__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY February 24, 2021 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

Six Nations schools won’t re-open Over half polled oppose Arrowdale sale until September 2021 DONNA DURIC

DONNA DURIC

519-445-0088

donna@tworowtimes.com

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

TWO ROW TIMES

Six Nations schools won’t re-open until September due to continually high numbers of COVID-19 cases in the community. The community is too vulnerable to risk further spread by re-opening schools, said I.L. Thomas Principal Reva Bomberry. “Our schools are not safe until our community has control of COVID-19,” said Bomberry during a special council meeting last Friday. “Our community is a vulnerable community. We have high levels of health factors that our affect our people. I hate to lose one more elder from our community. The three deaths that we’ve had have impacted the I.L. Thomas community. We have been impacted as a community because we’re all related in some way or another. If one family member dies in the community, we’re all impacted. We are a different community. The factors in our community are totally different than (other cities). Safety first.” Coun. Michelle Bomberry agreed it was too early to re-open, despite a planned re-opening date of March 1. “With the cases so high I don’t anticipate schools

Over half the Brantford residents polled in a recent survey oppose the controversial sale of Arrowdale Golf Course. The Friends of Arrowdale, a citizen’s group that banded together to fight city council’s sale of the property, delivered a petition to Brantford City Hall last week, which they say represents about 55 per cent of city residents saying no to the sale. Others argue the sale cannot move forward because it sits on unceded Six Nations land and that both Six Nations and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were not properly notified of the impending sale according to the stipulations of the Grand River Notification Agreement (GRNA). Eric Gillespie, a lawyer for citizen’s group “Know Your City”, argued at a virtual hearing in December 2020 that Six Nations and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were not notified of the sale in a timely manner. They were notified after the sale was complete, contrary to the GRNA, he said. The GRNA is a voluntary agreement between

Virtual learning only for the rest of this year for Six Nations students. PHOTO BY TRT

going back,” she said. After going most of 2020 with a relatively low number of cases, positive diagnoses exploded beginning in January. Two Six Nations people have died from the disease in 2021. A third person died last spring. Kathleen Manderville, Indigenous Services Canada director of education for Six Nations’s federally-run schools, said the decision to open or remain closed is up to the community and ISC would support the community’s decision. “It is a challenging situation but ISC is not unilaterally deciding on the school reopening. It is a community-supported decision.” Public Works Director Mike Montour had recommended re-opening schools, saying it was safe from a public health perspective. He also recommended schools re-open from a mental health perspective, saying kids needed to be

back in school and that parents were struggling and unable to work with schools and child care centres closed. Coun. Wendy Johnson did not agree with Montour’s recommendation. “There’s so much controversy with this. There’s so much fear around it and for good reason.” She agreed schools should re-open in September to give the community and parents time to plan for it. “There’s a huge urgency to have kids in school because we’ve lost so much and there’s something to be said for that classroom participation for those who want it and need it. I don’t agree with the March start.” SNGR elected council agreed to re-open schools in September and in the meantime, provide as many supports as possible to children and parents engaging in remote learning.

Your insurance and community partner

Six Nations, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, the City of Brantford, Brant County, Haldimand County and the Grand River Conservation Authority. The agreement asks that each party notify each other on matters of common interest on the lands in each county/territory. Brantford resident Elisabeth Chernichenko told the Two Row Times the petition, “refute(s) the opinions of Brantford city councillors to the effect of ‘no one caring’ or the amount not being significant enough to not sell. The statistics tell a very different story.” Over 8,000 people were contacted during a doorto-door campaign last year, and the results were analyzed by a statistician at Simon Fraser University. Out of those, 7,871 did not want the sale to proceed. The results translate to about 55,000 residents of the city, or 55 per cent, opposing the sale, according to Friends of Arrowdale. “We are hoping that these irrefutable figures show council exactly how many are opposed to this decision,” said Kailee Poisson, president of Friends of Arrowdale. The City of Brantford has said it wants to sell the former golf course to make room for more housing.

We hire local, shop local, and support community members and charities through donations and sponsorship We take pride in investing back into the community we share

grandriverinsurance.ca · 2176-B Chiefswood Rd, Ohsweken Call us today for a free quote (519) 445-2795

Home | Auto | Commercial | Pensions | Group | Risk Management


2

LOCAL

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

keeping you informed.

Six Nations date on COVID-19 vaccine supply still undetermined DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

A COVID-19 vaccine shortage in Canada means only Six Nations’ vulnerable and at-risk populations are getting inoculated against the virus until more doses become available for the general population. Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council approved a vaccine prioritization matrix last week, developed by Six Nations Health Services, which lays out who should get the vaccine on the territory, and when, as the country deals with a limited supply of the vaccine. Residents of care facilities remain the highest priority at this time, council heard during a special virtual meeting last week. As of press time, about 70 per cent of staff at Iroquois Lodge long-term care home were vaccinated against COVID-19, while over 80 per cent of residents have been vaccinated. Vaccinations were expected to be complete for residents at the Jay

Silverheels complex by the end of this week. In the meantime, Health Services has created an online registration database for anyone wishing to get the vaccine as soon as the supply becomes available. It’s not yet known when the vaccine will be available for the general population, said Zach Miller, administrative director at Health Services. “Once we have a more steady flow of vaccines coming in to the community and a consistent flow, we’ll switch that pre-registration system to a booking system so that people are aware of when they’ll be booked,” he said. “At this point because of the low amount of vaccines coming in to the community, it’s simply a registration system. Those on the (list) will be contacted once the vaccine becomes available.” Besides elders, frontline workers such as health services staff, paramedics and other first responders are high on the priority list. Community members tuned in for the virtual information session,

Six Nations of the Grand River has issued the above chart showing who will be prioritized to recieve the COVID-19 vaccine. Residents in long-term care and congregate care living situations are top priority with elders and immunocomprimised adults following after. The vaccine is not approved for youth under the age of 16. There are shortages of the vaccine across Canada. Northern Ontario First Nations have been largely vaccinated early due to the concerns of being in a remote community where access to health care is an issue along with overcrowding and boil water advisories. PHOTO BY SNGREC

with some wondering why masks and physical distancing will still be needed even after the vaccine has been administered to the majority of the population. Miller said the vaccine doesn’t prevent the spread of COVID-19, but is intended to reduce severe symptoms in those

exposed to the virus. “It’s not meant to slow the transmission. Even after you receive the vaccine, you still have to take public health precautions until notified otherwise. Really the focus is that you don’t have a severe outcome. This is similar to what we already have with the flu vaccines.

