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THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY April 28th, 2021 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

Mississaugas of the Credit mourns youth lost in collision STAFF REPORT

892 Highway 54, Ohsweken 519-753-3835

editor@tworowtimes.com

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HAGERSVILLE — A 23-year-old man lost his life after a tragic motorcycle collision in Hagersville over the weekend. Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation is mourning the loss of Alexander Dalton, who was tragically killed in the collision near his home the evening of Apr. 23, 2021. MCFN released a statement announcing the death of the young man. “The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Chief and Council are deeply saddened to learn of the sudden passing of Mississaugas of the Credit member Alexander Dalton,” the statement reads. Alexander is the son of Andrea King and Wayne Dalton. “Please join us in extending our love, prayers and condolences to the family,” MCFN said in the statement. “We are

Police are looking for information from the public on this Chevrolet Tahoe that was involved in a hit and run in Hagersville on April 23. The OPP continue to investigate the incident and are asking anyone with information or who may have witnessed the collision to contact them at 1-888-310-1122. You may also call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477. PHOTO BY OPP

thinking of you and send our strength during this difficult time.” The collision involved three vehicles and occurred on King Street West in Hagersville, Ont. OPP and emergency services personnel received a call around 9:05 p.m. notifying them

of a three-vehicle collision. A witness reported that a pickup, an SUV, and a motorcycle were involved in the collision. Police said the SUV fled the scene. The motorcycle rider was pronounced deceased at the scene. OPP said the motorcyclist was travelling westbound

on King Street West near Sarah Street when it was struck from behind by a westbound 2001 blue Chevy Tahoe, causing motorcyclist to be ejected and then be struck by an eastbound pickup truck. The SUV fled the scene. A witness said the SUV had a black hood and said

it continued westbound on King Street West and then northbound onto Ojibway Road. The witness also said the SUV drove into a ditch on Ojibway Road where two occupants fled the vehicle on foot into the nearby bush area. Canine units and drones patrolled the area to conduct a search of the area. The road was closed for six hours while technical collision investigators attended the scene. The OPP have recovered the vehicle and released photos in hopes of getting tips from the community about the SUV. The OPP continue to investigate the incident and are asking anyone with information or who may have witnessed the collision to contact them at 1-888-310-1122. You may also call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477. The Two Row Times extends its sincere condolences to the entire family and MCFN community during this difficult time.

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LOCAL

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April 28th, 2021

keeping you informed.

NEIL’S CHIP STAND Spring and Summer hours starting April 5 Open Monday to Saturday from 11-8pm

Unity concert commemorates 15 years since OPP raid DONNA DURIC

1241 Sour Springs Rd., 2nd Line Friday April 30 we will sell Perch Dinner for 15.50 dinner. 4 perch with fries and the works.

Reserve as soon possible. We will only be selling 20 perch dinners. Wings are every Wednesday. Corn soup with ham and scone Thursday. Friday fish and chips Cell number 226 388 0436

DR. ANNETTE DELIO & DR. KATHLEEN LEONARD OPTOMETRISTS

New Patients Welcome! 345 Argyle Street South Unit #104 ,Caledonia, ON N3W 1L8 Phone: 905-765-4362(iDOC) Fax: 905-765-1362 Web: www.drdelio.ca Monday to Friday: 9:00am – 7:00pm Saturday: 9:00am – 4:00pm

donna@tworowtimes.com

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On April 20, 2006, Ontario Provincial Police moved in to evict a handful of sleeping Six Nations demonstrators at a former housing development site in Caledonia in a pre-dawn raid that resulted in massive resistance from Six Nations people. The call went out through text messages and phone calls from newly emerging cellphone technology and thousands of Six Nations people attended the site, formerly known as Douglas Creek Estates, to push hundreds of OPP officers off the site. The former subdivision, which sits on Six Nations lands, is still in the possession of Six Nations people to this day. The land was given the moniker “Kanonhstaton”, meaning “The Protected Place”. In a similar action, demonstrators have stopped construction of the McKenzie Meadows, a 200-home subdivision in Caledonia — one that sits across the street from the site of the 2006 land reclamation. Skyler Williams has become the face of that new demonstration called Land Back Lane. Williams helped organize a unity concert

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Logan Staats played music for a small crowd on Saturday to commemorate the 2006 raids at Kanonstaton. PHOTO BY DONNA DURIC

last weekend to commemorate the 2006 raids at Kanonstaton with a focus on unity among all political factions on Six Nations. Williams says this is something he’s emphasized since he stopped construction of the McKenzie Meadows last August. Williams said the events of April 20, 2006 still reverberate on Six Nations to this day, saying it was a “moment in time where it was about unity. It was for

everybody. It was about the land.” He said the action at Land Back Lane, which Six Nations land defenders still occupy to this day, is also meant to unify the people. “This wasn’t for any one family or faction or group or Confederacy or this or that,” said Williams, who was also heavily involved in the action at Kanonhstaton 15 years ago as a young man. “It’s for everybody.” And unity is necessary

to say no to development, he said. “We’ve seen in the last nine months here (at Land Back Lane) those families and those friends that have been apart for so long have come together in a huge way to keep pushing forward and keep saying ‘absolutely no’ to these massive developments happening (on Six Nations unceded land).” A host of Six Nations talent came together for the concert, with most recording from home for a virtual concert, while some performed in person at Kanonhstaton. A small, physically-distanced crowd gathered at Kanonhstaton Saturday to hear award-winning musician Logan Staats croon about the loss of land in a number of his own original recordings. Williams acknowledges there are families and factions who hold on to “old grudges” – a theme that played out in 2006 and continues today. “Those are hard things to let go of,” he said. “I got no blame for anybody that wants to be angry because it is hard to let go of those old hurts but when it comes to the land, the only thing that keeps going on is these massive developments and resource extraction if we don’t come together.”

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April 28th, 2021

New series ‘Exterminate All the Brutes’ examining the roots of white supremacy JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

If you have ever wondered about how white supremacy took its roots and continues to blossom racism to this day, there is a new HBO TV Series that takes on the issue of cultural genocide without the kid gloves. The four part docudrama series “Exterminate all the Brutes” tells of the concept and history of mass exterminations throughout the world but spends a great deal of time focusing on the hostile colonial history of the Americas in particular. The series was created by Josh Hartness and co-writer Raoul Peck, a descendent of the indigenous peoples of Haiti who rebelled against the Spaniards after the great conquest of South and Central America and won

its independence through a passionate slave revolt. The writing and filming style reminds us that white supremacy in its many forms has never yet been eradicated from our existence. In one such scene, a U.S. calvary general stops to take a bath in a stream. He hears some chanting in the distance and when he looks up he sees a caravan of modern Indigenous people crossing the river chanting, “You shall not replace us.” While history unfolds, the series plows to the surface the real truth behind the recorded stories for all inhabitants of the Americas. Episode One, The Disturbing Confidence of Ignorance Part 1, is a wide-spreading footing to base the rest of the episodes upon. It examines bigotry throughout history and how it becomes institutionalized. Episode Two is entitled, “Who the F*** is Colum-

bus” but also reveals the true stories behind much of today’s modern accounts of historical events. Some you may know of while others will be new to the viewer. Episode Three, Killing at a distance, talks about the residential school concepts which were born in Ireland and migrated to North America with the Pilgrims. The final episode uncovers the full spectrum of “The colours of Facism," which is threatening its return across the world today through neo-Nazi and Facist elements. This is an important series to see towards understanding the different vantage points of history between the colonized and the colonizers. This series is a must-see, and both should learn much by doing so. Five stars to its creators.

It's not too late to apply!

UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM YEAR 1 PROGRAM Complete your first year of university with Six Nations Polytechnic. After the first year, students transfer to one of our six partner universities: Brock University, Laurier University, University of Guelph, McMaster University, University of Waterloo and Western University.

Apply now! snpolytechnic.com | admissions@snpolytechnic.com 519-445-0023 ext. 6226

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April 28th, 2021

Elected Chief calls for unity in response to federal budget DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Chief Mark Hill is calling on the community to unify — saying hereditary and elected leaders need to listen to the voices in the community seeking the two bodies to work together. Hill pointed to the recent federal budget announcement, promising $18 billion for Indigenous initiatives across the country. Hill says community leadership need to collaboratively hold Canada and Ontario accountable and pursue funding to care for elders, language programming and waterline hookups — spe-

cifically pointing to funding for a new building for the language-immersion school Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo. He said the school is a key language institution that aims to strengthen community traditional knowledge. The school began operating over 30 years ago and is a full immersion school where students partake in studies in one of the Haudenosaunee languages. But the school is without its own space and has been actively fundraising the roughly $12 million needed to construct a new building for years. Land for the school has already been designated behind Six Nations Polytechnic on Fourth Line Road. “Kawenni:io is in need of

a real school building,” said Chief Hill. “Six Nations has a chance to come together and work towards providing for this community need.” He said Six Nations leaders will be engaging with the federal government to pursue funding for the new school building. “There are a whole host of additional opportunities for us to come together to support,” said Chief Hill. This is the first council in over a decade to hold regular meetings with hereditary chiefs. Virtual meetings began late last year to develop a framework for approaching the federal government regarding Six Nations’ land rights. The pandemic has

hampered the ability to meet more frequently, said elected Chief Hill, but, “our elected council remains committed to meeting with the Confederacy Chiefs and Clanmothers,” he said. “We have much to cover during these important discussions so Six Nations can remain a stronger nation. Our people are counting on us to work together.” The elected Chief said he’s “optimistic” about the conversations between the two councils thus far. He acknowledged last week’s announcement from the HCCC calling for a moratorium on development on contested Six Nations lands unless developers agree to work with the HCCC. “We acknowledge their call for the moratorium,”

SNGR Elected Chief Mark Hill is calling for unity in response to the FILE PHOTO federal budget announcement.

said Chief Hill stopping short of supporting that call. When asked by reporters if he supported the hereditary chiefs call requiring developers work through the Haudenosaunee Development Institute, Hill pivoted to focus on listening to what the people are saying. “Our people have said they would like to see our two bodies work together. What that looks like, that’s the big question. We have to hold Ontario and Canada accountable. We need to figure this out once and for all because Six Nations can be a very strong nation. It’s a matter of getting Ontario and Canada on the same page (as us).” Chief Hill also addressed the long millions of dollars in tobacco excise tax

leaving Six Nations, saying that $200 million leaves the community in excise taxes each year from just one producer. Hill said his hope is for the community to see those excise taxes returned to Six Nations, saying it is something he has his eye on in light of the upcoming breech of trust claim — headed to courts in 2022. Hill says the federal government owes Six Nations “trillions” in that case. When asked what he saw as the immediate issues facing the hereditary and elected leaders from working collaboratively together Hill said people need to better understand each other, come from a good place and prioritize the voices of people in the community.

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April 28th, 2021

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Six Nations COVID-19 Vaccine Education Webinar Do you have questions about the COVID-19 vaccines and want to learn more? Are you unsure about whether you should get the vaccine or not? Or do you want to learn how to talk to others about the importance of getting vaccinated?

Join Health Services Vaccine Educators for a one hour webinar where we discuss the following topics:

Vaccine myths Vaccine types How vaccines work Vaccine safety Side effects Who can / can’t get the vaccine

Webinar is open to ALL Six Nations of the Grand River Community members whether you have been vaccinated or not. No medical or vaccine knowledge is required.

Please click the link below to register: https://forms.gle/XJWyV h6hJcYQK2i56

Nicole Bilodeau

Eve Kahama

Webinar Dates: Wed. April 28 @ 2pm Thurs. April 29 @ 10am Fri. April 30 @ 11am Mon. May 3 @ 12pm Tues. May 4 @ 3pm Wed. May 5 @ 6pm

Please register through the form - questions can be directed to nbildodeau@sixnations.ca AND sndrugstrategy@sixnations.ca


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OPINION

April 28th, 2021

Follow the story on social media!

editor@tworowtimes.com

@tworowtimes

Federal budget 2021: $18 billion is a step towards closing gaps between Indigenous and non Indigenous communities By Kerry Black There is no denying that the landscape of our collective reality has shifted dramatically since the pandemic began. Budget 2021 reveals significant investments in COVID-19 relief efforts, job creation and building a resilient economy. But where does the 2021 budget stand on investments in Indigenous people and communities? The pandemic continues to pose significant and unique risks to Indigenous people. They are disproportionately at risk of public health emergencies, and have been battling systemic and social inequities all while fighting COVID-19. Investment needs are both urgent and substantial. It is clear that the budget tabled by Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, showcases unprecendented levels of funding for all Canadians and for Indigenous people. Funds to MMIWG and community infrastructure The investments presented in Chapter 8 of budget 2021 show investments in excess of $18 billion over the next five years to ``improve the quality of life and create new opportunities for people living in Indigenous communities.'' There is no doubt that this government continues to prioritize Indigenous people in its efforts. Over the past four years, there have been significant investments, starting with $8.4 billion in 2016. And in the Fall Economic Statement, the Liberal government committed funding

to health and well-being of Indigenous people, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG), child care and significant investments in infrastructure including drinking water provisions in areas where there are advisories. Budget 2021 builds on the infusions into MMIWG from the Fall Economic Statement, which had previously committed $781.5 million over five years starting in 2021_22, and $106.3 million ongoing. A necessary funding investment to what many experts have warned is a public health emergency. Budget 2021 also announced over $6 billion towards infrastructure in Indigenous communities, a notable and necessary commitment. Distinctions-based investments into infrastructure include support for water, housing, schools and roads, building on the $1 billion dollar announcement from the Canada Infrastructure Bank. From budget 2021, $4.3 billion supports an Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund for all Indigenous people. A further $1.7 billion covers operation and maintenance costs for First Nations living on-reserve. Other notable investments include a continued focus on water and wastewater, including $125.2 million over four years beginning in 2022-23. These investments build on the recent announcement committing $1.5 billion for drinking water in Indigenous communities.

However, we know that closing the infrastructure gap will require upwards of $30 billion to address new and existing deficits because of historic underfunding of both capital and operations costs. Projects planned pre-pandemic now require more funding in order to be completed _ because of supply chain issues for items such as timber, initial projected costs have sky-rocketed. These are just some of the realities that will impact our ability to close the infrastructure gap by 2030. We need targeted funding for First Nations housing And what about housing, which is often lost among the landscape of infrastructure investments. Budget 2021 stays the course and does not directly target housing investments for First Nations living on-reserve. There are, however, topups to the Rapid Housing Initiative. This initiative however, doesn't have a targeted funding stream for First Nations despite the widespread agreement that over-crowded housing is a social determinant of health. Targeted investments in housing for First Nations living within their Nations are essential, and help to balance the housing needs on- and off-reserve. The 2016 Clatworthy report estimated capital investment needs of $20 billion. This value has only increased since then. COVID-19 response The $1.2 billion targeted investment for COVID-19 response has investments

Volume 8, Issue 38 Make advertising cheques payable to:

