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THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY April 14th, 2021 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

Six Nations stays in Red Alert status despite policy directing lockdown 892 Highway 54, Ohsweken 519-753-3835

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OHSWEKEN — Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council says it is moving the community into Red Alert status — despite it’s own policy that requires the community to move into Black Alert level status along with the provincial lockdown/stay-at-home order. SNGR Elected Council implemented the Six Nations Pandemic Response Framework in November 2020, saying the community required “stricter control measures than the surrounding areas, in part due to increased risk factors for on-reserve band members.” The policy says Six Nations will follow suit in the event of a provincial lockdown. It reads, “Our thresholds for action are stricter than Ontario’s, so we will increase our Alert Status more readily than other public health units.” And again, “If Brant and/ or Haldimand-Norfolk go into Lockdown or there is a Federal or Provincial lockdown, then Six Nations would go into lockdown as well.” Currently both regions, as well as the rest of the province, are in lock-

Six Nations reported an additional death Tuesday bringing to the total since the beginning of the pandemic to ten. Six Nations remains in red alert status. FILE

down. As of Tuesday afternoon, Six Nations is reporting a new COVID-19 death, bringing the total loss of community members to 10 since the start of the pandemic. There were 4 confirmed positive cases on the territory with 6 confirmed cases of variants of concern since they have been tracking those cases. But case rates in the surrounding regions, where Six Nations residents must travel daily for groceries and other essential services, are spiking. Brant County Health Unit is reporting 182 active cases with 40 reported in the last 24 hours. Seven people are in hospital. So far 152 confirmed cases of the UK variant and 2

cases of the Brazil variant have been detected in Brant. Haldimand-Norfolk is reporting 129 active cases and says nearly 40 cases of variants of concern have been confirmed in that region. According to the policy, weekly assessments are conducted by the ECG’s Incident Management Team to determine what the current alert level should be. Those assessments include “tracking indicators such as virus spread and containment, healthcare system capacity, Ohsweken Public Health capacity, Assessment Centre capacity and community compliance with public health measures.” The Framework explains

the need for stricter measures on the territory and says there is a high prevalence of pre-existing conditions among band members. Over a third of Six Nations on reserve population is in the in the 50+ age demographic. Half of that demographic has high blood pressure. Nearly a quarter of that demographic has heart disease. The Framework lists other socio-economic determinants of health like access to water and overcrowding in local housing that prompted a more aggressive approach to elevating alert level status during the pandemic. Premier Doug Ford advanced a province-wide lockdown with a stay-

at-home order this week due in part to a surge in cases driven by Ontario residents travelling from restricted areas into those with looser restrictions. Six Nations remaining in Red Alert status while the surrounding regions are on lockdown could carry on that trend of region hopping, attracting non-resident visitors to the community and potentially increasing the risk of local COVID-19 transmission. Off-reserve, stores that sell goods such as groceries, cleaning supplies and pharmacy products can remain open but only to sell essential items. Non-essential retail can open for curbside pickup or delivery only. The stay-at-home order prohibits Ontario residents from leaving home except for work, medical appointments and to get groceries or medication. TRT sent questions to both Elected Council and the Emergency Control Group for clarification on why the current alert status level change to Red does not match the Six Nations Pandemic Response Framework policy and who makes the decision on what alert level the community is at. No word from either group on that yet. PM42686517


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LOCAL

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April 14th, 2021

keeping you informed.

SIX NATIONS MOBILE CRISIS SERVICES 24/7 CRISIS PHONE LINE 866-445-2204 or 519-445-2204

LIVE CHAT (MESSAGING) Link on sixnationscovid19.ca under Crisis Support Live Chat

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Grand River Enterprises donates $450,000 to SN Language Commission DONNA DURIC

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TWO ROW TIMES The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers a 24/7 Crisis Line. A person seeking crisis support will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker.

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The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Live Chat crisis response. Live Chat or Instant Messaging is done on your computer over the internet. Live Chat (Messaging) is available Monday to Friday 8:30am - 4:00pm

CONFIDENTIAL SERVICES

226-777-9480

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Texting crisis response. Texting is available Monday to Friday from 8:30am - 4:00pm. A person seeking crisis support through text will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker and receive messages through text.

IF YOU HAVE A FEVER, COUGH AND DIFFICULTY BREATHING, The SixSEEK Nations MobileCARE CrisisEARLY Services is a MEDICAL confidential service offering crisis Stay home if you feel unwell. If support to Six Nations of the Grand River. youfeatures have a fever, coughaand The new run through program difficulty breathing, seek medical which offers safe and encrypted attention and callconversations in advance. technology to keep confidential and secure.

Source: World Health Organization

Youth charged HALDIMAND - The Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Haldimand County Detachment has charged a 15-year-old youth with multiple offences following a traffic stop on Haldibrook Road in Caledonia, Haldimand County, ON. On Thursday, April 8, 2021, at 7:05 p.m., OPP were patrolling on Haldibrook Road when a vehicle caught the attention of

an officer for a Highway Traffic Act violation. Officers observed there were three occupants aged 15-years-old and one aged 16-years-old in the vehicle. As a result of their investigation, OPP has charged the 15-year-old driver from Stoney Creek, ON with: Failing to stop for police, Careless driving, Driving a motor vehicle with no licence.

The Six Nations Language Commission is getting a $450,000 boost in funding thanks to a generous donation from Grand River Enterprises. Bryan Porter, CEO of the hugely successful tobacco manufacturing giant, located in the heart of Ohsweken, read about the language commission’s struggle for funding recently and decided the company should give back. “They feel they have a responsibility to help our people,” says Karen Sandy, SNLC executive director. The commission, which offers adult immersion classes in Mohawk, Cayuga and Onondaga to help create fluent second-language speakers on Six Nations, has been operating on a bare bones budget for years. Sandy says they don’t have enough funding to properly pay teachers, hire more staff, offer benefits or pensions or expand classes to include the oth-

er three Haudenosaunee languages: Seneca, Onedia and Tuscarora. The Tuscarora language is actually in danger of becoming entirely extinct. Sandy says there is only one fluent Tuscarora speaker left in the world. There are no Seneca or Oneida speakers on Six Nations, either, she said. The SNLC wants to see fluent language speakers throughout the community – those who can speak more than one of the Haudenosaunee languages. “Polyglots,” Sandy calls them. “That is our ultimate goal,” she said. “We’d eventually like to see everyone speaking the languages like they used to. It would be nice for everyone to be polyglots.” Sandy said the recent loss of prominent language speakers due to Covid-19 further compounds the importance of preserving Haudenosaunee languages before it’s too late. Porter also cited the recent loss of language speakers as a motivator in donating to the language commission on a yearly

basis. “In light of recent events where we unfortunately lost speakers, I think it is more important than ever to preserve our languages and assist those who are learning,” he said in an email to the language commission. “I feel we have a responsibility to help our people.” The language program is showing success, said Sandy. Every year, the SNLC produces more and more speakers, with Mohawk and Cayuga being the two most popular language courses. “These investments are working,” said Sandy. The SNLC is funded through a variety of sources, including Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council and donations from various community sources and trust funds, such as the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council, Grand River Employment and Training and the Six Nations Community Development Trust Fund. Elected Council is the largest funding contributor, at about $500,000

a year, but ideally, Sandy says they need about $1.2 million a year to function effectively. This year’s budget still leaves them short about $400,000 of that $1.2 million. But the infusion of $200,000 from GRE for the last fiscal year will help the commission avoid a deficit. Sandy had gone to elected council last month looking for funding to help offset the deficit with no luck. Sandy said the commission had also asked elected council to add the language commission as a regular line item in its annual budget but that was over a month ago. The commission has still not received an answer from council if that request will become a reality. GRE also promised $250,000 for the 20212022 fiscal and it will become a permanent yearly donation moving forward, said Sandy. “We are very grateful to GRE for stepping up to support (the SNLC),” said Sandy. “We still need council’s continued support. We shouldn’t have to beg.”

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April 14th, 2021

Virtual Powwow Class to combine fitness and traditional movement STAFF REPORT

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Often considered a sport due to the high levels of foot work, stamina and endurance; virtual Pow Wow participation have taken off during the pandemic. But a new kind of fitness class has grown with it as a combination of traditional dance and their physical benefits. On Thursday April 15 at 12:00pm the NAC Indigenous Theatre and CNA and National Arts Centre will present an Arts Powwow Workout Class, led by Josée Bourgeois. Bourgeois is an Algonquin woman and multi-disciplinary artist born in Ottawa and raised mostly in Toronto. She began her dance journey as a gymnast and contemporary dancer with training from Flames of Hope. Bourgeois was able to build a strong foundation of passion for stage performance with a drive to bring creation through dance at a very early age.

Virtual Pow Wow fitness classes have increased in popularity since the pandemic has cancelled pow wows for the last two seaSUBMITTED sons.

