his conviction and sentence. Roger Bilodeau was convicted in May and sentenced to 10 years in prison for the deaths of Jacob Sansom and Maurice Cardinal, who were shot and killed on a rural Alberta road after a brief vehicle pursuit in March 2020. Bilodeau's son Anthony, who was tried at the same time as his father, was convicted of second-degree murder in Cardinal's death and found guilty of manslaughter in Sansom's death. Roger Bilodeau argues in his appeal that the trial judge failed to properly instruct the jury on party liability, particularly the underlying elements needed to prove common intention required in the Criminal Code. In trial, prosecutors argued the elder Bilodeau took the law into his own

hands when he asked his son to bring a gun while he chased the truck Sansom and Cardinal were driving. The Crown argued that the father and son were angry because they thought the two hunters were trying to steal from them. Anthony Bilodeau is expected to be sentenced later this year. The court heard that Sansom, 39, and Cardinal, 57, had been moose hunting near Glendon, Alta., in March 2020, so they could fill the family's freezer with meat as COVID-19 was shutting down businesses. Justice Eric Macklin said that Sansom and Cardinal were not only providers for their families, but also the community at large by doing things such as giving food for families in need. ``They were described as men who honoured Mother Earth and were knowledge keepers of their culture. No sentence can relieve the heartbreak, anger and hurt suffered by the victims' families and friends.''

September 21st, 2022

Legault sorry for saying racism against Indigenous people at hospital is 'settled' CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

QUEBEC — Coalition Avenir Quebec Leader Francois Legault apologized on Tuesday for offending the husband of an Indigenous woman who filmed nurses mocking her as she lay dying in a Quebec hospital. Legault told reporters he never meant to offend when he said during a televised leaders debate last week that the racism situation at the hospital in Joliette, Que., is ``settled.'' Looking into the camera during a campaign stop in Orford, Que., in the province's Eastern Townships, Legault directly addressed Carol Dube, husband of the late Joyce Echaquan, an Atikamekw woman who died in hospital in September 2020. ``I offended you and I sincerely apologize,'' the incumbent premier said, adding that he wants to

meet with Dube after the election. ``I can only imagine how hard it must be, what you went through.'' Echaquan, a 37-yearold mother of seven, filmed herself on Facebook Live as a nurse and an orderly were heard making derogatory comments toward her shortly before her death at a hospital northeast of Montreal. Coroner Gehane Kamel concluded Echaquan's initial diagnosis was based on prejudice and she wasn't properly monitored before finally being transferred to intensive care. Kamel has said Echaquan would likely still be alive if she were a white woman and that systemic racism ``undeniably'' contributed to her death. Legault said Tuesday the point he was trying to make during the debate was that significant improvements have been made at the hospital since Echaquan died. The

hospital, he added, hired Indigenous liaison workers to improve relations between the Atikamekw community and the health-care system. In October 2021, PaulEmile Ottawa, chief of the Atikamekw Council of Manawan, told reporters that members of his community were slowly regaining their trust in Quebec's health-care system. He said he was ``very happy and particularly proud'' of the steps taken by the regional health board to improve the situation, adding that more needed to be done. The incumbent premier said he recognizes Indigenous people in Quebec still face racism. ``There are racist people in Quebec, particularly towards Indigenous people. We have to fight that; we can't accept that,'' Legault said Tuesday. Dube and Atikamekw leaders condemned Legault's comments in the

days following the debate; however, Legault said it was only after reading an interview with Dube in a Montreal newspaper Tuesday morning that he realized he had offended Echaquan's husband. In a letter made public through his lawyer on Friday evening, Dube wrote that the changes at the hospital have been largely cosmetic and that deeper systemic issues have not been addressed. On Saturday, Legault accused members of the Atikamekw community of wanting to reopen a debate on systemic racism — which he denies exists in Quebec's institutions — rather than solve problems at the hospital. ``So they want to have a debate about words rather than ensuring that we fix the problems on the ground,'' Legault told reporters. Legault on Tuesday did not address his comments from the weekend.

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September 21st, 2022

11

Monkeypox activity in Ontario peaked in July, top doctor says

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EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW

Post Secondary Dates and Events for 2021/22

Dec Graduate Promotion/Graduate Photo Publication Dec 2&3 Office Closed – staff planning Dec 23 Office Closed Holidays Jan 4 Office Reopens 2022 Feb 1* Deadline for Summer/Spring Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) Feb 21 Office Closed: Family Day Mar 4 Winter Semester Contact Required From All Students (Check With Your GRPSEO Funding Advisor) Apr 15 Office Closed: Good Friday Apr 18 Office Closed: Easter Monday May 1* Deadline for Fall (Fall/Winter) Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) May 1 Accepting Graduate Promotion Items May 23 Office Closed: Victoria Day June 1 Summer Office Hours: Open from 8 am to 4 pm June 21 Office Closed: Observance National Indigenous Peoples Day July 1 Office Closed: Canada Day Aug 1 Official Transcripts Due Aug 1 Office Closed: Civic Holiday Sept 1 Back to Regular Office Hours: Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Sept 5 Office Closed: Labour Day Oct 1* Deadline for Winter Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) Office Closed: Thanksgiving Day Deadline to Submit Graduate Promotion Items Office Closed: Observance of Remembrance Day

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EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW

Graduate Promotion/Graduate Photo Publication Office Closed – staff planning Office Closed Holidays Office Reopens 2022 Deadline for Summer/Spring Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) Office Closed: Family Day Winter Semester Contact Required From All Students (Check With Your GRPSEO Funding Advisor) Office Closed: Good Friday Office Closed: Easter Monday Deadline for Fall (Fall/Winter) Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) Accepting Graduate Promotion Items Office Closed: Victoria Day Summer Office Hours: Open from 8 am to 4 pm Office Closed: Observance National Indigenous Peoples Day Office Closed: Canada Day Official Transcripts Due Office Closed: Civic Holiday Back to Regular Office Hours: Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Office Closed: Labour Day Deadline for Winter Applications (Apply Online at www.grpseo.org) Office Closed: Thanksgiving Day Deadline to Submit Graduate Promotion Items Office Closed: Observance of Remembrance Day

Post Secondary Dates and Events for 2021/22

Attention Grade 12 High School Students: If you are considering college or university study, it will soon be time to apply for the College or University programs of your choice. Remember to also apply for post secondary funding through Grand River Post Secondary Education Office. (See deadline dates below*)

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WORROMOT OT HTAP A…NOITACUDE

MOTIVATEINSPIREEDUCATECHALLENGE

Attention Grade 12 High School Students: If you are planning to MOTIVATEINSPIREEDUCATECHALLENGE attend college or university beginning Fall 2023 remember to apply for post secondary funding no later than May 1, 2023.

My name is Megan Jamieson. I am Mohawk nation bear clan from Six Nations.

ta etisbew ruo dna srepapswen lacol eht kcehc esaelP gro.oesprg.www .noitamrofni erom rof 9122-544 )915( ta llac a su evig ro

MOTIVATEINSPIREEDUCATE CHALLENGE

all confirmed cases in the province is about 36, and confirmed cases range in age from under 20 to 74. Public health says 19 people have been hospitalized with the illness in the province and two people have been in intensive care. There are also 10 probable cases in Ontario.

