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Waterloo Indigenous Student Centre th FREE ADMISSION 16 Annual Pow Wow

EVERYONE WELCOME! Saturday September 28, 2019 • 12 - 5 pm Hosted by

For more information : wisc@uwaterloo.ca I uwaterloo.ca/stpauls/pow-wow I 519-885-1460 x25230

THE SPIRIT OF ALL NATIONS WEDNESDAY September 11th, 2019 | www.tworowtimes.com | 519-900-5535 | Grand River Territory e ee n Frke O Ta

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Under Treaty Rights First Nations people are entitled to receive Hearing Aids at no cost. Come see us for details. STATE OF THE ART PRODUCTS & EQUIPMENT COMPLIMENTARY HEARING TESTS CERTIFIED PROFESSIONALS LIFETIME FREE ADJUSTMENTS & CLEANING HEARING AIDS KEEP THE MIND EXERCISED AND SHARP! DON’T LET HEARING PROBLEMS STOP YOU FROM BEING PART OF THE FAMILY! WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE OUR TEAM IN CALEDONIA Karissa Schiestel Hearing Instrument Specialist

Tara Harview Hearing Consultant

NEW LOCATION! 322 Argyle St South, Caledonia 289-757-7777 6 Parkview Rd, Hagersville (Located Inside Morison Insurance) 1-844-233-4317

SIX NATIONS SENDS HELP TO BAHAMAS Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation organized two jet caravans this week transporting immediate disaster relief supplies to Abaco and Grand Bahama Islands for survivors of Hurricane Dorian. Over one million dollars in support was delivered thanks to local businesses and families from Six Nations and PHOTO BY JONATHAN GARLOW surrounding area.

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Admission $10

Good All Weekend www.ESPmyFuture.com for map & free stuff


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September 11th, 2019

LOCAL

keeping you informed.

Are you an Indigenous student? Need $ for school? We can help!

Next Deadline November 1, 2019. Apply at indspire.ca

Bursaries, Scholarships, and Awards

Six Nations launches campaign sending millions in relief to Bahamas Shoes, bedding, diapers, equipment and water donations sent directly to disaster zone by Dreamcatcher STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

HAMILTON - Six Nations and surrounding area business are responding to the Hurricane Dorian disaster by sending over a million dollars worth of immediate relief directly to the Abaco and Grand Bahama Islands in The Bahamas. Six Nations businessmen Ken Hill and Jerry Montour spoke with Two Row Times last week and shared details about the Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation’s immediate relief effort — along with 43 local businesses and families to respond to the disaster — bringing together

Ken Hill helps crew members load water into a jet destined for the PHOTO BY TRT Bahamas.

about $500,000 in supplies directly to the heart of the disaster zones. Two Row Times broke the story, which went viral, and gained hundreds of thousands in support from local businesses and contributors from across the country. Another three cargo jets were filled on Tuesday Sep-

tember 10 and are making their way to The Bahamas filled to the brim with diapers, shoes, clothing, bedding and water. Hill told TRT financial contributions were made by local businesses in addition to the supplies hauled in. Hill says those funds were used to purchase cots, diapers, and hygiene products

A second caravan of three cargo jets left Ontario with a new round of supplies heading to the BahaPHOTO BY TRT mas Tuesday morning.

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that are heading to Nassau for additional relief. The devastation Hurricane Dorian left in The Bahamas is catastrophic, with entire towns completely destroyed and several hundred people reported as missing. Officials now say the death toll and damages are unprecedented in modern reporting and the devastation is unlike anything ever seen. For two days the storm hovered above the islands of Grand Bahama and Abaco with sustained winds of up to 185mph. A local pastor reported the floodwaters reached the third floor of his home. Video footage of the devastation showed SUVs floated across neighbourhoods and crashed through the walls of nearby homes. Hill said the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport was completely destroyed in the hurricane leaving the island with no immediate place to receive air deliveries. CNN reported the airports walls and ceiling were ripped apart and the runway was underwater. Hill said the Dreamcatch-

er Charitable Foundation stepped up to respond to the disaster — collecting donations from across Canada and the United States last Wednesday. The use of several jets and cargo planes over two weeks were donated by Jetport in Hamilton to carry the goods to Nassau, Bahamas. Hill said the Seminole Tribe at the Hard Rock Casino in Florida also pledged two helicopters to meet the caravan of jets in Nassau where began transporting chopper loads of water, diapers, baby formula, sanitary pads, clothing and other

supplies directly to the heart of the disaster zones in Freeport and the Abacos. Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation’s Chairperson Delby Powless said the relief effort was close to his heart. “We have a lot of Bahamian friends and family down there and when they hurt, we hurt. To go down and help them, that’s something special to us. I know they’re in need so we’re here to help. That’s what Dreamcatcher does, we’re here to help. It’s our people — they are native people too, to the Bahamas. And we’re native people here all in to help each other.”

Diapers, shoes, water and clothing waiting to be delivered directly to Nassau to help those in need organized by the Dreamcatcher PHOTO BY TRT Chartible Foundation.

GROCERIES: Milk, Bread, Eggs, PARTY SUPPLIES, TOOLS, NAILS, FUNNELS, BATTERIES, ELECTRICAL ITEMS, SCISSORS, TAPE, HAIR TIES, GARBAGE BAGS, ELECTRONICS, HEADPHONES, $ $ PAINT BRUSHES, COIN ROLLERS, PAPER $ PRODUCTS, POP, CHIPS, BREAD, CANNED GOODS, FLOWERS, STATIONARY, BALLOONS, CANDY, HOUSEHOLD, SEASONAL, HARDWARE ITEMS. $

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September 11th, 2019

TWO ROW TIMES

www.sixnationsfoodbank.com

NEW BUILDING FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN

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Six Nations Community Food Bank strives to meet the short-term need for food, and find long-term solutions to hunger within our community.

Gold Sponsor: $5,000 Plus

• Advertising: written acknowledgement on sponsor level board • Speaking opportunity at Euchre Tournament • Set up of organization information at new food bank building SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES • Recognition on food bank website and other OHSWEKEN, ONTARIO social media – Facebook, local newspapers AUGUST 12, 2019 – SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 • Free admission for 4 to Food Bank Community The food bank is reaching out Events for 1 year – Euchre Tournament October 2019, Golf Tournament in June 2020 to community organizations, • Certificate of Appreciation and name on plaque to be displayed at the entrance to new associations, Six Nations Elected food bank

Council, Six Nations of the Grand Silver Sponsor: Up to $2,500 Plus River Economic Development Trust and surrounding businesses for your support in reaching our deficit of $75,000 by September 30, 2019. The new location will continue to offer food service every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

• Recognition as Silver Sponsor on the food bank social media – website, Facebook, local newspapers • Set up of organization information at new food bank building • Speaking opportunity at Euchre Tournament • Free admission for 2 to Food Bank Community Events for 1 year – Euchre Tournament October, 2019, Golf Tournament in June 2020 • Certificate of Appreciation and name on plaque to be displayed at the entrance to the new food bank

A GoFundMe page has been set up or donations may be made directly to the food bank. For information on becoming a Sponsor for the Food Bank Building Fund, please contact Ellen Rose Jamieson for more details: Ellen Rose Jamieson Food Bank Coordinator 519-771-0025 ellenrose@sixnationsfoodbank.com

LET US BUILD COMMUNITY MOMENTUM TOGETHER Six Nations Food Bank New Building Fund 600,000...................................................................................................