Garlow Media

that communities have been hoping for. This includes funding for mental health assistance, food security and nursing. In a survey conducted by Statistics Canada, six out of 10 Indigenous participants reported that their mental health has worsened since the onset of physical distancing. Similarly, demand for counselling services has grown throughout the pandemic, making these investments more critical. Suicide rates have increased, for example in Sioux Valley Dakota Nation, and among Alberta's Indigenous youth. Economic recovery and response to the pandemic was a key priority in the budget unveiled yesterday. And we need to ensure the investments non-Indigenous communities receive are at least mirrored for Indigenous communities. Historically underserved and under-resourced While the budget includes massive investments in the economy, Indigenous communities require substantial investment, arguably more, in these same initiatives. Indigenous communities have been historically underserved and under-resourced. Since the onset of the pandemic, there has been a delay in closing the gap for Indigenous business support. And Indigenous people experienced higher economic stress than non-Indigenous Canadians throughout the pandemic. Many programs in First Nations communities rely on own-source revenue, which has been severely

hindered during the pandemic. There are elements within the budget that highlight a commitment to Indigenous-led business, including support for Indigenous entrepreneurs, and investing $22 million into empowering Indigenous women through the Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship Initiative. It also expands on the Indigenous Growth Fund, first announced in the 2019 budget. Tackling systemic inequalities So where does the budget leave us? The substantial investments are notable, and the government deserves recognition for its efforts to address racialized and marginalized communities in Canada. But an important reminder is needed. True economic recovery necessitates tackling not only the funds required for investment, but also the systemic inequalities that contributed to marginalization in the first place. These systemic inequalities are built upon the foundations of colonial programs and processes. To address them, we must put equal funding into both the process and the outcome. Similarly, now might be a good time to rethink the colonial approach to determining the budget. A formal role in the decision-making process for Indigenous people in Canada is a necessary next step. Simply put, when we address the systems under which we operate, we can impact the outcomes that are generated.

STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OHSWEKEN — The Attorney General of Ontario selected Sonhatsi:wa, Ganohkwasra’s Sexual Violence Healing Center, as a recipient of the Attorney General’s Victim Services Award of Distinction for 2020-21. The award recognizes the dedication and creativity of professionals and volunteers who serve victims, and the courageous efforts of individuals who have been personally impacted by crime and are now working to raise the profile of victims’ issues in Ontario. SNGR announced the award Tuesday, acknowledging the work the Sonhatsi:wa team does for the community, saying the award is a well-deserved recognition of efforts the organization makes to provide support and counselling to individuals and their families. “Sonhatsi:wa cares for some of the most vulnerable members in the community each day to help those in need overcome past trauma and hurt,” said Elected Chief Mark Hill. Sonhatsi:wa received their award during a virtual awards reception on April 27, 2021.

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April 28th, 2021

Six Nations & New Credit Day School Photos We are looking for Six Nations & New Credit Day School photos dating from 1800's to 1997 and we need your help to collect them.

Do you recognize anyone in these photos? Or know what schools or years they are from? If so, contact us to let us know!

Prizes to be Won! $500 for OLDEST dated photo $500 for MOST photos submitted

There are 20 Day Schools listed. All of the numbered schools #1 thru to #12. Old Central, Central, O.M. Smith, I.L. Thomas, Emily C. General, Jamieson, J.C. Hill & New Credit School. Please send class photos, school activity photos, newspaper event clippings & school sports team photos. Please include the students names, year & school. We are hoping to get enough photos to fill each school album.

SUBMIT PHOTOS TO:

www.jotform.com/SNDaySchool/form For more info contact Ida Martin @ 519-445-4336 or email martin@oirsss.ca

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April 28th, 2021

Powwows across US adapt to pandemic for a second year CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The coronavirus pandemic brought powwow season largely to a screeching halt last year. Some powwows cancelled their annual events; others went online only. Some held virtual competitions and cultural events from afar, but left most of the food and art vendors and daily workers sitting on the sidelines. And powwow season

this year will not return to normal either, even with vaccines rolling out and restrictions being lifted in some states. Several powwows have been cancelled for a second year, or are still up in the air. The Shoshone-Bannock Indian Festival — the largest cultural festival in Idaho — was cancelled this week for a second year, as was the Coeur d'Alene's Julyamsh powwow, also in Idaho. The Denver March Powwow was also cancelled but left uncertain whether it could be

rescheduled for later in the year. It's been costly for everyone involved — the organizations that sponsor the events, participants, vendors, and the local communities that look forward to the economic boost they bring. ``As an Indigenous artist, most of my venues are powwows and other tribal-sponsored events such as conferences and sports tournaments,'' bead and shell artist Jennifer DeHoyos, Payomkawichum/ Cahuilla/Kumeyaay, told

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Call 226-227-2192 or 1-866-964-5920 Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

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Gathering of Nations held its second virtual powwow the weekend of April 23-24 in Albuquerque, FILE New Mexico.

Indian Country Today. ``The impact was great.'' The message is: Check

ahead before you go, and let's hope next year is back to normal. A BEACON OF HOPE Gathering of Nations held its second virtual powwow the weekend of April 23-24 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Since 1983, the event has attracted more than 750 tribes from all over the country and Canada, hosting more than 75,000 attendees. Known as the ``Super Bowl of Powwows,'' the event drew about 91,000 people to its last in-person powwow in 2019. For Gathering of Nations Founder Derek Mathews, the decision to go virtual rather than cancel was the best option. He considers the Gathering of Nations a beacon of hope for Indigenous communities of the world. ``We needed to keep the bright light on because if it shuts down here, we've turned it off, maybe for a lot of people. Keep a light on and keep looking to the future,'' Mathews told Indian Country Today in a recent interview. Mathews is of Native descent but is not affiliated with a tribe. Additionally, it has provided an opportunity for Gathering of Nations to be a leader in health and safety for the community by using its large platform to spread information throughout the past year on the coronavirus, preventative measures and established nonprofits that can assist Natives during the pandemic, he said. Central Michigan University's Celebrating Life Pow Wow also opted for a virtual event for a second year on March 20-21. The student-run event is one of the first powwows of the season within the state, and draws a crowd of about 2,000 annually to see more than 200 compet-

itors. Students were devastated in 2020 when the annual powwow was cancelled at the beginning of the pandemic. But they proposed a virtual powwow instead, said Native American Programs Director Colleen Green, a citizen of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians. Though some COVID restrictions were lifted in Michigan before this year's event, local government guidelines prevented an in-person powwow, Green said. ``We are close to the reservation here, and there's a lot of Indigenous communities within Michigan and we just didn't want to make anyone get sick,'' said Onyleen Zapata, a citizen of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi, a Central Michigan University undergraduate and co-chair for the powwow. The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recently announced that its Reservation Economic Summit, RES2021, will be held both in-person and virtually this year. The event — which includes an artisan market, trade show and business networking — will be held July 19-21 in Las Vegas. LOST REVENUES The financial losses have spread throughout the communities. For the city of Albuquerque and the state of New Mexico, the Gathering of Nations Powwow is a huge source of revenue. With an economic impact of $22 million for Albuquerque annually, the pandemic planted a blow on the tourist, hotel and restaurant businesses that profit from the event. Mathews said last year's loss was ``100 per cent.'' Tickets to the event and