That’s going to be an emphasis in our communications strategy.” Zach Miller, Lacey VanEvery, acting nurse in charge at Gane Yohs Health Centre, said the research is still on-going into how the vaccine can limit the spread of COVID-19. In the meantime, physical distancing

will still be required in the community. “It’s going to take some time before we can start lifting those precautions. We still have a ways to go in this pandemic. We’re dealing with a limited supply nationwide right now. There will come a time when more vaccine is available. I can’t answer how quickly but we are working diligently – once we get that flood of vaccine, we’re good to go. (prepared).” Vaccines will be administered via individual appointments, she said. Elected Chief Mark Hill reiterated that the vaccine will not be mandatory for any Six Nations person or employee. “It comes down to personal choice. It’s not mandatory.” Northern Ontario First Nations have already received the COVID-19 vaccine for all their residents, council heard. The province prioritized them as a high-risk group and made that decision, said Coun. Nathan Wright. The COVID-19 vaccine is not approved for children.

Custom Vehicle Wraps!

289.309.6494 | 2395 Cayuga Road. Ohsweken, Ontario | www.JukasaDesigns.com

MARKETING

Promotional Items Embroidery Heat Press Full Colour Printing Vehicle Wraps

DESIGN

Branding Logos Print Design Digital Advertising Conceptual Design

FABRICATION

Sign Manufacturing Tradeshow Booths Tents Flags Banners


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

3

Driver who fled police now facing multiple charges after arrest STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

YORK - The Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Haldimand County Detachment has charged a 28-year-old individual with multiple offences following a traffic stop on Haldimand High-

way 54 in York, Haldimand County, ON. On Friday February 19, 2021 at 9:51 p.m., OPP were patrolling on Haldimand Highway 54 when a vehicle travelling north bound caught the attention of an officer for a Highway Traffic Act violation.  OPP attempted to con-

duct a traffic stop of the vehicle when the vehicle fled north bound on Haldimand Highway 54. In the interest of public safety, police did not pursue the vehicle. Other officers in the area were made aware, and efforts continued to locate the vehicle. A short time later the

vehicle was located again on Haldimand Highway 54 and failed to stop for police. Officers utilized a tire deflation device and the vehicle was safely stopped. Investigation revealed the driver was in violation of multiple offences and they were arrested without further incident.

Good Minds Stand Up when it’s time to support each other!

Together we can stop bullying

Further investigation and search of the individual determined they were in possession of a prohibited edged weapon. As a result of their investigation, OPP has charged 28-year-old Joshua DUBY of Hamilton, ON with: Flight from a peace officer, Dangerous operation of a motor vehicle,

Possession of a prohibited device, Fail to stop for police, Drive motor vehicle - no drivers licence, Use plates not authorized for vehicle and Drive motor vehicle - no insurance. The accused is scheduled to appear at the Ontario Court of Justice in Cayuga at a later date to answer to the charges.


4

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

BULLYING

ENDS HERE

Pink Shirt Day 2021

Andrea Horwath

Sandy Shaw

Paul Miller

Monique Taylor

MPP Hamilton Centre

MPP Hamilton West— Ancaster—Dundas

MPP Hamilton East— Stoney Creek

MPP Hamilton Mountain

905-544-9644 ahorwath-co@ndp.on.ca

905-628-2755 sshaw-co@ndp.on.ca

905-545-0114 PMiller-co@ndp.on.ca

905-388-9734 mtaylor-co@ndp.on.ca


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Akwesasne seeking birthing centre DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Akwesasne has begun fundraising for a long-awaited and much-needed birthing centre on the territory. Like many other issues, COVID-19 has brought to light the need for a birthing centre in Akwesasne as new parents navigated an impersonal birthing process in off-reserve hospitals this past year that the Onkwehonwe Midwives Collective says wouldn’t have happened if the community had its own birthing centre. “Bringing birth back to our community is incredibly important and that's the main reasoning behind the birth center,” says OMC Interim Executive Director Anastasia George. “OMC believes that being born into the community is an incredibly important part of the birthing process. In terms of COVID-19 safety, a birthing center would allow for family members to be present in a safe way. In a hospital right now, there is only one person allowed to be with you and

they must follow safety protocols. A lot of people are choosing their mother over their partner, in a very tough decision, but we can allow for those people to be there, with safety precautions, of course.” George says a birthing centre in Akwesasne will help new parents feel closer to home and allow for closer connections during the birthing process. In many instances during the pandemic, women had to choose between their partner or mother to be with them while they give birth, said George. “The birth center allows for our new members to be born into our community, within the community. This is very important to us, as people whose community defies the confines of international and regional borders.” The Mohawk community of Akwesasne straddles the Canadian and United States border, as well as the Quebec and Ontario border. The GoFund Me campaign has raised $450 since Feb. 4. The team, which includes other Onkwehonwe midwives, hopes to raise $3 million.

“It has always been the dream of many an Akwesasne midwife to have our own birthing centre in our territory,” the OKC notes. “The Onkwehon:we Midwives Collective believes we now possess the power to bring this dream to fruition.” Jasmine Benedict is one of the midwives looking to bring the birthing centre dream to life. A midwife in Akwesasne, Benedict has been working with Akwesasronon and Indigenous families for the past 15 years and has seen the necessity for birth to be brought back to Akwesasne. As a mother of seven children, Benedict believes each pregnancy and birth is a unique and precious experience in which the mother should be the foundation, the GoFund Me notes. Benedict now works to help other women have a more personalized birthing experience. The OMC hopes to build a 6,000 square foot, stateof-the-art birthing centre that will exceed standards for environmentally conscious and sustainable buildings.

Every child deserves to feel safe at home and in his or her community.

SIX NATIONS

SIX NATIONS

This message is brought to you by the Six Nations Police Service

5


6

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

OPINION

Follow the story on social media!

editor@tworowtimes.com

@tworowtimes

COMPASSION WORD SEARCH

A O A B A F U H P G D Y Q W N C P R B E

M F N M T K L Z L G X C B W Q H B J Z O

L C O B T A G N X E H R U Z G A X I L V

N D H R G G M A L D R E S L T R Y S R F

W H Q Y G V B P E P R M A A T I X H S G

T U M Z I I E K O F J T C L R T W C S N

M G F J T A V J J N G H C O I Y M U E Q

T E N D E R N E S S T G S A W N O K N W

S F H O J W C N N M T S M Q B N G D S E

I S U Z T O C H R E E Z P F W G J B I E

C W E G D O L A V R S W T O T R U U T L

N S W N N O W A G Y L S J A Z E A C I L

B T E C D I I G C H K K G V R W J D V V

G D E R A N A V R T G E V O L F W B I J

TARGET TENDERNESS WARMTH

MERCY SENSITIVITY SYMPATHY

HUMANITY KINDNESS LOVE

CONCERN FORGIVENESS HEALING

AGGRESSOR CARE CHARITY

N R T P A S I P T A R G E T N F N D T U

N V B Y W C G K K P U U Q B O N N N Y Z

Z A S A Y T I N A M U H X B K L D X Z O

X S S W Q Y I A V Y H E J U A B W T Z H

G X R U K W I H X S E F A J Z F X Z U Z

D W Z O J G B U F J I U Z O G Z J B F L

Understanding compassion to overcome bullying GMSU -- The word compassion literally means “to suffer together”. The act of compassion is what stirs you into action when you see someone suffering and feel the need to do something to end that suffering. Needless to say — learning and practising compassion is a powerful tool to overcome bullying and end it in your community, family, workplace or school.