500,000...................................................................................................

400,000...................................................................................................

300,000...................................................................................................

Bronze Sponsor: Up to $500 • Certificate of Appreciation

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PLEASE BE SURE TO CHECK THE EXPIRATION DATE ON ALL DONATED FOOD ITEMS. THANK YOU.

Amount needed to reach our goal

$72,660.18

Donations update for September 2nd to 8th, 2019 Six Nations Natural Gas – $ 1587,82.00


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2019 SN Fall Fair feels like new By TRT Staff SIX NATIONS — Ontarios longest running indigenous fair has had some ups and downs over it’s 152 year run. But this year seemed like nothing but ups as the Six Nations Agricultural Society has all but restored the family favourite fall event to a former glory that shone brightest last weekend. With the fair founded in 1867, the executive members of the Six Nations Agricultural Society made full use of the SN Community Hall, the Dajoh

GRAND RIVER

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September 11th, 2019

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Youth and Elders Centre and the Gaylord Powless Arena parking lot were each transformed into a reminiscent atmosphere that was filled with life this year. Besides the regular midway and food attractions, beautiful exhibits filled the hall, a smoke dance competition took place in the arena, and visitors were graced with a pet show, fire works, a baseball tournament, archery competition and even a greasy pig contest that proved that the fair had a lot to partake in. The Six Nations Agricultural Society Executive Members were comprised of Mark Hill serving as president, First Vice President Dakota Brant, Second vice President Michelle Bomberry, Secretary Rachel Hill and Treasurer Desmond Anderson, while the Board of Directors included Patty Doxtator-Hill, Sharron Anderson, Lori Skye, Nikki Skye, Deanna Skye and Sue Martin. “On behalf of our Executive Team and Board

Warrior Park Athletics had an engaging booth for youth at PHOTO this years fair. BY CHEZNEY MARTIN

of Directors, we would sincerely like to thank each of you for supporting our 152nd Six Nations Fall Fair,” wrote President Mark Hill to Facebook. “It takes a lot of work throughout the year to pull an event like this one off and we couldn’t have don’t it without each of our event team leads, all of our volunteers, community in general and most importantly our sponsors. We learn every year on how to make things

CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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Heater Grates Hot Water Tanks Lawn Tractors Light Ballasts Light Fixtures Mixed Metals Oversized Heavy Steel Pop Cans Radiators Railings Rims Rotors Short Steel (4’x2’x’2) Siding Stainless Steel Trailers, transport & hitch Transmissions Water Mains Wire (copper, alum, steel, coated & non coated)

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September 11th, 2019

TWO ROW TIMES

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Yvonne Jamieson (right), Executive Director of the Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation presented Aleria McKay with a cheque for $2,500 as she was crowned Miss Six Nations. PHOTO BY DAVE LAFORCE

Clarity Carter, first place better, what to change and events included the crowning of the new Six include for next year and for 19-23 months went to Nations Ambassadors; also what to keep.” Rowisawakhon Brinklow, Miss Six Nations Aleria Hill offered apprecifirst place for toddlers age McKay, Miss Teen Six ation for the live enter2 went to Tyrn Smith, the Nations Madison Miller, tainment that performed Miss Tiny Tot Award went Miss Preteen Six Nations throughout the duration to Kawisonni Martin, the Westyn Myers, Miss Mini of the fair, including The Mister Tiny Tot Award Six Nations Rayna Isaacs, Healers and David Wilcox went to Kylokarhahtayeh Little Miss Six Nations who paid an additionEmme Loft for their 2019- Brant, the Chip off the al visit to the Iroquois Old Block Award went 2020 reign. Lodge following a $1000 to Kayden VanEvery, the donation to the SN Youth As well, the Baby and Council. Typical Indian Girl Award Tot Show contestants “Our goal is to continue were announced Sunday went to Oceana Jacobs to grow the fair each year and the Typical Indian night; first place for 0-6 for everyone to enjoy,” Boy Award went to Cash months went to Egahyo CONNECT HEARING – CALEDONIA said Hill. Doxtator. Vyse-Square, first place Notable achievements 5” × 6.5” 01/08/19 for 13-18 months went to for participants in fair

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September 11th, 2019

OPINION editor@tworowtimes.com

The first scent of Autumn has come EDITORIAL

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Aid workers in the Bahamas said the devastation of Hurricane Dorian is “still unfolding” on Tuesday after the official death toll rose to at least 50 while tens of thousands of people remain homeless. But there is a light. Recently, the Two Row Times covered the efforts made in sending aid to the Bahamas, and it made the world seem a little brighter. We then found that sometimes thats all we need is a few moments in the light. And summer in the newsroom is a reminder of sunshine. It has become a season full of activity as youth put away their books and pens to enjoy simple freedom

at its fullest. Camps and sports take to the fields, arenas, and pools while dancers perform, and food vendor smells fill the thick air. And we try to capture it all. But what we don’t get to capture is collecting fireflies and watching hummingbirds drink from the feeder, while squirrels bounce across the lawn. That moment of relief when the heat of summer is blocked by an entrance to a fully AC’ed building. The pool parties and barbecues that turn into bonfires at night, and the responsibilities that seem to fade away into a watercolour sunset. We capture moments, sure, but not always the ones that we want to escape in. Now the season has begun to shift again and

we are entering our first cold nights — the nights where you have to grab an extra blanket. The youth that ran the summer have returned to their books and pens as students once more, like Cinderellas set to transform in the early hours of September 4. The warm air is replaced by a chilly bite and the leaves on the trees, now green, will soon start to change. Again the year has finished off powwow season and leapt into fair season, where funnel cakes and candy apples reign supreme. Where knuckles turn white from gripping the cold metal of midway rides and the smell of hay and barley fills the streets. While the fruits of harvest compete against one another and farmers show off their best beasts, the

world slowly rolls into a season of family. Harvest season would be the best way to describe it, as remnants of last years turkey dinner comes in the form of cravings for canned cranberries and pumpkin pie. Pretty soon the year will roll into Halloween, as the leaves of the trees turn deep auburns and cherry reds with sunflower yellow thrown in. Pumpkin patch carousing and pumpkin carving mixed with apple cider and apple picking. Scary movies will play on repeat as the backdrop to home cooking with baked foods returned to the menu because the weather is just right for a hot oven. Cozy slippers and warm blankets with hot chocolates and gummy worms in hand will

The Healers are `bringing some healing to the Bahamas,` says PHOTO BY JONATHAN GARLOW Carter Bomberry (above).

accompany nights spent binge watching TV shows. All seems right in the world now that the first scent of Autumn has come and we can sort of, kind of forget the state of the world for a moment. Perhaps that’s a privilege that we can take immense

advantage of, but at the same time, maybe it’s a sign that something is being done right. And sometimes it is much more therapeutic to cherish memories than to actively pursue their capture.

ohn=ganos

water

R E L AT E D W O R D S :

editor@tworowtimes.com

Oneh]%wi* - Water-Drum Dance gahn=%ga%* - it has water in it ONONDAGA LANGUAGE

SOURCE: Onondaga-English, English-Onondaga Dicitonary, Hanni Woodbury

Volume 7, Issue 5 Make advertising cheques payable to:

Garlow Media

Oneida Business Park Suite 124 50 Generations Drive, Box 1 Ohsweken, ON N0A 1M0

Publisher: Jonathan Garlow Editor: Nahnda Garlow Head of Production: Dave LaForce Co-Editor: Chezney Martin Senior Writer: Jim Windle Website Manager: Benjamin Doolittle Contributing Writer: Gary Farmer Advertising Sales Co-ordinator: Marshall Lank Advertising Sales Executive: Christine Patton Advertising Sales Executive: Rachel Binek Distribution Manager: Tim Reynolds Distribution: Christian Kovacs Distribution: Logan Martin-King Distribution: Mari Reeve Main office: (519) 900-5535 Editorial line: (519) 900-6241 Advertising line: (519) 900-6373 For advertising information: ads@tworowtimes.com General inquiries: info@tworowtimes.com Website: www.tworowtimes.com


September 11th, 2019

For more information contact Jessica Miller Williams jmillerwilliams@sixnations.ca 226.227.2192 ext 3288

TWO ROW TIMES

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September 11th, 2019

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September 11th, 2019

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Fall time is annual deer hunting season STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Thousands of people across North America find hunting game to be a rewarding pastime. People hunt many different types of animals, but deer are some of the most popular to target. Deer hunting can help to address deer overpopulation in many areas. Hunting requires more than going out with a weapon and targeting deer. Hunters must prepare themselves and purchase the appropriate equipment to protect

themselves and make sure they are hunting in adherence to local laws. To begin, hunters should check with their local fish and game organizations to learn about

acquiring hunting licences. Licenses will ensure that hunting is being done according to the rules of a particular state, town or province, and establish just how many animals

can be taken. Hunters will need to make sure their firearms or bows are operational and clean. Hunters may also want to invest in tree stands, binoculars, knives, ammunition, hunting blinds, shooting glasses, ear protection, processing kits (for field dressing), and hunting attire. To make themselves more visible to fellow hunters, hunters should wear clothing in blaze orange rather than camouflage. Hunters can visit fishing and game retailers for additional recommendations on gear.

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September 11th, 2019

2 arrested in Hawaii near giant telescope protest site CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

HONOLULU — Two men were arrested and a Hawaii state flag was torn Friday when crews and police arrived to a lava field on a Big Island mountain to remove a small wooden house built by demonstrators near the camp where they are blocking construction of a giant telescope, officials said. Law enforcement officers arrived to clear the area around the structure Friday morning. But the two men refused to leave and were arrested and charged with obstruction of a governmental operation, officials said. Protesters who oppose the Thirty Meter Telescope planned on Mauna Kea have been camped to block the road to the mountain's summit since July. A ``handful of guys'' built the house, or hale in Hawaiian, as a learning centre for children, said Andre Perez, one of the protest leaders. ``They wanted to create a space for children to congregate, a teaching area,'' he said, adding that the builders knew it wasn't legal or sanctioned by protest leaders. The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, which owns the land, said earlier this week that the unpermitted building would be removed. It needed to be removed because it ``presents health, safety and environmental concerns,'' Gov. David Ige said. Officers had to cut

through a Hawaii flag that was on a barricade over a door to get into the building and see if anyone was inside, said Ed Sniffen, deputy director of the state Department of Transportation's highways division. A second flag on the roof was also removed. Both flags were returned to protesters, Sniffen said. ``There was no way to safely remove it other than to tear it,'' state Attorney General Clare Connors said of the first flag nailed to a barricade over the door. A second flag on the roof was carefully removed, she said. Cutting the flag escalated an already tense situation, Perez said. ``They ran a knife right down the middle and cut it,'' he said. ``It wasn't necessary to cut a Hawaiian flag in half.'' A loader knocked the structure over, and workers cut up the pieces, Sniffen said. Big Island Mayor Harry Kim, who has been tasked with leading discussions with protesters, said he's pleased with progress being made and believes there is a way for the telescope to be built while still honouring the concerns of Native Hawaiians. ``We're caught between what we have to do by law and truly understanding why the protectors, for lack of a better word, are doing what they feel they have to do,'' Kim said. ``We should all be joining hands, recognizing where we were and recognizing how we go forward.''

Demo derby still popular

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September 11th, 2019

SEPTEMBER 2019 BOTANICAL GARDENS

Rooted is a celebration of the beauty and history of Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens. This festival connects us to the natural, cultural and culinary stories surrounding Niagara region. Join us throughout each weekend in September, to explore our incredible gardens, learn from professional horticulturists, interact with local creative minds, and savour delicious flavours from across the region.

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September 11th, 2019


September 11th, 2019

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New policy recognizing Aboriginal rights could accelerate B.C. treaty process STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

VANCOUVER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The federal and provincial governments along with the First Nations Summit have reached an agreement on a new policy approach that could accelerate the treaty-making process in British Columbia. Treaty negotiations in B.C. have been plodding along since the early 1990s, with 11 agreements reached and another 28 in advanced negotiation stages. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the changes mean First Nations will no longer have to give up their rights to self-government and negotiators will automatically recognize those

rights. Bennett says that change _ along with the federal government's move to forgive or reimburse First Nations about $1.4 billion in legal costs _ may convince other Indigenous groups to come to the negotiating table. The summit represents 65 First Nations involved in the treaty process, which is about half of all Indian Act bands in the province. The Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, which has opposed the treaty-making process over the issue of giving up Aboriginal rights, says in a news release it's disappointed the policy doesn't address the issue of overlapping territory between neighbouring nations. Robert Phillips, a First Nations Summit political executive, says they've heard from many chiefs

in and out of the treaty process that the issue of overlapping and shared territory needs to be dealt with and a forum is planned for next March to find solutions. Bennett says she wants critics of the treaty process to read the policy changes. ``It will, I think, allay a lot of fears. We're dealing with the cynicism that's rightfully there of 150-plus years of broken promises.'' Phillips says he's hopeful that the changes will lead to more treaties because the policy is based on principles from the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. He says one of the biggest criticisms of the treaty process in the past has been lack of recognition of Aboriginal title.

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Six Nations of the Grand River

NOTICE DISTRICT FIVE (5) ELECTION CODE BY-ELECTION TO BE HELD A By-Election to fill a vacancy position will be held in District Five (5) Six Nations of the Grand River for a District Councillor

To vote you must be: NOMINEE: 1) Six Nations NOMINEE: Member living Kerry Dean Bomberry Nicoli Wilson Wyman (Nick) on Reserve Moved Cecil K. Davis 12 orMoved by: Loreen H. Harris 2)by:Grade equivalent Seconded by: Philip A. Monture by: Tracy L. Newman 3) 4 year term Seconded maximum terms - 2 ELECTION A vote to fill an opening in District Five (5) for 4) No districts is at large a councillorvote will be held Saturday February 24th, 2017 At the the highest eg. Top 9 with Six Nations Band Administration Building number1695ofChiefswood votesRoad In the council chambers from 9 a.m. to 12 noon 5) You will vote for 9 The By-election is called by Steve Williams councilors and 1 Chief Six Nations Chief Polling Officer The Nominees for District Five (5) By-Election are:

Dates of nomination September 28, 2019 at Community Hall. Six Nations of the From Grand River 9-12pm