Oct 10 Oct 31 Nov 11

July 1 Aug 1 Aug 1 Sept 1 Sept 5 Oct 1*

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Apr 15 Apr 18 May 1*

Feb 21 Mar 4

Dec Dec 2&3 Dec 23 Jan 4 Feb 1*

noitacilbuP otohP etaudarG/noitomorP etaudarG ceD gninnalp ffats – desolC eciffO 3&2 ceD syadiloH desolC eciffO 32 ceD 2202 snepoeR eciffO 4 naJ enilnO ylppA( snoitacilppA gnirpS/remmuS rof enildaeD *1 beF )gro.oesprg.www ta yaD ylimaF :desolC eciffO 12 beF stnedutS llA morF deriuqeR tcatnoC retsemeS retniW 4 raM )rosivdA gnidnuF OESPRG ruoY htiW kcehC( yadirF dooG :desolC eciffO 51 rpA yadnoM retsaE :desolC eciffO 81 rpA ylppA( snoitacilppA )retniW/llaF( llaF rof enildaeD *1 yaM )gro.oesprg.www ta enilnO smetI noitomorP etaudarG gnitpeccA 1 yaM yaD airotciV :desolC eciffO 32 yaM mp 4 ot ma 8 morf nepO :sruoH eciffO remmuS 1 enuJ selpoeP suonegidnI lanoitaN ecnavresbO :desolC eciffO 12 enuJ yaD yaD adanaC :desolC eciffO 1 yluJ euD stpircsnarT laiciffO 1 guA yadiloH civiC :desolC eciffO 1 guA mp 03:4 ot ma 03:8 nepO :sruoH eciffO ralugeR ot kcaB 1 tpeS yaD ruobaL :desolC eciffO 5 tpeS ta enilnO ylppA( snoitacilppA retniW rof enildaeD *1 tcO )gro.oesprg.www yaD gnivigsknahT :desolC eciffO 01 tcO smetI noitomorP etaudarG timbuS ot enildaeD 13 tcO yaD ecnarbmemeR fo ecnavresbO :desolC eciffO 11 voN

Audrey Powless–Bomberry, Six Nations Council Rep

released Wednesday, Public Health Ontario said there were 656 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the province as of the previous day, an increase of 25 from the week before. The agency said 484 of the confirmed cases, or about 74 per cent, were in Toronto, and all but five cases were reported among males. The average age of

In 2016, I graduated with honors from the University of Guelph with my Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Animal Biology. In May 2022, I graduated with my Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree with distinction from the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After obtaining my veterinary degree and license in May 2022, I began my full-time career at Upper Grand Veterinary Services in Guelph, IMPORTANT REMINDERS: Ontario as an Associate Livestock Veterinarian. Specifically, I Attention Grade 12 High School Students: If you are considering provide ambulatory veterinary care and services for production college or university study, it will soon be time to apply for the College or University programs of your Remember to also apply for post animals that are used for food or fibrechoice. (cattle, sheep, goats, secondary funding through Grand River Post Secondary Education alpacas, llamas, chickens, ducks, pigs). Office. (See deadline dates below*) Dates and Events forand 2021/22 I have had one goal in life since I was very young, and thatPost wasSecondary to become a veterinarian help Dec Graduate Promotion/Graduate Photo Publication animals. Throughout my academic career, I took every step and opportunity I could to try and reach my Dec 2&3 Office Closed – staff planning dream career. Getting into veterinary school can be a difficult competitive process since only a small Dec 23 and Office Closed Holidays Jan 4 Office Reopens 2022 fraction of applicants get an acceptance letter every year. Getting my acceptance letter to multiple Feb 1* Deadline for Summer/Spring Applications (Apply Online www.grpseo.org) veterinary schools in Ontario and the United States was one ofatthe major accomplishments in my life Feb 21 Office Closed: Family Day that I am very proud of achieving. Mar 4 Winter Semester Contact Required From All Students With Your GRPSEO Funding was Advisor) I would say that the biggest challenge I faced throughout my(Check post-secondary education adjusting Apr 15 Office Closed: Good Friday to living away from home. It was especially difficult during my clinical yearEaster at Michigan Apr 18 Office Closed: Monday State University May 1* Deadline for Fall (Fall/Winter) Applications (Apply when I was constantly working long hours and could not comeOnline homeat for long periods of time. I have www.grpseo.org) 1 Accepting Items to visit or a very close relationship with my family, so it was hardMay at times when I Graduate couldn’tPromotion come home May 23 Office Closed: Victoria Day attend events that I normally would. June 1 Summer Office Hours: Open from 8 am to 4 pm June 21 Office and Closed: Observance Indigenous Peoples As an onkewhon:we person, I’ve always valued the perseverance strength of National our people. I take Day pride in being an Onkwehon:we person for that reasonJuly and1 I’veOffice always prioritized this value to remind Closed: Canada Day Aug 1 Official Transcripts Due myself to keep pushing and working hard during my academic career when times seemed tough. If it Aug 1 Office Closed: Civic Holiday Sept 1 Back to Regular Office Hours: Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm wasn’t for perseverance, I would not be where I am today. Sept 5 Office Closed: Labour Day One of the great parts of my job as a livestock veterinarian that I for amWinter able to play a contributing Oct 1* isDeadline Applications (Apply Online atrole www.grpseo.org) to society with regard to food safety. Not only do vets treat sick animals, but we also provide valuable Oct 10 Office Closed: Thanksgiving Day information and expertise to ensure producers are raising animals thatGraduate are safe for consumption. Oct healthy 31 Deadline to Submit Promotion Items Nov 11 Office Closed: Observance of Remembrance Day Pursuing a career in veterinary medicine can be intimidating and sometimes discouraging given check the local newspapers and our website at its competitive nature. My hope is that I can be a role modelPlease for other indigenous students in my www.grpseo.org community and show them that any dream is possible as long as us you areat willing to work for it. or give a call (519) 445-2219 for more information. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Indigenous veterinarians are also very underrepresented in the veterinary community. My other hope is EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW to inspire more indigenous students like myself to pursue a career in veterinary medicine and potentially bring more accessible veterinary services to indigenous communities in Canada. One challenge that Six Nations and other communities continue to deal with is preservation of indigenous language and culture. Although there are already programs in place, I think it will be very important to continue providing resources and education on indigenous language and culture throughout elementary school and high school. Don’t be afraid to dream big! Anything is achievable and nothing is impossible. If something doesn’t turn out the way you planned, use it as an opportunity to grow, adapt, and try again. It took me three attempts to get into veterinary school. I never gave up after receiving two denial letters and now I am working in the career I have always dreamed of. Throughout my academic journey, I have had a tremendous amount of support from my community. I would like to extend a huge thank you to everyone in my community who followed me on my vet school journey and provided words of encouragement along the way. I could not have done it without you all! 22/1202 rof stnevE dna setaD yradnoceS tsoP

Grand River Post Secondary Grand River Post Secondary Board Members Board Members Dr. Susan M. Hill (Chair) Dr. Carol Jacobs Susan M. Hill (Chair) Marion Martin Carol Jacobs Marion Martin Rick Monture Barbara A. Martin Rick Monture Shirley BomberryBarbara A. Martin ShirleySix Bomberry Michelle Bomberry, Nations Council Rep Michelle Bomberry, SixSix Nations Council Rep Rep Audrey Powless–Bomberry, Nations Council

IMPORTANT REMINDERS:

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Website: www.grpseo.org Website: www.grpseo.org E-mail: info@grpseo.org Website: www.grpseo.org

:SREDNIMER TNATROPMI

Toll Free: 1 877-837-5180 located at FourthLine Line located at 2160 2160 Fourth Fax: (519) 445-4296 located at 2160 Fourth Line

Attention Grade 12 High School Students: If you are considering college or university study, it will soon be time to apply for the College or University programs of your choice. Remember to also apply for post secondary funding through Grand River Post Secondary Education Office. (See deadline dates below*)

Onkwehon:we Onkwehon:we with Grand River River Territory lineage with Grand Territory lineage are empowered are empowered through higherhigher education through education withinwithin available resources. available resources.