When she began her first year of high school, she was signed to the Ford International modelling agency and began a lengthy journey as one of Canada’s only First Nations high fashion models. At the age of 23, she made a profound decision to begin learning Pow Wow dancing and her life completely shifted through this decision. Josée has focused her lifestyle over the past 12 years to traveling as a Fancy Shawl and Jingle dress dancer, collaborating with artist like DJ Shub, DJ Classic Roots, and DJ Rise Ashen. Bourgeois is committed to continuing trailblazing and reclaiming space as an

Algonquin Artist all over Turtle Island and across the world. The free class will be posted on NAC Indigenous Theatre's Facebook page. Each video will be available online until 2:00pm EST on the following Saturday. “Get ready to learn the basics of different powwow styles, all the way to modern hip hop infused choreography to really get your sweat on!” Reads the Facebook Page. Powwow Workout Classes are created for participants with all levels of experience. Be sure to listen to your body while participating in this workout, and any kind of physical activity.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN OGWEHOWEH LANGUAGES The Bachelor of Arts in Ogwehoweh Languages degree seeks to further the continued development of Ogwehoweh cultural understanding within an Ogwehoweh language context.

Mohawk and Cayuga 3 Year Degree Program Apply on our website snpolytechnic.com | admissions@snpolytechnic.com

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April 14th, 2021

Young Six Nations artist chosen for Grand River paddle art project DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

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Jasmine General has been painting since she was a little kid. And today, the amazingly talented 14-year-old is contributing her vibrant work for an art project that aims to promote unity along the Grand River.

The Haldimand County Public Paddle Art Tour sought 23 local artists in southern Ontario last year to partake in what they hope will be a traveling art project after pandemic restrictions are lifted. Each artist was asked to paint something significant and symbolic on a paddle for submission into the traveling art project.

Jasmine General is one of 23 artists to be featured in an upcoming SUBMITTED Paddle Art Tour.

DR. ANNETTE DELIO & DR. KATHLEEN LEONARD OPTOMETRISTS

14-year-old Jasmine’s creation is almost complete, just in time for an anticipated virtual unveiling of the project on April 22. The BCI student was enrolled in an after-school art program in Cayuga when her art teacher noticed her exceptional use of colour and decided to enter her in a contest last year to be chosen to participate in the project, said Jasmine’s dad, Brian General. “It’s all based on the (Grand) river and their personal view of what the river means to them,” said General. “There’s lots of cultures that live along the river. It has to do with unifying everyone, showing the views that each individual has of what the river means. They wanted to do this collective...to give their point of view artistically.” The use of paddles as the medium is symbolic, said General, as they were part of the transportation  system (canoes) used along the river for centuries. They wanted to use that symbolism for each artist to express what they see and what they feel regarding the river. The project is being

345 Argyle Street South Unit #104 ,Caledonia, ON N3W 1L8 Phone: 905-765-4362(iDOC) Fax: 905-765-1362 Web: www.drdelio.ca Monday to Friday: 9:00am – 7:00pm Saturday: 9:00am – 4:00pm

coordinated by two Haldimand County artists – Gina Wilson-Mcintee and Kerry Walford. Students and staff from Dunnville Secondary School and McKinnon Park Secondary School constructed the paddles

for the project. The beautiful and colourful paddles are nearing completion and can be viewed on Wilson-Mcintee’s Facebook page. Jasmine’s eye-popping paddle invokes the importance of all the clans in

fire service and an adjunct professor at the University of the Fraser Valley's criminology department. ``We're comparing with the Canadian population of about 37 million and (more than) 1.6 million individuals identify themselves as being First Nations, Metis or Inuit (according to Statistics Canada),'' he said. ``The numbers that we're talking about are significant in comparison to the rest of the Canadian population.'' The study was commissioned by the National Indigenous Fire Safety Council Project and funded by Indigenous Services Canada. It used data from a census in 2011 and followed through until 2018. It also found that First Nations people are four

times more likely to be hospitalized because of a fire-related injury compared with people who are not Indigenous. Garis said fires that have taken the lives of Indigenous people across the country have been devastating. In 2014, four people including three children from the Mishkeegogamang First Nation in Ontario died in a fire. In Saskatchewan, a couple lost two babies in a 2015 fire while they were asleep with their grandmother. Garis said underlying social concerns may be the reason behind the higher rates of death among Indigenous people. ``There are things like housing conditions. Crowding puts excess pressure

'Daunting and disturbing:' Study finds Indigenous people more likely to die in fires CANADIAN PRESS

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Jasmine General, 14, painted a canoe paddle depicting the importance of the clan system of the Haudenosaunee people. The work SUBMITTED will be included in the upcoming Paddle Art Tour.

the Haudenosaunee clan system with Grandmother Moon overseeing the river. The other side of the paddle showcases a vibrant scene of Haudenosaunee life with a longhouse, strawberries (an important Haudenosaunee medicine) and three Onkwehonwe people dressed in traditional regalia spread out along a field of grass along the river, encompassed by the night sky and big dipper overlooking the scenery. Jasmine’s use of bold primary colours makes the paddle pop. “I wanted to include all the traditional stories (on the paddle),” said Jasmine, adding that immersing herself in her artwork has helped her deal with the isolation of the pandemic this past year. “It’s calming,” she said. General says he is very proud of his daughter and the work she’s produced. “Her gift – people are seeing what she can really do. It’s absolutely amazing the things that she comes up with and creates.” Anyone wishing to follow the project and view the beautiful creations can follow the hashtag #haldimandpaddleart on Facebook.

OTTAWA — The research director for an initiative that promotes fire safety in Indigenous communities says a study that found Inuit are over 17 times more likely to die in a fire than non-Indigenous people is disturbing. The Statistics Canada study also found that, overall, Indigenous people are five times more likely to die in a fire and First Nations members living on reserves are 10 times more likely. ``It's incredibly daunting for sure. It's disturbing and it's a concern,'' said Len Garis, who is former chief of the Surrey, B.C.,

on infrastructure and the risks are higher because (if) there is a fire breaking out ... trying to access those people becomes difficult.'' Garis also cited poverty and health issues. ``There is a lot of work to do. This organization of course is focusing on fire safety, (but) I can't ... ignore their social characteristics or problems as well.'' Garis said among the approximately 650 Indigenous communities across Canada there are about 350 fire departments. That means some communities may not get immediate help when there is a fire. The council also noted that there is no national code that enforces fire safety standards on reserves.


April 14th, 2021

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1492 Land Back Lane Community Update - April 2021 After nine months we continue to be in good spirits out here on the land. We have made a lot of progress turning 1492 Land Back Lane into our home. There have been 10 tiny homes constructed, as well as two communal buildings - a living room and a kitchen - where we share meals, meet, and socialize. We’re well into spring and for us, that means preparing gardens for the upcoming seasons. We’re working on projects to rehabilitate the land, grow and gather medicines, and continue to think of ways to engage with our culture and community.

Advocacy Update

We have had many meetings with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council, Clan Mothers, and the Six Nations Elected Council. In these conversations, we continue to push forward with the perspectives shared with us through conversations, our survey, and social media. We continue to think deeply on the themes that were brought forward in our past updates and community work - that we secure our lands, keep our community on the ground safe, and that we address governance issues in our community. Ultimately, we hope to address one huge issue - what work can we do now that will make sure our community members don't have to keep putting our bodies on the line to stop unwanted development? There is a lot of work that needs to be done and our camp plays a small role in that. We know our community cares deeply about our lands and waters, and protecting them for our future generations. There are many issues that need to be addressed and this a daunting task during a global pandemic, however it is not impossible!

Criminal Defense Update

Our lawyers continue to organize around the 40+ people who have been arrested in relation to 1492 Land Back Lane. In our criminal defense cases, several of the folks who were arrested for Disobeying a Court Order and Mischief have been granted withdrawals and other conditional discharges, which will be finalized at upcoming court appearances. In other cases, the Crown is asking people to serve jail time. We are continuing to organize support for folks with more complex legal battles ahead. We are also aware that there may be more arrests in the future as we continue to defend our lands from development. Our legal defense fund is available for everyone charged in relation to 1492 Land Back Lane, including covering related expenses like fines. The legal defense fund will also be available to these individuals to access for support.

Civil Defense Update

We have filed an appeal to the permanent injunction placed on our camp. While we were self-represented in the initial injunction proceedings, after months of fundraising, we were able to hire a lawyer to fight the appeal. We are hoping that the appeal will be heard this spring/summer, however, we have not received a specific date. We are optimistic of our chances and will continue to update as the appeal moves forward.

Fundraising Update

Our fundraising campaign for our legal costs has almost reached its goal thanks to the many people who have made donations. Our goal was to raise $500,000 and currently we are $50,000 away from this target. We are humbled and overwhelmed with the support we have received from the community and from our allies. Humble donations and full-fledged auctions organized by community members and allies have given us the freedom to pay for the injunction appeal and criminal defense costs to date. Our last fundraiser was a Facebook auction which raised $30,000. This fundraiser was organized by allies to build more tiny houses for our growing community. This project is being led by supporters of the camp.