NOTICE

Date of advance Poll(5) DISTRICT FIVE BY-ELECTION TO BEFrom HELD November 9, 2019. A By-Election to fill a vacancy position will be held in District Five (5) 9-6pm Six Nations of the Grand River for a District Councillor The Nominees for District Five (5) By-Election are:

Copies of the 2019 NOMINEE:Six Kerry Dean Bomberry Nicoli Wilson Wyman (Nick) Nations Election Code will be atby:the Band Office Moved Cecil K. Davis Moved by: Loreen H. Harris

NOMINEE:

Seconded by: Philip A. Monture

Seconded by: Tracy L. Newman

Further notices will be ELECTION A vote to fill an opening in District Five (5) for coming ina the newspaper in a councillor will be held Saturday February 24th, 2017 few weeks At the Six Nations Band Administration Building 1695 Chiefswood Road In the council chambers from 9 a.m. to 12 noon The By-election is called by Steve Williams Six Nations Chief Polling Officer


152nd Annual Six


x Nations Fall Fair

RADIO 93.5 FM


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Conference looks at how First Nations can be involved in cannabis industry CANADIAN PRESS

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VANCOUVER — The cannabis industry is seen by some First Nations as an opportunity to take the initiative and get out of poverty, says the regional chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations. Cultivating, buying or selling cannabis could

provide economic support to those First Nations devastated by a downturn in the province's forest industry, Terry Teegee said Wednesday at a summit on cannabis held by the Assembly of First Nations. ``A lot of the communities are tired of living in poverty,'' he said. ``It's an opportunity for your community to assert your jurisdiction, assert your self-determination.

We want to be a part of the community.'' The two-day First Nations Cannabis Summit is attended by chiefs or their representatives from across the country to hear about policy, safety, health, and social and economic development. There are varying points of view among First Nations on how involved they want to be in the cannabis industry with some ``dead

set against it,'' while others look at it as an economic development opportunity, Teegee said. While he doesn't have statistics on how many First Nations want to be involved in the cannabis industry, Teegee said eight licences out of 122 were given to First Nations in Ontario. ``So in Ontario that's a real issue because there's a lot more than eight First

Nations interested in having a distribution site or cultivating them.'' Teegee said it's unclear how much money can be made in the industry because there's been a limited number of licences distributed in most of Canada. ``The only one that came out aggressively has been Alberta and that's why you see Alberta leading the nation in terms of tax revenue,'' Teegee said.

We could not be more pleased with the amount of funds raised this year to support McMaster Children’s Hospital and the children in OUR community who are served by such caring people at McMaster. This year, we were able to raise $15,024.00 to send to McMaster and this would not have been possible with out the assistance of our community partners listed below. A special thank you needs to go out to The Costabile Group who donated their time and $1000.00 as well as LiUNA Local 183 who donated $1000.00 as well as Anytime Fitness who donated $300 and The Ontario Provincial District Council of LiUNA who also donated $1000.00. Photo courtesy of Jason Freeze at BScene

Left to right: Ken Breau (DQ Brant Owner), Rob Tamburini (LiUNA), Nancy Sheffield (McMaster), Courtney and Chris Costabile (Revel Realty), Taylor Lavergne (DQ Brant Operations), Shaun Mulrain (Guitars), absent: Rusty James (Musician), Paul Kunkel (Anytime Fitness).

Thank you for helping Make Miracles Happen in YOUR community! Sincerely, Ken and Tammy Breau

Wesley Sam, owner of Nations, an Indigenous-controlled cannabis production company based in Burns Lake, B.C., said one of the main challenges for First Nations is financial backing. But there is still room for First Nations to get involved in the industry, he said, adding that profits could be used to fund housing or other projects. Sonia Eggerman, a law-

yer with MLT Aikins who has extensive experience with Aboriginal and treaty rights, said after speaking to the conference that current federal and provincial regulations have cut First Nations out of opportunities to take part in the cannabis industry. ``And I think that's a real missed opportunity,'' she said. Drew Lafond, also with MLT Aikins, said the key obstacle is lack of meaningful engagement by the federal government to work with First Nations. ``Much like gaming and tobacco, cannabis carries a spiritual connotation, has traditional significance, medicinal significance, plus socio-economic significance,'' he said. ``From a legal perspective, it's an area that First Nations have a close relationship with historically. So breadth and history are the two things that make this such a huge issue in Indigenous country.''

Bones to be returned to a tribe

BOISE, ID — Human bones excavated from a 4,000-year-old burial site in western Wyoming will be returned to a Native American tribe to be determined. The National Park Service this week said the fragmentary human remains of an 8- to 9-yearold child and an adult will be returned to a tribe in Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana or Idaho following consultations. The bones were removed from a site near the U.S. Forest Service's Dead Indian Campground in the Shoshone National Forest in 1969 during an archaeological excavation.


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September 11th, 2019

arts. culture. entertainment.

Dior faces appropriation backlash for Sauvage ad STAFF REPORT

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The campaign video immediately sparked criticism from viewers who saw the depiction of a Native American dancer as an instance of cultural appropriation. The issue arose from the term “Sauvage,” which is French for savage, in Dior’s fragrance campaign being accompanied by an indigenous fancy dancer and a woman in wolf skin in the campaign teaser video. Critics of the fragrance campaign said the use of Native American culture was tone deaf. On Twitter, the hashtag #NotYourSavage was being used by in tweets for them to voice their anger about the campaign. “Calling us Savage in a different language and accent doesn’t remove the long-standing historical violence and racism we continue to experience!” one Twitter user wrote. The short video features the dancer performing to a drum beat, followed by a narrator saying “We are the land. Dior.” The LVMH-owned fashion house described the campaign on social media as “an authentic journey deep into the Native Ameri-

After backlash sprung forth against the Sauvage Fragrance campaign teaser video, Dior recalled their ad after only being live online Friday for a few hours for "tone deaf" appropriation. SUBMITTED PHOTO.

Third Celebration of Nations hits St. Kitts

can soul in a sacred, founding and secular territory” and said it had also worked with Americans For Indian Opportunity, an indigenous advocacy group. But the backlash was almost immediate. The campaign was live for several hours on Friday before Dior deleted it from Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. In a statement, Parfums Christian Dior said the company is “very proud of this collaboration with AIO,” describing it as part of the organization’s campaign to “change the misperceptions about Native Americans, to share accurate American history, to build awareness about Native Americans as contemporary peoples and to promote Indigenous worldviews.” But this is not the first time Dior has been accused

of cultural appropriation either. A campaign for the Cruise 2019 collection, featuring garments influenced by Mexican culture, was criticised for starring Jennifer Lawrence, who is not Mexican. In April, Dior debuted its Resort 2020 collection in Marrakesh, Morocco, with opinion split between those who saw African influences on the show as another instance of appropriation, and others who saw an example of cultural borrowing done right. In an interview released last Tuesday, Depp said: “There was never — and how could there be or how would there be — any dishonorable [intent].” “The film was made with a great respect for the indigenous people not just of North America, but all over the world. It’s a pity

that people jumped the gun and made these objections. However, their objections are their objections.” He continued, “I can assure you that no one has any reason to go out to try to exploit. It was a film made out of great respect and with great respect and love for the Native American peoples to bring light to them. They haven’t had the greatest amount of help out of the United States government. The idea is as pure as it ever was, so we will come to an agreement so that everyone is happy.” However, the consensus of the situation still found that the use of indigenous imagery regardless of the intent, was still done in bad taste considering it adds fuel to the stereotypical history attached to the “Indian savage.”

