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THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY February 17, 2021 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory | FREE

Pandemic wellness series brings community together virtually DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

519-445-0088

It seems a lifetime ago when the community got together for events, mingling, chatting, eating, laughing, and yes, sometimes arguing, but always finding new and old and friends to connect with. The entire social fabric of the world has changed as the globe continues to battle the Covid-19 pandemic and all of its implications, physically, financially, spiritually and mentally. Business meetings, court appearances, health appointments, family get-togethers - things we all took for granted as a normal part of daily life - are now frequently conducted via technology, and the lack of physical connection is even more pronounced in a closeknit community like Six Nations. But on Family Day, there was a small sense of normalcy and connection again, after the first in a series of seven community wellness Zoom sessions brought out a feeling of connection among residents not seen in a long time. Organized by Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council and hosted by noted Cree speaker and entertainer Stan Wes-

Stan Wesley, pictured upper right, was host to the first of a Community Wellness Series, put on by Six Nations of the Grand River - a series of virtual community events to unify the Six Nations community and safe togetherness during the pandemic. PHOTO BY

TRT

ley, Monday's session was a virtual reminder of how important social connections are, as community members played trivia games and chatted during the live session streamed on elected council's Facebook page. It was a way to bring the community together during pandemic times, said SNGR Communications Officer Candace Lickers. Wesley began with an opening acknowledging "manitou" - the term for "spirit" among Anishinaabe peoples. "In a time like this when we can't see each other, we're hopeful of the spirit that surrounds us, but we're all here," said Wesley. "The spirit is here. Today will be our version of ceremony, thanks to manitou, thanks to spirit, thanks to all of your spirits coming together in this virtual forum." And although Monday

was celebrated as Family Day across much of the country, Wesley said it seemed like every day has been Family Day since the world shut down last March in response to the emerging pandemic. It's been an unprecedented year, he acknowledged, but noted that Indigenous people have surviced pandemics before and they will survive Covid-19, passing the strength gained from the experience on to the next generations, as their ancestors did before them. "Don't forget: our ancestors dealt with situations of sickness and illness and pandemics before. They've survived. They've told stories how they survived. And what are we doing now? We're surviving this pandemic and like our ancestors, we're going to come out of this telling some amazing stories. When our ancestors told stories about

their hardships, we felt strong. That strength is in our DNA" When stories of the pandemic are told to the next generation, they'll feel just as strong as we did when we heard those stories, said Wesley. "We're looking forward to the day this thing is over. We have so much to look forward to." Close to 30 people enjoyed the virtual gameshow Wesley hosted, asking questions such as "what is your favourite powwow food (the most popular answer was Indian Tacos)" and "what would be the movie title you would choose" to describe how they've dealt with the pandemic. One of the clever answers was, "50 Shades of Stay (At Home)," an example of the humour that Six Nations people are known for employing during difficult times. Wesley, who is not from Six Nations but moved to the community a year ago, chuckled at some of the answers when he asked for the popular slang terms used in the community, such as "bwoot," "heck innit," "skoden," and "stoodis." "You have sayings in this community that no other community in the world has," he said. Judging by the answer's to Wesley's question asking what people have

learned throughout the pandemic it's that they're going to be grateful for social interaction once more when it's safe for people to mingle together again. Community members said they missed sports events, hugs, travelling, live music and just being social with each other. "We have to acknowledge that not everybody is doing well. Some people are struggling out there. This is hard. I get it. Some people - their safe place isn't at home. And their safe person - they don't get to see that person. I acknowledge you. We all have good days and bad days." Others said they've learned they can live without going to the casino, that they enjoy their own company, they're learned to slow down and they're enjoying time with their families. In closing the trivia session, Wesley asked community members to provide personalized words of support for Six Nations' frontline workers. "We're just so thankful for their dedication and love to the community," said Wesley. Mohawk knowledge keeper Tom Porter will host the next community wellness series streamed live on SNGR's Facebook page. PM42686517


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LOCAL

February 17, 2021

keeping you informed.

COVID-19 outbreak on Six Nations claims another life STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

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Six Nations is suffering a signifigant COVID-19 outbreak with 44 active cases and 3 deaths. In looking at the weekly case rates per 100,000 as a way to level the playing field between communities, Six Nations currently has the worst case rate outbreak in all of Ontario with a case rate of 358 per 100,000. In contrast Toronto, which remains in a stay-at-home order, currently has a case rate of 86 per 100,000.

The OES Project is a proposed 250 MW / 1000 MWh battery storage facility that can withdraw, store, and inject energy into the grid on-demand, creating grid stability, ratepayer savings, and enhanced renewable energy efficiencies. SNGRDC and project partner NRSTOR is inviting the Six Nations Community to participate in an Investment Review of the proposed Oneida Energy Storage Project (The OES Project).

Six Nations Commentary Period: Jan 25 - Feb 25, 2021 Webinars will provide a full overview of the Oneida Energy Storage Project.

To learn more, attend a webinar or submit a question/comment, scan the QR Code below!

Attend a live webinar to raise questions for real time responses. Webinar Dates Wednesday, January 27 ∙ 11 AM & 1:00 PM Wednesday, February 3 ∙ 5 PM & 6:30 PM Wednesday, February 10 ∙ 11 AM & 12:30 PM Wednesday, February 17 ∙ 1 PM & 2:30 PM Wednesday, February 24 ∙ 7 PM & 8:30 PM

info@snfuture.ca www.snfuture.ca

Scan the QR Code and Select Register for a Webinar or email info@snfuture.ca.

OHSWEKEN — A raging outbreak of COVID-19 on Six Nations has claimed another life this week, bringing the total number of lives lost in the community to 3. Six Nations of the Grand River announced the member’s passing on Tuesday morning and issued condolences to the grieving family. The council says that due to the significant risk of community transmission, Six Nations will remain in a Black Alert lockdown despite surrounding areas in the re-opening. Haldimand-Norfolk and Brantford-Brant, the two regions that immediately surround Six Nations both transitioned to Orange Restrict in the province’s COVID-19 Response Framework. Outlying regions including Hamilton, Halton and Waterloo have transitioned to Red - Control while Niagara is being held in Grey - Lockdown.

Toronto, York and Peel will remain under stay-athome orders until February 22. SNGR issued a warning to community residents of an increased risk of transmitting COVID-19 on the territory after they were informed of community members travelling across the border and not following quarantine orders. Another warning was issued after longhouse ceremonies were conducted at Six Nations with hundreds of incoming non-residents in attendance who did not adhere to social distancing, handwashing or mask protocols. Six Nations currently has one of the worst outbreaks in the entire province with 44 active cases. Other communities of interest connected to Six Nations families include: Fort Erie, 26 active cases; Niagara Falls, 87 active cases; St. Catharines, 103 active cases; Akwesasne, 26 active cases; Oneida Nation of the Thames, 3 active cases; Tyendinaga, 2 active cases.