Community Survey

We have put out a community survey and have compiled the results. A video exploring the results will be available on our Facebook page. This page is public, you do not require a Facebook account to review the video. Everyone who shared their email address with us will be sent a link. If you would like to receive a link to view the video, please email us at landback6nations@gmail.com.

Upcoming Events

An important announcement will be made on April 20, 2021. This press conference will be live-streamed on social media. We are preparing 10 community garden plots that will be available to interested community members to plant and use the land this year. If you are interested, please email us or contact us via social media. On April 24th, we will be putting on a Covid conscious concert celebrating the 15th anniversary of the last time our community came together to say NO to developers. In 2006, our women from Six Nations halted Douglas Creek Estates. Their brave actions changed the course of history for our community, protecting our land and resources, and setting an example for other nations. This commemorative show will be hosted by Six Nations’ own Logan Staats, who will be accompanied by a host of headliners from across Turtle Island: Buffy St Marie, Snotty Nose Rez Kids, Tribe Called Red, Josh Miller and many more. This will be going live via Facebook, so save the date!

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TWO ROW TIMES

OPINION

April 14th, 2021

Follow the story on social media!

editor@tworowtimes.com

Six Nations economic future is at a cross-roads — and it’s not from the pandemic. Since the launch of the tobacco industry on Six Nations, community members have seen the quality of life in our community improve. From job opportunities to companies coming through to assist local programs with financial help — tobacco on Six Nations touches all of our lives in some way, shape or form. Now, multiple members of the tobacco industry are reporting that they are facing retaliation by national banks closing their accounts with little to no explanation, demarcating shareholders, senior staff, and leaving companies scrambling to find solutions. This is a dangerous situation for the people of Six Nations. If the major tobacco producers are left without banking solutions, what will that mean to Six Nations local economy? This week, we reported that Six Nations language programs turned to Grand River Enterprises for funding to carry on operations. Funding that the Elected Council could not provide to keep the program running. The facts are that federal funding to keep the community operational is declining, in part because

of the COVID-19 pandemic — for example, Six Nations OLG funding will not come through this year. This puts the entire community in a situation where the shortfalls are going to grow. There will be more need, less money, and if the tobacco retailers and producers are beginning to have their bank accounts frozen — no promises that the local economy will be able to backfill funding shortfalls through programs, generosity or employment. It is the beginning of a crisis. If banks can arbitrarily decide to close the personal bank accounts of those connected to Six Nations tobacco economy, even those who are paying federal excise tax, without having to provide a reason why — what is next? It presents a very troublesome situation for those edging for an unregulated cannabis industry on the territory. If the legal tobacco companies are being shut out of Canadian banks — how do those pushing for an unlicensed industry claim they will be able to help their allies in the cannabis industry find a banking solution? Elected leaders must negotiate an agreement with federal and provincial officials to make a pathway to protected banking for Six

Nations businesses that ensures the local economy is protected. Without elected council’s engagement on this issue — the people are left with no advocate recognized by the federal and provincial systems to drive change at the level where it is needed. What action will our elected leaders take to protect more tobacco industry participants from being demarcated? How much authority and power does an elected system actually have if it can’t protect membership from situations like this? What if their advocacy falls on deaf ears and has no impact to drive change? Does that mean Six Nations members in the business community on any front are at risk of being similarly prohibited from holding a bank account? Other creative solutions could be creating a Six Nations cryptocurrency. Iroquoin? Sixcoin? Let’s put a bookmark there and come back to it another time. It is a conversation worth having. One thing is sure — without immediate and meaningful political engagement by elected council with federal officials to permanently resolve this issue — this situation could become a disaster that puts the well-being of all our families on the line.

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First Nations and cardiac arrest CANADIAN PRESS

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Wes Lambert's heart stopped at his wedding reception in Saskatoon 15 years ago. ``I got up to go to the podium, and I did not make it,'' he recalls. He was 50 years old, an unusually young age for a cardiac arrest. Lambert, a member of the Flying Dust First Nation, is not alone. A study of cardiac arrests in the First Nations population, believed to be the first of its kind, published last December in the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine, shows the average age of victims is 46, which is 19 years younger than other Canadians. The research looked at cardiac arrests within the ambulance catchment area of Saskatoon's Royal University Hospital. But Dr. Philip Davis, the lead author and a Saskatoon emergency physician, suspects his study highlights a much broader problem. ``I have worked in Quebec, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta. Anecdotally it's the same everywhere,'' Davis says. ``But we don't have the data.'' The term cardiac arrest describes a condition where the heart stops beating. It is often fatal. A common reason is a heart attack caused by narrowing blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart. However, most heart attacks do not lead to cardiac arrest. Davis's team is now reviewing data on all heart attack victims admitted to the Royal University Hospital, which services

the northwestern part of Saskatchewan. Like cardiac arrest, early findings suggest that First Nations people tend to be struck at a younger age _ 10 years younger than other Canadians. It is well-known that risk factors that lead to heart attacks, such as diabetes, smoking and high blood pressure, are higher in the Indigenous population. A Public Health Agency of Canada report indicates that diabetes rates are three to five times higher for First Nations people who live on reserves than for the general population. Experts, including those with the World Health Organization, ascribe this gap to higher rates of poverty and poor access to food. An article published in the Lancet in December 2019 showed on-reserve grocery stores carry fewer fruit, vegetable, meat and dairy products than neighbouring communities, and food on reserve is often more expensive, as much as twice the national average on some reserves. For years there have been calls for a national database detailing the high rate of cardiac arrests in the Indigenous population, or the underlying causes. As recently as last March, Dr. Steven Lin, an emergency physician at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital, and his co-authors wrote in the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine ``there is a need for a national strategy to address the knowledge gaps regarding sudden cardiac death in Indigenous peoples.'' In Davis's study, the survival rate for cardiac arrest was similar among First Nations and nonFirst Nations populations _

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about 15 per cent. Lambert, who works as a potash miner, did not suffer from high blood pressure or diabetes, and he is not a smoker. His doctors chalked his event up to electrolyte abnormalities, perhaps due to working long hours in the mines. Now 65, he is still working 12-hour shifts at BHP's Jansen operation, east of Saskatoon. Elmer Campbell, chief of the Buffalo Dene River Nation, a community 550 kilometres north of Saskatoon, had a heart attack when he was 50. Like Lambert, Campbell did not have normal risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes or smoking. Doctors told him his heart attack was the result of years of stress serving as chief, and eating too much processed and fast food. He says some of his friends have suffered heart attacks at as young as 44. Fruit and vegetables are delivered to Buffalo Dene River Nation once a week. But they are pricey, and supplies often run out or spoil so locals have little choice but to rely on processed foods. The community has tried a nurse-led initiative to increase the number of fruit and vegetable deliveries each week. But it has been unable to secure government funding for the program. Marcia Mirasty, senior director of health and social development for the Meadow Lake Tribal Council, which represents nine First Nation reserves in northwestern Saskatchewan, notes that many First Nations communities are making strides toward healthier food options.

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April 14th, 2021

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Years later, Chickasaw remains returning to Mississippi home CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

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JACKSON, Miss — A man and a woman were found buried among wolf teeth and turtle shells. Other graves contained mothers and infants. Some tribal members were laid to rest with beloved dogs. Over the last century, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History has stored the remains of hundreds of Native Americans who once inhabited the state. Most of the remains were found in the Mississippi Delta and range from 750 to 1,800 years old. For decades, they sat on shelves in the state's collections. Now, 403 Chickasaw ancestors have been returned to their people and will be laid in their final resting place on Mississippi soil. This initiative is the largest of its kind conducted by the state of Mississippi since the passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, or NAGPRA, three decades ago. Since 1990, federal law has required that institutions like museums and schools that receive federal funding return human remains, funerary objects and other sacred items to their Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian descendants.

The remains of hundreds of Chickasaw ancestors will be returned to their respective nations in Mississippi.