The FirtOntario Performing Arts Centre and Kakekalanicks Indigenous Arts presented Celebration of Nations, a gathering of Indigenous arts, culture, and tradition in downtown St. Catharines from 6 - 8 September 2019. Numerous events took place in downtown St. Catharines, within the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre’s four venues, as well as The Mann Raceway Plaza (the PAC’s outdoor gathering space

ed dying, C-16 on gender identity and human rights, and C-45, The Cannabis Act. She has helped to build bridges between First Nations communities and the Canadian government and is committed to helping Indigenous peoples seek self-government and gain equality in education, health care and legal rights. But Wilson-Raybould was removed from the Liberal caucus in early April of this year after the months-long SNC-Lavalin affair gripped the nation's capital with accusations of judicial interference by the Prime Minister's Office. While some might open

her book to look for an SNC-Lavalin tell-all, much of the text will be instead devoted to addressing Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples. Her piece, From Where I Stand, is set to be released on September 20. The 264 page-long book is fully titled “From Where I Stand: Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada,” and from the novel’s introduction, her writing seeks to bring to light a future “where Indigenous Rights are recognized, respected, and fully implemented.” The former justice minister will release the book under her publisher’s promise that the piece

is a "timely" and "impassioned" piece of work. Another reviewer has since called the text a "mustread for all Canadians.” Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, a former Saskatchewan provincial court judge who testified at the House of Commons committee studying the SNC-Lavalin affair, said Wilson-Raybould's book is a "must-read" for Canadians. "Having witnessed her remarkable courage and capacity as Canada's attorney general and her determination to do what is right without succumbing to unrelenting political pressure, Puglaas stands tall among Canadians

as a person for whom truth, thoughtfulness and principle are not mere words — but values to sustain a different kind of policy and politics," Turpel-Lafond said in the press release announcing the book. ('Puglaas' is Wilson-Raybould's name in the Kwakʼwala language.) Following the high-profile scandal and a difficult period of her career, the new author now sits as an independent in the House of Commons for the Vancouver riding of Granville. And the book release is just a month ahead of the election which is set for October 21, 2019. The book will land just as Wilson-Raybould is prompt-

STAFF REPORT

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commonly referred to as “the Backyard”), and within spaces at Brock University’s Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts. The event kicked off Friday morning shortly after 6 a.m. and continued until Sunday with more than 40 events including music and dance performances, film screenings, and an outdoor artisan market. The sunrise ceremony featured teachings from respected elders as they built up a fire with cedar, wood, birchbark and tobacco.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

Wilson-Raybould to release a “must read for all Canadians”

STAFF REPORT

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The writing of Jody Wilson-Raybould will be reaching book shelves this month. The Minister of Justice and Attorney General (2015–2019) Wilson-Raybould began serving as Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of Canada (MOJAG) on November 4, 2015, becoming the first Indigenous person and third woman to hold the office. During her time she introduced groundbreaking legislation, including Bill C-14 on medically assist-

ing voters in her riding to send her back to Ottawa, this time as an Independent MP.

Rather than isolating the SNC-Lavallin scandal, Jody Wilson-Raybould covers Canada's relationship with indigenous people. PHOTO SUBMITTED


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Obomsawin doc looks at medical care for Indigenous children CANADIAN PRESS

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TORONTO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alanis Obomsawin has spent much of her career documenting injustices facing Indigenous peoples in Canada, and the wrongs she outlines often overwhelm, infuriate and bewilder. But for the dogged 87-year-old Abenaki director, the work continues to inspire. ``We're in a much better place. You have to recognize there's been so many

people working for this across this country (and) it's different,'' Obomsawin says of public awareness of Indigenous issues as her 53rd film was set to launch at the Toronto International Film Festival. ``This is why I do what I do (and this film) is very encouraging. I think people will come out seeing that justice is possible.'' Obomsawin's latest project, ``Jordan River Anderson, The Messenger,'' examines the decade-long legal battle to secure equal care for Indigenous children with special needs.

It starts with a look at the Manitoba boy who inspired a 2007 law known as Jordan's Principle, which was supposed to guarantee equal access to health care and services but was continually ignored in ensuing years. Even when the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal issued a ruling that resolved a debate over jurisdiction, many Indigenous children continued to be denied care until several more mandatory orders were issued, the film recounts. Much of the film's emotional power comes

from the painful story of little Jordan River Anderson of Norway House Cree Nation, who was born in 1999 with a rare muscle disorder known as Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome. In 2002, Jordan was cleared to leave the Winnipeg hospital in which he had spent his entire life for home-based care in the city, but the federal and provincial governments could not agree on who should pay for medically necessary modifications to his foster home. He died in hospital at age five in 2005.

In the documentary, family members and caregivers tell Obomsawin the ordeal was especially hard on Jordan's mother, who had three other small children more than 800 kilometres away on the reserve, but couldn't bear to leave Jordan alone in hospital. She died just months after Jordan did. At last count, Jordan's Principle has helped fund care for 216,000 children, says the Montreal-based Obomsawin, noting it's gratifying to offer a happy ending to the saga. Last week, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal awarded more than $2 billion in damages to First Nations children and their families who were separated by a chronically underfunded welfare system. The decision includes compensation for children separated from their families because proper medical support wasn't made available to them. ``Fighting is very important,'' says Obomsawin, whose landmark documentaries include 1984's ``Incident at Restigouche,'' and 1993's ``Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance.'' ``Often people just let it go and that's the last thing they should do. Because if you keep on and you believe in something and it's just, you're going to win. I don't think anybody could tell me otherwise.'' The hour-long movie is the seventh in a recent series by Obomsawin for the National Film Board devoted to the rights of Indigenous children and peoples. It began with 2012's ``The People of the Kattawapiskak River,'' and was followed by ``HiHo Mistahey!'' in 2013, ``Tricky or Treaty?'' in 2014, ``We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice'' in 2016, and ``Our People Will Be Healed'' and ``Walking with Medicine,'' both in 2017. Most are available to stream for free at NFB.ca, with ``Walking with Medicine'' available on CBC Gem. Obomsawin says she didn't conceive of the individual films as connected to each other, simply tackling each topic as they emerged. But she agrees that taken together they trace a damning history of racism that is still not fully

grasped by many Canadians. ``People don't know anything, for instance, about treaties,'' she says. ``When they look at 'Trick or Treaty?' they're just flabbergasted. Up to about 10 years ago, even, if you said the word 'treaty' white people said, 'Oh, don't talk about that! That's finished. It doesn't exist.' But it's not true.'' Obomsawin traces her devotion to Indigenous stories, especially those involving children, to her own childhood experiences with the discriminatory education system of her youth. ``The history of this country was taught officially in the classroom and all of it was very racist towards our people _ a lot of lies and stealing of land and national resources. And teaching officially in the classroom that we were savages, (that) we scalped the poor white man who came here,'' she says. ``I said to myself: The children have to hear another story. (Schools) are raising children to hate, teaching hate towards the people, what is that? So I have done what I could, in my own way.'' Obomsawin says she's lucky to be healthy and possess the stamina to travel the country and meet all of her subjects, many of whom pour their hearts out to her. The work can be draining, she allows, but nourishing, as well. ``It's more important to think of the people themselves. Most of the time they don't know how beautiful they are,'' she says. ``I'm a person who listens for hours with people and I don't get bored. I just find it sacred. It's the voice of the people and what they're going through and you see the magic of it at the same time.'' ``Jordan River Anderson, The Messenger'' premieres Tuesday, with additional screenings Thursday and Saturday. It also screens at the FIN Atlantic International Film Festival in Halifax, the Calgary International Film Festival, and Vancouver International Film Festival, with more festivals to come.