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February 17, 2021

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Argyle Street barricade removed DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

The four-month long closure of the main artery through Caledonia moved toward re-opening on Tuesday after Six Nations land rights supporters agreed to remove barriers put in place on the road last October. The move is being welcomed by Caledonia residents, as well as Six Nations residents, who say the detours around the road caused inconveniences and hurt local businesses. Skyler Williams, spokesperson for the Land Back movement in Caledonia, said the group decided to remove the barricades for the convenience of both Six Nations and Caledonia residents. "We wanted to make sure we were doing what we could to listen to the community," said Williams, adding that there is still a minority who

did not want to re-open the road. "We've made a decision that their convenience is important." Land Back Lane is the moniker for a former housing construction site in Caledonia known as McKenzie Meadows. In July 2020, a small group of Six Nations people and allies stopped construction of the 200-home subdivision, saying it sits on unceded Six Nations land. A number of Six Nations people and allies continue to maintain a presence at the site. Land Back Lane supporters shut down Argyle Street and the Highway Six bypass in October 2020 after Ontario Provincial Police attempted to arrest a Land Back Lane supporter. It was the latest in a string of arrests targeting Land Back Lane supporters for defying an injunction barring anyone from "trespassing" on the former housing development site. Dozens of supporters face numerous trespassing and mischief

charges in relation to the injunction. After the attempted arrest, Williams said police used rubber bullets against unarmed land defenders, who shut down the roads around the town in response and as a measure to protect them from further police violence. Williams said the removal of barricades is not a capitulation to the heavy OPP presence that remains around the town, nor continued pressure from politicians and townspeople, who are calling for them to vacate the Land Back Lane property on McKenzie Road. "Our resolve has never been stronger," said Williams. "But we are under no misconceptions. There is still a permanent injunction in place and we are doing all we can to fight that. But we are acutely aware that the police are going to mess with the peace that we've strived for since day one."

Schedule for March 2021

Gather the knowledge, tools, and structure for setting and fulfilling healthy lifestyle goals.

Mondays 1:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Tuesdays 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Introduction, Diabetes Awareness & Goal Setting Exercise: The Basics & Strength Yoga Benefits & Practice Make it Sacred: Healthy Mindful Eating Daily Mindfulness Practices Breath Awareness & Breathing Practices Benefits & Practice of Meditation & Relaxation Wellness Journal Offering, Wrap-up & Closing

Agádon’he’ I Am Full of Life March 2021 Eight-Part Virtual Wellness Program

Have you been making modest lifestyle improvements? IDHC invites 25 people who have begun a healthier lifestyle and are ready to commit to a journey of self-awareness and wellness in body, emotion, mind and spirit. This holistic program is ideal for those new to a deep calling to nurture holistic self-care.

How to Register REGISTRATION FORM includes eligibility criteria (due to the virtual platform and for safety purposes); if you meet the criteria, you will be prompted to complete your registration. REGISTRATION LINK https://soadi.wufoo.com/forms/mrj4mb11ekg8r7/ REGISTRATION DEADLINE Wednesday, February 24, 2021 REQUIRED ACCESSORIES Participants will require: journal or paper; pen or writing utensil; yoga mat; yoga block (kleenex box or roll of toilet paper will work); sturdy chair; cushion, bolster, or pillow; pair of light to moderate dumbbells (soup cans or water bottles will work)

Series Facilitated by Diabetes Wellness Worker Crystal Bomberry


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STAFF REPORT

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SIX NATIONS — First Responders executed a dramatic rescue on February 9 of a dog who fell through the ice on the Grand River. Dramatic video captured by Six Nations Fire and Emergency Services showed a two man rescue team: Firefighter Cameron Green and Acting Fire Chief Dereck Manitowabi hoisting the animal out of the frigid waters and back to safety. Six Nations of the Grand River Elected Council issued a statement, commending the community’s first responders and said the dog, known as Ted, was brought safely home to it’s owner. SNGR also issued a warning to community members that extreme caution should be used before approaching the

The heroes of Six Nations Fire and Emergency Services crew pose here with Ted the dog, who was reuinted with his owner after fallPHOTO BY SNGR ing through the ice on the Grand River.

river and any ice covered body of water in the community as the constant flow of water under the

surface creates unstable ice conditions.

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February 17, 2021

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OPINION

February 17, 2021

Follow the story on social media!

editor@tworowtimes.com

@tworowtimes

Column: Is Bill C-15 the New Smallpox Blanket RACHEL A. SNOW

editor@tworowtimes.com

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The political agenda of Trudeau’s government is clear, rushing through Bill C-15 as one of their top priorities because this will severely restrict the sovereignty of Indigenous Nations when it comes to self-determination. The Covid-19 pandemic has seen several attempts to curtail rights of Indigenous people. Whether through the limiting of rights of assembly and protest under the guise of “critical infrastructure defence” (legislated specifically against Indigenous people, in Alberta), or to the introduction of United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) Act after only six weeks of ‘engagement’ with select Indigenous ‘stakeholders’. This rushed legislation avoids substantial discussions on the implications of this legislation to Treaty and Inherent Rights of self-governance, proving that reconciliation is colonialspeak only. The government has still not learned that their paternalistic approach will only set off more legal actions and legislative rot. In 2016, the United Church of Canada adopted UNDRIP into their institutional framework. The United Church did not put it through sterilizing wrangling legal analyses thus changing UNDRIP into what they were willing to accept. Full adoption and implementation is ongoing work. The Government of Canada, on the other hand,

in its infinite wisdom wants to do the opposite. They are sifting through the articles in order to determine what they are willing to adopt as they water down the spirit and intent of the document. This is calculated. By rewriting UNDRIP into what the government says it is willing to accept, it is clouding the arguments and selling a new set of beads and trinkets to Indigenous leaders. Most, like the Assembly of First Nations, will dutifully follow suit because they know which hand has been feeding them, and which is broadly empowering their organization to act as the voice of Indigenous people without an actual mandate. But make no mistake, Bill C-15 is our new smallpox blanket. In Amherst’s smallpox germ warfare initiation, a biological weapon was used against the Indians at Fort Pitt in 1763 in an attempt to wipe them out during Pontiac’s War. This sickness eventually caused the death of millions and was our first encounter with this brand of nihilism and hatred. What we see today is the dual hit from a biological disease and the effects of a systemic inequality that significantly worsens the result. In our remote and on most reserve communities, families live in substandard conditions, often sharing households intergenerationally with Elders, adults and children all sharing space in aging homes without amenities or the basic income to conduct repairs and upkeep.