``We see the repatriation process as an act of love,'' said Amber Hood, Director of Historic Preservation and Repatriation for The Chickasaw Nation. ``These are our grandmothers, grandfathers, aunts, uncles and cousins from long ago.'' Through the years, enactment of NAGPRA has moved faster in some states than others. Around 83,000 remains in the U.S. had been returned to descendants as of this fall, according to data provided to The Associated Press by the National Park Service. But at least another 116,000 ancestors are still waiting to be returned. Anne Amati, NAGPRA co-ordinator with the Uni-

versity of Denver Museum of Anthropology, said institutions in southeastern U.S. house more remains than anywhere else in the country. Many dozens of tribes, including the Chickasaw, Choctaw and Cherokee, once lived across millions of acres throughout the southeastern U.S. They were forcibly and violently removed by the U.S. government following the Indian Removal Act of the 1830s. Following the Great Depression, thousands of graves were disrupted by the Tennessee Valley Authority as workers constructed reservoirs. Almost 11,500 remains from Tennessee have

now been returned to descendants, but 21,200 remain in the state. More than 18,600 in Alabama have been returned, with around 10,650 still instate. A survey of institutions by the University of Denver in 2019-20 found that obstacles to completing NAGPRA work included funding, time and incomplete or inaccurate information in catalogue records about Native American collections. There's also some fear among museum professionals, Amati said. ``I think one of the fears is that they've done something wrong,'' Amati said. ``They don't want to get in trouble, whether it's with the government or with

SUBMITTED

tribes.'' Still, more and more institutions are becoming engaged in the repatriation process, Amati said. Many remains in Mississippi were discovered by Delta farmers developing land in the 1950s to 1970s. In some instances, shell beads, stone tools, celts and vessels found in burial sites in the U.S. have been put on exhibit in museums. Meg Cook, the MDAH's director of archaeology, said the state had not only a legal responsibility to return remains, but an ethical one. Repatriations are now the main priority for the state's archaeology collection. ``We're doing everything that we can to reconcile

the past and move forward, in a very transparent way,'' she said. ``It's our responsibility to tell the Mississippi story. And that means all of the bad parts, too.'' The department has worked to create bonds with its 11 tribal partners, not only to repatriate remains but also to uplift historically underrepresented voices. A sign above the door where remains are housed in the Department of Archives and History now reads, ``This is a reverent space. Please respect the individuals that are resting here.'' There are still more than 1,000 remains to be identified and returned to tribes in Mississippi alone. The Chickasaw Nation advised MDAH that they wished for remains and objects from their ancestors to be transported in muslin bags, which will decompose in soil when reburied. Volunteers were recruited during the pandemic shutdown to make the bags at home. ``Volunteers knew they were helping in some ways to bring these people home, to put them to rest,'' Cook said. The state is planning to launch a new website — NAGPRA.MDAH.ms.gov — the week of April 2. Browsers can peruse interactive maps and other resources documenting the repatriation process in Mississippi.


8

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A Tribe Called Red rename themselves the Halluci Nation TORONTO — A Tribe Called Red have changed their name to the Halluci Nation. The electronic producers made the announcement official on their Facebook page after performing under their new identity in recent months. The duo say the name is inspired by the works of Indigenous poet and activist John Trudell, who

died in 2015. He was also the inspiration for their 2016 concept album ``We Are the Halluci Nation.'' Tim (2oolman) Hill and Ehren (Bear Witness) Thomas started billing themselves as Halluci Nation last year, and appeared under the name on a televised New Year's Eve special for TVO.

A Tribe Called Red announced an official name change to HalATCR FACEBOOK luci Nation.

Notice of Project 2021 Highway 3 Jarvis – Sandusk and Stoney Creek Bridges The Ministry of Transportation has awarded Contract 2020-3034 to McLean Taylor Construction Ltd. for the structural rehabilitation work at the Sandusk Creek Bridge on Highway 6, the Sandusk Creek Bridge on Highway 3 and the Stoney Creek Bridge on Highway 3. Highway 6 Sandusk Creek Bridge rehabilitation was completed in 2020. Work for the 2021 construction season will include a full closure of Highway 3 at the Stoney Creek Bridge with implementation of detour route using local roads and single lane closures with Temporary Traffic Signals at the Sandusk Creek Bridge.

Construction activities including a full closure of Highway 3 is expected to commence in April 2021 with an anticipated completion in November 2021. For project construction information, please contact: Raj Sehgal - Contract Administrator Morrison Hershfield Limited E-mail: RSehgal@morrisonhershfield.com For General Road Information, please phone the Ministry of Transportation, toll free, 24 hours a day, at 1-800-268-4686 or visit the Ontario511 website at 511on.ca

April 14th, 2021

University offers first degree in Indigenous language fluency VICTORIA — Students at the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus will soon be able to receive an Indigenous language fluency degree. Anne Kang, B.C.'s minister of advanced education and skills training, says the new bachelor's degree of Nsyilxcn language fluency will boost the number of speakers at a time when Indigenous languages in B.C. are endangered. She says the degree is the first of its kind in the province and will be offered by UBC Okanagan

in partnership with the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology in Merritt and the En'owkin Centre in Penticton. Kang says Indigenous communities expressed the need for a language degree that creates fluent graduates who will continue to work in education, culture, tourism, resource management and social services. She says there are five similar post-secondary Indigenous language programs in the planning stages, including for the Lake Babine Nation,

Lillooet Tribal Council and Nicola Bands. Nsyilxcn is an endangered language spoken among the peoples of the Okanagan Nation, which includes bands in the Lower Similkameen, Okanagan, Osoyoos, Penticton and West Bank. The advanced education ministry said in a news release Monday there are 34 First Nations languages in B.C. with at least 93 different dialects of those languages.

OTTAWA — RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki says the Mounties have enforced racist and discriminatory legislation and policies, and they should do better in the future. Speaking to Indigenous chiefs at a national forum on First Nations policing, Lucki says RCMP actions have eroded First Nations' trust, with some incidents leaving generational scars. She says the nation-

al police force is at the beginning of a very long journey to regain the confidence of First Nations, noting that developing a respectful relationship is going to take time. National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations says there is a need to work with the RCMP to ensure policing is beneficial for Indigenous people. He says the RCMP should adopt a zero-toler-

ance policy for excessive use of force by members, as well as put in place better recruitment processes and proper training on de-escalating confrontations. Bellegarde also called on the federal government to strengthen civilian oversight for the RCMP and provide the necessary human and financial resources to deal with complaints about the Mounties.

Mounties enforced racist policies, RCMP commissioner says


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April 14th, 2021

9

NOTICE OF STUDY COMPLETION Braneida Stormwater Management Facility Retrofit and Downstream Channel Remediation Municipal Class Environmental Assessment The Project

Study Area

Figure 1: Study Area

The City of Brantford initiated a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) Schedule ‘B’ for the retrofit of the existing Braneida stormwater management facility (SWMF) and to undertake downstream channel rehabilitation. Ecosystem Recovery Inc. was retained by the City of Brantford to complete the study. The existing Braneida SWMF was constructed in the 1990s and does not meet current standards. The proposed retrofits will provide for water quality and quantity control in compliance with current provincial standards. The study identified a preferred solution that uses the same SWMF property while adding a permanent pool to provide enhanced quality control.

The Process The study was conducted in compliance with Schedule ‘B’ requirements of the Municipal Engineers Association “Municipal Class Environmental Assessment,” (October 2000, as amended 2007 & 2011) as approved under the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act. A key component of the study is consultation with interested stakeholders (public, landowners and agencies). An online Public Information Centre (PIC) was held to provide interested parties with an opportunity to review and discuss issues and submit comments related to the project.

Project Report for Public Review A project report was developed, summarizing the study approach and methodology, findings, development, evaluation and selection of alternatives, and recommendations and conclusions. The report will be available for public and agency review at brantford.ca/BraneidaEA for a 30 day review period, starting from April 15, 2021and ending on May 17, 2021. All comments and concerns should be sent directly to the project team listed below:

Nahed Ghbn P.Eng. Senior Project Manager, City of Brantford Tel: 519-759-4150 ext. 5262 I Email: NGhbn@brantford.ca

Chris Moon, P. Eng

Requests should identify what kind of order is being requested (request for additional conditions or a request for an individual/comprehensive environmental assessment), how an order may prevent, mitigate or remedy those potential adverse impacts, and any information in support of the statements in the request. This will ensure that the ministry is able to begin reviewing the request efficiently. Requests should include the requester’s contact information and full name for the ministry. This request must be received within the above-noted 30-day timeline ending on May 17, 2021, by the Minister, at the address listed below, and copied to Nahed Ghbn, City of Brantford Senior Project Manager. If no request is received, subject to the receipt of necessary approvals, the City intends to proceed with the project implementation phase. Part II Order Requests should be made in writing or by email to the City Project Manager and Consultant and following:

Senior Project Manager, Ecosystem Recovery Inc. Phone: 519-621-1500 I Email: chris.moon@ecosystemrecovery.ca If you have any accessibility requirements in order to be able to comment on the above reports, please contact the Project Manager as soon as possible. Anyone interested in the Study is encouraged to provide comments to the City during the designated review period. If concerns arise during the 30-day review period which cannot be resolved through discussions with the City, a request may be made to the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks for a Part II order of the Environmental Assessment Act (a Part II order) requiring a higher level of study (i.e. requiring an individual/comprehensive EA approval before being able to proceed), or that conditions be imposed (e.g. require further studies).