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April 28th, 2021

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participation fees were on sale beginning in the fall of 2019, with a cost of $19 for a one-day admission, $42 for a two-day pass and $85 for a two-day VIP pass. But when the pandemic hit, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan-Grisham ordered a pause on large events on state properties. The Gathering of Nations team decided to put together the 2020

powwow on their website in collaboration with Powwows.com, streaming an enhanced replay of the 2019 powwow on one website and musical performances on another. ``There was no revenue. We lost it all in a sense because we use vendor fees, advanced tickets, sponsorships to put the production together,'' Mathews said. ``The week going into it, you'd see tractor-trailers bringing the stage and lighting, flooring, fencing. It's major. But people don't understand, you can't go into a gym, turn on the lights, get a folding

table, set up a microphone and go. It's a big, big, big production, indoors and outdoors.'' Unlike Gathering of Nations, a non-profit organization that relies on ticket sales and funding from local governments and sponsors, the Celebrating Life Pow Wow is fully funded by Central Michigan University. Admission is regularly $7, but the virtual events were free both years. `POWWOW SHOPPING NETWORK' Vendors have also taken a financial hit. Many virtual powwows

are trying to include vendors by setting up dedicated webpages for powwow merchandise and goods. Vendors send in photos of their products to be featured on the page in a typical online shopping format. After the 2020 in-person powwow was cancelled, Gathering of Nations did not offer refunds because of pre-paid production costs, but invited the vendors to attend the virtual market and offered a free spot to the next in-person trader's market, currently scheduled for 2022. The Gathering of

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Marjorie Henhawk Cell: 519-732-6128 marjorie@greatsn.com

April 28th, 2021

Nations' Virtual Traders' Market for 2021 will live on a separate page on the website, in a classic online shopping format. Products were also featured and promoted during the virtual event. Last year, the Celebrating Life Pow Wow did the same thing. But this year they decided to go with a ``QVC-style,'' traders' market they coined the ``Powwow Shopping Network,'' Green said. Green said vendors were enthusiastic about taking cues from the QVC Network, showing close-ups of their products and going into great detail about their offerings. ``The vendors were just amazing to work with. When I said QVC, they're like, `OK, I got you,''' Green said. The vendor videos were played from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 21, during the virtual powwow, drawing an audience of about 1,500. When it was their turn, vendors were directed to hop onto the Facebook Live chat to interact with customers and answer any questions. ``It was definitely a brand-new idea,'' Zapata said. ``Our committee members wanted to get the vendors more involved. This year was more interactive. So that worked out pretty well.'' The Celebrating Life Pow Wow issued refunds last year, while allowing vendors to sell their products without paying a fee. Green said the group waived the vendor fee for this year, too. ``The day we were told we're shutting the university down we literally refunded everybody by 5 o'clock,'' Green said. ``We want to make sure that you get some recognition as well.'' But virtual powwows and trader's markets haven't been successful for everybody. ``With no events I had to re-evaluate and evolve my way of doing business very quickly,'' said DeHoyos, the bead and shell artist. ``It really was a sink-or-swim type of situation as I rely on my sales to help make ends meet and put food on the table for my five kids.'' Before the pandemic, DeHoyos would do at least four powwows a year along with other tribal events. She has participated in

two West Coast virtual powwows and two online marketplaces, but found them confusing, difficult to navigate, and felt alone after giving the co-ordinators her information. ``The ones I participated in, to me, seemed like a list of resources posted to their main pages,'' she said. ``So, I'm certain that my social media following did increase because of the exposure, but I'm not completely convinced that I got new customers from those venues.'' Social media, rather than powwows, has been the main source of income for many Native vendors during the pandemic, DeHoyos said. ``I hate to say it but right now my social media following is everything,'' she said. WHERE'S THE BEEF? The smell of powwow food is missing from the virtual events, however, and so, largely, are the food vendors. Even socially distanced powwows pose problems. Poor availability of crews and wary customers are difficult to overcome, vendors said. ``People are easily grossed out by food, even though we would be wearing masks, gloves and are clean,'' said food vendor Jolene Mangilinan, Cahuilla/Luiseno/Paiute. Mangilinan, who regularly cooks food at funerals, had planned to get more into the powwow scene last year but the pandemic stopped her plans. ``Me and my crew thought about a food truck or a trailer, but since COVID we've all split up,'' she said. ``I've got kids in online school. My friend has to work the graveyard shift. My crew is not a crew anymore. We've had to move on. We can't wait for jobs.'' Now that food vendors who relied on the powwow circuit and other tribal events have had to find other opportunities, Mangilinan is worried there will be no one left to do the job. ``This isn't just stuff you learn in a day, it's something you need to learn all of your life,'' she said. ``There's a lot that goes into cooking and it's not for everybody.'' With the overhead costs, licensing fees, vendor fees and sheer competition, it's

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April 28th, 2021

a difficult business to break into, she said. Working in-person events like powwows during the pandemic can have additional costs, including increased sanitation, to-go boxes and individually wrapped condiments and utensils. Even many large, well-attended virtual powwows like Gathering of Nations have yet to perfect a way to bring food back to the powwow experience. Mathews said their team looked into partnerships with food delivery apps, but creating these partnerships and a network of local vendors across the nation proved to be too difficult. But the Celebrating Life Pow Wow has defied the odds. After reaching out to food vendors, Green said the local Jackson Food Stand was up for the challenge. Owner Julia Jackson sold out both days of the event, with orders coming in over the phone, online and in-person. Orders were delivered and some customers came to her home, where she and her crew cooked Indian tacos, nachos, fry dogs, fry bread, soup and desserts. ``People were understanding when they would call to place an order and we said, `We'll work you in when we can.' And everyone was respectful of my home, wearing masks, and they asked before they came in,'' Jackson said. People drove from other cities, some more than two hours away, for Jackson's food, Green said. Jackson's team was so busy that she pulled her husband, Delmar, Saginaw Chippewa,

out of retirement to aid with the cooking. ``My grandkids asked me, `How many did you cook for today?' And I said, `Grandma couldn't tell you. I just know it was a lot,'''' Jackson said. The powwow organizers were happy to give back to local Native businesses by offering free publicity for any food vendors, Green said. ``Last year, we didn't contact the vendors for food at all, because of course, we were on complete lockdown back then. And this year, we wanted to open it up to our vendors, especially the food vendors,'' Green said. ``As long as we're not held liable, you have all of your health certificates and safeserve certifications and all of that, you can do this from your house. We'll just publicize this for you. No cost at all.'' For Jackson, the event was well worth it. She said it was her big break back into the powwow scene, as she plans to attend two local Michigan powwows in July and August in person. ``I'm looking forward for the powwows to start back up, but there's going to be a lot of changes,'' she said. ``My son is on a powwow committee. He said we can't have bottled ketchup and mustard; it has to be individual packets. Silverware wrapped. And that's the safest thing we can do. Respect what our committee is asking of all the traders and it will turn out OK.'' Jackson is hopeful that her 40-year-old business will succeed after the pandemic is over. Before,