So we are being “locked down” in our communities that are dealing with the generational effects of substandard living conditions, high unemployment, restricted movement and lack of adequate resources and food security. This matters because while people are trying to put food on their tables and feed their children, grandchildren and Elders, they are unaware and unable to deal with the government’s attempts to curtail, eliminate and redefine their inherent First Nation Indigenous rights to govern themselves. Instead First Nation Indigenous people continue to be treated as wards of the state, unable to care for themselves: when in fact they have been systematically debilitated, disenfranchised and disempowered through a lack of representation and accountability of Federal Government defined “Indian” leadership. The kowtowing of First Nation Indigenous leadership in the Assembly of First Nations, lawyers, tribal governments, church bodies and bureaucrats in the departments of the federal government act on the same formula as those intermediaries who took the infested blankets from Captain Simeon Ecuyer and delivered them to the Indian people. As Commander William Trent noted: “…we gave them Two Blankets and a Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect.” (- W. Trent, May 24, 1763) This all means that Trudeau’s government, with his slapdash con-

Volume 8, Issue 27 Make advertising cheques payable to:

Garlow Media

sultation framework and legislative wrangling can effectively dictate how generations of Indigenous people will live after Covid, without ever having consulted actual people in the communities about what is being done. Once again, the intentions of those in power are assumed benevolent where there is every indication that this is setting up yet another line in the sand in the battle for our sovereignty. The smallpox infection of Bill C-15, much like the disease itself, will be handed-off to dupes willing to carry water for the Trudeau government, as it gets slammed through parliament while everyone is busy just trying to survive. This makes this process inherently one-sided, punitive and evil. One of our recourses, is to remain vigilant: to question “our leaders”, to guide with our advocacy and activism, to work toward educating the next generation in what we know today because they will need those tools to protect their children tomorrow. We know that our people, our Elders, and our ancestors relied on the guidance of the Great Spirit to maintain balance and harmony. The will of the Creator guides all our decision-making and understanding of the way things are and the things that are to come. This has helped us to survive in our times of greatest need, and we draw from that

stronghold today. It is encouraging to see more and more young people turning to those teachings in order to understand who they are, who we continue to be, as they seek to find purpose at this time. These lessons will echo throughout their lives. As they grow and as they learn our oral history and our cultural ways, they will find that having true First Nation Indigenous hearts is the best form of inoculation against the effects of colonialism, assimilation and despair. By knowing our people, knowing our history, knowing who we are and how we are meant to live, guided by the Creator, we will continue the proud legacy of governance and adaptation that has held us together despite all that we have been forced to survive. So while it would have been so much easier to just work with First Nation Indigenous people, to embrace the nation-to-nation doctrine of our people, the Trudeau government, and subsequent provincial governments including the Kenney government continue their work to destroy our people. We must maintain our integrity; listen to our Elders and those First Nation Indigenous who raise questions. We must speak for the land, or the land will be speaking to us. It is up to our people to right the fiasco for future generations and all life to survive.

JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

MISSOURI - A sacred white buffalo has been spotted in Missouri’s Ozark Mountains, a nature reserve of around 10,000 acres. The Buffalo population is estimated at 25 animals in total. Park rangers have named him Takoda, According to Dogwood Canyon director of wildlife Jeremy Hinkle, as published in Prevention Magazine, the blond coloured beast represents only one in 10,000,000 bison being born white.” “The phenomenon is becoming more common due to crossbreeding with cattle as a result of attempts by ranchers to save the species from extinction after original populations plummeted to only a few hundred between 1830 and 1900,” said Hinkle. “Takoda” is 100% Bison, however, one of a reported 50 alive today in a population of an estimated 400,000 Buffalo in North America. Native legend tells that the “White Buffalo Woman” appeared to the Lakota people around 2000 years ago. To some North American Native populations, the new calf represents goodwill and peace for Indigenous people.

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SIX NATIONS MOBILE CRISIS SERVICES 24/7 CRISIS PHONE LINE 866-445-2204 or 519-445-2204

LIVE CHAT (MESSAGING) Link on sixnationscovid19.ca under Crisis Support Live Chat

2 M / 6 FT

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers a 24/7 Crisis Line. A person seeking crisis support will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker.

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Live Chat crisis response. Live Chat or Instant Messaging is done on your computer over the internet. Live Chat (Messaging) is available Monday to Friday 8:30am - 4:00pm

TEXT MESSAGING

CONFIDENTIAL SERVICES

The Six Nations Mobile Crisis Services offers Texting crisis response. Texting is available Monday to Friday from 8:30am - 4:00pm. A person seeking crisis support through text will be connected with a Crisis Response Worker and receive messages through text.

IF YOU HAVE A FEVER, COUGH AND DIFFICULTY BREATHING, The SixSEEK Nations MobileCARE CrisisEARLY Services is a MEDICAL confidential service offering crisis Stay home if you feel unwell. If support to Six Nations of the Grand River. youfeatures have a fever, coughaand The new run through program difficulty breathing, seek medical which offers safe and encrypted attention and callconversations in advance. technology to keep confidential and secure.

226-777-9480

Source: World Health Organization

Maori lawmaker wins battle against ties By TRT Staff CHRISTCHURCH — An Indigenous lawmaker has won his battle against wearing a tie in the New Zealand Parliament, ending a longstanding dress requirement that he describes as a ``colonial noose.'' Rawiri Waititi, the co-leader of Maori Party, this week sparred over the dress code with Parliament Speaker Trevor Mallard, who has the job of enforcing the rules _ even though Mallard said he didn't personally agree with the necktie rule. Mallard had previously warned Waititi that he needed to wear a tie and then on Tuesday kicked him from the debating chamber after Waititi showed up wearing a traditional pendant around his neck called a hei tiki. ``I do not recognize the member, he will now leave the chamber,'' Mallard told Waititi, who responded by saying the issue wasn't about ties but about culture. ``This is a breach of the rights of Indigenous peoples,'' Waititi told reporters afterward. ``We have the right to practice our cultural identity.'' But by the following evening, Mallard had changed course. It happened after a committee

meeting during which lawmakers heard from Maori. ``The majority of the committee was in favour of removing the requirement for ties to form part of `appropriate business attire' for males,'' the speaker wrote in his explanation, adding that ties would no longer be required. Waititi hailed the change as a win for Maori and Indigenous people around the world. And with the rules loosened, several other male lawmakers followed his lead by not wearing ties on Thursday. Waititi, a father of five, surprised many people when he won a seat during last October's election and arrived in Parliament with a jovial but also uncompromising attitude, promising to fearlessly promote the rights of Maori. ``Mr. Speaker, Maori have had enough of being assimilated and forced to do and look like everyone else,'' Waititi told lawmakers during his opening speech in December. ``We are not like everyone else. We are unique. Being Maori is like having superpowers. There is no-one else in the world like us, and we need to maintain who we are.''