Minister – Honourable Rod Phillips Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks 777 Bay Street West, 5Th Floor Toronto ON M7A 2T5 Minister.mecp@ontario.ca

Director – Environmental Assessment Branch

Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks 135 St. Clair Avenue West, 1st Floor, Toronto ON M4V 1P5 enviropermissions@ontario.ca

All information collected will be used in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. RSO, 1990, c.F.31. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record. All information collected will be used in accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. RSO, 1990, s. 10(1). With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record.


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April 14th, 2021

'It's a part of who we are:' Inuit work to revitalize endangered dialect OTE is searching for a motivated Accounting Assistant who reports and works under the direction of the Director OTE Administration. The candidate must be an excellent multitasker with exceptional communication and time management skills. ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT

Job Summary:

Type Closing Date Hours of Work Wage

Full-time April 30, 2021 40 hours weekly TBD

The Accounting Assistant is responsible for data entry, processing accounts payable and accounts receivables, recording transactions, performing bookkeeping, accounting, administrative functions and other duties as may be assigned. Responsibilities: • • • • • •

Provide support to the Accounting department Accounts payable, reconciliation, processing transactions Accounts receivable, processing invoices, applying receipts. Performing basic office tasks, filing, data entry, and processing mail. Handling communications with customers via phone, email and in person Assisting in other duties as assigned

Qualifications: Knowledge • •

Accounting Diploma with minimum 2 years experience in full cycle bookkeeping Knowledge of Microsoft office 365 and financial software

Skills and Abilities • • • • •

Strong time management skills, ability to prioritize and meet deadlines Excellent verbal and written communication skills Ability to multi-task and work in a fast pace team environment Mathematical and analytical skills Willingness to learn custom software

As a First Nations Employer, we are committed to diversity and an inclusive workplace. We will recruit the best qualified candidates based on skills, experience, qualifications, and competencies required for the position. Preference will be given to a First Nations candidate of Indigenous ancestry and Indigenous applicants can choose to self-identify. Interested candidates are encouraged to submit a Resume outlining their qualifications and work experience to; Sandra.smoke@originaltradersenergy.com

A group of Inuit women gather around a table over cups of coffee and speak to each other in a language that is expected to vanish over the next two generations. The women live in Cambridge Bay in western Nunavut. They're speaking Inuinnaqtun, a dialect of Inuktut, while recording a podcast for the Kitikmeot Heritage Society as part of its campaign to preserve and protect the endangered language. The heritage society says there are fewer than 600 people left who speak Inuinnaqtun fluently and it's on UNESCO's list of endangered languages. Inuinnaqtun is spoken mainly in Cambridge Bay, Gjoa Haven and Kugluktuk — all in Nunavut — and in Ulukhaktok, N.W.T. Pamela Hakongak Gross, the society's executive director, says the lan-

A student of the Inuinnaqtun language practicing during a class in FACEBOOK Cambridge Bay.

guage is at a critical point where, if it isn't protected, it will be lost. ``It's really heartbreaking to think that it could be a possibility. None of us, as Inuit, want to see a language die. It's a part of who we are. Without our language, we don't have our culture,'' Gross says. It's the heritage soci-

ety's 25th anniversary this year and keeping Inuinnaqtun not only alive, but getting it off the endangered list is the priority for the next 25 years, Gross says. To do that, the society hopes to raise $250,000 over the next year to CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY For Grand River Post Secondary Education Office POSITION TITLE: Post Secondary Education Researcher

LOCATION: Ohsweken

PERIOD OF EMPLOYMENT: Full time Contract – May 4, 2021 to March 31, 2022. JOB SUMMARY: The Post Secondary Education Researcher with the Grand River Post Secondary Education Office (GRPSEO) reports to and is directly responsible to the Director of Post Secondary Student Service and a Steering Committee of the GRPSEO Board for: The organizational accomplishment of identified Board Ends policies; and operating within established Board and Operational policies and procedures to accomplish these ends.

Promotion Assistant Summer Student

To do this the Post Secondary Education Researcher will: Be knowledgeable about all Board and Operational policies and procedures. Conduct research and community consultation to develop a comprehensive Post Secondary Education model/strategy for Six Nations of the Grand River that meets and supports identified student and community needs. Conduct research on current and required Education programs and services. Review the current landscape of Post Secondary Education at Six Nations including findings from previous reports, promising practices, and identified gaps and needs. Analyze current Post Secondary Education delivery organizations and services. Conduct community consultation using appropriate social media platforms to obtain members’ input via surveys and conduct meeting forums. Analyze data and incorporate findings into a Post Secondary Education strategy/model final report. Make recommendations for improving Post Secondary Education services at Six Nations. Report to the Director of Post Secondary Student Services and the Steering Committee of the Board on a regularly established basis regarding ongoing project development. Contribute to the overall development and coordination of programs and services of the GRPSEO. Carry out his/her duties in a professional manner consistent with a team approach.

Original Traders Energy is a wholesale fuel supplier that delivers fuel to First Nations owned and operated gas stations in First Nations communities throughout Southern Ontario. OTE is located on the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. We are excited to be introducing a new customer points program that will bridge multiple gas stations together and allow customers to earn points that can be redeemed for draw entries and prizes. Job Description: The ideal candidate for our Promotion Assistant position is confident, calm under pressure with a positive attitude. Responsibilities: • • • • • •

Learn and fully understand how the OTE Points Program operates Confidently provide all details to our customers in a way that encourages them to join our program Create and maintain a positive image of the Loyalty program using social media Completing weekly logs detailing interactions with our customers, tracking and compiling data while providing feedback Assist in the organization and marketing of various campaigns Other duties as assigned

Qualifications: • Ability to work on multiple projects/tasks simultaneously • Well-organized with a customer-oriented approach • Communication, people skills with a team player mentality • Comfortable with using computer applications (Microsoft Office, Internet, videoconferencing) • Well versed in Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) Deadline is: April 28th 2021 @ 4pm Tentative Start Date: May 10th, 2021

MANDATORY QUALIFICATIONS DESIRED FOR THE POSITION: Ø Ø

Master of Education with advanced skills in conducting research and data analysis; experience and evidence in developing First Nation reports/documents and evidence through work history of prior achievement in a related field. Minimum five years work experience.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POSITION: Ø Knowledge/Understanding of Six Nations historical and contemporary context with specific awareness in education. Ø Experience working with Six Nations of the Grand River. Ø Satisfactory police check and must be bondable. Ø Excellent working knowledge and experience with Microsoft Office Programmes and Windows Operating System. Ø Excellent working knowledge of social media platforms and ability to work efficiently with various software applications. Ø Excellent research, analysis and communication skills. Ø Prior successful experience in a multi-task work environment requiring professional level of time, information and project management skills is preferred. Ø Communicate clearly, concisely and correctly in written and spoken form. Ø Able to travel using own vehicle and valid driver’s license (some over night travel required). Ø Interact with others in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and completion of projects. Ø Work collegially with co-workers and clients while maintaining confidentiality and organizational integrity Ø Organize tasks and manage time effectively. Ø Be dependable, flexible, and take initiative when necessary (work flex hours as required). SALARY: To be determined dependent upon experience and qualifications. CLOSING DATE: April 21, 2021 by 4 pm.

Resumes can be emailed to scott.hill@originaltradersenergy.com with the subject line “Promotion Assistant Summer Student”

Applicants must submit their resume with (3) recent reference letters by: e-mail to Justine Henhawk-Bomberry, Director of Post Secondary Student Services at: justineb@grpseo.org or drop box located at the front entrance of the office located at 2160 Fourth Line Road, Ohsweken or by mail to the: Attention: Director of Post Secondary Student Services, GRAND RIVER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION

OFFICE P.O. BOX 339, OHSWEKEN, ON N0A 1M0


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13

continued from 12 support language preservation programming in all four communities. One of those programs pairs a fluent speaker with someone who doesn't speak the language for 300 hours of Inuinnaqtun immersion each year. The program only operates in Cambridge Bay, but the society hopes to expand it to the three other communities. ``Predominantly, there's a lot of elders that are unilingual and there's been language barriers between the younger generation and older generations that may not have been exposed to or learned Inuinnaqtun,'' Gross says. ``We want to see our language thriving and have our communities be immersed in it.'' Another program works to document Inuinnaqtun through annual language workshops with elders, fluent speakers and language specialists to record vocabulary. For Inuit, the fight to

preserve language in not new. A 2016 report from Statistics Canada said the number of Inuit who reported Inuktut as their mother tongue dropped to 65 per cent from 72 per cent between 2001 and 2016. Colonization and intergenerational trauma have contributed to the loss of languages across Nunavut, including Inuinnaqtun, Gross says. ``Our language, because of colonization and the impacts of residential school and other colonial impacts, has been on the decline.'' Reclaiming and retaining the language is at the heart of healing for Inuit, Gross says. ``It's critical to keep that going strong with our language. It's a lot to work for, but we have to keep going.'' There's also more to understanding Inuinnaqtun than just speaking it, Gross suggests. Although Inuinnaqtun refers to the dialect of

Inuktut, it also means to think, create and practise like an Inuinnaq, or a human being. ``With our language, we know who we are as people. There's so many different world views and different things that are not translatable in English, and to know who we are through our language and our culture is very important for us as a people.'' Gross says she is hopeful that through collective effort, Inuinnaqtun will see a resurgence in the next 25 years. ``The more that we speak about it and talk about it in our communities and share why it's crucial, especially with each different generation, the more everyone feels that sense of pride for our people. ``We need to keep passing on the tradition and the language because one is embedded in the other.''