Jackson's crew usually included 16 workers in shifts. But for her first pandemic powwow, she had a crew of five. With more in-person powwows coming, she is anxious to get more of her family involved again. ``It's a family business and I want it to continue after Delmar and I are gone so we can look down and see how it continues to grow and go on,'' Jackson said. ZOOM COMPETITIONS For Gathering of Nations, the Celebrating Life Pow Wow and other virtual powwows, the fees to compete in dancing, singing and drumming competitions are often waived or minimal, but prizes are still awarded. Gathering of Nations hosted competitions over Zoom, while others, such as the Celebrating Life Pow Wow, have asked contestants to send in pre-recorded videos. One contestant, Cruz Perez, Saginaw Chippewa, regularly competes in the Celebrating Life Pow Wow as one of 10 he attends each year. Perez — a dancer who won $400 for second place in the Adult Men's Traditional category this year — enjoys the healing energy and cultural connection of attending powwows over the monetary compensation for winning, though there are some who rely on powwow winnings to help make ends meet. ``I miss being able to see other people dance and to talk with them, and virtual just isn't the same because it's just a lot of technological use,'' he said. ``It's still good, though, being able to see all my people on Facebook pages submitting their videos for competitions.'' In a normal year, the Celebrating Life Pow Wow has about 200 people competing. This year, they received 79 uploaded dance videos and five hand drum uploads. Some categories had up to eight contestants; others had one or none competing. The number of contestants isn't too far off the norm, Green said. What was shocking was the reach of the virtual competitions this year and last year. ``We were able to see championship dancers all across the United States and Canada the last two

years as opposed to half of the United States and part of Canada,'' Green said. ``Prior to that, we typically get people from Oklahoma, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, parts of Canada, in Ontario, sometimes New York — pretty regional for our university powwow. This year, we had people out in British Columbia, Saskatchewan; we had people in California, New Mexico and Idaho.'' Similarly, the Gathering of Nations powwow, which normally draws close to 3,000 contestants, will have about 300 contestants from across the country and Canada, with one dancer from Europe and one from Nigeria. A benefit to livestreaming the powwows on social media is the everlasting quality of the posts, Green and Mathews said. ``It has allowed us to reach more people and embrace their lives in some manner or another, whether it's the music, whether it's the phenom-

13 enal dancing. We were able to reach over 24,000 people this year. Last year, I think it was around 34,000. We're still getting hits on our Facebook videos and pages,'' Green said. When the Gathering of Nations went virtual for the first time last year, it had nearly 400,000 views — a 10 per cent increase from their previously live-streamed powwows, Mathews said. But the virtual powwows and competitions don't fully replace the live events. ``I miss being there in the moment,'' said Zapata, the co-chair of the Celebrating Life Pow Wow. ``I was raised around the drum. Being a dancer, being there is what I miss. It's all about community for me, being able to walk around, see family and friends, engaging and having a great time all around.'' Some contests, including some of the Native royalty pageants, are cancelled until further notice. The Miss

Indian World — the largest of its kind — was cancelled in 2020, with titleholder Cheyenne Kippenberger agreeing to serve a second term. Kippenberger will step down April 24, however, on the final day of the event, without passing on the crown; for the first time since 1983, Miss Indian World will remain unfilled until 2022. ``I really had to find a new way to be Miss Indian World essentially,'' said Kippenberger, a former Miss Florida Seminole. For Gathering of Nations, a team of 50 people worked behind-the scenes from the fairgrounds in Albuquerque and elsewhere to make the event run smoothly online. The team has also produced a sort of time capsule by combing through decades of footage of performances, to edit together the best performances and contest specials from previous years played throughout the weekend, Mathews

Marketing Coordinator Position Original Traders Energy is a Wholesale Fuel Supplier that delivers fuel to First Nations owned and operated gas stations in First Nation communities throughout Ontario. OTE is located on the Six Nations if the Grand River Territory. We are seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist in several areas within our organization. Job Responsibilities: Markets products by developing and implementing marketing and advertising campaigns; tracking sales data; maintaining promotional materials inventory; planning meetings and trade shows; maintaining databases; preparing reports. Marketing Coordinator Job Duties: Implements marketing and advertising campaigns by assembling and analyzing sales forecasts; preparing marketing and advertising strategies, plans, and objectives; planning and organizing promotional presentations; updating calendars. Track’s product line sales and costs by analyzing and entering sales, expense, and new business data and prepares marketing reports by collecting, analyzing, and summarizing sales data. Keeps promotional materials ready by coordinating requirements with graphics department; inventorying stock; placing orders; verifying receipt. Supports sales staff by providing sales data, market trends, forecasts, account analyses, new product information, relaying customer services requests. Plans meetings and trade shows by identifying, assembling, and coordinating requirements; establishing contacts; developing schedules and assignments; coordinating mailing lists. Monitors budgets by comparing and analyzing actual results with plans and forecasts. Accomplishes organization goals by accepting ownership for accomplishing new and different requests; exploring opportunities to add value to job accomplishments. Marketing Coordinator Skills and Qualifications: Direct Marketing, Market Segmentation, Marketing Research, Coordination, Project Management, Reporting Research Results, Understanding the Customer, Process Improvement, Initiative, Planning and, Financial Skills. Minimum 2 yrs. marketing experience. Marketing diploma or degree is an asset. Wage: TBD Resumes will be accepted via email only to scott.hill@originaltradersenergy.com no later than end of day May 12, 2021. ORIGINAL TRADERS ENERGY LP A-1110 HIGHWAY 54, CALEDONIA N3W 2G9 519-512-2245 WWW.ORIGINALTRADERSENERGY.COM


14

SPORTS

TWO ROW TIMES

April 28th, 2021

know the score.

The boys can play at home: Cody Jamieson to coach Six Nations Arrows STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS - It was reported earlier last month that the Six Nations Arrows would be leaving the Ontario Lacrosse Association's Jr. ‘A’ circuit to join the Tewaaraton Lacrosse League. The new TLL plans to hold its inaugural season this June through August. But the announcement brought shock and concern in the Six Nations Arrows alumnus, who were vocal in their love for the team and the chance to vie for a Minto Cup. Of them was Cody Jamieson, one of the worlds top professional lacrosse players with roots in Six Nations minor and junior lacrosse systems. “Initially I thought about my time with the Arrows and how hard we worked to get a Minto Cup,” said Jamieson. “I remembered the devastation that I had and I felt like I was letting the community down by losing it those three times; we didn’t win it since 1992 before that too. So I know that me and my friends, our dream was to bring home a Minto Cup and how special it was.” Jamieson won the Minto Cup with the Arrows in 2007, but lost it three times before that. “When I read the news about them leaving [the OLA], it was just devastating and I thought to myself ‘what can I do to

help my community?’ You know, I’m in a position now where I’m a lot older so I just wanted to do whatever I could. I looked into it and found out that something could be done to make sure that there’s a team here.” It is speculated that the TLL announcement followed the OLA rejection of a bid by the OJALL to extend its age range to include 22-year-olds at a vote late last year. Jamieson explained that when he found more information on the process of the Arrows leaving the OLA, he found that the league needed to fill the Six Nations position or move forward without a team at all. This prompted Jamieson to take a spot, and as a prestigious player of the game, he calmly explained his reasoning: “Honestly, I would love to coach and I would love to pass on my knowledge there, but if somebody didn’t step up, they were prepared to move forward and have other teams have pickings of our community players.” “At that point I just thought ‘we may never get a team back here,’ because all of our players for the next five years would have their rights with another team, another city. So it needed to be acted upon quickly, and I just said ‘I’ll do it,’ it was a way to keep our boys in our community and to make sure that we have a team and make sure that our boys can stay home and play.”

“I would get called up in 2002. I was fourteen years old, first year of midget and I started getting called up to play. It was a dream come true, a thrill, being fourteen years old, playing with a lot of the guys that I looked up to and ever since then, when I was fourteen, all I ever wanted to do was play for the Arrows. “Every opportunity I got I would go and play for them,” — Cody JamieFILE son.