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Meet the Mesoamerican Batman look-alike STAFF REPORT

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In January, Warner Bros. announced that Robert Pattinson will officially be the ‘new’ Batman. They closed the deal for the Twilight actor to play the Caped Crusader in a production that will be released on June 25 of 2021. But amid the tribulation as to who would fit the bats boots, there were concerns that majority of the candidates might not be menacing enough. And although the original concept for Batman was created by Bob Kane who was Inspired by Sherlock Holmes, Zorro, a Leonardo da Vinci sketch of a batwinged flying machine, and his own imagination. This still brought fans to dig up how menacing Batman should be with an old deity that featured as an imposing power in Mesoamerican mythology. This takes us to Templo Mayor, located in downtown Mexico City, which has an adjacent museum that proudly displays artifacts and renditions of items from the remnants of the once great Mesoamerican civilizations. Interestingly, the top floor of this museum contains a recreated statue of the Mayan bat god, Camazotz — also known as Zotzilaha Chamalcan. The name Camazotz translates roughly to ‘bat of death.’ This deity appears in the Popol Vuh, which is a foundation narrative of the Kʼicheʼ before the Spanish conquest of Guatemala that translates to "Book of the Community, and Camazotz is still a very prominent figure in the con-

After the long-awaited reveal of who the next Batman will be, the origins of Batman came into question as the figure is believed to be both menacing and powerful. This prompted some fans to dig past the character creation by Bob Kane, and some came face-to-face with the mesoamerican bat god Comazotz, who became a Mayan bat SUBMITTED PHOTO. diety that evolved to blend with their fire god. The photo above is a rendition of Comazotz created by a Mexican artist.

tinuing Maya religion, even though the Mayans merged Comazotz with their god of fire, Zotzilaha Chamalcan. The diety himself is described as an anthropomorphized leaf-nosed bat which has led to conjecture about the source of the myth. Some believe the ancient peoples based him on the common vampire bat or the Desmodus draculae, a much larger species that was leaf-nosed as well. Both of these species inhabited the area of Oaxaca, Mexico in 100 A.D. when a bat deity was first mentioned in a cult of the Zapotec tribe. The Zapotecs believed bats represented night, death, and sacrifice. This was likely due to the fact

that the bats would inhabit the caves around the sacred cenotes, which the Mesoamericans believed were portals to the underworld. It would be a very chilling sight at dusk when the bats would swarm out of these ‘portals’ and begin drinking the blood of the other animals. The god is also commonly depicted holding a sacrificial knife in one hand and a human heart or sacrificial victim in the other. Camazotz was later adopted into the pantheon of the Maya Quiche tribe and the legends of the bat god were later recorded in Maya literature. In the Popol Vuh, Camazotz is considered the name of a monstrous creature

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which inhabited a cave called “the house of bats, or Zotzilaha. Comazotz was described as a monster with a humanoid body, the head of a bat, and a nose that resembled a flint knife that was said to attack victims by the neck and decapitate them. In the Popol Vuh, it is also recorded that this creature decapitated the Maya hero Hunahpu. The hero twins were forced by the lords of Xibalba to spend the night in the House of Bats in the underworld. The legend is that the hero twins slept inside their blowguns as protection from the bats. However, when the bats went silent, Xbalanque asked Hunahpu to check if dawn had come and Hunahpú did so by poking his head out of the blowgun tip. But, it was not yet dawn and one of the bats took the opportunity to swoop down and rip away Hunahpú’s head, leaving him decapitated. Xbalanqué was left inside the blowgun, questioning why he had gone so still without receiving answer from his brother. The bat then took the head of Hunahpú to the ball court of the Xibalba lords to be gruesomely displayed and used as a ball while the lords rejoiced in their assumed victory.

Later in the Popol Vuh, a messenger from the underworld in the form of a humanoid bat (believed to be Camazotz) appears to broker a deal between humanity and Lord Tohil, the patron god of the K’iche’. In this deal, mankind promised their armpits and their waists in exchange for fire which is how the ritual of cutting open a person’s breast in sacrifice came to be. Some myths claim that, during the day, Camazotz would turn into a stone statue and therefore could only move at night, but this has not been confirmed. Another example of such a story is the Chonchon in Peru and Chile, which is thought to be created when a sorcerer, known as a kaku, performs a magical rite causing his severed head to sprout giant ears and talons at death. The giant ears become wings. Most scholars believe that Camazotz was inspired by the common vampire bat, but others have suggested that it was based on a giant vampire bat that (probably) went extinct sometime during the Pleistocene or Holocene periods. This ubiquity of giant bat monster legends leads many archaeologists to propose that the monsters have a basis in encounters with

a real animal - such as the vampire bat. The vampire bat is favoured because of its historical association with bloodletting and sacrifice. It is, however, possible that the legends could be derived from a giant bat that was present during the Pleistocene or early Holocene – one which may still exist today. Despite the tantalizing fossil evidence, and the strange stories about encounters with giant bats, there isn’t any indisputable evidence at the moment that D. Draculae was common enough to be encountered by ancient inhabitants of South America and Central America on a regular basis, or that the giant vampire bat is still alive today and could thus be the creature reported in giant bat sightings. Nonetheless, the fact that the fossil evidence suggests that D. Draculae may have coexisted with humans for thousands of years in the Americas and the ubiquitous legends of bat-like monsters all over south and central America does make it a plausible connection. Let’s finish this off with noting that according to the Maya, Camazotz is also one of the four animal demons responsible for wiping out mankind during the age of the first sun.


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3rd Celebration of Nations continued from 18

TORONTO - Returning to Toronto in May 2020, the biennial event that has become known as Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto will SUBMITTED PHOTO. take place at a larger venue to accomodate the high demand for attendance in 2018.