Issue 84339 P.O. Box Box P.O. 339 Ohsweken ON, Ohsweken ON,N0A N0A1M0 1M0 Phone: (519) 445-2219 Phone: 445-2219 P.O. (519) Box 339 Ohsweken N0A 1M0 TollFree: Free: ON, Toll 1 877-837-5180 877-837-5180 Phone: Fax:(519) (519) 445-2219 445-4296 Fax: (519) 445-4296

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Fall 2022

22/1202 rof stnevE dna setaD yradnoceS tsoP

noitacilbuP otohP etaudarG/noitomorP etaudarG ceD gninnalp ffats – desolC eciffO 3&2 ceD syadiloH desolC eciffO 32 ceD 2202 snepoeR eciffO 4 naJ enilnO ylppA( snoitacilppA gnirpS/remmuS rof enildaeD *1 beF )gro.oesprg.www ta yaD ylimaF :desolC eciffO 12 beF stnedutS llA morF deriuqeR tcatnoC retsemeS retniW 4 raM )rosivdA gnidnuF OESPRG ruoY htiW kcehC( yadirF dooG :desolC eciffO 51 rpA yadnoM retsaE :desolC eciffO 81 rpA ylppA( snoitacilppA )retniW/llaF( llaF rof enildaeD *1 yaM )gro.oesprg.www ta enilnO smetI noitomorP etaudarG gnitpeccA 1 yaM yaD airotciV :desolC eciffO 32 yaM mp 4 ot ma 8 morf nepO :sruoH eciffO remmuS 1 enuJ selpoeP suonegidnI lanoitaN ecnavresbO :desolC eciffO 12 enuJ yaD yaD adanaC :desolC eciffO 1 yluJ euD stpircsnarT laiciffO 1 guA yadiloH civiC :desolC eciffO 1 guA mp 03:4 ot ma 03:8 nepO :sruoH eciffO ralugeR ot kcaB 1 tpeS yaD ruobaL :desolC eciffO 5 tpeS ta enilnO ylppA( snoitacilppA retniW rof enildaeD *1 tcO )gro.oesprg.www yaD gnivigsknahT :desolC eciffO 01 tcO smetI noitomorP etaudarG timbuS ot enildaeD 13 tcO yaD ecnarbmemeR fo ecnavresbO :desolC eciffO 11 voN

ta etisbew ruo dna srepapswen lacol eht kcehc esaelP gro.oesprg.www .noitamrofni erom rof 9122-544 )915( ta llac a su evig ro

KOOBECAF NO SU EKIL

WORROMOT OT HTAP A…NOITACUDE

Issue 84

their clothing or bedsheets, and symptoms can include rash, swollen lymph nodes and fever. Ontario's progress is remarkable, Moore said, and the province has seen an absolute plateau. ``To me, risk has diminished dramatically in Ontario,'' he said in an interview. In its latest report

gniredisnoc era uoy fI :stnedutS loohcS hgiH 21 edarG noitnettA egelloC eht rof ylppa ot emit eb noos lliw ti ,yduts ytisrevinu ro egelloc tsop rof ylppa osla ot rebmemeR .eciohc ruoy fo smargorp ytisrevinU ro noitacudE yradnoceS tsoP reviR dnarG hguorht gnidnuf yradnoces )*woleb setad enildaed eeS( .eciffO

GRAND RIVER

GRAND RIVER POST POST EDUCATION...A PATH TOSECONDARY TOMORROW SECONDARY BOARD BOARD GRAND RIVER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER POST SECONDARY Winter 2021 BOARD Winter 2021 NEWSLETTER Issue 84

Advisory Committee on Immunization to provide guidance on if and how to start a second-dose strategy. As of this week, there have been 656 confirmed cases of monkeypox in Ontario. Monkeypox spreads when people have close, physical contact with an infected person's lesions,

IMPORTANT REMINDERS:

TORONTO — Ontario's chief medical officer of health says monkeypox activity in the province has peaked. Dr. Kieran Moore says the province peaked in total number of active cases the week of July 15, when roughly 16 to 18 cases a day were being identified

through PCR testing, while now that is down to only about one a day. Moore says most of those new cases are travel-related, particularly from American hot spots, rather than people acquiring an infection within Ontario. He says Ontario has immunized 32,175 people against monkeypox and is waiting for the National

:SREDNIMER TNATROPMI

The Canadian Press




14

TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022

Expert panel calls for Indigenous representation at Thunder Bay, Ontario, police, board CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

An independent expert panel is calling for more Indigenous representation in top positions of the Thunder Bay Police Service and the board overseeing it, in order to help achieve longstanding recommended policing reforms. The panel appointed by the Thunder Bay Police

Services Board in March to assess the culture of both organizations presented an interim report Tuesday, after consultations with community and police service members. That report said urgent measures are needed in the areas of chief selection, police board appointments and labour relations, and suggested the next chief should be Indigenous or another person of colour with police leadership experience.

With the northern city's police service searching for a new chief and the board due for a changeover this fall, the chair of the expert panel said it's an opportune time to get the right leadership in place to oversee steps to rebuilding trust, particularly among the region's Indigenous residents. ``It is an opportunity to put the right people in place and to provide them with the kind of resources they need to do their

work,'' Alok Mukherjee said from Thunder Bay, where he presented the report to the police services board. Mukherjee, former chair of the Toronto Police Services Board, said it's ``critical'' to have the right chief in place to move forward and ensure outstanding recommendations from past reports outlining evidence of systemic racism and lack of trust in the police force can be implemented.

``It's an opportunity to do the right thing.'' The report is the latest in a series of reviews that scrutinized policing in the northern Ontario city, including some that have found evidence of systemic racism in how it handles cases involving Indigenous people. Indigenous leaders have called for the service to be disbanded altogether because of the erosion of trust. It also follows the recent suspension of chief

Notice of Completion Design and Construction Report #1 Highway 6/Hanlon Expressway Midblock Interchange (Contract 2021-3004) Detail Design and Class Environmental Assessment THE PROJECT The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) is moving forward with Phase 2 of the Highways 6 and 401 Improvements Project (G.W.P 3042-14-00). Phase 2 includes the new Highway 6/Hanlon Expressway Midblock Interchange (G.W.P. 3059-20-00), north of Wellington Road 34, as shown on the key plan. Construction of the early works is planned to begin in Fall 2022, subject to approvals. The early work includes: • Constructing the Midblock Connection Road Bridge abutments and piers; • Widening along Highway 6 for the speed change lanes and staging; and • Implementing environmental protection measures (e.g., erosion control, fencing). Traffic on the Hanlon Expressway will be maintained for the majority of construction, with some temporary lane closures required. It is expected that construction of Phase 2 - Midblock Interchange Remaining Works will be completed by late 2025. Additional details can be found on the project website at www.Highway6Midblock.ca. THE PROCESS Building on the approved Individual Environmental Assessment, this project followed the MTO Class Environmental Assessment (EA) for Provincial Transportation Facilities (2000) for a Group ‘A’ project. It is anticipated that two (2) Design and Construction Reports (DCR) will be made available for review, documenting the detail design. The first DCR for the early works will be available on the project website at www.highway6midblock.ca/reports/ for a 30-day comment period from September 21, 2022 to October 20, 2022. A hard copy of DCR #1 will not be provided at public review locations. If you wish to review DCR #1 and require an alternate format, you may email the Project Team to discuss review options. COMMENTS Interested persons are encouraged to review the report on the project website and provide comments by October 20, 2022 to the Project Team by emailing ProjectTeam@Highway6midblock.ca. Additional information can be found at www.Highway6Midblock.ca. THIS NOTICE WAS ISSUED ON SEPTEMBER 21, 2022.