But things can get complicated. You see the bully and the person being bullied, also known as the ‘target’, have their own issues that brought each of them into the situation. Everyone has a backstory. And prt of overcoming bullying long term means discarding labels that vilify or victimize either the aggressor or the target in a bullying situation.

Volume 8, Issue 28 Make advertising cheques payable to:

Garlow Media

Teaching youth to be compassionate is important. First, recognize the suffering in a situation. Next, decide what you can do to help. And lastly, take action towards a solution that is within your reach. For example, let’s say a girl on the playground is getting bullied by a group of three older girls. She is trying to walk away but the older girls won’t let her

go. She is hanging her head down and looks a little afraid. If you can tell she is feeling bad and want to help her — take action in the best and safest way you can. Invite the girl to come join your circle of friends to get her away from the girls who are being aggressive. Tell a teacher or grown up you trust what you saw. Or if the situation is more

Advertising Sales Co-ordinator: Marshall Lank Advertising Sales Executive: Christine Patton Advertising Sales Executive: Rachel Binek Publisher: Jonathan Garlow Head of Production: Dave LaForce Editor & Social Media: Nahnda Garlow Writer: Donna Duric Website Manager: Benjamin Doolittle Senior Writer: Jim Windle Columnist: Rachel A. Snow Distribution Manager: Tim Reynolds Brantford Distribution: Christian Kovacs Distribution: Logan Martin-King Toronto Distribution: Mari Reeve

Oneida Business Park Suite 124 50 Generations Drive, Box 1 Main office: (519) 900-5535 Editorial line: (519) 900-6241 Advertising line: (519) 900-6373 Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0

Thank you for your advertising support!

serious you can even call the police. The bottom line to bullying anywhere is that it can be ended. But it takes human will. That step of action by everyday willing people to overcome bullying situations with wisdom, support and empowerment so everyone can live a life free of oppression.

For advertising information: ads@tworowtimes.com General inquiries: info@tworowtimes.com Website: www.tworowtimes.com


February 24, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

What Is the Definition of Compassion Compassion. This is the desire to alleviate the suffering of another person. To have compassion for someone doesn’t really mean feeling sorry for them or pitying them — but that you can sympathize with what they are going through. In bullying situations compassion can help both sides of the issue. Both the bully and the victim have personal issues that make up how they treat people and how they handle themselves in a given situation. Unless an observer fully knows both the bully and the victim, objective truth of the situation may never come to light. Compassion for the Victim The victim, or target, needs compassion in a bullying situation because they are the one who was attacked. However there can be situations that later reveal the target did something to instigate the bully and aggravated the situation in some way. This could’ve been done without bad intention, but in the eyes of the bully that aggravation warranted some kind of retaliation. Offering compassion for the target does not mean making them a martyr, or giving them everything they ask for. It means empowering them with the assistance to move past that bullying situation and giving them what they need to heal from the event. Perhaps the target needs some counselling or mentoring to understand why things are happening. In a classroom situation, offering access to staff who will ensure students can continue classes without harassment can be an empowering solution for targeted students and also help end bullying situations in schools. Offering compassionate support to targeted victims is empowering, solidifying the truth that targets are not alone and that everyone is worthy of dignity and respect. Compassion for the Bully Does a bully deserve compassion too? The answer is yes. Even if the actions of a bully, also known as the aggressor, are malicious and hurtful there are many reasons behind that behaviour — the why behind them taking action to harm someone else. It’s true that some people are just plain mean spirited. Others might be reacting to a frustrating situation, or feeling like they are out of control. The important thing to remember about an aggressor is vilifying them — instead of calling out the bullying behaviour — is not going to make the situation any better. In fact, it could get worse. Oversimplifying a bullying situation by labelling the aggressor a “bully” can overlook a situation that needs immediate intervention by mental health professionals and even possibly the police. Perhaps the aggressor has been living in a violent home situation and physical retaliation is all they know. They could also be the victim of psychological, emotional, sexual of physical abuse at the hands of an older sibling, parent or other family member. The good news is that there are several local health resources children, youth and even adult aggressors can access to help break free from unhealthy situations that may have aggravated their response in a bullying situation. With the help of an able counsellor who looks into a bullying situation with compassion for the “bully” — ending a hopeless cycle of hostility and violence can help an aggressor heal and could also be a long term solution to stop bullying in your community. Compassion for All Compassion is world changing. One simple act of kindness will lead to many other acts of kindness like the ripple effect that is seen when a stone is cast into a pond. Compassion for targets helps them heal from trauma, while compassionate intervention with aggressors can sometimes resolve a bigger issue and help them find healing as well. When you show compassion — you are telling everyone in the situation that they are still valued — even if they were hurt, or even if they acted in the wrong. No one wants to be defined by their mistakes or made to feel like they deserves to be treated badly. When it comes to bullying there is so much that can be done to halt the harm and turn the tides towards kindness. With the right approach parents, teachers, and community leaders can break the cycle of bullying and make our communities healthier, happier places to be.

7


8

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Brant mayor David Bailey receives development award STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

BRANT COUNTY – Brant Mayor David Bailey was presented the “Community Influencer of the Year” award from the Economic Developers Council of Ontario (EDCO). This award recognizes an elected official that has ‘made a significant impact on their peers, the industry of Economic Development, their community and overall influence of economic development’. “I am so pleased to be recognized. We share a strong, resilient and charming community where people and businesses thrive. It is my honour to lead and represent the County of Brant,” said Mayor David Bailey. “EDCO does a wonderful job to advance economic development in municipalities and foster economic prosperity in Ontario. Thank you for your hard work year over

David Bailey Mayor of Brant County received an award PHOTO from EDCO. OBTAINED BY TRT

year.” EDCO is the provincial organization that represents Economic Development in Ontario. Hosted virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the award announcements were made during the 64th Annual Conference. EDCO’s membership encompasses over 1,100 members and is Canada’s largest professional economic development association.