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Anthology highlights musician Willie Dunn By TRT Staff TORONTO — A new anthology of music from late Indigenous singer-songwriter Willie Dunn is hoping to set the record straight on ``one of Canada's unsung musical heroes.'' Light in the Attic, a Seattle-based music label, says it's planning to release a remastered collection of 22 songs that serves as a ``definitive overview'' of the Montreal-born artist, who is of mixed Mi'kmaq and Scottish/Irish background. ``Creation Never Sleeps,

Creation Never Dies: The Willie Dunn Anthology,'' due on March 19, will bring together unreleased and rare recordings, photos and interviews with the musician. Dunn launched his music career in the 1960s alongside Buffy Sainte-Marie, A. Paul Ortega, and Floyd Westerman, but his far-reaching influence only started to receive greater recognition in the years after his death in 2013. His song ``Charlie,'' which appears on the upcoming album, is consid-

ered to be the first piece of music that told the story of Chanie Wenjack and the residential school system. The track was released in the early 1970s, decades before Gord Downie made it the focus of his ``Secret Path'' project. Dunn was also a filmmaker whose ``The Ballad of Crowfoot'' short film is ``often referred to as Canada's first music video,'' according to the National Film Board. Organizers of the Prism Prize, which celebrates Canadian music video cre-

ators, named its trailblazer award after Dunn last year to recognize his influence on the medium. The new anthology album goes a step further in putting Dunn's cultural influence on display. The collection will offer space for perspective from other Indigenous creators, among them acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin. Liner notes will be written by Kevin Howes, who contributed to the label's previous collection ``Native North America, Vol. 1.''


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February 17, 2021

Ottawa to define "prior consent" through dialogue with First Nations CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

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Ottawa can build a shared understanding of free, prior and informed consent with First Nations, Metis and Inuit into a new law to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Justice Minister David

Lametti said Thursday. ``From Canada's perspective, free, prior and informed consent is about self-determination, respectful two-way dialogue and meaningful participation of Indigenous Peoples in decisions that affect you, your communities, and your territories,'' Lametti said at a virtual forum organized by the Assembly of First Nations to discuss

the proposed law. The Liberal government introduced the long-awaited legislation, Bill C-15, in December after a previous version of the bill died in the Senate ahead of the 2019 election. It spells out the need for consent from Indigenous Peoples on anything that infringes on their lands or rights, such as major resource projects, but does

not define consent. The proposed law would require the federal government to work with First Nations, Metis and Inuit to do everything needed to ensure Canadian law is in harmony with the rights and principles in the UN declaration, which Canada endorsed in 2010. Lametti said the UN declaration and C-15 are fundamental contributions

to the government's work to advance reconciliation and tackle deep-rooted discrimination and racism. Judith Sayers, president of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council in British Columbia, said free, prior and informed consent is vital to First Nations to protect their territories. ``We hear from the prime minister and here in B.C. from the premier

Notice of Public Information Centre (Online) Highways 6 & 401 Improvements from Hamilton North Limits to Guelph South Limits Detailed Design and Class Environmental Assessment (G.W.P. 3042-14-00)

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) continues to move forward with the Detailed Design and Class Environmental Assessment for improvements to Highway 6 and Highway 401 (G.W.P. 3042-14-00), located in the Township of Puslinch, Wellington County, and the City of Hamilton (the Project). Building on the approved Individual Environmental Assessment, this study is being completed in accordance with the requirements of a Group ‘A’ project under the MTO Class Environmental Assessment for Provincial Transportation Facilities (2000). Additional information can be found on the Project website at highways6and401hamiltontoguelph.ca The Project includes: • A new controlled access four-lane alignment of Highway 6 west of the existing highway, from Highway 6 at Maddaugh Road northerly to Highway 401; • Improvements to the Highway 6 / Maddaugh Road intersection; • Structures to carry CP Rail, Calfass Road and Concession Road 1 across the new Highway 6 alignment; • A new two-lane connection road north of the community of Morriston, linking the existing and new alignments of Highway 6; • Reconfiguration of the Highway 401 interchanges at Highway 6 / Wellington Road 46 (Brock Road), and at Highway 6 (Hanlon Expressway); • Widening of approximately 6 km of Highway 401 to 10 lanes including managed lanes from west of Hanlon Expressway to east of Highway 6 / Wellington Road 46 (Brock Road); • Replacement of the Hanlon Expressway intersection at Wellington Road 34 with a bridge (no connection to the highway); • Closure of the Hanlon Expressway intersection at Maltby Road / Concession Road 4; • A new Hanlon Expressway interchange approximately midway between Wellington Road 34 and Maltby Road / Concession Road 4 linking Wellington Road 34 on the west side of the Hanlon Expressway to Concession Road 7 on the east side of the Hanlon Expressway; • Reconstruction of Concession Road 7 between Maltby Road and Wellington Road 34; and, • Reconfiguration and expansion of the Wellington Road 46 (Brock Road) commuter parking lot.

PUBLIC INFORMATION CENTRE #1 (ONLINE) A Public Information Centre (PIC) is being held online through the Project website. The purpose of this PIC is to reintroduce the Project as well as present an overview of the approved plans, the Environmental Assessment study process and the Detailed Design work that has been completed to date. The Project Team welcomes your input. The PIC materials will be available online as follows: Where: highways6and401hamiltontoguelph.ca Date: February 24th – March 10th, 2021 A PIC Comment Form will also be available online providing the opportunity to ask questions or submit comments on the PIC material. Questions will be answered by the Project Team. If you require further information regarding the Project, would like to participate but do not have access to the internet, or have accessibility requirements in order to participate in this virtual PIC, please contact the Project Team at the contact information provided below or by emailing the Project Team at ProjectTeam@Highways6and401hamiltontoguelph.ca Sarah Jewell, P.Eng, M.Eng MTO Project Engineer Ministry of Transportation 659 Exeter Road London, ON N6E 1L3

Tim Sorochinsky, P. Eng Consultant Project Manager AECOM 30 Leek Crescent, 4th Floor Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4N4 tel: 905-418-1475