Announcements for IFWT 2020 STAFF REPORT

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TORONTO — Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto (IFWTO) returns to Harbourfront Centre for the second biennial event May 28-31, 2020. The Runway Program will take place at a larger venue, the Harbourfront Centre Theatre, due to the incredible demand at the inaugural event in 2018. A focus on cultural, intergenerational and artistic exchange at IFWTO 2020 will bring together several designers and artists of diverse artistic disciplines, ages and cultures in four runway shows, over 50 marketplace exhibitors, an art exhibit at the Harbourfront Centre Artport Gallery, a lecture series and handson workshops. IFWTO 2020 is thrilled to announce 23 Canadian and International Indigenous artists and designers who will present new designs in fashion, textiles and crafts during four live runway presentations. Some of the selected designers include: political streetwear brand Section 35; Philippines weaving social enterprise Kandama; renowned visual and craft artist Amy Malbeuf; beading and tanning social enterprise Tania Larsson by Tania Larsson, who is also a founder of Dene Nahjo Urban Hide Tanning Camp; and Victoria’s Arctic Fashion, who recently presented an Inuit couture collection at Paris Fashion Week. IFWTO 2020 Runway is

curatorially underscored by the interconnectedness through and to water. The IFWTO Selections Committee recognizes mainstream and Indigenous fashion as it relates to climate seasons that correspond to the land, water, harvests and moon. Seasons occur and change, in part, due to the tidal force of the moon on the waters. Water is a vital resource and is sacred for Indigenous people around the world. It is protected and nurtured by women and carries metaphorical and literal connections to blood and life. In relation to fashion, both Indigenous and mainstream, water is an undeniable resource and life force that must be protected and nurtured. The Opening Night Runway presentation at IFWTO on May 28, 2020 will showcase those creating fashion as a form of protest for the protection of water, land, people and culture. This program, titled “TU GH'EH NAH (Water is Life)” will include Section 35, Skawennati, Indi City, Miss Chief Rocka and Mobilize Waskawewin. Water covers over 70% of the earth's surface. Since time immemorial, the great oceans have acted as both barrier and bridge to connecting peoples around the globe. The Global Program on May 29, 2020 celebrates water as a bridge for exchange, highlighting our interconnectedness as Indigenous peoples through the presentation of designers from Canada and beyond. This program, titled “TU

CHO (Big Water)” will present Tradara (Australia), Celeste Pedri-Spade (Canada), Designs by Della (USA), Kandama (Philippines), Warren Steven Scott (Canada) and Maru Creations (New Zealand). Rivers and streams are the veins of the earth, integral to sustaining life on land. The “TU GH'EG TL'E'TH (Streams)” program on May 30, 2020 will present Margaret Jacobs, Louise Solomon of Hand of Solomon, Victoria’s Arctic Fashion, Amy Malbeuf, Curtis Oland, Tania Larsson and Evan Ducharme - designers that present works materially and conceptually rooted in that connection. The Closing Night Program on May 31, 2020 will honour and celebrate womxn as water carriers. Foregrounding IFTWO's mandate to program over 50% Indigenous womxn designers, the “TU GH'EL T'ILHN (Water Carriers)” program will include contemporary collections by Pasapa, Ay Lelum - The Good House of Design, Bobby Itta Designs, Angela DeMontigny & Jason Baerg, and Lesley Hampton. “Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto is proud to announce a program of traditional and contemporary garments, crafts and textile works that show Indigenous fashion at the exciting intersection of mainstream fashion, Indigenous art and traditional culture,” says Sage Paul, Artistic Director. “The programmed runway artists and designers are diverse and individually unique in vision, style,

skill and form. They have created beautiful collections of garments, accessories and jewellery that carry cultural continuity in their artistic creation and presentation and promote the economic development of our communities that I think will insightfully captivate audiences.” Additional Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto programming details and complete schedule will be announced in 2020, including special programs, marketplace, art exhibit, workshops and panels. Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto is a fourday multi-platform festival of the most distinct and progressive Indigenous-made fashion, craft and textiles, challenging mainstream perceptions of Indigenous people and culture, which are often stereotyped, commodified or exploited. IFWTO is led by majority Indigenous women, offering audiences an authentic, accessible opportunity to connect with Indigenous artists and celebrate cultural expression. Ticket sales will open Spring 2020 while workshop announcements and registration will open winter 2019/2020 for Thursday, May 28, 2020, 8 - 9:30pm: TU GH'EH NAH (Water Is Life), Friday, May 29, 2020, 8 - 9:30pm: TU CHO (Big Water), Saturday, May 30, 2020 8 - 9:30pm: TU GH'EG TL'E'TH (Water Streams) and Sunday, May 31, 2020, 4 - 5:30pm: TU GH'EL T'ILHN (Water Carriers).

Customary 'firekeepers' watched over the sacred flame all weekend long until the celebration reached it's end on Sunday evening. This Indigenous gathering is part of a longterm vision of Kakekalanicks, the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre, and the City of St. Catharines to build on the Two Row Wampum teaching that promotes all Nations walking together, in parallel, with respect, compassion, and understanding to cultivate an inclusive community for our shared future. Guided by that philosophy, Artistic Director Michele-Elise Burnett (Métis) and Artistic Producer Tim Johnson (Mohawk) have curated the programming with support from the Celebration of Nations Advisory Council and PAC programming staff. The three-day gathering showcased a wide variety of Indigenous arts and artists, ranging from traditional to contemporary music, dance performances, sunrise ceremonies, film screenings, creative workshops, an outdoor artisan market that includes food vendors, and hands-on workshops and an activity zone for both children and adults. 2019 Celebration of Nations programming can be found here. Additional programming to be announced in the coming weeks. “Our theme for 2019 is Empathic Traditions: Honouring Mother Earth,” explains Artistic Director Michele-Elise Burnett. “The programs we’re producing will present a wide range of Indigenous artistic expression and knowledge, combined with scientific research, designed to nurture

human connections to the natural world that foster environmental ethics and manifest our responsibility for future generations.” Artistic Producer Tim Johnson adds, “We’ve recruited a group of prestigious allies who are working hard to address the complex environmental issues that are challenging the health of our living earth. These include Brock University, the Canadian Biosphere Reserves Association, Centre for Climate Change Management at Mohawk College, Niagara Parks Commission, Plenty Canada, Ontario Nature, Trent University, Walpole Island Land Trust, Youth Circle for Mother Earth, Canadian Commission for UNESCO, and many others. In addition, we’ve asked our participating artists to present creative works that reflect upon this year’s theme.” “Celebration of Nations has become a wonderful tradition of cross-cultural learning and celebration each year. With a focus on honouring Mother Earth, this year’s celebration will encourage us to focus on sustainability and the natural environment that we are fortunate to share with all of the people and First Nations of the Niagara region” said St. Catharines Mayor Walter Sendzik. Celebration of Nations is an opportunity for Niagara residents and visitors to actively participate in an inclusive and engaging community gathering that provides cultural and historical insights infused within entertainment and social activities that forge connections and strengthen the bonds of community. The three day celebration of Indigenous arts, culture, and tradition was dubbed a success.

The event showcased over 40 events and perfomances that alPHOTO lowed visitors to enjoy all aspects of the celebration.

SUBMITTED.


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September 11th, 2019

SPORTS

know the score.

Haud. Favourites look for your vote in MLL awards STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

BOSTON, MA (September 6, 2019) - Major League Lacrosse (MLL) today announced the shortlist for the end of regular season awards last Friday on September 6. This year, MLL fans will be able to vote on six regular season awards: Coca-Cola Most Valuable Player, Warrior Offensive Player of the Year, Warrior Defensive Player of the Year, Brine Goalie of the Year, Tito’s Coach of the Year, and Cascade Rookie of the Year. And this year, both Randy Staats (Mohawk), and Lyle Thompson (Onondaga) are at the helm of nominees. MLL Honors presented by New Balance will take place at Union Station on October 5th. The event will be hosted by Alexis Perry and streamed live on MajorLeagueLacrosse.com. The winners of the six awards will be announced live during the broadcasted event. Winners will be selected through a combination of the fan vote and voting by current MLL coaches and general managers. The MLL Honors presented by New Balance falls between the MLL Semifinals, set to be held October 4th at Peter Barton Lacrosse Stadium on the campus of the University of Denver, and the MLL Championship Game, set for October 6th at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, CO. The MLL semi-final and Championship games will all be nationally broadcast on ESPN2. Voting for the six awards

Loving friends and family of Nick Clause (pictured) Joan and Kevin Garlow, Brenda Williams, Mark Hill, Peggy Hill, Chuck Martin, Missy White, Rob Logan, Christian, Tony Styres, pose together as they present the funds accumulated during the “Tournament of Friends” golf tournament held at the Greens of Renton on SaturPHOTO BY CHEZNEY MARTIN day, August 31. .