“The Economic Developers Council of Ontario recognizes excellence in economic development initiatives and leaders from Ontario communities,” said Lidy Romanuk, 2021 President of EDCO. “The announcement celebrates winning communities of all sizes for a variety of economic development projects. The County of Brant’s Mayor David Bailey has been a champion for local businesses throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and is an ambassador for businesses in Brant. He serves on several Board of Directors for both local and regional groups that contribute to the economic success of Brant. It is our pleasure to acknowledge Mayor Bailey as this year’s Community Influencer.” A complete list of 2020 award recipients can be found on the EDCO website at www.edco.on.ca.

WE’RE HIRING! / NOUS EMBAUCHONS! Join us at the Correctional Service of Canada and contribute to changing lives and protecting Canadians. Joignez-vous au Service correctionnel du Canada et contribuez à changer des vies et à protéger les Canadiens.

WE’RE RECRUITING / NOUS RECRUTONS : • Correctional Officer / Agent(e) correctionnel(le) • Primary Worker/Kimisinaw / Intervenant(e) de première ligne • And more! / Et bien plus!

WE OFFER / NOUS OFFRONS :

• Competitive salaries / Des salaires compétitifs • Excellent benefits, including medical and dental insurance, and a pension plan / D’excellents avantages sociaux, dont un régime d’assurance médicale et dentaire, ainsi qu’un régime de retraite

INFORMATION csc-scc.gc.ca

APPLY / POSTULEZ jobs.gc.ca / emplois.gc.ca


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

9

WEEK 2

comm

VIRTUAL WELLNESS SERIES

presents

03 06

comm

VIRTUAL WELLNESS SERIES “TRADITIONAL CEREMONIES AS MEDICINE”

with

presents

TOM PORTER

“TRADITIONAL CEREMONIES AS MEDICINE” with

TOM PORTER

JOIN US!

SATURDAY, JOIN US! MARCH 6, 2021

3 PM

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2021

3 PM

Special guest Tom Porter shares his knowledge about Special guest Tom Porter the importance of attending shares his knowledge about our traditional ceremonies the importance of attending & how they came to be! our traditional ceremonies

& how they came to be! PARTICIPANTS: Pre-register by emailing sncoas@sixnations.ca to be entered into PARTICIPANTS: Pre-register by emailing to be entered into a draw to win 1 of 10 Wellness Boxes!* NOTE: sncoas@sixnations.ca This event will be live-streamed on a draw win 1 ofencouraging 10 Wellness Boxes!* This within event your will be live-streamed on ZOOM andto Facebook, you to enjoyNOTE: with those household. ZOOM and Facebook, encouraging you to enjoy with those within your household.

* Registration hour before * Registration closescloses 1 hour1before start of start eventof event

WEEK 2

03 06


PMS 186

PMS Black C

RADIO 93.5 FM

design group inc. 201-51 Breithaupt St. Kitchener, ON E: info@lwdg.ca • www.lwdg.ca

CONCEPT

1A

Designs have been created using graphics and imagery for position only. LWDG inc. does not own or hold license for any of these images. All conceptual designs are the property of LWDG inc. until they are paid for in full.

DOCKET: 5037 DATE: DEC8/2015 CLIENT: Jukasa Radio ITEM: Jukasa Radio Logo FILE NAME: 5037_JukasaRadio_Logo_Concepts_V2.ai

DESIGN FILE


12

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Indigenous services minister sounds alarm over COVID 19 variants By Canadian Press TORONTO — Officials expressed growing concern Wednesday over highly transmissible new COVID-19 variants taking hold in Canada's biggest cities and in First Nation reserves across the country. Toronto's mayor, top doctor and emergency management boss announced they want the metropolis to remain under Ontario's toughest restrictions until at least March 9, two weeks longer than planned.

``I have never been as worried about the future as I am today,'' said medical officer of health Dr. Eileen de Villa. She said there are 56 cases with variants of concern _ predominantly the one first identified in the United Kingdom _ in Toronto, up from 33 a week ago. Another 283 cases have screened positive for being variants of concern and lab work is underway to make the final confirmation, de Villa added. She said the city faces

a ``deceptively dangerous situation,'' as overall daily case counts have been trending lower lately. ``Today's variant count is the tip of an iceberg,'' de Villa said. ``By the time the confirmed case counts are big enough to shock us, it will be too late to do anything. We will be in a third wave as bad as anything we've been through thus far.'' The top doctor in Peel Region, a COVID-19 hot spot west of Toronto, joined de Villa in asking Ontario's chief medical officer

of health for a two-week extension to the tougher rules. Ontario recorded 847 new infections Wednesday, along with 10 more deaths and 23 fewer people in hospital than the day before. New modelling out of Quebec suggests a more contagious COVID-19 variant could dominate in the Montreal area in a matter of weeks. As of Wednesday, there were 16 confirmed variant cases in Quebec, including 13 cases of the U.K. mutation, and another 135

Do You Have A Family Member Who Is Addicted to Drugs or Alcohol? Are You In Need Of Support?

Here are some requently asked questions that arise when trying to help amily or riends who are ighting substance use. Where can I go to get help with my family member who is addicted to alcohol/drugs? There are a few different places within our community where you can access services to help with a loved one who are affected by drug and alcohol addiction. The Six Nations Mental Health & Addictions Team offers walk-in services, addiction counseling, and groups such as Relapse Prevention and Wellbriety. The Youth Life Promotion and Children’s Mental Health and Addictions Programs provide children and youth aged 0-18 and their families with programs and services to support positive mental health, addictions support, pro-social skills, and connection to cultural knowledge and experiences.

When is this going to end, how can you make them realize they need to get help before they harm themselves? Drug and alcohol addiction is complex, and quitting usually takes a combination of the individual wanting to change along with a healthy support system. Drugs change the brain in ways that make quitting hard, even for those who are ready to better their lifestyle. There is no set timeframe on how long this will take for a person who is addicted. It could happen today, next month, or next year. ust remember that everyone is different, everyone is fighting their own fight, and not everyone is ready to change just yet.

What happened in his/her life to get them to this point? Did I fail him/her? Is it my fault? Everyone is different. A number of factors can come into play when talking about the root of these addiction issues and what could have happened in one’s life to cause this. Things such as underlying mental health problems, environment, development, historical trauma, grief, stress, and unhealthy coping can all contribute to the increased likelihood of substance use and addictive behaviors. When you realize that a person has reached your “rock bottom”, but not theirs, and you can’t help them anymore, how do you leave the door open for them to have some family life?  The best thing we can do to support ourselves and the active substance user  is to focus on getting support and education for ourselves. Setting clear and consistent boundaries for what is acceptable for us while expressing our love and interest in spending sober family time is important. Al-Anon family groups is a great resource to support and educate family members to be able to care for themselves without guilt and learn how to best support their loved ones with substance use issues. Self-care, personal and professional supports for the family as well as doing things we enjoy are all very important for us to manage our stress levels and effectively support others.