Olga Khuskivadze, P.Eng. Project Engineer Ministry of Transportation West Region, Planning & Design 659 Exeter Road, London, ON N6E 1L3 Peter Bamforth, P.Eng., CEng, MICE Consultant Senior Project Manager Dufferin/WSP 610 Chartwell Road Oakville, ON L6J 4A5 All stakeholders and members of the public who are on the project contact list will receive notification of future consultation opportunities as part of the Highways 6 and 401 Improvements Study. If you are interested in being added to the project contact list, please register on the website or contact the Project Team members at any time. Your comments are always welcome. We are committed to providing accessible government information and services for all Ontarians. For communication support or torequest project material in an alternate format, please contact one of the project team members listed above. Comments and information will be collected to assist MTO in meeting the requirements of the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

of police Sylvie Hauth, as well as human rights complaints and low morale among members of the police force who also have high rates of PTSD, Mukherjee said. A final report is expected early next year that the panel says will focus on ``a roadmap for change'' to rebuild trust between the city, police board and community. But in the meantime, the panel said appointing a new police chief and re-constituting the board are areas that need immediate attention to ensure the proper leadership is in place to oversee those changes. It recommended the board expand its membership to seven from five, and require that at least three of the members are Indigenous, including at least one person from Fort William First Nation, a community that's adjacent to Thunder Bay. It also advised the selection process for the chief and police board members should involve outreach to candidates from First Nations and other diverse backgrounds, and should take input from Indigenous community leaders. The report outlined priority characteristics for the next chief of police that include an understanding of the city and its status as a hub for the region, an understanding of First Nations governments, a commitment to a trauma-informed work culture and an understanding of poverty, racism, homelessness and mental health. There is also call to revise the police board appointment process and require mandatory training for members about their roles and responsibilities. It said the chair of the board should be a citizen member to establish its independence from the city. Labour relations also stood out to the panel as a key area in need of improvement, the report said. It called for a swift commitment to trauma-informed labour relations and training for all senior

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September 21st, 2022

Expert panel calls for Indigenous representation CONTINUED FROM 14

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Police investigate Saskatoon daycare after boy's hair was cut without consent CANADIAN PRESS

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officers and managers. ``This training be comprised of two parts: trauma as it affects the mental health and well-being of members of the police service and trauma as it affects the lives and realities of Indigenous members of the community,'' the report said. After managers are trained on the practice, the report said steps should be taken to provide such training to all uniformed officers. During consultations, Mukherjee said the breakdown of trust was a recurring theme, as was burnout among members of the police service. The report also noted the fact that it is not the first to call for changes to policing in Thunder Bay. A summary described the lengthy series of previous reports on issues with

racism and trust as ``more scrutiny than any police board or police service has received in Ontario, if not the country.'' The panel is now turning its attention to a final report. Mukherjee said he was pleased with the response when he presented the interim report, though it ``remains to be seen'' if its recommendations will be implemented while others have not been. He said the leadership changes, resources and training are ``critical ingredients'' to finally seeing change. ``The reason that we are urging the decision makers to put the right people in place is that will create the best possible condition for changes to happen,'' he said. ``In effect, Thunder Bay needs to get away from same old, same old.''

15

SASKATOON — A Saskatoon daycare is being investigated by the city police's hate crime unit and is having its licence reviewed after a Metis mother alleged her toddler's hair was cut without her consent. Jana Nyland had been taking her 19-month-old son to Bajwa's Childcare for a year when he came earlier this month with his neck-length hair cut, paNOW reported last week. Irum Bajwa operates the daycare out of a home on the northeast side of Saskatoon. ``When I asked her the reason why she cut his hair, she told me she didn't like long hair on boys and that native children shouldn't have

This little Metis boy had his hair cut without consent by daycare workers. CP

long hair,''' Nyland told the news outlet. Nyland said she immediately took her son and informed the daycare provider that she would be reporting the haircut to police. PaNOW quoted the mother as saying the operator had started to become obsessive about the boy, asking to keep him later in the evening and to have him stay for sleepovers. Nyland also said Bajwa was encouraging the child to call Bajwa ``mom.''

``She would call and ask to talk to him. She was just overstepping boundaries completely,'' Nyland said. Calls and emails to Bajwa from The Canadian Press went unanswered. Nyland ceased responding to messages seeking an interview. The Saskatoon Police Service said in an email that its hate crime unit is investigating a report filed on Sept. 12 against a child-care provider in Saskatoon. Spokesman Brad Jennings said no further details could be provided as the investigation is ongoing. The Saskatchewan Ministry of Education said it was also notified. It said ministry staff visited the child-care home the same day concerns were raised, and have increased monitoring. Parents accessing the home's services have also been told of the inves-

tigation. The ministry said the home is still operating, although the status of its licence is being reviewed. PaNOW was provided with a written statement from Bajwa acknowledging she cut the boy's hair without his mom's permission but explained she did not know it was his first haircut. ``[The] first haircut is very important for everyone. Please cut your child's hair immediately after birth and put in safe closet for whole life until he/ she died (sic). It will save you from evil eyes, ghosts, witches, enemies, and any other invisible creatures,'' she wrote. Nyland, a single mother, said she is pursuing legal action and has started a GoFundMe page to raise money for legal fees.


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September 21st, 2022

Beyond Orange Shirt Story- Niagara Sept 30 2022 Come and feel the healing power of Niagara Falls! Beyond Orange Shirt Story Ni-

agara 2022 is a week of activities culminating in the Sept 30 National Day of Truth

and Reconciliation in Niagara Falls, On. Monday Sept 26-

7pm Panel session at Performing Art Centre – Phyllis Webstad and other survivor

stories; Wednesday Sept. 28 7pm Drum across the Niagara River; Thursday 29

Beyond the Orange Shirt Story — Niagara Falls 2022 September 26th — Beyond the Orange Shirt Story — Meridian Credit Union, First Ontario Performing Arts Centre and Niagara Catholic District School Board present an intergenerational perspective on the Indian Residential Schools. Guests Speakers include: Phyllis Webstad (whose story is the “Orange Shirt Story”), Phyllis’ family, Dawn Hill, Roberta Hill, Willow Shawanoo and Mitch Case. This session will be available for a limited subscription to all School Boards the week of September 30th. Register through the First Ontario Performing Arts Centre — 90 minute presentation will be live streamed and a recording available for board-wide use the week of September 30th. Cost per school board for full access, $1000.

September 26th 7:00pm — Beyond the Orange Shirt Story—Survivors Speak — First Ontario Performing Arts Centre (St. Catharines) — tickets available through https:// firstontariopac.ca — pay what you can at time of booking tickets. Event sponsored by Meridian Credit Union and First Ontario Performing Arts Centre. Book sale and signing.