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SPORTS

TWO ROW TIMES

April 14th, 2021

know the score.

ISWO Provides 5km running program in interactive group STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Brigette Lacquette is one of the indigenous female players in the running for Team Canada.

TC

3 Indigenous women strong contenders for Team Canada STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

HALIFAX - Brigette Lacquette (Ojibwe), Jocelyne Larocque (Métis) and Jamie Lee Rattray (Métis) are set to attend with Team Canada at the BFL National Women’s Team Selection Camp on April 14 -22, 2021 in Halifax, NS. Twenty-eight Lacquette was the first First Nations woman on Canada's Olympic hockey team. She grew up in the small town of Mallard, Manitoba to parents from the O-ChiChak Ko Sipi First Nation of Manitoba and Cote First Nation of Saskatchewan. Larocque, a two-time

NCAA Women's Ice Hockey Tournament champion, was the first indigenous athlete to participate in the women's ice hockey tournament at the Winter Olympics. Rattray is a member of the gold medal winning squad at the 2010 IIHF World Women's U18 Championship, and a hockey card of her was featured in the Upper Deck 2010 World of Sports card series. Their participation in the camp will be the final evaluation and preparation for the 2021 IIHF Women’s World Championships taking place on May 6-16, 2021 in Halifax, NS and Truro, NS. Canada will begin their

quest for a gold medal when the tournament opens when they play against Team Finland on May 6, 2021.

Jocelyne LArocqui, Metis, is also a contendor for Team CanTC ada. .

Indigenous Sport and Wellness Ontario has been working to provide virtual sport and athletics programs for youth at home. This week they launched the Well Nation Couch to 5K, which is a six week running program with an interactive Facebook page that will award participants with prizes. The page itself is directed towards Indigenous athletes and those interested in fitness. The 6 week program will run from April 12 - May 23, 2021. “We want to encourage positivity, health and wellness, and community connection with this initiative. Join this fun and supportive community,” read their Facebook page. To participate, those interested are asked to join the Facebook group that will remain open to the public. “Although ISWO is unable to provide in-person programming at the moment due to COVID-19 limitations, the organization is doing all that it can to support both individual and communal wellness through online programs and community-based funding opportunities,” says Mekwan Tulpin, High Performance and Sport Coordinator at ISWO. “As an avid multi-sport athlete, current sport leader of Team Ontario as well as former NAIG competitor, I understand the disappointment and frustration that many of our youth are facing with the

CALL TODAY AND GET YOUR MEMBERSHIP.

ISWO launched a Couch to 5K six week running program and FILE Facebook page to award participants with prizes.

cancellation of the 2020 NAIG and the 2020/21 NAHC. We’ve also become more stagnant in our day to day living.” “Youth need a positive outlet, and to feel like they are part of something again. It’s time to reactivate that amongst each other, and we hope that the Virtual Games will help bring us all together in an uplifting way. Games and sport have always been central to our lives as Indigenous Peoples; movement is medicine and we need that more than ever right now – we just need to find some creative and safe ways to do it, until we can be together again in person.” Weekly schedules for the program will be posted every Sunday for the upcoming week and participants are free to download/save the schedule photos to your phone for easier access each day. Daily schedules will also be posted throughout the week. Participants are encouraged to come back to the forum posts to share their experiences to further their personal accountability and enhance their experience. There

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will also be “questions of the day” to answer, to help increase ease of participation and communal interaction. There are also chances for prizes. “Prizes will be awarded at the end of the program to hardworking participants! To maximize your chances, come back to our posts and comment a picture to share you have completed your cardio that day! Your picture can be anything to show you’ve completed the cardio (scenery, water bottle, smile, running shoes, etc). Feel free to also share a small snippet of your success!” Wrote Belle Bailey, an admin for the group. “We want this group to be welcoming for all and we encourage all participants to engage with each other’s posts, comments, and photos to make this a successful experience for all. Feel free to start discussion posts and see what suggestions others have to share!” The interactive Facebook group grew by nearly 400 new members in the past week and the schedule to participate will be released this week.


April 14th, 2021

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Six Nations COVID-19 Update

New daily cases can be found on page 2 of the report at Sixnationscovid19.ca

Currently Hospitalized

Total self-isolation

4

0

121

Variants of Concern Update

Previously diagnosed COVID-19 case specimens that have under-gone further testing to determine if that person is infected with a variant of concern

# of cases screened positive for a VOC

6

4/13/21 13:44

Note: Active cases are the number of confirmed cases minus the number of resolved cases and deaths.

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Red

Active Cases

Update as of:

Total Cases

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

447

434

10

Vaccination Update as of 2021-03-30

This does not include individuals who have been vaccinated off-reserve. Number booked in for future clinics have scheduled an appointment through the call centre but have not yet received their vaccination.

# partially vaccinated (received 1 dose)

# fully vaccinated (received 2 doses)

% of On-reserve SN Band Members partially vaccinated

2119

293

7%

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For support, resources, and guidance on planning a safe farming season during the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact Ohsweken Public Health. Please contact A/Nurse-in-Charge Lacey VanEvery: 519-445-2672 ext. 249 lacey.vanevery@canada.ca

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16

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April 14th, 2021

A Performance Consultant and Kinesiology Professor STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The early spring has brought with it the nostalgia of summer sports. Unfortunately, many do not know for certain how their sports will be adapting in the coming months to the ever-changing environment of the pandemic. Even the 2021 Masters Indigenous Games (MIG) was postponed to protect the health and safety of participants, visitors and communities, given the uncertainty of hosting amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. In the mean time, young athletes have found themselves in an unprecedented situation—they may or may not be able to play with their peers this year, and many didn’t play at all last year. We sat down to speak with Leah Ferguson, an associate professor with the College of Kinesiology and the University of Sas-

katchewan, who focused her responses on related topics using the area of sport psychology and her experience as a mental performance consultant. In terms of youth development; besides the ability to engage in their sports, what else do you believe has been taken away from young athletes? Researchers have shown that engaging in sports can have a wide range of physical, psychological, and social benefits. Some of the evidence-based advantages of sport participation include: building self-esteem, autonomy, independence, friendships, and communication and leadership skills; increasing competence, confidence, skill development, and physical fitness; decreasing anxiety; and, experiencing success in other life domains (e.g., school). It is difficult to identify the extent to this which the benefits that are normally experienced from sport participation will be hindered due to

the pandemic and related restrictions. In any case, sport typically provides an environment where these advantages may be experienced and the pandemic has interrupted those opportunities. Many organizations put their sports on hold, including the Olympics; have any mental wellness resources been created for athletes since last year that you know of, or would recommend? The Sport Information Resource Centre is an exceptional organization advancing sport through knowledge and evidence (https://sirc. ca/about-sirc/). One resource (blog post) in particular is called “Mind over COVID? Mental health tips for coaches, athletes, and sport administrators” (https:// sirc.ca/blog/mind-overcovid/?utm_source=CAC+-+Inside+Coaching&utm_campaign=d8cf165714-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_04_17_ COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_

Notice of Study Completion

term=0_b810808a44d8cf165714-193451942), and includes a number of great suggestions for targeting mental wellness. Two other organizations that I highly recommend are the Coaching Association of Canada (https:// coach.ca/) and Student Athlete Mental Health Initiative (http://samhi.ca/; which is focused more so on student-athletes and includes a number of relevant articles/resources: http://samhi.ca/huddle/ ) If an athlete is losing motivation to stay engaged during the pandemic, do you have any tips for maintaining their fitness levels at home or virtual programs/supports that they could get involved in? As a mental performance consultant, I often work with athletes and teams to target motivation, which may drop during difficult times (such as a pandemic!). I encourage athletes to reflect on why they do their sport in order to better understand what motivates them, and to

Joe Murphy, C.E.T Corporation of the County of Brant 26 Park Avenue, P.O. Box 160 Burford ON N0E 1A0 Phone: (519)449-2451 Ext. 2209 Email: Joe.Murphy@brant.ca