Since he entered the NLL league as the first overall pick by the Knighthawks in the 2010 draft, Jamieson has become the franchise’s third-leading goal scorer (281) and point-getter (763) and second in assists (482). But on this side of the arena glass, Jamieson admitted that he is coming to understand the responsibilities of his role. “It means a lot of work, I never realized how much work had to be done. But it’s all worth it, it’s for our kids to have something to call their own and to call home and that’s huge. You know, I’ve played for our home town teams and I’ve played outside of Six Nations teams and the championships are a little more sweeter and a little bit better when you get to do it in front of your

family, in front of your friends, while playing with your family and with your friends.” “Even the ones you don't win, it doesn’t sting as much because you’re having fun and you’re having a blast with your family and friends throughout the whole season.” The TLL plans to include players aged 18 to 22 and play a 20-game schedule with its championship concluding in August, before players attending college in the United States have to return to school. For Jamieson, there aren’t any hard feelings for where the players choose to play. “I firmly believe that there is enough talent down here to have another junior team,” he said. “I just hope everyone stays

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playing lacrosse, playing our game that much longer.” Jamieson said that keeping the community in mind, he hopes to keep younger genera-tions of Six Nations and Haudenosaunee lacrosse players in the competitive field that he grew up with, but will not bar anyone from opportunity. “I have nothing against the new league, I don’t really know much about it — it might turn out to be the best thing, but as of right now, the best play for the Minto Cup.” “The best play against the best and as of right now, we need Ontario Junior A down here and we’re gonna let the boys decide where they want to play. If they want to go and try something new, then they can and if they want to stay within the OLA and play and play in the feeder system and move up through the ranks, then we’re going to give them that option as well.” He explained that the skill development he strived for and honed while playing at the highest level is what made him the player he is today. “I just don’t want to see it go—I wouldn’t be who I am and the player that I am if it wasn’t for the Arrows organization and playing Junior ‘A’ here in Six Nations. I think t propelled me a lot more than if I would have played somewhere else or at a different level. I don’t know if I would go on to

have the career I’ve had so far without the opportunities that the Arrows provided with losing and competing for Minto Cups has helped me to take. I’ve won some championships in my career so far and I think it all started with losing those Minto Cups and ultimately winning one, and learn how to win. I had to learn how to get over that hump of losing and learn how to win with my whole group there.” Jamieson, has been a player for the Halifax Thunderbirds of the National Lacrosse League, the New York Lizards of Major League Lacrosse and the Six Nations Chiefs in Major Series Lacrosse. For him, he said that his role will be involved in ensuring that the communal sense of family in the team isn’t lost and neither is the chance to play high level junior. “I think that my life and definitely a lot of our youths, now adults, lives wouldn’t be the same if they didn’t get the chance to play for a Minto Cup or compete for a Minto Cup and play lacrosse at the highest level, so I took over the role to make sure that our youth still have that chance.” “I, personally, think that the OLA is the place to be because I always wanted to play the best and that’s where all of the competition is going to be.” And as one of the top ranked players in mens lacrosse, Jamieson would know.

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April 28th, 2021

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Powwows across USA continued from 13

said. ``The people that have started out as tiny tots are now parents, and some of them are grandparents,'' Mathews said. ``And then there's those that aren't with us anymore, and those that we've lost during the Coronavirus. We saw them in these videos; they came back one more time. And so that was very, very special.'' MISSED CONNECTIONS For organizers, dancers, vendors and attendees, virtual powwows are still missing one key element, however: the feeling of community. They're not a replacement for the real thing. ``Someone asked me, `What do you miss by not going to powwows?''' said Mathews. ``I said, `Seeing it. Feeling it. Smelling it.' If nothing else, those are elements. As soon as you arrive, they're there, and you can smell leather, food;

hear bells, drums, the people talking and laughing.'' DeHoyos, the vendor, misses making lifelong friends and connecting with her customers. ``There is something to be said for seeing the look on people's faces when they are admiring my jewelry,'' she said. ``That really is an amazing feeling and I really miss seeing the smile on people's faces when they get what they want and walk away wearing it.'' Jackson said powwows were always family time. Long ago, she and her husband cooked as the children danced. Now her children make regalia for their own children to participate. She recalled their first powwow after her husband had multiple bypass surgery. ``Everyone surrounded us to ask if we were OK, to tell us they prayed for us,'' she said. ``We were so thankful. Every day is

a blessing. And every day that I can feed people is another blessing for me.'' Since the pandemic hit, many have learned not to take the experience for granted. ``I miss grand entries,'' Kippenberger said. ``I know I probably complained so much while we were doing them, because you're sweating and it's hot. But I really miss it. Here in Florida, we don't have a very heavy Native population. When you go to a powwow in Oklahoma, you end up running into everybody that you possibly have known since you were a child. ``We're a very tight-knit, communal people,'' she said. ``So it's very difficult to be away from each other. We just miss each other. We miss hugging each other and hearing each other in person and just being able to sit and laugh and, and share stories.''

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY For Grand River Post Secondary Education Office POSITION TITLE: Post Secondary Education Researcher

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To do this the Post Secondary Education Researcher will: Be knowledgeable about all Board and Operational policies and procedures. Conduct research and community consultation to develop a comprehensive Post Secondary Education model/strategy for Six Nations of the Grand River that meets and supports identified student and community needs. Conduct research on current and required Education programs and services. Review the current landscape of Post Secondary Education at Six Nations including findings from previous reports, promising practices, and identified gaps and needs. Analyze current Post Secondary Education delivery organizations and services. Conduct community consultation using appropriate social media platforms to obtain members’ input via surveys and conduct meeting forums. Analyze data and incorporate findings into a Post Secondary Education strategy/model final report. Make recommendations for improving Post Secondary Education services at Six Nations. Report to the Director of Post Secondary Student Services and the Steering Committee of the Board on a regularly established basis regarding ongoing project development. Contribute to the overall development and coordination of programs and services of the GRPSEO. Carry out his/her duties in a professional manner consistent with a team approach. MANDATORY QUALIFICATIONS DESIRED FOR THE POSITION: Ø B. A. / Bachelor of Education with advanced skills in conducting research and data analysis; and evidence through work history of prior achievement in developing First Nations research-based reports/documents; and minimum of five years related work experience. OTHER REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POSITION: Ø Knowledge/Understanding of Six Nations historical and contemporary context with specific awareness in education. Ø Experience working with Six Nations of the Grand River. Ø Satisfactory police check and must be bondable. Ø Excellent working knowledge and experience with Microsoft Office Programmes and Windows Operating System. Ø Excellent working knowledge of social media platforms and ability to work efficiently with various software applications. Ø Excellent research, analysis and communication skills. Ø Prior successful experience in a multi-task work environment requiring professional level of time, information and project management skills is preferred. Ø Communicate clearly, concisely and correctly in written and spoken form. Ø Able to travel using own vehicle and valid driver’s license (some over night travel required). Ø Interact with others in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and completion of projects. Ø Work collegially with co-workers and clients while maintaining confidentiality and organizational integrity Ø Organize tasks and manage time effectively. Ø Be dependable, flexible, and take initiative when necessary (work flex hours as required). SALARY: To be determined dependent upon experience and qualifications. CLOSING DATE: May 7, 2021 at 4 pm. Applicants must submit their resume with (3) recent reference letters by: e-mail to Justine Henhawk-Bomberry, Director of Post Secondary Student Services at: justineb@grpseo.org or drop box located at the front entrance of the office located at 2160 Fourth Line Road, Ohsweken or by mail to the: Attention: Director of Post Secondary Student Services, GRAND RIVER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION OFFICE P.O. BOX 339, OHSWEKEN, ON N0A 1M0