Sept – Niagara Parks Power Station 6 pm Treaty: A Reconciliation Revelry concert; Friday Sept 30- a day of activities to Honour Residential and Day school Survivors in Niagara Falls beginning with a Sacred fire at 7:00am, a formal presentation time at 10am and ending with the Falls turning orange and orange fireworks display.

September 27th 11:30am Rotary Luncheon honouring Survivors — Club Italia, Niagara Falls, — Guest Speaker: Phyllis Webstad — $50/person purchase tickets in advance contact Carrie Zeffiro at carrielzeffiro@gmail.com. Sponsored by Cogeco – Your TV Niagara. Book sale and signing September 28th noon De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre — Luncheon, First Ontario Performing Arts Centre — contact info@dahac.ca for details September 28th 7:00pm Drums Across Niagara — Oakes Garden Theatre, Niagara Falls, Canada and Niagara Falls Observation Tower, Niagara Falls, NY. Join drummers and singers as voices carry across the great Niagara River. Special tribute to Grandmother Lena Jack (Phyllis Webstad’s grandmother 1918—2019) September 29th 6:00pm TREATY—A Reconciliation Revelry concert — Niagara Parks Power Station Special guest speakers, Phyllis Webstad, and Chief Hank Adam

Photo Credit: Mark Zelinski

September 30th sunrise (7:00 am) Sunrise Ceremony and Ceremonial Fire — Niagara Parks Power Station September 30th 10:00—11:00am Orange Shirt Day Recognition of Survivors — Niagara Parks Power Station Special guest speakers, Phyllis Webstad, Chief Fred Robbins September 30th 8:00pm Niagara Falls turns orange every hour for 15 minute segments September 30th 10:00pm Niagara Parks Commission fireworks October 1st Niagara Regional Native Centre 8th Annual Traditional Powwow— Meridian Centre—St. Catharines —Free admission Grand Entry 11am and 6pm — Dedicated to honouring all Survivors. Special Thank you to the following supporters and sponsors: Brock University / City Cruises Canada / City of Niagara Falls / Cogeco – Your TV Niagara / Canadian Pacific Railway / De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre / First Ontario Performing Arts Centre / Fort Erie Native Friendship Centre / Grandmothers Voice / Great Wolf Lodge / Meridian Credit Union / Metis Nation of Ontario / Niagara Airbus / Niagara Catholic District School Board / Niagara Chapter of Native Women / Niagara College / Niagara Regional Native Centre / Rotary Club Niagara Falls, Sunrise / HIP (Honouring Indigenous People) / Westjet Airlines Visit Facebook: Beyond the Orange Shirt Story—Niagara Falls 2022 for event details

Phyllis Webstad of the Orange Shirt day story will be on hand to speak as will others to provide survivor stories and reflections. There will be a location for quiet reflection and support for survivors on Sept 30 at the Power Station at the brink of the Falls.

Many events are intended to provide recognition and honour to survivors of Indian Residential and Day schools. For more information see Beyond Orange Shirt Story on Facebook or contact Brian Kon at kon@ sterlingfrazer. com


September 21st, 2022

SPORTS

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17

know the score.

Inaugural Indigenous Ontario Championship to stay on Six Nations John Monture Junior and Senior dominate golf tournament at the beautiful MontHill Golf and Country Club STAFF REPORT

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SIX NATIONS — Monthill Golf & Country Club welcomed representing golf players from 41 Indigenous nations to the Inaugural Indigenous Ontario Championship from September 18 to 20 in the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. The event marked the first Open Provincial Championship in Canada for Indigenous golfers and featured participants from across North America. It was a triumphant day on Tuesday, as both John Monture Senior and Junior won hardware. After four play-off rounds due to an initial tie, the gold medal for the Men’s Overall Division went to John Monture Jr., announcing that the trophy and championship will stay on Six Nations for next year. Silver went to Ian Ford of the Lac Suel First Nation, and bronze went to Conrad Naponse of the Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation. The Net Men’s Overall Division saw three Six Nations based medalists including John Monture Sr., with gold, Matt Jamieson with silver, and bronze for Scott Hill. For Senior Mens, John

Local legend John Monture Sr. (left) won gold in Net Men's Overall and Senior Men's division. Six Nations' golfers Matt Jamieson and Scott Hill also placed in Men's Overall. John Jr. (right) won gold in Men's overall ensuring the 2023 tournament location. TRT

Monture Sr., earned another gold medal, Ted Williams of the Chippewa of the Thames First Nation won silver and Della Bomberry won bronze. For Junior Boys, Lucas Rogers of the Kettle Point First Nation won gold and Chad Styres of Six Nations won silver. The Women’s Overall Division saw gold go to Cheryl Mitchell of the Walpole First Nation, silver to Melanie Burgess of the

Metachewan First Nation, and bronze to Katheryn Corbiere of the Ojibway First Nation. The Net Women’s Overall Division saw Savana Smith of the Delaware Nation win gold, Shari Hunt of the Saint Mary’s First Nation win silver, and Nancy Jamieson of the Moravian of the Thames First Nation win bronze. Savana Smith also won gold, the only medal, for the Junior Girls Division.

For the Senior Women’s Division, Kathy Jamison took gold, Shari Hunt took silver and Roxanne General took bronze. “Having this event at MontHill Golf & Country Club is very special to us being 100 percent Indigenous owned. It was our late owner’s goal to host events of this nature, and I feel he will be smiling down at the 41 different nations coming from all over gathering to play for a provincial

championship at MontHill,” said Brendan Painter, Director of Golf Operations at Monthill. “The support our community has shown in helping fundraise and put on a first-class event for all competitors is amazing, and I can’t thank them all enough. We look forward to making this an annual event.” A large donation was made to the Dreamcatcher Fund through the championship, with Delby Pow-

less providing thankful remarks. Entry into the 36-hole tournament was open to Indigenous community members (First Nations, Métis & Inuit) to offer two full days of stroke play that contained various divisions, including Men’s and Women’s Gross, Men’s and Women’s Net Stableford, and also recognizing the top junior and senior players. “For too long, Onkwehon:we have been underrepresented and lacked opportunity in the golf world. This event will showcase and identify great Indigenous golfers, but more importantly, our hope is that it leads to opportunity, access, and growth of the game in our First Nation communities,” added Jesse Smith, Championship CoChair. Sunday the 18th featured a kid’s golf clinic, opening ceremonies and dinner for participants of the event, as well as key representatives from the Host Association Golf Ontario, members of the local Indigenous community including Delay Powless, Cody Jamieson, Brendan Bomberry and Lyle Thompson, and distinguished guests representing the Provincial Government.