How do you help people who start using substances again after treatment? Relapse is the return to drug use after an attempt to stop. This could be an indication that different methods of treatment need to be explored. What it does not mean is that the individual has failed with regards to being on their healing journey. A relapse doesn’t mean that they’ll never walk down the path they prefer. But relapses are almost an inevitable part of any course of self-development.

Youth Life Promotion and Children’s Mental Health and Addictions Program 226-227-9271 18 Stoneridge Circle, Ohsweken

Mental Health and Addictions 519-445-2143 1769 Chiefswood Road, Ohsweken

suspected cases. Quebec added 14 more deaths from past dates, but no new ones, in its update. It reported 800 new infections and five fewer COVID-19 patients in hospital than a day earlier. In Ottawa, Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said he fears the prospect of variants taking hold in First Nation communities, where residents often live in overcrowded homes and have worse health outcomes due to several socio-economic factors. ``I don't think I can be any more concerned,'' Miller said. Miller said that, as of Tuesday, there had been more than 19,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases on First Nation reserves, nearly 1,400 of which were active. Active cases are one-quarter what they were a month ago, but Miller said ``these numbers continue to be alarming.'' He said the Prairie provinces, in particular, have had ``really scary spikes.'' ``It is no secret that the opening up of the economies at the end of the summer created that catalyst,'' Miller said. ``The science is showing that we're still very much at risk as a country and none more so than Indigenous communities, who have really, really fought and continue to fight overwhelming odds. ``The best way to see a

third wave is to ignore the science.'' New recommendations from the National Advisory Committee say all adults in Indigenous communities should receive a COVID-19 vaccine in the second stage of the immunization campaign to start this spring. Miller said vaccinations have started in 400 Indigenous communities. More than 83,000 doses had been administered as of Tuesday. Miller said vaccines have been delivered to about a quarter of the adult population in First Nations, Inuit and territorial communities, a rate that is six times higher than that of the general population. A shipment of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was delayed because of heavy snowfall earlier this week that temporarily closed operations of the shipping company UPS in Kentucky. Canada's doses of that vaccine are made in Belgium but are routed through the UPS air hub in Kentucky. Heath Canada said provinces could expect to receive shipments of the Pfizer-BioNTech product at least a day behind schedule, but all 400,000 doses should be in Canada by Friday. In Newfoundland and Labrador, which is under strict measures to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus, there were 44 new confirmed cases and 21 presumptive ones.

SIX NATIONS MOBILE CRISIS SERVICES

24/7 CRISIS PHONE LINE 866-445-2204 or 519-445-2204

LIVE CHAT (MESSAGING) Link on sixnationscovid19.ca under Crisis Support Live Chat

2 M / 6 FT

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers a 24/7 Crisis Line. A person seeking crisis support will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker.

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Live Chat crisis response. Live Chat or Instant Messaging is done on your computer over the internet. Live Chat (Messaging) is available Monday to Friday 8:30am - 4:00pm

TEXT MESSAGING

CONFIDENTIAL SERVICES

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Texting crisis response. Texting is available Monday to Friday from 8:30am - 4:00pm. A person seeking crisis support through text will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker and receive messages through text.

IF YOU HAVE A FEVER, COUGH AND DIFFICULTY BREATHING, The SixSEEK Nations MobileCARE CrisisEARLY Services is a MEDICAL confidential service offering crisis Stay home if you feel unwell. If support to Six Nations of the Grand River. youfeatures have a fever, coughaand The new run through program difficulty breathing, seek medical which offers safe and encrypted attention and callconversations in advance. technology to keep confidential and secure.

226-777-9480

Source: World Health Organization


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Notice of Submission of Environmental Assessment Biggars Lane Landfill Expansion, County of Brant The County of Brant has completed the environmental assessment (EA) for the Biggars Lane Landfill Expansion. As required under section 6.2(1) of the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act (EAA) and according to the Terms of Reference (ToR) approved by the Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) on May 15, 2015, the County of Brant has submitted its environmental assessment to the MECP for review and approval. The County is seeking EAA approval to increase the Biggars Lane Landfill disposal capacity to meet the County’s disposal requirements for the estimated 30-year planning period following the closure of the existing approved landfilling area. Biggars Lane Landfill is located in the County of Brant, Ontario, as shown below:

As required under the EAA, the environmental assessment will be available for public review and comment from February 15, 2021 to April 4, 2021. Due to the current closures of public spaces the environmental assessment is available for online public review at: https://www.brant.ca/en/resident-services/Solid-Waste-EnvironmentalAssessment.aspx Anyone wishing to provide comments on the environmental assessment must submit their comments in writing and/or by fax and/or by email to the MECP by April 4, 2021. All comments must be submitted to: Adam Sanzo, Project Officer Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks Environmental Assessment Branch 135 St. Clair Avenue West Toronto, Ontario M4V 1P5 Tel: 437-244-9402 Email: adam.sanzo@ontario.ca A copy of all comments will be forwarded to the proponent for its consideration. If you have any questions or if you or someone you know has any issues accessing the environmental assessment from the County’s web site, please contact: Matthew D’Hondt, C.E.T. Corporation of the County of Brant 26 Park Avenue, P.O. Box 160 Burford, Ontario NOE 1AO Tel: 519-449-2451 Fax: 519-449-3382 Email: SolidWasteEA@Brant.ca All personal information included in a submission – such as name, address, telephone number and property location – is collected, maintained and disclosed by the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks for the purpose of transparency and consultation. The information is collected under the authority of the Environmental Assessment Act or is collected and maintained for the purpose of creating a record that is available to the general public as described in s.37 of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Personal information you submit will become part of the public record that is available to the general public, unless you request that your personal information remain confidential. For more information, please contact the Project Officer at the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks. First Posted: February 11, 2021

13


14

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Commissioner calls for transparency on response to Indigenous women inquiry By Canadian Press MONTREAL — A commissioner who served on the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls implored the federal government for more transparency on its response to the final report's calls for change. Michele Audette's remarks came on Saturday during what she and other advocates described as a time when Indigenous women are facing heightened risks of violence in

the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. ``Tell us where you are at. Give us some information,'' Audette said at a news conference. Audette said she and her fellow commissioners took in the voices, tears, anger and hopes of families of women and girls over the course of three years, during which the inquiry held hearings across the country. Their final report was delivered to the federal government in June 2019

and included 231 calls for justice. While Audette said working groups have been formed to hash out a national action plan, it ``feels like it's taking forever.'' ``My patience is very thin,'' she said. A statement from the National Action Plan Core Working Group in December said work was underway to develop the strategy, including an accountability framework, in partnership with Indigenous Peoples. The Crown-Indigenous

department website also sites a list of actions taken to address violence against Indigenous women and girls. It includes a commitment to end drinking water advisories, funding for Indigenous languages and a counselling phone line for Indigenous people. Audette spoke during an online news conference with Indigenous leaders and activists ahead of the annual vigil for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls on Sunday.