Class Environmental Assessment

The Study

The Process The Class EA study has been completed in accordance with the requirements of Schedule C projects of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment document (Municipal Engineers Association, October 2000 as amended in 2007, 2011 & 2015). Alternative wastewater servicing solutions and preliminary servicing concepts were identified and evaluated as part of the study. Measures to alleviate any adverse effects that may result from the construction of the proposed works have been recommended. The preferred wastewater servicing concept recommends expansion of the existing St. George Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) to 3,900 m3/d with the existing outfall location and expanding aerobic sludge digestion on-site with continued off-site dewatering of biosolids at the Paris WPCP. The Class EA Environmental Study Report (ESR), detailing the planning process, findings, and recommendations for the study will be available for public review from April 8 to May 24, 2021 at the following locations, but due to COVID-19 call 519.44BRANT (519.442.7268), 1.855.44BRANT for an appointment: • County of Brant Administration Office, 26 Park Avenue, Burford • Paris Customer Service Office, 66 Grand River Street North, Paris The ESR and the Notice of Study Completion will also be available for viewing on the County of Brant’s website, www.brant.ca/plans from April 8, 2021.

skills, techniques, drills, practices, etc. Imagery can also be a powerful tool to create/re-create emotions around sport performances (e.g., re-creating the feelings of preparing for a competition), which might further benefit motivation during the pandemic. Do you have an opinion on what sports organization might look like after Covid-19 restrictions are lifted? (new safety parametres, is there anticipation that more interest in sports will be garnered in youth, is there more risk of injury due to the lack of training throughout the pandemic). It will continue to be important to adhere to all health and safety parameters as the pandemic restrictions are lifted. I hope we continue to get creative in finding solutions for athletes to safely return to sport (e.g., changes made to golf), so as to not stifle sport participation and the many advantages that come with sport participation.

Interested persons may provide written comments to our project team by May 24, 2021. All comments and concerns should be sent directly to Joe Murphy at the County of Brant and Sandra Rodriguez at CIMA+.

St. George Wastewater Servicing

The County of Brant has completed a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) study for wastewater servicing upgrades required in the community of St. George to provide long-term and sustainable wastewater treatment capacity for proposed development in the settlement area.

then use that as motivation to continue doing what they can during the pandemic. Some sports have offered virtual training and practices, though others have not. Speaking with a coach or another sport support person (or even a teacher!) might help identify relevant and available virtual options that are available for various sports, competitive levels, geographic areas, etc. I highly recommend using mental skills such as goal setting and imagery to further stay motivated and engaged during the pandemic. Athletes might set daily/weekly/ monthly goals (e.g., time spent in virtual training, skill development at home, nutrition and sleep) and track those goals to see how they are progressing. Imagery can be a highly useful skill whereby athletes use all of their senses to imagine themselves performing their sport (e.g., training, practice, competing) in their minds eye and create/re-create different

Sandra Rodriguez, P.Eng. CIMA+ 5935 Airport Road, Suite 500 Mississauga, ON, L4v 1W5 Phone: 905-695-1005 Ext. 6704 Email: Sandra.rodriguez@cima.ca

In addition, a request may be made to the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks for an order requiring a higher level of study (i.e. requiring an individual/comprehensive EA approval before being able to proceed), or that conditions be imposed (e.g. require further studies), only on the grounds that the requested order may prevent, mitigate or remedy adverse impacts on constitutionally protected Aboriginal and treaty rights. Requests on other grounds will not be considered. Requests should include the requester contact information and full name. Requests should specify what kind of order is being requested (request for conditions or a request for an individual/comprehensive environmental assessment), how an order may prevent, mitigate or remedy potential adverse impacts on Aboriginal and treaty rights, and any information in support of the statements in the request. This will ensure that the ministry is able to efficiently begin reviewing the request. The request should be sent in writing or by email to: Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks 777 Bay Street, 5th Floor Toronto ON M7A 2J3 minister.mecp@ontario.ca and Director, Environmental Assessment Branch Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks 135 St. Clair Ave. W, 1st Floor Toronto ON, M4V 1P5 EABDirector@ontario.ca Requests should also be copied to the County of Brant by mail or by e-mail. Please visit the ministry’s website for more information on requests for orders under section 16 of the Environmental Assessment Act at: https://www.ontario.ca/page/class-environmental-assessments-part-ii-order.

During the public review period you are encouraged to contact the County of Brant and/or CIMA+ if you have any questions or concerns about this project.

All personal information included in your request – such as name, address, telephone number and property location – is collected, under the authority of section 30 of the Environmental Assessment Act and is collected and maintained for the purpose of creating a record that is available to the general public. As this information is collected for the purpose of a public record, the protection of personal information provided in the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) does not apply (s.37). Personal information you submit will become part of a public record that is available to the general public unless you request that your personal information remain confidential.

This notice is being provided pursuant to the Environmental Assessment Act, the Municipal Engineers Association’s Municipal Class Environmental Assessment, dated October 2000, as amended in 2007, 2011 & 2015, and the direction of the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks.

This notice is being provided pursuant to the Environmental Assessment Act, the Municipal Engineers Association’s Municipal Class Environmental Assessment, dated October 2000, as amended in 2007, 2011 & 2015, and the direction of the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks.


TWO ROW26 TIMES

April 14th, 2021

TWO 17 ROW TIM

ATTN:

J O B Position

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com

B O A R D

Employer/Location

Term

Salary

Closing Date

In Memoriam

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Support Staff

Childcare Services, Social Services

Contract

TBD

April 21, 2021

Family Services Worker

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Full-time

TBD

April 21, 2021

Child and Youth Services Worker

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Full-time

TBD

April 21, 2021

Community Support Worker

Community Support Services, Health Services

Part-time

TBD

April 21, 2021

Food Services Worker

Iroquois Lodge, Health Services

Part-time

TBD

April 21, 2021

Land Based Helper

Egowadiyadagenha Land Based Healing Centre, Health Services

Full-time

TBD

April 21, 2021

Health Transformation Community Engagement Coordinator

Administration, Health Services

Contract

TBD

April 21, 2021

Housekeeper

Iroquois Lodge, Health Services

Contract

TBD

April 28, 2021

Director

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Full-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

Programming Assistant

Parks and Recreation

Part-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

Personal Support Worker

Personal Support Services

Part-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

Alternative Care Resource Team Member

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Contract

TBD

April 28, 2021

Alternative Care Resources Support Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Contract

TBD

April 28, 2021

Mental Health Nurse Case Manager

Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services

Contract

TBD

April 28, 2021

Esadatgehs (Quality) Lead

Administration, Health Services

Full-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

Unit Assistant

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services

Contract

TBD

April 28, 2021

Personal Support Worker FT

Iroquois Lodge, Health Services

Full-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

Personal Support Services PT (5 positions)

Iroquois Lodge, Health Services

Part-time

TBD

April 28, 2021

SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Researcher

Indspire

Full-time

TBD

April 27, 2021

Program Development & Implementation Officer

Six Nations Polytechnic Institute

Full-time

TBD

April 23, 2021

Campus Manager

Six Nations Polytechnic Institute

Full-time

TBD

April 15, 2021

Staffing and Total Compensation Officer

Six Nations Polytechnic Institute

Full-time

TBD

April 16, 2021

Vice-President Academic (VPA)

Six Nations Polytechnic Institute

Full-time, permanent

TBD

Consideration of candidates will begin mid-April

Post Secondary Education Researcher

Grand River Post Secondary Education Office

Full-time, contract

TBD

April 22, 2021

Spa Associate

Grand River Spa

Part-time

TBD

Youth Navigator

Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board

Full-time, contract

$49,857.60 - $57,336.24

Open until filled

Coach/Mentor

Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board

Full-time, contract

$49,857 - $57,336.24

April 26, 2021

Community Counsellor

Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services

Full-time

$50,000

April 20, 2021

Intake Worker

Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services

Full-time

$50,000

April 20, 2021

Sexual Assault Community Counsellor

Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services

Full-time

Up to $54,600

April 20, 2021

Youth Lodge Counsellor

Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services

Full-time

$50,000

April 20, 2021

Chief Financial Officer

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Full-time, permanent

$100,000 – $115,000

April 22, 2021

Human Resources Manager

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Full-time, permanent

$51,313.50-73,346.50

April 22, 2021

Employment Support Assistant

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Supervisor – Maawdoo Maajaamin Child Care Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Until filled

Contact

$18.80 – $26.33/hour

April 22, 2021

Full-time, permanent

$51,313.50 – $73,345.50,

April 15, 2021

SNGREC POSITIONS Post-Secondary Students Summer Camp Coordinator

Parks and Recreation

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Student Corrections Officer

Corrections Department

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 30, 2021

Activity Assistant

Iroquois Lodge

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Camp Leader (2 positions)

Parks and Recreation

8 weeks

$14.25/ hr

June 18, 2021

Maintenance Assistant

Housing Department

8 weeks

$14.25/hr

June 18, 2021

Secondary Students

SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Post-Secondary Positions Unit Coordinator Assistant

Six Nations Polytechnic

16 weeks

$16.00/hr

April 23, 2021

Foodbank Coordinator Assistant

Six Nations Food Bank

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 16, 2021

Wholesale Market Representative

Sapling and Flint

16 weeks

$20.00/hr

April 16, 2021

Production Assistant

MTS Services

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 26, 2021

Indigenous Language Street Team

Jukasa Radio

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Sr Seedkeeper

Mohawk Seedkeeper Garden

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Operations Assistant

Kayanase

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Park Attendant

Six Nations of Grand River Development Corporation

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Marketing Trainee

Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation

16 weeks

$ 14.25/hr

April 23, 2021

Language Unit Assistant

Woodland Cultural Centre

16 weeks

$14.25/hr

April 19, 2021

River Guide (2 Positions)

Grand River Rafting

8 weeks

$14.25/hr

June 18, 2021

Landscaping Assistant

Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation

8 weeks

$14.25/ hr

June 18, 2021

Building Maintenance Assistant

Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation

8 weeks

$14.25/hr

June 18, 2021

Grounds Crew

Sandusk Golf Club

8 weeks

$14.25

June 18, 2021

Water Helper

Kool Kidz Ice and Water

8 weeks

$14.25/hr

June 23, 2021

Ice Bagger/Packer

Kool Kidz Ice and Water

8 weeks

$14.25/hr

June 23, 2021

Secondary Student Positions

GREAT SUMMER STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES Please be advised, interested candidates must be registered with the GREAT student office. Please contact Carly Martin at (519) 445-2222 ext. 3133 to get started! The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. Only local positions are posted in the paper. For more positions in the surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn.com.