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April 28th, 2021

17

J O B B O A R D Position

Employer/Location

Term

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Intake Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time COVID Response Nurse School Nurses, Health Services Contract Registered Early Childhood Childcare Services, Social Services Contract Educator PT (maternity) Registered Early Childcare Services, Social Services Full-time Childhood Educator Disclosure/Legal Clerk Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time Intake and Crisis Child & Family Services, Full-time Response Worker Social Services Fire Chief Fire Services Full-time Early Intervention for Mental Health and Addictions Contract Psychosis Nurse Health Services Unit Assistant Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time GEDEO Clinician – Mobile Community Crisis Health Services Full-time Crisis Rapid Response Team IVS Quick Response Justice Central Administration Contract Program Advocate IVS Telephone Virtual Advocate Justice Central Administration Contract IVS Program Assistant Justice Central Administration Contract Restorative Justice Assistant Justice Central Administration Contract Section 84 School Social Worker Youth Life Promotion Contract Maintenance Worker Stoneridge, Social Services Full-time Manager of Resources Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time Registered Practical Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time Alternative Care Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time Resource Team Member Alternative Care Resource Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time Support Worker Support Staff Childcare Services, Social Services Contract Child and Youth Services Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services Contract Employee Relations Officer Human Resources, Central Administration Full-time Youth Life Promotions Worker Administration, Social Services Full-time SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Horticultural Research Technician Kayanase Greenhouse Full-time Manager, Marketing & Indspire Full-time Digital Strategy Six Nations Youth Six Nations Youth Council Full-time, contract Council Coordinator Vice-President Academic Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time, (VPA) permanent Subject Matter Experts: Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Fee for service contract Indigenous Pedagogies (e-Learning & Alternative Assessments) Educational Research Assistant Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Fee for service contract Indigenous e-Learning Specialist Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Fee for service contract

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Salary

Closing Date

TBD TBD TBD

May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021

TBD

May 5, 2021

TBD TBD

May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021

TBD TBD

May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021

TBD TBD

May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021

TBD

May 5, 2021

TBD TBD TBD

May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021 May 5, 2021

TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

TBD

May 12, 2021

TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

$21.00/hour TBD

May 7, 2021 May 13, 2021

TBD

May 7, 2021

TBD Consideration of candidates will begin mid-April $50.00/hour May 7, 2021 $35.00/hour $62.50/hour

May 7, 2021 May 7, 2021

Position

Employer/Location

Term

Post Secondary Education Researcher Grand River Post Secondary Full-time Education Office Part-time Driver Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Part-time Management Board Curriculum Developer Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Full-time, Management Board contract Instructor/Coordinator Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Full-time, (Hamilton) Management Board contract Community Youth Counsellor - Ganohkwasra Family Assault Full-time Ohahiyo Support Services Sexual Assault Community Ganohkwasra Family Assault Full-time Counsellor Support Services Child and Youth Ganohkwasra Family Assault Full-time Community Counsellor Support Services Administrative Assistant Aecon Six Nations Joint Venture Full-time Grocery/Produce/ Townline Variety and Gas – Full-time & Stock Clerks Townline Grocery part-time Meat Cutter Townline Variety and Gas – Full-time Townline Grocery Baker Townline Variety and Gas – Full-time Townline Grocery GREAT SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES

Salary

Closing Date

TBD

May 7, 2021

$18.36/hour

Open until filled

$57,200.00 $65,780.00 53,040 $60,996.00 $50,000

Open until filled

$54,600

May 7, 2021

$50,000 (negotiable) TBD TBD

May 7, 2021 Open until filled Open until filled

TBD

Open until filled

TBD

Open until filled

Open until filled May 7, 2021

Please be advised, interested candidates must be registered with the GREAT student office. Please contact Carly Martin at (519) 445-2222 ext. 3133 to get started! SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES POST-SECONDARY Student Corrections Officer Corrections Department 16 weeks $14.25/hr April 30, 2021 Promotion Assistant Original Traders Energy 16 weeks $14.25/hr April 28, 2021 Unit Assistant Coordinator Six Nations Polytechnic Institute 16 weeks $14.25/hr May 7, 2021 SECONDARY STUDENT River Guide (2 positions) Grand River Rafting 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Camp Leader (2 positions) Parks and Recreation 8 weeks $14.25/ hr June 18, 2021 Maintenance Assistant Housing Department 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Landscaping Assistant Six Nations of the Grand River 8 weeks $14.25/ hr June 18, 2021 Development Corporation Building Maintenance Assistant Six Nations of the Grand River 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 18, 2021 Development Corporation Grounds Crew Sandusk Golf Club 8 weeks $14.25 June 18, 2021 Water Helper Kool Kidz Ice and Water 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 Ice Bagger/Packer Kool Kidz Ice and Water 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 Summer Library Assistant Six Nations Public Library 8 weeks $14.25/hr June 23, 2021 The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. Only local positions are posted in the paper. For more positions in the surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn.com.

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


18 37

TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

April 28TH, 28th, 2018 2021 NOVEMBER

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituaries

Legal Notice

LONGBOAT: JAMES

NOTICE TO CREDITORS HEIRS & OTHER CLAIMANTS

Quietly and peacefully surrounded by loving family. James Jesse Longboat passed away April 24, 2021 at the age of 73 years. Proud father to James (Cindy), Sissy (Rico), Trevor (Delaney), Nathan, and Curtis. Much loved “Doda” to Jackson, Jurnee, Holden, Marshall, Marcus, Ladaiya, Emily, Lolo, Jake, and Nash. Friend and partner to Bev. He will be greatly missed by his siblings, Gloria, Dale (Jake), Sally (Cyril), Mary (Moe), Angela, Rod, Peggy (Clarence), and Mervin (Debbie). Predeceased by parents Alton & Cassie Longboat; sisters, Bernice (Carl), and Adeline (Raymond); brother, Virgil. Jim will be fondly remembered by numerous nieces, nephews, the family of the late Howard Thomas and friends. The family extends a heartfelt Thank you to Bev for her endless care of Jim in his final year, to Stedman Outreach Team Jeanette and Dr. Renn and F.N.N. Jim was part of Local 736 Ironworkers, loved joking around and his casino and market trips. Sunday night bingo games with his sisters will always be remembered. Private arrangements. www.rhbanderson.com

Lawn Maintenance Tender

Ogwadeni:deo is accepting bids for lawn maintenance at the following locations: 2469 Fourth Line Road 1754 Chiefswood Road Maintenance includes cutting the grass and trimming on a weekly basis or as necessary and at the request of Ogwadeni:deo, and to pick up the dead grass if need be and requested by Ogwadeni:deo. Please drop your bid off at the office at 2469 Chiefswood Road to the attention of “Nora Green” OR Mail to Ogwadeni:deo, PO Box 5000, Ohsweken ON, N0A 1M0 and clearly mark “Grass Cutting” Deadline to submit is May 12, 2019. The successful applicant will be notified and expected to start the third week in May, 2021.

Hill’s Snack Bar Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Services

ALL PERSONS having claims against the estate of: Eva Logan of the Six Nations Indian Reserve, who died February 15, 2021 are notified to send full particulars of their claim to the undersigned on or before April 30, 2021 after which date the estate will be distributed with regard only to claims then received. Dated this 4th day of April, 2021 Edward Logan

Executor Administrator(s)

1401 Cayuga Rd., Ohsweken, ON

CLASSIFIED ADS CAN NOW BE PLACED AT:

519-771-2530 Telephone number

For Sale

905-768-4413 Mini Barns 8’x8’ and up Picnic Tables 6’ and 8’ For Sale 2304 Third Line

CLASSIFIED ADS STARTING AT $12.50

Metal Roofing Services

Fjord Metal Roofing Six Nations' Metal Roofing Specialist Call or text 905-330-4123 or 519-774-9633

insta: fjord_metal_roofing

Free Estimates


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

April 28th, 20212018 DECEMBER 19TH,

CLUES ACROSS 1. Switches 7. Legal financial term (abbr.) 10. Sweeties 12. Competition 13. Measures electrical resistance 14. Psychotherapy researcher 15. Causes injury to 16. Open 17. Polish peninsula 18. Hebrew calendar month 19. Whale ship captain 21. Children’s accessory 22. Unknown point 27. Exists 28. Extremely confident 33. Expression of disgust 34. The government has many 36. Small constellation 37. Northern Indian city 38. The best pitchers 39. Naturally occurring solid 40. Apple computers 41. Portuguese city 44. Ancient Greek war dance 45. More reliable 48. Sailboat 49. Newspapers 50. Frequently flooded area 51. They dig for coal CLUES DOWN 1. Partial 2. “Mad Men” leading man

19 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you have a unique perspective, and sometimes you appear uninterested in the opinions of others. But this week it is best to be humble and accept other thoughts.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you routinely put caring for others ahead of caring for yourself. This compassion is commendable, but you can’t offer help if you aren’t in top form. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, let others bring up issues with you rather than prying. You willingness to lend an ear is wellknown, and others will come to you on their own.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 It may be tempting to slack off when supervisors are not looking, Cancer. However, a lack of discipline now may have a trickle-down effect in the future. Stay focused.