The first memorial march took place on Valentine's Day in 1992 after Cheryl Ann Joe, a young Coast Salish mother, was murdered in East Vancouver. Jessica Quijano, project coordinator at the Native Women's Shelter of Montreal, said nearly 30 years of grass-roots activism hasn't been enough to instill the political will to make real changes across all levels of government. At the same time, she said, women and girls are

still facing significant levels of violence. ``It's not slowing down,'' she said. Amanda LaBillois, an Indigenous navigator at Medecins du Monde which helps people access healthcare, says the situation has worsened with the COVID-19 pandemic. Restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the virus have meant services for Indigenous communities are more difficult to access or have been cut altogether.

APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN FOR FALL 2021 519-445-0023 ext. 6226 admissions@snpolytechnic.com snpolytechnic.com

Apply Today!

VIRTUAL

OPEN

285C

HOUSE

PRE-REGISTER to WIN 1 of 20 $

100 Visa Gift Cards

SATURDAY March 27th 10am-3pm

285U

100K

DREAM

BIG! 90C 48M

300U

TER ONLIN EN E

Win $3, 000 F

OR

300U

*

TUITION AWARD

TO A C HAN C E

Have Questions? Visit niagaracollege.ca/recruitment to book a one-on-one session today.

300U

*Tuition award has no cash value and is applicable towards September 2021, Winter or Spring 2022 tuition fees. Photos depict campus activities that took place prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Niagara College is complying with public health safety measures and directives related to COVID-19. Visit niagaracollege.ca/covid19


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

15

Racist philosophy of residential schools also shaped public education By Hunter Knight, PhD Candidate, Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto Conservative leader Erin O'Toole issued a public apology in December: ``I said that the residential school system was intended to try and `provide education.' It was not. The system was intended to remove children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions and cultures.''He was referring to comments he made in a meeting with a Conservative club at Ryerson University, where he defended Egerton Ryerson in response to substantial debate and protest surrounding Ryerson's legacy.

O'Toole's apology gives us an opportunity to think about Ryerson's understanding of education and the purposes of schooling in a settler colonial society. As critics rightly noted, it is true that the primary objectives of residential schools were not to educate children. It is also true that these institutions were part of Ryerson's broader conception of schooling as key to what he foresaw as the evolution of Canada into a ``civilized'' white and culturally British nation. Ryerson designed a model for residential schools that was influential in shaping a system that amounted to cultural genocide. He is also credited for founding public schooling in Ontario. In 1847, the Department

of Indian Affairs asked for Ryerson's suggestions for a model for industrial schools for Indigenous children. His recommendations would influence the development of residential schools throughout Canada. Today, racism in mainstream schooling is an ongoing urgent problem as is school equity or inclusion for Black, Indigenous, low-income and disabled people. Project of national development Before he passed any major legislation, Ryerson's first initiative in his tenure was a report that served as a basis for the Common Schools Act of 1846. It illuminates the philosophy behind Ryerson's vision. Ryerson set up the project of schooling as one of

national development. This vision was understood in deeply colonial, racialized and hierarchical terms. He wrote: ``We should judge, not by what has been, or is, but what ought to be, and what must be, if we are not to be distanced by other countries in the race of civilization.'' Public schooling was understood as a venue through which children could do necessary work for their country's ``forward development.'' The framework for development here was as an extension of Enlightenment European philosophies of the world and humanity, which were posited as universal while being structured by ideologies of pseudo-scientific racism

CALL TODAY AND GET YOUR MEMBERSHIP.

and evolutionary thought. As Wynter explains, these philosophies emerged amidst efforts to rationalize and justify colonial practices and transatlantic slavery. Through this lens, advocates of colonial expansion argued that individual humans and races of people progressively develop from irrational, malleable subjects towards higher rationality and advanced scientific capabilities. As such, the state is an ultimate reflection of how advanced, or ``civilized,'' its people are. In this pseudo-scientific evolutionary philosophy, the ``rational, advanced, civilized'' subjects who deserve more power _ and are justified in inflicting colonial rule, violence and genocide on others _ are white European men.

MONDAY - THURSDAY: 5:30AM - 11:00PM • FRIDAY: 5:30AM - 9:00PM • SATURDAY - SUNDAY: 7:00AM - 5:00PM 3771 SIXTH LINE, OHSWEKEN, ONTARIO N0A 1M0 • PHONE: 905-765-1210 or INFO@PRO-FITHEALTHCLUB.COM PRO-FITHEALTHCLUB.COM

Justifying colonial violence, hierarchies For Ryerson, creating a framework for public schooling and also for residential schools was part of the same project of furthering Canada's development. The differentiated schooling he proposed was intended to serve those explicit aims, and the contrast in schooling methods and what Ryerson advocated (or did not advocate) for is stark. Ryerson described education in common schools as a ``charming passage,'' in which students were inspired towards lifelong learning and growth. In contrast, for industrial schools for Indigenous children, the model which the residential school system emerged from,


16

TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Trucker guilty of manslaughter By Canadian Press

J O B Position

B O A R D

Employer/Location

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Maintenance Housing Director of Care Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Intake and Crisis Response Worker Child & Family Services, Social Services Resident Support Attendant Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Intake Team Member Personal Support Worker (multiple positions) Registered Nurse – Charge Nurse Cultural Language Instructor Registered Practical Nurse Supportive Housing Case Manager Senior Financial Analyst Manager of Resources Support Staff Community Support Worker Personal Support Worker

Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Child Care Services, Social Services Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Finance, Central Administration Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Child Care Services, Social Services Community Support Services, Health Services Personal Support Services, Health Services Diabetes Education Program, Health Services Administration, Health Services

Registered Nurse – Diabetes Education Health Transformation Community Engagement Coordinator Urban Unit Assistant Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Cannabis Addiction Outreach Mental Health and Addictions, Worker (2 positions) Health Services COVID Response Nurse School Nurses, Health Services (multiple positions) Scheduler LTC/HCC, Health Services Registered Practical Nurse LTC/HCC, Health Services Community Educator Health Promotions, Health Services SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Casual Bus Driver’s GRETI, Ogwehoweh Skills and Trades Training Centre Children’s Mental Health Worker Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Policy Analyst Writer

Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

Term

Salary

Closing Date

Full-time Full-time Full-time Contract (6-month) Full-time Contract

TBD TBD TBD TBD

March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021

TBD TBD

March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021

Contract Full-time Full-time Contract

TBD TBD TBD TBD

March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021

Full-time Full-time Contract Part-time

TBD TBD TBD TBD

March 3, 2021 March 10, 2021 March 10, 2021 March 10, 2021

Contract (6-month) Contract (maternity) Contract

TBD

March 10, 2021

TBD

March 10, 2021

TBD

March 10, 2021

Full-time Contract

TBD TBD

March 10, 2021 March 10, 2021

Contract

TBD

March 10, 2021

Full-time Part-time Full-time

TBD TBD TBD

March 10, 2021 March 10, 2021 March 10, 2021

Part-time

$20.00$30.00/hour $47,641.50 $67,837.50 $47,641.50 $67,837.50 $21.25/hour TBD

On-going recruitment March 4, 2021

Full-time Contract

March 4, 2021

Peacekeepers Coordinator Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time March 4, 2021 Manager, Business Process Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time March 3, 2021 & Student Systems Development Officer – Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time TBD March 5, 2021 Institutional Advancement Health and Safety Officer Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time TBD March 2, 2021 Payroll/Personnel Grand River Enterprises Unknown TBD Until filled Administrator Assistant Security PM Shift Supervisor Grand River Enterprises Full-time TBD Until filled The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. For more positions in the surrounding area, visit our job board at www.greatsn.com! To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 2188230) or email us at info@greatsn.com. Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com

EDMONTON — A mother bent over and wept with other loved ones in an Edmonton courtroom Friday night as a jury declared a man guilty of manslaughter in the death of her daughter. Two trials and a decade after police were called to the bloody crime scene, Bradley Barton, a former trucker from Mississauga, Ont., was found responsible for the death of Cindy Gladue, a 36-year-old Metis and Cree woman at the Yellowhead Inn in 2011. Barton slouched and looked down as the jury revealed its decision following 10 hours of deliberations. Family and friends of Gladue held hands and cried after sitting through six weeks of graphic details of how the mother of three was left to die in

agony in a bathtub. ``We're happy. Justice has been served,'' Gladue's friend Kari Thomason said outside court. Lisa Weber, the lawyer for Gladue's mother, Donna McLeod, echoed that sentiment. ``In this case, we had a victim who was silenced and so she didn't have the opportunity to tell her side of the story,'' Weber said. ``This gives us some confidence that perhaps there is a chance you can have justice even though you were silenced.'' Gladue was someone who loved to cook and spend time with her three children, her friends said. Had she been alive, she would have had the chance to play with her grandchildren. ``So this is a victory for her children and grand-

children,'' Thomason said. In thanking the jury for its service, Court of Queen's Bench Justice Stephen Hillier acknowledged the graphic testimony heard over the course of the trial and urged members to lean on supports offered by the court. Barton, 52, testified that he arranged to pay Gladue for sex and was shocked when he woke the next morning to find her body. The Crown argued that Barton performed a sexual act on Gladue while she was passed out and, when she was bleeding profusely, dumped her in the tub. Medical experts told the trial that Gladue had four times the legal limit of alcohol in her system and she bled to death from a severe wound in her vagina.

Grand River Enterprises Employment Opportunities Accepting resumes for: · General Labourer (PM Shift) – Previous experience in a factory setting an asset; ability to perform hard physical labour; must be over 19 years of age; ability to work full-time. Specialized Opportunities: · Personnel Administrator (contract position) – Secondary School diploma required; HR and/or payroll experience preferred; proficient computer skills required; $20/hr (TBD). · Security Shift Supervisor (PM Shift) – Previous experience required; minimum Ontario “G” Class license, P.A.L. certification and police clearance check required; must be available to work 12-hour shifts, includes weekends and holidays; references required. · Security Guard – Previous experience preferred; minimum Ontario “G” Class license and police clearance check required; must be available to work 12-hour shifts, includes weekends and holidays. Applications are available at G.R.E. guard shack located at 2176 Chiefswood Rd. Please return your application and a current resume to the guard shack or by: Mail:

P.O. Box 760 Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0

Fax:

519-445-0516

Email: lhill@grandriverenterprises.com *Only successful candidates will be contacted.


February 24, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

17

Indigenous Diabetes Health Circle Programming MARCH 2021 IDHC Webinar Series

Frontline Worker Training

Self-Care, Covid-19 & Diabetes Thursday, March 11, 2021 1:00 p.m. – 2 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/idhc-webinar-registration20202021/

Virtual Programming Workshop for Front Line Workers Tuesday, March 16, 2021 1:00 p.m. – 2 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/virtual-programmingworkshop-registration/

Diabetes in Indigenous Communities Speaker: Dr. Lindsay Crowshoe Thursday, March 18, 2021 1:00 p.m. – 2 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/idhc-webinar-registration-drcrowshoe/

Foot Care Program

Oral Health & Diabetes Thursday, March 25, 2020 1:00 p.m. – 2 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/idhc-webinar-registrationoral-health/

Wellness Wednesdays

Virtual Workshops & Programs Gentle Yoga March 3, 10, 17, 2021 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Register here: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/m1mrsy2r0waek53/ Hatha Yoga Wednesday, March 3, 10, 17, 2021 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/m1mrsy2r0waek53/ Inspirational Speaker Series Wednesday(s) March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. and repeat at 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/inspirational-speakers-series Winter Foot Care Tips & Trekking Techniques Thursday, March 4, 2021 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/m1sxhu5k1ipy4gu/ Diabetes Information Circle Tuesday, March 9, 2021 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/idhc-virtual-diabetesinformation-circle/ Virtual Cooking Kitchen with Laura Thursday, March 11, 2021 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/virtual-cooking-kitchen-withlaura/ Family Wellness Scavenger Hunt Monday, March 15, 2021 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. Register: https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/m186mvd5168kgrq/

The Foot Care Program offers resources for personal foot inspections and basic daily foot care. Request a kit here: https://soadi.wufoo.com/ forms/foot-care-program-resource-request/ Every Wednesday a new recipe and cooking video from IDHC’s chef Laura Lenson goes live on our Facebook Page. Try out the recipe and send us your comments and pictures to Kathleen Laforme at dwcsouth@idhc.life for a chance to win a $25 gift card! Traditional Practitioner Schedule Wednesday, March 3 Dorothy Taylor Friday, March 5 Ed Sackaney Wednesday, March 10 Lisa Green Friday, March 12 Grandmother Renée Thomas-Hill Wednesday, March 17 Grandmother Renée Thomas-Hill Friday, March 19 Lance Logan-Keye Wednesday, March 24 Audra Maloney Friday, March 26 Valarie King Wednesday, March 31 Gail Whitlow To register and book a time to speak with an Elder-Practitioner, register at https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/traditional-healerregistration/ and book a time by contacting Gail Stup by phone, text or email at elderhelper@idhc.life or 289-241-9913. Visit us on Social Media for event listings, videos, news and resources. https://www.facebook.com/IDHCHealth/