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com

Memoriam Hubbert, Laura Mae (Tory) nee; Davis In loving memory of our dear Sister and best friend who passed away April 13, 2016 We’re sending a dove to Heaven with a parcel on its wings Be careful when you open it It’s full of beautiful things Inside are a million kisses wrapped up in a million hugs To say how much we Miss you and to send you all Our Love We hold you close within our hearts and there you will remain To walk with us throughout our lives until we meet again. Lovingly remembered and sadly missed. Your Sisters Sharon, Marilyn, Jean (deceased), Nance, Elda and Families. Give Our Dwayne a hug and kiss for us.

CLASSIFIED ADS CAN NOW BE PLACED AT: Memoriam Hubbert, Dwayne Michael

In loving memory of our dear Nephew and best friend who passed away April 14, 2019 There is a special kind of Love That’s meant for you alone, A special place within our heart That only you can own You know that we still love you That we Miss you every day, That we still feel lost without you And will always feel that way. Time may hide the sadness Like a smile that hides the tears, But precious Memories will never fade Despite the passing years. If love could have saved you, you would have lived Forever. Everlasting love, we miss you. Aunt Sharon, Aunt Marilyn, Aunt Jean (deceased), Aunt Nance, Aunt Elda and Families. Give your Mom a hug and kiss for us.

CLASSIFIED ADS STARTING AT $12.50


18 37

TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

April28TH, 14th,2018 2021 NOVEMBER

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Notice

Legal Notice

BOMBERRY: Ritchie Erwin

NOTICE TO CREDITORS HEIRS & OTHER CLAIMANTS

It is with great sadness we announce the sudden passing of Ritchie Erwin Bomberry (Hermie) on Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at the age of 65 years. Father of Kelli (Greg), Shawn (Jenni), Joshua (Erica), Lance (Beki), Tyler and Gavin. Papa to Kalisha, Logan, Jaxon, Heath, Zachary, Terrell, Taylor, Dacey, Ainsley, Sydni, Keegan and Junior. Greatgrandfather to Anakin and Myla. Brother to Annie, Linda, Lizzie, Marilyn, Sheldon (Stella), Allen (Cheryl). Predeceased by parents Norman Bomberry and Ella Garlow and brother Chad (Bernadette). Survived by many nieces and nephews and cousins. Proud member of local 736 for 25+ years and many other locals in the United States. He will be missed by many friends at the day centre. He was an avid dice player. He was known by his friends as Doctor, Boob and Boo Bear. He will be forever loved by his fur kids Jackie, Jason and Juelz. A graveside service will be held at Lower Cayuga Longhouse on 5th Line on Sunday, April 11, 2021 at 11am. www.rhbanderson.com

Trees/Bush Lots Wanted

Make $$$ Today! Top Dollar paid starting at $1000-$20,000 for mature and dead trees. Bush lots of over 5 acres. No clear cutting. Environmentally friendly and fully insured. Add more wildlife and improve the health of your forest Today. Call 226-388-0738

ALL PERSONS having claims against the estate of: Eva Logan of the Six Nations Indian Reserve, who died February 15, 2021 are notified to send full particulars of their claim to the undersigned on or before April 30, 2021 after which date the estate will be distributed with regard only to claims then received. Dated this 4th day of April, 2021 Edward Logan

Executor Administrator(s)

1401 Cayuga Rd., Ohsweken, ON

519-771-2530 Telephone number

For Sale

905-768-4413 Mini Barns 8’x8’ and up Picnic Tables 6’ and 8’ For Sale 2304 Third Line

Hill’s Snack Bar Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

Puppies Wanted

Farm Land Wanted

Puppies wanted for good families Please call Bob Johnston after 4pm at 289-377-9623

Paying Top Dollar for Farm land. Starting at $75-$125 per acre for organic soy beans. Long term leases available. environmentally friendly. Unlike tobacco that strips your land of nutrients. Let us replenish your land & pay top $ Call 226-388-0738

Metal Roofing Services

ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

Services

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Fjord Metal Roofing Six Nations' Metal Roofing Specialist Call or text 905-330-4123 or 519-774-9633 insta: fjord_metal_roofing

Free Estimates


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

April 14th,19TH, 2021 2018 DECEMBER

CLUES ACROSS 1. Pituitary hormone (abbr.) 4. Ceramic jars 9. Monetary units 14. Alias 15. “Superman” actor 16. Britonic tribe 17. Shorten 18. LA Dodgers manager 20. Hoarded 22. Theatrically portray 23. Noah’s grandson 24. Dependent 28. Peyton’s little brother 29. Cools the house 30. Principle part of 31. Type of wrap 33. Peels 37. Commercial 38. Make an attempt 39. Arrange in steps 41. U. Utah athlete 42. Old English 43. Trade 44. Nostrils 46. Ticket seller __Hub 49. Of I 50. Institute legal proceedings against 51. Takes apart 55. Doorway 58. Long int’l river 59. Trailblazing athlete Gibson 60. Former CBS News host 64. Sign language 65. Badgerlike mammal 66. Thin strips of wood 67. Brooklyn hoopster 68. Portents of good or evil 69. Footwear 70. When you think you’ll arrive

19 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, if you feel like every day is the same thing, then figure out a way to add some spark to the week. Invite friends for an adventure or embrace a new hobby.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, find ways to entertain your family and yourself without breaking the bank. Recreational centers and parks are often free and have many possibilities. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, explore more creative pursuits in the days to come. You can find many great ideas and starter kits for arts and crafts projects at your local craft store. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Don’t pressure yourself into taking on more than you can handle, Cancer. Even though you may feel up to the challenge, there’s no shame in accepting help.

CLUES DOWN 1. Batflower genus 2. Predatory seabirds 3. Fish farm 4. Arrangements 5. Go in advance of others 6. Bulgarian monetary unit 7. “__ Maria” 8. W. African ethnoreligious group 9. Wild Asian oxen genus 10. Vinegary 11. To this 12. Explosive 13. Female sibling 19. Orlando museum (abbr.) 21. Type of hoop 24. About Holy Father 25. Academic environment 26. Extremely angry 27. Surrenders 31. Swiss mountain pass

Answers for April 14th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

32. Sharp mountain ridge 34. Erases 35. Spielberg’s alien 36. Absurd 40. Dorm worker 41. Used to make pesticides 45. The sister of your father or mother 47. A way to let know 48. Can’t produce much vegetation 52. Small streams 53. Folk singer DiFranco 54. Weights 56. Start over 57. Black Sea resort city 59. Wimbledon champ 60. Corporate executive (abbr.) 61. Unskilled actor who overacts 62. Bravo! Bravo! Bravo! 63. Of or relating to ears

SUDOKU

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, this week you may find yourself looking inward, which is not necessarily the norm for you. Try connecting with others as it may do you some good. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 A new relationship could start this week, Virgo. Don’t try to put on airs; just be yourself and you will likely find that everything will work out for the best. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Financial uncertainty has you rethinking things this week, Libra. Just be sure you are not being pennywise but dollar foolish. Make cuts across the board.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, when another person confides in you, it is up to you to keep his or her secret, unless you believe doing so would be harmful to that person. Maintain your trustworthy reputation. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, don’t rush ahead on a project, even if you think you are ready to move forward. Give it a few more days of careful consideration before diving right in.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, as tedious as research can be, it is ultimately necessary if you are planning a big move or a change in your financial situation. Seek professional advice, if necessary. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, some details are still up in the air about a potential trip or adventure. But that doesn’t mean you can’t get excited about the prospects.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, if you are being too critical of yourself, change your way of thinking. Others do not view you in the same manner.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


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