Comments are being collected to assist MTO in meeting the requirements of the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act. Information collected will be used in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record. If you have any accessibility requirements in order to participate in this Study, please contact one of the Project Team members listed above.

and minister of Indigenous relations that (free, prior and informed consent) does not mean a veto,'' she said. ``But I'm not sure what consent means if it's not yes or no.'' Sayers said the right of free, prior and informed consent cannot be read by itself because there are many sections in the UN declaration that talk about Indigenous Peoples' rights to own, manage and use resources in their territories. ``If we don't have the right to say yes or no to development, those areas can be destroyed. And our relationship also will be destroyed,'' she said. Lametti said free, prior and informed consent isn't simply about resources. It's about having a consensual and informed relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. ``It touches upon all the other aspects of the declaration and about our relationship. And we need to, frankly, just get it better,'' he said. ``It hasn't been done in the past, and that's one of the real vestiges of colonialism, that's still exist in such a wide variety of sectors.'' Lametti said his view of free, prior and informed consent is that ``you try to get to yes, and you do that through dialogue.'' He said good resource projects will only go forward it they have consent from Indigenous Peoples, where a dialogue has been respected. Lametti said a number of leaders in the resource industry are realizing that dialogue with Indigenous Peoples is not only the best way forward, but it is the only way forward. ``There's a great deal of positive energy with respect to putting free, prior and informed consent into practice as a process.'' He said Indigenous people should be involved in the development of their land and that he is ``optimistic'' this will end up making ``the idea of a veto meaningless, in the sense that projects will only move forward, where there is that kind of that level of collaborative collaboration between whoever is involved.''


TWO ROW TIMES

February 17, 2021

60% of Indigenous workers feel emotionally unsafe on the job: Catalyst survey CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

TORONTO — As Krystal Abotossaway navigated corporate Canada over the last decade, the Toronto woman with Anishinaabe Kwe heritage always paid always took care to be on time, to watch her drinking at after-work events and to be agreeable in meetings. ``I didn't want to show when I was angry or that I disagreed with my peers,'' said Abotossaway, TD Bank Group's senior manager of diversity and inclusion and the president of the Indigenous Professional Association of Canada. ``I didn't have the same privilege as non-Indigenous people and I was aware of it.'' Those decisions were her way of staying ``on guard'' _ something many Indigenous workers in Canada say they must do to protect themselves from biases and discrimination at work, a study released Wednesday found. The report from equity organization Catalyst Canada says about 52 per cent of the 86 Indigenous people surveyed are ``on guard'' at work and about 60 per cent feel psychologically unsafe on the job. The study was based on a survey of 820 Canadian workers from various underrepresented groups, but Catalyst isolated results from Indigenous respondents for this report because their need to feel on guard was so significant. The report, which interviewed Indigenous people from the C-Suite all the way to down to non-management roles, found the majority experience an ``emotional tax'' _ a feeling of being different from peers at work because of

gender, race or ethnicity, which can affect a person's well-being and ability to thrive. ``Indigenous people in Canada, especially women, continue to face some of the workplaces' most entrenched hurdles, including bias and discrimination that impact their health, well-being, and ability to progress,'' said Vandana Juneja, Catalyst Canada's executive director, in a statement. Her survey uncovered that only four in 10 Indigenous workers feel safe enough to make mistakes and take risks without being penalized. Indigenous employees who don't feel psychologically safe are less likely to report a sense of belonging or being valued for their uniqueness, speak up when something isn't right and be able to share their creativity at work, said Catalyst. That feeling of lacking safety doubles when gender is taken into account. About 67 per cent of the Indigenous women surveyed _ that's two of every three _ reported that they feel the need to be ``on guard'' at work, in comparison to 38 per cent of Indigenous men. ``As a woman, there is definitely always a need to prove you deserve to be there,'' said Tabatha Bull, an engineer and chief executive at the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business. She finds Indigenous workers often feel torn between being true to themselves and ignoring colleagues' unconscious biases, so they can seem amenable to corporate culture. That's why some Indigenous workers will stay ``on guard'' and not complain when colleagues refer to meetings as powwows or use idioms such as ``too many chiefs and not enough

Indians.'' ``There's only so many times that you can raise your hand and say that's not appropriate,'' said Bull. She wishes more people would take a moment to think about who they are listening to in meetings and what speakers' comments make them avert their attention. There's a good chance the exercise will expose a bias, she said. Managers, she added, also have a duty to think about who rarely speaks up in their departments and consider whether that's because they may be ``on guard'' or carrying an emotional tax. Meanwhile, Abotossaway believes the emotional tax can be conquered if workplaces help to educate people about Indigenous history and correct misrepresentations that popular culture has generated. A hard look at why people with Indigenous heritage are under-represented on Bay St. despite comprising almost 5 per cent of the country's population is also needed, she said. ``We're not really represented in a lot of different fields like law and consulting and finance. And there are big employers there and a lot of really amazing careers there,'' she said. Abotossaway took on the role as president of the Indigenous Professional Association of Canada because she is anxious to help more Indigenous people find a sense of community, especially if they've left reserves or rural towns for big cities where they have fewer connections. Being able to draw on the organization's network and connect with people who have faced challenges like hers has helped her professionally, where she finds the need to be ``on guard'' has been melting away.

11

County of Brant OPP blotter JIM WINDLE

jim@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

COUNTY OF BRANT County of Brant Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) were alerted to a vehicle on February 13, 2021 at approximately 1005 p.m. on Brant Road in the County of Brant. County of Brant OPP initiated a traffic stop and conducted an investigation. They found that driver was impaired by

alcohol. As a result of the investigation police have charged the driver William PELTON 59-years-old of The County of Brant with the following offenses contrary to the Criminal Code of Canada: Operation while impaired by alcohol or drug, Operation while impaired - blood alcohol concentration 80 plus. The accused will appear in the Ontario Court of Justice in Brantford at a later date to answer to the charges. If convicted, the offender will

be subject to the Criminal Code penalties, including a fine or jail time, and a driving prohibition. The OPP has created a framework to support those individuals suffering from substance use disorder, while holding drug traffickers who cause these overdoses accountable. Since 2016, the OPP has investigated 23 occurrences where charges have been laid for Manslaughter and/ or Criminal Negligence Causing Death in relation to fatal overdoses.