“For too long, Onkwehon:we have been underrepresented and lacked opportunity in the golf world. This event will showcase and identify great Indigenous golfers, but more importantly, our hope is that it leads to opportunity, access, and growth of the game in our First Nation communities,” added Jesse Smith, Championship Co-Chair. TRT


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September 21st, 2022

Six Nations Masters teams both place second in Toronto competition

TORONTO — The Six Nations Jr. Masters lacrosse team (left photo) came second in the OMLA provincial run. They defeated Muskoka, Riverside and Six Nations 2 team in round robin play. Then beat Kincardine in semifinals 7-4 Sunday morning before loosing to Merritton Weekend Warriors 9-5 in the championship. Six Nations only had eight runners and two goaltenders, but defeated teams with full benches. The team is run by captain Andy Hill, assistant captains Chris Vale and Derek Hill, with goalies Elan Henhawk and Brian Curnow, and runners Riley Squire, Zach Hill, Stephen Henhawk, Kyle Green, Marky Maracle and bench staff Al Henhawk and Joe Squire. The 2022 Ontario Masters Lacrosse Association (OMLA) saw the Six Nations Sr. Masters team (right photo) come in second in the Senior Division of the the OMLA provincials versus Halton Hills at the Toronto Rock Athletic Centre. They still had themselves a great season, and as pictured: Russ Davis, Roger Vyse, Fred Doolittle, Tyler Bomberry, Corey Bomberry, Jim Henhawk ,Brian Porter Brad Martin Josh Powless, Darren Wilson, Randy Renaud, Trent Hill, Brandon Hill, Tony Henderson, Rick Filon, Ryan McNaughton, Travis Bland, Kyle Jamison, Darren Williams and Ken Montour. SUBMITTED

North American Indigenous Games try out dates set STAFF REPORT

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www.patreon.com/2RT

Support Indigenous Media

ONTARIO – September 16, 2022 – As Ontario’s designated Provincial and Territorial Aboriginal Sport Body, Indigenous Sport & Wellness Ontario (ISWO) is tasked with identifying, selecting, and managing the athletes, coaches, and team staff who will represent Team Ontario at the North American Indigenous Games 2023. Indigenous youth residing in Ontario that meet the age eligibility guidelines are welcome to try out for Team Ontario; the age eligibility for athletes for NAIG 2023 are as follows: 19U are 2004 and later, 16U are 2007 and later and 14U are 2009 and later. Tryouts for Team Ontario will kick off in Thunder Bay on October 2 at several venues across the city, for the following sports: archery, soccer, athletics, softball, baseball, beach volleyball and canoe/kayak. A full schedule of tryouts for Thunder Bay has been posted to the ISWO website and registration is now open. Tryouts will continue to take place throughout the year and into 2023. Here are the additional upcoming tryouts currently planned for Team Ontario in preparation for the 2023 North Ameri-

Indigenous Sport & Wellness Ontario will be hosting tryouts across the province of Ontario, in all regions, to select Indigenous athletes to represent Team Ontario at NAIG 2023, scheduled to take place in Kjipuktuk (Halifax), Dartmouth and Millbrook First Nation. NAIG

can Indigenous Games currently: Kapuskasing for October 14 and 15, Six Nations and London for October 29 and 30, Sudbury for November 5 and 6, Sault Ste. Marie for November 26 and 27, Toronto for December 3 and 4 and 10 and 11, Moose Factory for January 13 to 15, Timmins January 27 to 29, Sioux Lookout on January 28 and Kenora on February 4 and 5. Registration opens approximately one month in advance of tryouts. Registration must be done in advance of tryouts. Dates and locations are tentative and subject to change. Tryouts for some sport categories will be taking place online only. For the most up-to-date info, visit iswo.ca

Note that online registration is required to attend a tryout. For those youth unable to attend a tryout in person, an ‘online tryout application’ will be available via the My ISWO Portal. Online tryout applications require a tryout fee and will be assessed using the same guidelines and selection policies as in-person tryouts, by Team Ontario coaches and managers. The upcoming tryouts slated to take place in Kapuskasing, Six Nations, London, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Oshawa, Moose Factory, Timmins, Kenora and Sioux Lookout include varying sports. Visit iswo. ca for the most up-to-date information.


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September 21st, 2022

19

Six Nations Roxanne General wins bronze at Canada 55-Plus Games

Roxanne General (left) earned a bronze medal in the Canada 55-Plus games.

STAFF REPORT

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TWO ROW TIMES

KAMLOOPS, B.C. — Athletes representing “District 25” which encompasses Brant, Haldimand, Norfolk and Six Nations returned home with medals in three sports

from last month’s Canada 55-Plus Games held in Kamloops, B.C. Amongst the medal winners was Roxanne General, 67, of Six Nations, who earned a bronze medal in golf in the 65plus division. “It felt awesome,” said General. “I just couldn’t wait to go. I waited two

SUBMITTED

years ‘cause it kept getting cancelled.” Her journey to the Games was one that was interrupted by both the pandemic and an injury. After playing at the Greens of Renton in a qualifier, the Ontario Senior Games Association re-gional games in Kincardine in 2020, saw

Vancouver Warriors sign Chase Scanlan STAFF REPORT

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TWO ROW TIMES

VANCOUVER — The Vancouver Warriors have signed Chase Scanlan of the Seneca Nation’s Cattaraugus Territory, the power forward that was arrested twice last year. The Warriors announced his arrival at the start of September, joining as a free agent. Scanlan was kicked off of the University of Syracuse field lacrosse team after his arrest in a domestic dispute with his girlfriend in May of 2021. The player was later arrested for driving while intoxicated and without a licence a few months later in September. Both incidents happened in two different parts of New York State. Scanlan made a deal in April of this year to avoid a criminal charges if he stays clear of the law for

another year. That process, known as an adjournment in contemplation of dismissal, is still underway with charges of mischief that remain pending under technicality. Scanlan’s deal to avoid conviction also contains a requirement not to contact the woman involved. Scanlan has since taken a 14-week domestic violence prevention classes. In terms of the incident itself, details were filed in a police report that outlets in New York State published at the time, detailing that the woman involved has bruising on her ribs and that she feared for her life. On September 17, USA Lacrosse issued an apology for an article that was released the day prior that wrote that Scanlan had released a statement to City News Vancouver through the Warriors. “USA Lacrosse condemns any narrative

which minimizes the traumatic events experienced by domestic violence survivors. To indicate that we do not recognize the sensitivity of this topic was not out intention and for that, we sincerely apologize,” reads the statement. The deal with the Warriors was sign for 1-year on September 6, but details of Scanlan’s contract with Vancouver were not announced. Inside Lacrosse wrote that Scanlan spent a year off the field before joining the Western Lacrosse Association’s Langley Thunder at the end of May; he scored 29 goals in 16 games as part of the Vancouver-based team. The same team competed for the Mann Cup against the Major Series Lacrosse champion, the Peterborough Lakers, who won for the fourth time on September 17 over the Thunder.

her win gold over Linda Wood, who won silver, and Melanie Hind, who won bronze, in the 55-plus category. Her gold medal qualified her to move on to the Canada 55-Plus Games. Fast forward to July of this year, General explained that she might have torn her meniscus, a primary tendon in the knee, and is awaiting an MRI. But with her sights set on competing in Kamloops still, she wouldn’t allow it to stop her. “I wasn’t giving it up because I tried so hard to get it, and when I got it, I had to wait two years. So I didn’t care how I golfed—I wanted to win, but to me, my goal was to finish.” “I was only four strokes

behind silver,” she said. General said that her favourite part of the experience at the Games was the opportunity to take part in the opening and closing ceremonies. The Games featured more than 2,700 athletes com-peting in 26 events. “There were a lot of us and we got to march in by our provinces,” she said, noting that she en-joyed the bagpipes that led Ontario. In the future, General competed in the first Indigenous Ontario Championship to be held at the MontHill Golf Course that finalized yesterday on Tuesday, September 20, and the Masters Indig-enous Games next July in Ottawa.

For others looking for advice in the sport, General shared that tenacity is key. “Just keep trying,” she said. “To me, you have to go into a sport to have fun, so I like to win, but if I don’t win, I still love the sport. I like going in it for the experience and you can meet a lot of peo-ple. When you go into tournaments, you hardly know anyone, so I met a lot of people, which is awesome.” As pictured, from left, General stands with silver medalist Stacey Wheeler and gold medalist Lauren Lehman after the Canada 55-Plus Games medal ceremony finalized.