3. The __ of March 4. Healthy 5. Where golfers begin 6. Soviet Socialist Republic (abbr.) 7. Of the cheek 8. Injury reminder 9. Statesman Franklin 10. For an unknown reason 11. Brain parts 12. Islamic calendar month 14. Avenue where ad men work 17. Possesses 18. Accept 20. Stake 23. Former British PM May 24. US battleships circa 1939 25. Greek alphabet letter 26. When you hope to get

Answers for April 28th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

there 29. Top lawyer 30. Fiddler crabs 31. Intolerant 32. Persons that cause extreme fear 35. Car mechanics group 36. Capital of Ghana 38. Famed ballplayer Hank 40. Emphasizes insignificance 41. Light-colored 42. Distinctive smell 43. Muckraking journalist Jacob 44. Sunscreen rating 45. Short-term memory 46. Japanese delicacy 47. One point north of due east

SUDOKU

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 You may not be sure if you should pursue an opportunity that is before you, Leo. Consider your skills and talents and be honest with what you are capable of accomplishing.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, even though it can be risky to express your true feelings, especially when you go against popular opinion, don’t shy away from being true to yourself.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Your head is pushing you in a practical direction, Libra. Yet your heart wants you to go a different way. Try to find a balance between both scenarios. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, others are ready and willing to offer advice if they sense you need it. While you can be open to suggestions, don’t follow others’ dreams if they aren’t your own.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 You may be conflicted about telling someone you need a little personal space, Sagittarius. But it’s not good to suffer through situations that make you unhappy.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, even though you cannot please everyone, you can do what is necessary to make yourself happy. Make this your primary goal this week. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, people may misunderstand your intentions when you start a new project. You don’t have to please everyone right now. The end result will be met with positive responses.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Moving on from an emotional situation can be taxing, Pisces. But it may be necessary right now and could make you stronger in the long run.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


20

TWO ROW TIMES

April 28th, 2021

Attention Farmers!

For support, resources, and guidance on planning a safe farming season during the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact Ohsweken Public Health. Please contact A/Nurse-in-Charge Lacey VanEvery: 519-445-2672 ext. 249 lacey.vanevery@canada.ca

Monday - Friday, 8:30am - 4:30pm

Update as of:

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Update as of:

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Total Cases

Six Nations Update as of:

COVID-19 Response Level: Black Six Nations COVID-19Update Update as of: 4/27/21 15:00Response Level: Black COVID-19

Update as of:

ns COVID-19 Update 4/27/21 15:00

Six Six Nations Nations COVID-19 Update

Total Cases

4/27/21 15:00

4/27/21 15:00 Update as of:

486

Total Resolved Total Cases

TotalTotal Deaths Total Deaths % Resolved of Active Cases Six Nations COVID-19 Response TotalLevel: Cases Black Total Resolved

D-19 Response Level: Black

451486

486

451 10

10 486

451

451

10

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

486

451

10

Total Cases

Currently Hospitalized

Screened positive Active Cases for a VOC % of Active Cases

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

Total Deaths

Total Cases

4/27/21 15:00

4/27/21 15:00

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

Total Resolved

Total self-isolation

486 10

451 135

Total Deaths

New positive case

10 0

Active Cases Currently % of Active Cases positive Total New positive Cases Currently % of ActiveScreened ened positive Total New positive Currently Screened positive Total Total New positive Active Cases ly Screened positivefor a Currently Total Newself-isolation positive New positive Hospitalized Hospitalized for a VOC case VOCfor a VOC self-isolation self-isolationcase case Active Cases Hospitalizedcase self-isolation forActive acase VOC Cases Hospitalized zed self-isolation

25

68%

25 251

135 15:00 1 68% 0 68% Variants of Concern Update135 68% 0254/27/21 Update as of:

ns COVID-19 Update

135

1

68%

11

0

135135 0 as of 2021-04-14 Vaccination Update 0

Previously diagnosed COVID-19 case specimens that have This does not include individuals who have been vaccinated off-reserve. Number booked in for under-gone further testing if that person is future clinics have scheduled an appointment through the call centre but have not yet received ern Update Vaccination Update astoofdetermine 2021-04-14 Variants of Concern Update Vaccination Update as of 2021-04-14 Total Cases Total Resolved Total Deaths ase specimens that have This does not include individuals who haveof been vaccinated off-reserve. Number booked in for Variants Concern Update Update as of 2021-04-14 infected with a variant of their vaccination. Previously diagnosed COVID-19 case specimens that have This does notconcern include individuals who have been vaccinated off-reserve.Vaccination Number booked in for D-19 Response Level: Black

termine if that person is under-gone further future clinics have andiagnosed appointment through the clinics call centre have not received through Previously COVID-19 case specimens that have This does individuals who have been vaccinated off-reserve. Number booked in for Vaccination Update ofscheduled 2021-04-14 testing toas determine if that person is future have but scheduled an yet appointment the not call include centre but have not yet received nt of concern their vaccination.

Variants of Concern Update

486

451

Vaccination Update as of 2021-04-14

10

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in for

vaccinated (received (received 2 the call Band partially Active Cases further testing to determine if that person is (UK) future clinics have scheduled an appointment through centreMembers but have not yet received Lineage B.1.1.7forunder-gone a VOC (lineage not Lineage B.1.1.7 #yet screened positive determined) vaccinated (received (received 2 vaccinated Band Members partially (received (received 2 # partially Band Members partially % of On-reserve SN 1vaccinated dose) # fully vaccinatedtheirdoses) vaccinated yet determined) (UK) Currently ened positive Total NewLineage for aa(UK) VOC (lineage not infected variant of doses) concern vaccination. 1 positive dose) B.1.1.7 doses) 1 dose)with vaccinated vaccinated (received (received 2 Band Members partially yet determined) # fully vaccinated self-isolation % of On-reserve SN case(UK) Hospitalized or# apartially VOC 1 dose) doses) vaccinated

14 68%

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1152

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se specimens that have ermine if that person is of concern

Lineage B.1.1.7 (UK)

14

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1509

21

21 135 014 Lineage B.1.1.7

9% 1152 15099% # fully vaccinated 1509

# partially 1152 vaccinated (received 1 dose)

9% (UK)

Vaccination Update as of 2021-04-14

14

This does not include individuals who have been vaccinated off-reserve. Number booked in for future clinics have scheduled an appointment through the call centre but have not yet received their vaccination.

# partially vaccinated (received 1 dose)

# fully vaccinated (received 2 doses)

% of On-reserve SN Band Members partially vaccinated

1152

1509

9%

1152

9%

(received 2 doses)

% of On-reserve SN Band Members partially vaccinated

1509

9%

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