SIX NATIONS POLICE Constable - Contract Position Applications for a contract position for Constable with the Six Nations Police are now being called for. All applicants must fill out a standard application form available at the Six Nations Police Station. CRITERIA for applicants are as follows: Minimum Requirements to be considered for a career in First Nations Policing with the Six Nations Police Service, you must: -

Be 19 years of age or over and able to provide an official birth certificate or proof of age; Be physically and mentally able to perform the duties of the position having regard to your own safety and the safety of members of the public Have successfully completed at least 4 years of Secondary School education or its equivalent (official transcripts and diplomas will be required) Be of good moral character and habits, meaning that you are an individual other people would consider being trustworthy and having integrity, with no criminal record; certified by a physician to be fit for duty as a front line Six Nations Police Constable and able to pass physical tests which are required in the recruiting process Possess a valid driver’s license with no more than 6 accumulated demerit points, permitting you to drive an automobile in Ontario with full driving privileges Be able to pass a security clearance as well as background investigation, credit card and reference checks

If you have any criminal convictions under a Federal Statute you must obtain a pardon. Special Requirements – for the Six Nations Police Service, in order to address the unique and at times urgent needs of the Six Nations of the Grand River Community and Haudenosaunee culture, additional requirements include: -

Extensive knowledge of the unique social dynamics of the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory A sound understanding of Haudenosaunee culture, customs, traditions and social political issues of the Six Nations of the Grand River Six Nations of the Grand River Band Membership/Citizenship and residency is considered a preferred asset and Membership or extensive working experience with any Indigenous Nation will also be considered an asset

Desirable Qualifications: · Six Nations Band member preferred Assets: · Previous policing related experience · Law and security courses, etc. Closing Date: Applications must be received by 3:00 p.m. Friday, February 19, 2021 Applications in complete form are to be mailed or hand delivered to: Six Nations Police P.O. Box 758 2112 4th Line Road Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Attention: Policing Administrator For further information, please contact the Policing Administrator at 519-445-4191.

CALL TODAY AND GET YOUR MEMBERSHIP.

MONDAY - THURSDAY: 5:30AM-11:00PM • FRIDAY: 5:30AM-9:00PM • SATURDAY-SUNDAY: 7:00AM-5:00PM 3771 SIXTH LINE, OHSWEKEN, ONTARIO N0A 1M0 • PHONE: 905-765-1210 or INFO@PRO-FITHEALTHCLUB.COM PRO-FITHEALTHCLUB.COM


12

TWO ROW TIMES

February 17, 2021

Closing housing gap for urban Indigenous people will cost billions CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

OTTAWA — The federal government would have to spend about $1.4 billion more a year to close a housing gap facing urban Indigenous people, the parliamentary budget officer says in a report that hints at the scale of a promised federal strategy to address the issue. The cost in the report would be at the upper end of a range that starts

at $159 million annually, depending on what percentage of construction costs and rent subsidies the government wants to cover. As is, the Liberals' decade-long national housing strategy explicitly allocates $179 million per year to Indigenous housing in urban, rural and northern areas, the PBO calculated. The Liberals bill the cost of the strategy at over $55 billion, which includes spending to help offset mortgage costs for

first-time homebuyers, as a key avenue to help ease a housing crunch for hundreds of thousands of households. Nationally, about 124,000 Indigenous households are in core housing need, the PBO report estimated, meaning they live in units that stretch them financially, need hefty repairs, or are not large enough for their families. The budget office's calculation estimated the annual gap between what those households pay and

the housing costs deemed affordable by a federal housing agency to be $636 million. The federal Liberals have promised to create an urban Indigenous housing strategy, with details expected in this year's federal budget. Already, Liberals have been out touting coming spending to meet a promise made during the 2019 federal election campaign and sprinkled into multiple ministerial mandate letters. The Liberals have

SIX NATIONS JUSTICE DEPARTMENT ARE YOU INTERESTED IN KNOWING WHAT PROGRAM SERVICES ARE BEING OFFERED THROUGH THE SIX NATIONS JUSTICE DEPARTMENT— CHECK BELOW FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESENTATION VIA ZOOM. *************************** Indigenous Victim Services March 2nd at 2 pm *************************** Bail Verification & Supervision March 3rd at 2:00 pm Please send an email to lisafisher@sixnations.ca to register and to obtain the zoom link. She will need your name and email for each presentation you are interested in attending.

spoken about funding for urban Indigenous housing providers as the missing piece of the national housing strategy, having already provided funding for on-reserve housing. More than half of Indigenous households living in inadequate homes reside in the country's biggest cities, with Winnipeg housing the highest number based on the PBO's estimates, followed closely by Vancouver. The report from budget office provides an idea of how much spending the Liberals would have to add to the national housing strategy, depending on how much of the housing and affordability gap the government wants to close. Budget officer Yves Giroux said the gap is unlikely to shrink, pointing to relatively hot housing markets across the country, despite the pandemic, and demographic factors: Indigenous populations have recently grown faster than non-Indigenous people. ``These two factors suggest that the numbers to plug the affordability gap are likely to go up rather than down,'' he said. That could change if Indigenous households gain a larger foothold in the labour market and see their incomes rise, Giroux said, ``but it's not what we are seeing in the last

several years.'' Indigenous households are one-and-a-half times more likely to be in housing need than non-Indigenous households, Giroux noted, with an average annual gap of $5,000 between what they should and do pay for adequate housing. The situation is even more acute in the North, with Inuit households almost two-and-a-half times more likely to live in inadequate or unaffordable housing. Part of the gap has to do with the adequacy requirement that the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation uses to define ``core housing need,'' which looks at how many rooms are needed depending on family size. Indigenous families tend to be larger than non-Indigenous households, and census data has shown that multiple Indigenous families can be living under one roof in overcrowded homes. A parliamentary committee researching urban Indigenous housing issues commissioned Giroux's report released Thursday. The House of Commons committee is expected to soon release its report, which would lay the foundation for a federal program.

*************************** Restorative Justice March 4th at 2:00 pm *************************** Community Standards

March 5th at 2:00 pm ***************************

Department Office Hours: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Six Nations Justice Department—226-227-2192

DR. ANNETTE DELIO OPTOMETRIST New Patients Welcome! 345 Argyle Street South Unit #104 Caledonia, ON N3W 1L8 Phone: 905-765-4362(iDOC) Fax: 905-765-1362 E-mail: reception@drdelio.ca Web: www.drdelio.ca

Hours Monday to Friday: 9:00am – 7:00pm Saturday: 9:00am – 4:00pm Sunday: Closed By appointment only