18 37

TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

February 24, 2018 2021 NOVEMBER 28TH,

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituary

Obituary

In Loving Memory of Wilma Rosalind Langel (nee. Jamieson) March 9, 1931 - February 16, 2021

POWLESS: Byron Daniel August 28, 1989 February 15, 2021

Wilma passed away peacefully at her home at the Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay on Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at the age of 89. Wilma is predeceased by her beloved husband Charlie Langel. Devoted mother of Debra, Carolyn, Sandra, Reg and Paula Laforme and Robert Laforme (predeceased) all of Hamilton and step-mother of Mike. Cherished grandmother, great grandmother and great great grandmother of many. Predeceased by her siblings Lorne (Terri) Jamieson, Peggy Collins, Darlene Silversmith, George and Frank Jamieson. Survived by her sister Carol Doolittle. Will be missed by many nieces, nephews, great nieces, great nephews and friends. Cremation has taken place. In lieu of flowers  donations may be made to the Manitoulin Lodge or a charity of your choice.

Notice

Oneida Energy Storage Project Virtual Information Session Wednesday January 27, 2020 | 11AM & 1PM Join the live discussion about the Oneida Battery Storage Project. Ask questions and get real time responses from project representatives. Future sessions include: Feb 3, 10, 17 and 24. Register by email info@snfuture.ca https://linktr.ee/OneidaEnergyStorage

CLASSIFIED ADS Fjord Metal CAN NOW BE Roofing PLACED AT: Six Nations' Metal Roofing Specialist call or text 905-330-4123 or 519-774-9633

Free Estimate s

“Year round Installation” Puppies Wanted Survived by father Steve “Boots” Powless; siblings Steven (Catherine), Amanda, Greg, Andrew, and Michelle; special friend Jill Styres, and many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Predeceased by his mom Karen Nowegejick. A private visitation for immediate family was held. Arrangements by Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken. www. rhbanderson.com

Hill’s Snack Bar Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

Metal Roofing Services

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Puppies wanted for good families Please call Bob Johnston after 4pm at 289-377-9623

CLASSIFIED ADS STARTING AT $12.50 Stump Grinding Services


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

February 24, 2021 DECEMBER 19TH, 2018

CLUES ACROSS 1. Ancient Persian city 5. Spindles 11. Stake 12. Retrain 16. Close by 17. Commercial 18. One who publicly announces 19. American ballplayer 24. Junior’s father 25. Go up or climb 26. Concern 27. When you hope to get there 28. Iacocca and Oswald are two 29. Plant of the lily family 30. Male college organization 31. National capital 33. Raccoonlike animal 34. Symbols of fertility 38. Astronomy unit 39. Series of ridges in anatomy 40. Hebrew leader 43. A portent of good or evil 44. Supreme goddess 45. Gelatinous substance 49. Engage in a contest 50. Famed ballplayer Ruth 51. Pledge 53. -__, denotes past 54. Revival 56. Spanish surname 58. Gold 59. Elsa’s sister 60. Workplace 63. Large quantity of something 64. Engraved 65. Discount CLUES DOWN 1. Shoe

19 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you may be falling behind on keeping resolutions, but that is alright. It’s easy to get back on track once you set your mind to it. Ask a friend to keep you accountable.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, right now your mind is focused on “the more the merrier” but you have to find ways to safely connect with others. Keep everyone’s health in mind.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 It may have seemed like the last few months of 2020 flew by, Gemini. A new year provides a chance to restart, slow down and smell the proverbial roses.

2. Disquiet 3. Posture 4. Large nests 5. Soviet “Second Symphony” composer 6. Joins two pipes of different diameter 7. Exist 8. Overdose 9. Pleat of fabric 10. Predict the future 13. Burgeoning technology 14. Having made a valid will 15. Having no fixed course 20. __ route 21. Lethal dose 22. Indian musical pattern of notes 23. Athlete 27. Geological times 29. Atomic #21 30. In support of 31. Brew

Answers for February 24th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

32. Certificate of insurance 33. Taxi 34. Type of saying 35. For cigars 36. Phil __, former CIA 37. Local area network 38. Gym class 40. Philippine Island 41. Not great or bad 42. Eastern part of NY state 44. Gov’t lawyers 45. Constructions 46. Former British gold coin 47. Unkeyed 48. Rechristen 50. Threaten persistently 51. Southeast 52. Cools your home 54. Removes the leaves 55. Regretted 57. Thus 61. Relief organization (abbr.) 62. Exclamation of surprise

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 This week can prove to be epic if you just go with the flow a little bit, Cancer. Let others take the lead and simply follow along. You never know where things will lead.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, figure out how to align your priorities with what you do for a living. It could mean changing careers. Even though it may seem risky right now, start exploring the waters.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, some down time and R&R can do a body good. Ask your partner to cover for you and then reciprocate so you can both unplug and refresh. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, a midweek business proposition or a real estate endeavor may present itself. This could lead to some exciting changes for your family.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 You don’t mind defending your opinions or your ideals, Scorpio. In fact, you are highly skilled at constructive conversation. Your negotiation tactics may be put to the test. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 The early part of the week may be pretty uneventful, but things heat up as the week progresses, Sagittarius. You may not have time to do everything you desire.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Boredom isn’t a bad thing when you desire a respite, Capricorn. While others may be looking for ways to chase away cabin fever, you may be perfectly content snuggling in. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Unexpected partnerships can yield some amazing results, Aquarius. This may be the opportunity you are looking for at this juncture in your life. Push ahead for the time being.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, momentum swings in your favor and you can sail through all of your tasks and goals in record time. Enjoy the ride.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


TWO ROW TIMES

February 24, 2021

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated at 13:30pm Mon-Fri

Update as of:

2/23/21 13:30

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days? Date

New Lab confirmed

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

258 - 226 Total Cases

Total Resolved

Total Deaths

3

How many new people are becoming sick with COVID-19?

Active Cases

=

29

2/17/2021

1

2/18/2021

0

2/19/2021

6

2/20/2021

2

2/21/2021

5

2/22/2021

1

2/23/2021

0

Total (Last 7 days)

This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak is progressing over time.

Cumulative cases

20

10

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Date reported

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

15

How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total? 100

New Lab confirmed

20

50

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported

Sep 2020

Profile for tworowtimes

Two Row Times, February 24, 2021  

February 24, 2021

Two Row Times, February 24, 2021  

February 24, 2021

Advertisement