GRAND RIVER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION OFFICE 2022 DEADLINE CALENDAR for / gweh?: weh n=:` Ohsweg,h]:n/h Onkwehón:we ne: Ohswekenhro:non Feb. 1st

Application Deadline for Summer semester Apply on-line! Fall Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Winter course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due.

May 1st Application Deadline for Fall or Fall/Winter semester(s) Apply on-line! Winter Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Summer course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due. 11:59 pm May 1st to 9 am July 1st - The On-line Application on the GRPSEO Website is not available. Aug 1st

Official transcripts are due from students funded for any of the three previous application periods (Summer/Fall/Winter). For all APPROVED FALL applications - Any documentation that was requested by the Funding Advisor to be submitted to GRPSEO by August 1, (as outlined in the “Check List of Required Documentation” form provided to the applicant), and not received by this deadline date will result in CANCELLATION of the approved application and loss of funding.

Oct. 1st

Application Deadline for Winter semester – Apply on-line! Summer Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Fall course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due. STUDENTS MUST APPLY ON- LINE BY SPECIFIED DEADLINE

O T H E R P O S T S E C O N D A RY D AT E S A N D E V E N T S 2 0 2 2 Jan. 4 Feb. 21 Mar. 4

Office Reopens 2022 Office Closed: Family Day Winter Semester Contact Required From All Students (Check With Your GRPSEO Funding Advisor) Apr. 15 Office Closed: Good Friday Apr. 18 Office Closed: Easter Monday May 1 Accepting Graduate Promotion Items May 23 Office Closed: Victoria Day June 1 Summer Office Hours: Open from 8 am to 4 pm June 21 Office Closed: Observance National Indigenous Peoples Day July 1 Office Closed: Canada Day Aug. 1 Official Transcripts Aug. 1 Office Closed: Civic Holiday Sept. 1 Back to Regular Office Hours: Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Sept. 5 Office Closed: Labour Day Sept 30 National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Oct. 10 Office Closed – Thanksgiving Day Oct. 31 Deadline to Submit Graduate Promotion Items Nov. 4 Fall Semester Contact Required From All Students (Check With Your GRPSEO Funding Advisor) Nov. 11 Office Closed: Observance of Remembrance Day Dec. 23 Office Closed: Christmas Closure Jan. 3, 2023 Office Reopens Please check the local newspapers, our website at www.grpseo.org FaceBook or give us a call at (519) 445-2219 for more information.

EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW


20

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Position

Employer/Location

Term

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Assistant Caretaker Parks and Recreation Part Time Maintenance Mechanic Occupational Therapist Child and Youth Health, Health Services Full Time Volunteer Coordinator Justice, Central Administration Contract Dementia Care Team-Elder Companion Home & Community Care, Health Services Part Time Caretaker Maintenance Mechanic Parks and Recreation Full Time Registered Nurse Diabetes Wellness Program, Health Services Contract Help Desk Specialist Computer Services, Central Administration Contract Mental Health Addictions and Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Full Time Concurrent Disorder Worker Ęsadatgęhs Quality Lead Administration, Health Services Full Time Registered Practical Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract Administrative Assistant Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full Time Communicative Disorders Assistant Child and Youth Health, Health Services Full Time Registered Early Childhood Educator Child Care Services, Social Services Full Time Drainage Superintendent Administration, Central Administration Full Time Personal Support Worker Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full Time Health Advocacy Officer Home and Community Care, Health Services Full Time Behaviour Unit Administrative Assistant Child and Family Services, Social Services Full Time Mental Health Nurse/Case Manager Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Full Time Land Use Officer Lands and Resources Full Time Community Food Animator Community Health and Wellness, Health Services Full Time I.T. Support Technician Ogwadeni:deo Full Time Ogwadeni:deo Legal Ogwadeni:deo Full Time STM Family Service Ogwadeni:deo Full Time Speech Language Pathologist Child and Youth Health, Health Services Full Time Early Childhood Development Worker Child and Youth Health, Health Services Full Time Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services Part Time Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services Full Time Youth Life Promotion Advisor Kanikonriio Child and Youth Programs, Social Services Full Time Senior Accounts Receivable Clerk Finance, Central Administration Full Time Caretaker Maintenance Mechanic Parks and Recreation Contract Special Needs Resource Consultant Child Care Services, Social Services Contract (Maternity) Admission/Concession Worker Parks and Recreation Part Time School Caretaker (2 Vacancies) Public Works Part Time Sanitation Truck Driver Public Works Part Time Administrative Assistant Community Health & Wellness, Health Services Contract Maintenance Worker Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part Time Cook Child Care Services, Social Services Full Time Education Manager Education, Central Administration Contract Academic Lead Education, Central Administration Contract Intake Worker Ogwadeni:deo Full Time Cultural Advisor Ogwadeni:deo Full Time SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Maintenance Worker Brantford Native Housing Full Time Gladue Writer – Brantford Aboriginal Legal Services Full Time/ Contract Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays...Monday through Friday from 8:30-4:30pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Salary

Closing Date Position

$16.00/ Hour

September 21, 2022

TBD TBD TBD $18.00/ Hour $70, 000 to $74,147 TBD TBD

September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022

TBD $75,000 to $80,000 $23.00/ Hour TBD TBD $75,000 to $95,000 $22.00/ Hour TBD $36,400 TBD TBD $50,000 to $55,000 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD $21.00/ Hour $21.00/ Hour $45,000 $56,000 to $66,000 $18.00/ Hour $27.00/ Hour $16.00/ Hour $18.00/ Hour $19.00/ Hour $22.00 to $25.00/ Hour TBD $20.00/ Hour $70,000 to $90,000 $65,000 to $75,000 TBD TBD

September 21, 2022 September 21, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 September 28, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022 October 5, 2022

TBD TBD

Child Care Assistant Special Projects Coordinator Human Resources Assistant Receptionist Cyber Security Analyst PowerSchool Coordinator Library Technician - Delhi Library Technician - Haldimand Cayuga Language Instructor Executive Director of Finance MCFN Lands Claim Coordinator Cultural Awareness Coordinator Anishinaabemowin Instructor – Ekwaamjigenang Children’s Center (ECC) Director of Advancement Post Office Assistant Library Assistant Gas Technician or Helper Construction Staff

September 21st, 2022

Employer/Location Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Grand River Employment and Training Grand River Employment and Training Brantford Region Indigenous Support Center Grand Erie District School Board Grand Erie District School Board Grand Erie District School Board Grand Erie District School Six Nations Polytechnic Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Term

Salary

Full Time/ Permanent $32,953.50 - $45,805.50 Full Time TBD Contract TBD Full Time $18.00/ Hour Full Time $78,249 to $88,919 Contract $78,249 to $88,919 Part Time $23.30/ Hour Part Time $23.30/ Hour Full Time/ Permanent TBD Full Time/ Permanent $100,000 to $115,000 Full Time/ Permanent $40,297.50 to $56,821.50 Full Time/ Contract $40,250 Full Time/ Permanent $36,662.50 to $51,350.50

Closing Date September 22, 2022 September 23, 2022 September 23, 2022 September 23, 2022 September 26, 2022 September 26, 2022 September 27, 2022 September 27, 2022 September 29, 2022 September 29, 2022 September 29, 2022 September 29, 2022 September 29, 2022