TWO ROW TIMES

February 17, 2021

J O B

B O A R D

Position Employer/Location Term Salary SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Manager of Resources Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services Contract (6 months) TBD Registered Nurse Diabetes Education Program, Health Services Contract TBD Community Support Worker Community Support Services, Health Services Part-time TBD Anti-Bullying Task Force Lead Child and Youth, Health Services Contract TBD Support Staff Child Care Services, Social Services Contract TBD Child and Family Well-Being Administration, Health Services Contract TBD Project Coordinator Health Transformation Administration, Health Services Contract TBD Policy Analyst Indigenous Transition Facilitator LTC/HCC, Health Services Full-time TBD Gedeo’ Clinician – Mobile Crisis Community Crisis, Health Services Full-time TBD Rapid Response Team Covid Response Nurse School Nurses, Health Services Contract TBD (multiple positions) Archaeological Community Archaeology, Lands and Resources Contract TBD Monitor (6 positions) Human Resources Coordinator Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD Family Services Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD Child and Youth Services Worker Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD Intake Worker (2 positions) Ogwadeni:deo. Social Services Full-time TBD Registered Early Childhood Child Care Services, Social Services Full-time TBD Educator (multiple positions) Personal Support Workers Personal Support Services, Part-time TBD (2 positions) Health Services Site Support Worker Health Promotions, Health Services Part-time TBD Maintenance Housing Full-time TBD Director of Care Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD Intake and Crisis Response Worker Child & Family Services, Social Services Full-time TBD Resident Support Attendant Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract (6-month) TBD Intake Team Member Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD Personal Support Worker Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD (multiple positions) Registered Nurse – Charge Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD Cultural Language Instructor Child Care Services, Social Services Full-time TBD Registered Practical Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD Supportive Housing Case Manager Mental Health and Addictions, Contract TBD Health Services Senior Financial Analyst Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Casual Bus Driver’s GRETI, Ogwehoweh Skills and Part-time $20.00Trades Training Centre $30.00/hou Children’s Mental Health Worker Mississaugas of the Credit Full-time, $47,641.50 First Nation permanent $67,837.50 Onkweshona Development Coach The Everlasting Tree School Full-time $58,000 Occasional Support Staff The Everlasting Tree School On-call TBD People Development Coach The Everlasting Tree School Full-time TBD Kanen’shon’a Early Years Team The Everlasting Tree School Full-time TBD BRANT COUNTY, KW REGION, LONDON Substitute Teacher Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Contract TBD

Closing Date

February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 17, 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 February 24 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 March 3, 2021

GRAND RIVER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION OFFICE 2021 DEADLINE CALENDAR for Feb. 1st

Application Deadline for Summer semester Apply on-line! Fall Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Winter course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due.

May 1st

Application Deadline for Fall or Fall/Winter semester(s) Apply on-line! Winter Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Summer course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due.

March 3, 2021 On-going rrecruitment February 18, 2021 Until filled Until filled Until filled Until filled

On-going recruitment AQ Course Developer Six Nations Polytechnic TBD TBD February 22, 2021 Officer Cleaner Brantford Native Housing Part-time TBD Until filled The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. For more positions in the surrounding area please visit our website: www.greatsn.com. To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn.com. Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

13

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com

11:59 pm May 1st to 9 am July 1st - The On-line Application on the GRPSEO Website is not available. Aug 1st

Official transcripts are due from students funded for any of the three previous application periods (Summer/Fall/Winter). For all APPROVED FALL applications - Any documentation that was requested by the Funding Advisor to be submitted to GRPSEO by August 1, (as outlined in the “Check List of Required Documentation” form provided to the applicant), and not received by this deadline date will result in CANCELLATION of the approved application and loss of funding.

Oct. 1st

Application Deadline for Winter semester – Apply on-line! Summer Marks/Progress Reports due for all continuing students. Levels 3 & 4 (Master or Ph.D. students) provide Letter of Good Academic Standing. Fall course registration/timetable and detailed tuition fees due.

STUDENTS MUST APPLY ON-LINE BY SPECIFIED DEADLINE. LATE APPLICATIONS CANNOT BE SUBMITTED AFTER THE DEADLINE. Please, check the local newspapers, our website at www.grpseo.org FaceBook or give us a call at (519) 445-2219 for more information.

EDUCATION…A PATH TO TOMORROW


14 37

TWO TWOROW ROWTIMES TIMES

February 17, 2021 NOVEMBER 28TH, 2018

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituary

Obituary

Card of Thanks

Logan: Eva nee: Thomas

MONTURE: Patsy Ann

Nyá:węh/Thank you

It is with great sadness the family of Eva Logan announce her passing on Monday, February 15, 2021 at the age of 73 years. Eva was the beloved wife of the late Roger Logan. Dear mother of Kim & Troy, Ed & Kim. Grandmother of Steve, Valen, Ivy, Kristen, Brady, Kwincey, Brianna and Kessa. Great grandmother of Natalia, Alivia, Rosie and Lewis. Sadly missed by her sisters-in-law Winnie Thomas, and Ivadell Keye Logan; brothers-in-law, Robert (Shirley) Logan, Wilfred Logan, and Ivan Thomas and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by grandson Leland; parents, Gilbert & Mabel (Turkey) Thomas; sister, Janice Williams; brothers Eddie and Carmen Thomas; father-in-law and mother-in-law Josie & Verna (Kick) Logan; sister-in-law, Garnet Thomas; and brothers-in-law Irvin (Verna) and Ben Logan. The family will honour her life with visitation at Hyde & Mott Chapel of R.H.B. Anderson Funeral Homes (2020) Ltd., 60 Main St. S., Hagersville on Wednesday from 2-6 pm. (must follow Covid 19 restrictions). A family funeral service will be held at Onondaga Longhouse on Thursday, February 18, 2021. www.rhbanderson.com

It is with deepest sorrow that we announce the loss of Patsy Ann Monture (General). Loving mother to Sherry (Tony), Johnny (Lori), Rock (Mike). Grandmother to Sherisa (Den), Tia (Tyler), Tamara (Jay), Katie (Tyler), Rylan, John Boy (Shanda), Havana. Deeply loved by 15 great grandchildren and 1 great great granddaughter. Loving sister to Jean (Leslie) Carpenter, Norma (Leonard-deceased) Lickers. Predeceased by parents Hazel Burning and Benjamin General. Sister Mae (Donald) Hess, brothers Maynard (Velma) General, Willard “Yago” (Vera) General. Grandsons Dustin and Dayts. Also survived by many nieces and nephews, cousins, and friends. A private visitation for immediate family will be held at her home, 2119 3rd Line on Saturday, February 13th. Pat will be resting at her home until her funeral service on Sunday, February 14th at 2pm. Intermittent will be held at Bethany Baptist Church. Those who plan to attend, please adhere to COVID-19 regulations. Masks are mandatory. Arrangements by Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken. www.rhbanderson.com

In the early morning hours on January 29, our beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and uncle, Clarence Everett Jacobs, was called home by the Creator. Our family wishes to express our sincere appreciation for all the caring thoughts, expressions of sympathy and support received from family, friends and neighbours, during his illness journey and at the time of his passing. Nyá:węh/Thank you to each of you for the prayers, cards, monetary and food donations, flowers, phone calls, social media postings, errands and donations to Lower Cayuga Longhouse Building Fund. Thank you to the staff at Joseph Brant Hospital 400 South ICU 200 staff for the complex care he needed, and to West Haldimand General Hospital Emergency Department. Special thanks to Veronica Pell, Social Worker, and Marie Jones, Aboriginal Navigator, for their caring support in helping us cope and to keep connected with him throughout his hospital stay. Nyá:węh to speaker Cam Hill, Eileen and family for arranging his clothes, Arnold, Everett, Leland and Robert for cemetery arrangements and Miran Hill for making his casket and head board. We sincerely appreciate the guidance, caring and support from Bill Lofthouse and his team at RHB Anderson Funeral Home, throughout the entire special funeral proceedings.

Hill’s Snack Bar

Nyá:węh/Thank you to all, Ruby Cheryl, Leland, Cali, Alexis Everett, Sarah, Izaak, Haven, Oceanna Summer, Kelvin

Stump Grinding Services

Metal Roofing Services

Fjord Metal Roofing Six Nations' Metal Roofing Specialist call or text 905-330-4123 or 519-774-9633

Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

“Year round Installation”

ALL DAY BREAKFAST

Free Estimates

Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Notice Oneida Energy Storage Project Virtual Information Session Wednesday January 27, 2020 | 11AM & 1PM Join the live discussion about the Oneida Battery Storage Project. Ask questions and get real time responses from project representatives. Future sessions include: Feb 3, 10, 17 and 24. Register by email info@snfuture.ca https://linktr.ee/OneidaEnergyStorage


TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES TWO

February 19TH, 17, 2021 DECEMBER 2018

CLUES ACROSS 1. Big tech firm 4. Picked 10. Type of whale 11. A woman of refinement 12. New England state 14. Common gibbon 15. Tall coniferous tree 16. State capital 18. Making a liquid muddy 22. Vinegary 23. Peninsula 24. Thee 26. Atomic #55 27. Used in units of measurement 28. Welsh female name 30. Arab ruler title 31. One’s mother 34. Trap 36. Soviet Socialist Republic 37. Assn. of oil-producing countries 39. Holy fire 40. Emit coherent radiation 41. Atomic #81 42. Orthodox Jewish college 48. Herbs 50. Ran after 51. Begin again 52. Named 53. Barbary sheep 54. Unwell 55. Postscript 56. Drivers 58. One point east (clockwise) of due north 59. Prim

15 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you are feeling ambitious this week, so it might be time to try a new hobby or other interest. Write down your goals and see if any align with potential hobbies.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, some nice surprises are likely to come your way, especially in your private life. Enjoy every moment as it unfolds and express your appreciation when applicable. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you are likely to upstage everyone else this week because people simply cannot get enough of your magnetic personality. If you grow weary of the limelight, take a break.

60. A facility equipped for sports or physical training

20. Nostril 21. Surprise Icelandic politician CLUES DOWN 25. Conclusive acts 1. Small islands 29. Inform on 2. Skullcap 31. Grinding tooth 3. Unexplained events 32. Keep up 4. One hundredth of a meter 33. Tablelands 5. Beloved baseball an35. Raising nouncer 38. Mythical creature 6. Repulsive 41. Hums 7. Northern European lan- 43. Mountain in Antarctica guages 44. Neighborhood in Man8. Match or surpass hattan 9. Northeast 45. Distinctive practice 12. Chew the fat 46. Vice president 13. Innovative industry 47. Contributes to 17. Land to put down to 49. Small bones grass 56. Oil company 19. Products 57. Empire State

Answers for February 17th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, clear your social schedule in favor of some quiet time at home. Such a respite can provide a great opportunity to reflect and make a new plan.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you have a goal to meet someone new and there’s a good chance you will discover that person in the days to come. Accept the possibility that hopes and dreams can come true. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, friends often end up filling familial roles. Even though a person may not be related by blood, certain friends can be relied upon through thick and thin.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Even though the holidays are over you may still want to continue the celebration, Libra. Find a way to socialize with friends or family in a responsible manner. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, you may be finished with the business that made last month hectic. Now you are ready to start a new chapter. A calm period is ahead. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a potentially lucrative opportunity may present itself in the days to come. Consider all of your options and give equal though to all of them.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, even if you don’t say much, there is a lot of chatter going on in your head. Take some time to find a quiet place and meditate for a while. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Sometimes you just have to take a risk without vetting all of the possible outcomes, Aquarius. If it feels like it’s a good time to make a change, embrace the opportunity.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 This week is the ideal opportunity to show strength and exhibit your organizational skills, Pisces. Don’t be afraid to think big.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


TWO ROW TIMES

February 17, 2021

Six Nations COVID-19 Update Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Update as of:

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated daily.

Update as of:

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated daily.

How many casesDate have w the last 7 days?

2/16/21 13:30 Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

243 243

-

196 196

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

Total Cases

Total Resolved

243

196

3

=

20

3243

20

243

-

New Lab confirmed

outbreak is progressing over time.

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black20 0

This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak is progressing over time. Jul 2020

Sep 2020

-

Total Resolved

196

Nov 2020

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Nov 2020

How many Date reported 100

-

May 2020

Active Cases

44

May 2020

Jan 2021

50

2/12/2021 7 44

10

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Sep 2020

Date reported

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

May 2020

2/15/202

Total (La

=

How many 7 people have become infect 100

2/15/2021

Total (Last 7 days) 50

0

Jan 2021

confirmed

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

2/10/2021

2/11/2021 Jul 2020

44

5

44

50

Date reported

11

5

2/13/2021

4

2/14/2021

7 5

Sep 2020 Nov 2020 Total (Last 7 days)

Date reported

Jul 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported

44 Jan 2021

Sep 2020

Date reported

Sep 2020

100

0

3

2/12/2021

May 2020

May 2020

9

Sep 2020

50

0

Total (Last 7 days)

5

100

How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total?

Cumulative cases

New Lab confirmed

This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak is progressing over time.

3

2/14/2021

100

20

2/15/2021

Active Cas How many people have become infected with COVID-19 Total Deaths 4

5 2/13/2021

2/15/2021 Jul 20200

2/14/202

2/14/2021

9

4

Date reported

0

0

2/13/2021

3

2/11/2021

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This is an epidemic curve, this shows us how the outbreak is progressing over time. How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total?

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