Brantford Native Housing Part Time/ Contract TBD September 30, 2022 Canada Post Temporary/ On-call $18.08/ Hour October 1, 2022 Woodland Cultural Center Full Time $18.00/ Hour October 6, 2022 Wil iam Bros. Heating & Cooling Full Time TBD October 15, 2022 Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent $18.00 to $20.00/ Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Cook Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Casual $16.90/ Hour Until Fil ed IT Technician Ohsweken Speedway Full Time/ Permanent $45,000 to $75,000 Until Fil ed Kitchen Help Sade:konih TOJ TBD Until Fil ed Cashier Styres Gas Bar Part Time TBD Until Fil ed Weekend Visitor Services Woodland Cultural Center Part Time $15.00/ Hour Until Fil ed Housing Outreach Worker Brantford Native Housing Full Time TBD Until Fil ed Tire Technician Hil s Tire Full Time TBD Until Fil ed Building Attendant Staff Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent TBD Until Fil ed Development Corporation Chiefswood Park Food Truck Cook Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Seasonal $18.00 to $20.00/ Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Project Administrative Assistant Woodland Cultural Centre Full Time TBD Until Fil ed Operations Manager Kayanase Full Time TBD Until Fil ed Forestry Labourer Kayanase Summer Student TBD Until Fil ed Ground Maintenance Worker Kayanase Summer Student TBD Until Fil ed Gas Bar Attendant Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Part Time TBD Until Fil ed Park Attendant Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent $18.00 to $20.00/Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Bingo Hall Cook Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent $18.00 to $20.00/Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Bingo Sales Representative Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent $18.00 to $20.00/Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Education Curriculum Developer Woodland Cultural Center Contract TBD Until Fil ed Building Attendant Staff Six Nations of the Grand River Full Time/ Permanent $18.00 to $20.00/Hour Until Fil ed Development Corporation Supply Cook Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Contract/Casual $16.90/Hour Until Fil ed The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. Only local positions are posted in the paper. For more positions in the September 20, 2022 surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book your intake appointment with an ETC by calling 519-445-2222 (TollSeptember 21, 2022 Free long distance at 1-888 218-8230 or email us at info@greatsn.com. Phone: 519.445.2222 Fax: 519.445.4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


TWO TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022 26

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21 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20TH, 2022

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com

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September 21st, 2022 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20TH, 2022

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Notice

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com

Notice

Yard Sale END OF SUMMER YARD SALE

September 24th & 25th, 9am - 3pm 3 Stoneridge Circle DOWNSIZING Clothes, Households, Custom Jewellery, CDs, Complete Longhouse Attire $200 Rain Date October 1st & 2nd, 9am - 3pm

For Sale

Six Nations Farmers Association Fall Fair Draws. • • • • •

A BIZZY B SHOP

50/50 Draw - $150.00 Winner: Pam Sault Fruit Basket donated by John Monture - Winner: Joyce Longboat Beef Package donated by Dekoning Meats - Winner: Rick Brant Pork Package donated by Frank Montour - Winner: Bev. MtPleasant Free Fresh Apples were given to all who desired one

Net Profit for SNFA was $651.00 which will cover booth presentation expenses.

Thank you to all who supported the initiative which allowed SNFA to participate in our Fall Fair. Nya:weh

Notice to Creditors

OPEN SEPTEMBER 17-18, 24-25 9 AM - 4 PM

ALL SUMMER SPIN TO WIN UP TO 70% OFF!

3404 MISSISSAUGA ROAD NEW CREDIT


TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES TWO

September 21st,2018 2022 DECEMBER 19TH,

CLUES ACROSS 1. Crops sown in winter in India 5. Nursemaids in East Asia 10. Investigates 12. Treated like a child 14. About religious belief 16. Widely used exclamation 18. Car mechanics group 19. Not good 20. Indigenous people of Alberta 22. Everyone has one 23. Fencing sword 25. Soaks 26. The human foot 27. Of she 28. Erythrocyte (abbr.) 30. Soldiers 31. Energy, style and enthusiasm 33. Playwright O’Neill 35. Stone parsley 37. Small stones 38. Gas descriptor 40. Monetary unit of Samoa 41. Jeans manufacturer 42. NHL great Bobby 44. Cool! 45. Bravo! Bravo! Bravo! 48. Winged 50. Partner to “oohed” 52. Defensive nuclear weapon 53. Coated 55. Furry household friend 56. Chinese principle underlying the universe 57. Prefix meaning “within” 58. Makes easier 63. Transferred property 65. Branched 66. Hillsides 67. Abba __, Israeli diplomat CLUES DOWN

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ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Teaching what you know to others is a continuous theme for you this week, Aries. You want to impart wisdom any way that you can and you’ll have the opportunity to do so.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you’ll finally gain greater control over your thoughts this week when someone close to you helps you see the bigger picture. Now you can focus on important things. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Your love life may seem confusing this week, Gemini. It may wax and wane from fevered passion to apathy. Rough patches are not unusual and you need to see this through.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, a change in routine is necessary. Lately you may have been feeling overwhelmed by responsibilities, so take time to figure out what you need to do.

1. Eggs in a female fish 2. Military mailbox 3. Unit to compare power levels 4. Line on a map connecting similar points 5. One who accepts 6. Partner to cheese 7. Ancient Greek sophist 8. About hilus 9. Southeast 10. Where actors ply their trade 11. Beloved Philly sandwich 13. Intend 15. Talk excessively 17. Bronx cheers 18. Drain 21. Renews 23. Monetary unit in Asia 24. Relative biological effectiveness (abbr.) 27. Carthaginian statesman

Answers for September 21st, 2022 Crossword Puzzle

29. Aged 32. Mauna __, Hawaiian volcano 34. Firearm 35. Consolation 36. An island in the north Atlantic 39. Pitching statistic 40. Disconsolate 43. A part of a river where the current is very fast 44. Call it a career 46. Behave in a way that degrades someone 47. Health insurance 49. Recommend 51. Baltic peninsula 54. Father 59. After B 60. Bar bill 61. Doctors’ group 62. 2,000 lbs. 64. Equal to one quintillion bytes

SUDOKU

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 A turning point in your love life may come this week, Leo. It may hit you in a most unexpected way. Even a relatively simple gesture may sway your feelings.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, your social circle could open up this week and expand your prospects even further. Use the new connections to get out of the house more than ever before. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 An unexpected financial windfall could come your way this week, Libra. While it could be tempting to spend all this extra money right away, save some for a rainy day.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Your desire for excitement could lead you on a wild goose chase, Scorpio. You may find that it’s not excitement you need, just a change of scenery. Book a trip. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, this week you may find that one day you are calm and collected, and the next you are all riled up. Find a balance between them both to get through the days.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, though making sudden changes in your life seems like a good idea, it’s best to take some time mulling things over before you dive into any new situations. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Even the best plans can use a little tweaking from time to time. Go with the flow, Aquarius. Enjoy this more laid back approach and consider taking it more often.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, a professional change will happen soon. All that hard work you have been putting in is sure to pay off in the weeks ahead.

Container Sales and Modifications Service Since 2007

Paul LeBlanc Owner

90 Morton Ave. East, Unit 1-B • Brantford, ON N3R 7J7 Cell: 519.754.6844 • Tel: 519.751.1651 • Fax: 519.751.3328 www.vbinc.ca • Email: vb.container4@gmail.com


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TWO ROW TIMES

September 21st, 2022