Playing for the Chesapeake Bayhawks, Lyle Thompson has been nominated for Offensive of the Year Award and the MVP of the Year Award along with opposing player Randy Staats of the Atlanta Blaze. PHOTO SUBMITTED Your vote online could help them achieve recognition.

will remain open through September 20, at 5pm ET. Fans may vote as many times as they would like for their favourite players at MajorLeagueLacrosse. com.

8. Zach Currier, Denver Outlaws 9. John Grant Jr., Denver Outlaws 10. Rob Pannell, New York Lizards

COCA-COLA MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

WARRIOR OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Presented to the athlete whose overall performance and impact were proven to be the most valuable to his team's success during the regular season. Last year the Coca-Cola Most Valuable Player of the year was presented to Rob Pannell. 1. Shayne Jackson, Atlanta Blaze 2. Randy Staats, Atlanta Blaze 3. Bryan Cole, Atlanta Blaze 4. Mark Cockerton, Boston Cannons 5. Lyle Thompson, Chesapeake Bayhawks 6. Sean Sconone, Dallas Rattlers 7. Craig Chick, Dallas Rattlers

Presented to the athlete whose offensive performance was outstanding throughout the regular season. 1. Shayne Jackson, Atlanta Blaze 2. Tommy Palasek, Atlanta Blaze 3. Randy Staats, Atlanta Blaze 4. Bryan Cole, Atlanta Blaze 5. Mark Cockerton, Boston Cannons 6. Lyle Thompson, Chesapeake Bayhawks 7. Steele Stanwick, Chesapeake Bayhawks 8. Chris Aslanian, Denver Outlaws 9. Zach Currier, Denver Outlaws

10. Rob Pannell, New York Lizards As well, the second annual David Huntley Man of the Year Award will be announced during the MLL Honors presented by New Balance in memory of the former MLL head coach who passed away in December 2017. The award will be presented to a player who has demonstrated “outstanding sportsmanship, professionalism and service to his community.” The Maverik Players Choice Award will be given out to the player who is considered “the best teammate in Major League Lacrosse.” This award is in its second season and is voted on by the players. The player with the highest percentage of votes from their teammates is named the winner of the Maverik Players Choice Award. In its inaugural season last year, the award was won by Mitch Belisle of the Boston Cannons.

A letter of appreciation: Tournament of Friends for Nick Clause By Brenda Williams

RENTON — It was a fabulous day on Saturday, August 31 at The Greens at Renton where $24,700.00 was raised for Nick Clause. Tournament Organizers were Brenda Williams, Missy White, Mark Hill, Chuck Martin, Peg Martin, Rob Davis, Derek Williams and Rob Logan who have been working on this for two months and their hard work has definitely paid off. Although Nick suffered 3 strokes in April he is now on his way to recovery. Nick we love you and you have given so much to the community with the years of organizing The Victor "Yogi" Bomberry Memorial. This is one way that we could show our appreciation. Thank you to the volunteers Timarah Hill, Richard Adams, Kolbi Williams, Karissa Williams, Peg Martin,Tammy Jacobs & Derek Jr. Williams, Dalton Williams, Will Poulton and Ruby Miller. Thank you to all the Golf-

ers it was a great day with fun had by all. Thank you to all who Generously Donated and made this tournament a great success: Glenn Styres Racing, The Krib on 54, Diane Bomberry, Ironworkers Local 736, Rob Davis and Friends, Grand River Enterprises, Christian Hansen, Byogi Corp, Sue Martin Golf for Timbuck, Seneca Smokes , Josh Burnham, Chiefswood Gas & Garage, Halifax Thunderbirds, Victor Bomberry, Kool Kids Property Maintenance, Victory Games, Kool Kidz Ice & Water, Enohai hodageh, Styres Gas & Convenience, River Range Gas, Tim’s Tire, Scott’s Towing, Golf Depot, Derek Williams, Rob Logan, Chuck Martin, Mark Hill, Amy Verboom, RV Repairs Les Shultz, Roger Hill Roofing, ASAP Water, John Monture Farms, SN Veterans Association, SN Farmer's Association, Mohawk Asphalt, Main 88, South Side Louie’s, Phil Fraser, Lone Wolf and Jesse Maracle.


September 11th, 2019

TWO ROW TIMES

MOHAWK/ CAYUGA 26 WEEK CONVERSATIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAM 26 WEEK PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 24TH- MARCH 25TH TUESDAY NIGHT: CAYUGA  WEDNESDAY NIGHT: MOHAWK 5PM-8PM *SPACES ARE LIMITED*

Participants will learn culture, language, and employment information during this 26 week program. 

FREE Meals will be served each week as part of the program starting at 5pm, while instruction and workshops are held from 6pm-8pm.

FOR MORE INFO OR TO REGISTER, CONTACT KAITY AT 519-445-2222

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September 11th, 2019

Female officials in the NHL STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

BUFFALO — The NHL will feature female officials this season for the first time ever in their rookie tournaments. While the league hasn’t yet committed to any officials for the 2019 - 2020 season, referees Katie Guay & Kelly Cooke and linesmen Kirsten Welsh & Kendall Hanley, four of the 96 officials who participated in the 2019 NHL Exposure Combine, have been selected to officiate in 2019 rookie tournaments. And as you can see from the profiles of the four female officials, courtesy of NHL.com, the women are legitimate: Guay has officiated for 14 years, including at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics. The 37-year-old officiates men’s and women’s NCAA Division I hockey, was part of the first all-female officiating crew at the 2019 Women’s Frozen Four and was the first woman to

BUFFALO —While the NHL hasn’t yet committed to any officials for the 2019 - 2020 season, referees Katie Guay & Kelly Cooke and linesmen Kirsten Welsh & Kendall Hanley, four of the 96 officials who participated in the exposure combine in the last week of August, PHOTO SUBMITTED have been selected to officiate in 2019 rookie tournaments..

officiate the men’s Beanpot Championship in 2019. She played Division I hockey for Brown University from 2001-05 and has competed for USA Hockey’s National Under-22 Team. Cooke is a licensed referee for the IIHF and NCAA (Division I) and has officiated for 10 years. She was also part of first all-fe-

male officiating crew at the 2019 NCAA Women’s Frozen Four. The 29-year-old played Division I hockey for Princeton from 2009-13. She was a four-year ECAC All-Academic Team selection, was selected as Princeton’s captain and named team MVP in 2012-13. For Welsh, the Exposure Combine was her first

introduction to officiating. She played Division I hockey for Robert Morris University from 2015-19 and was captain during her senior season. The 22-year-old was a two-time All-College Hockey America First-Team selection and CHA Defender of the Year in 2017-18. She helped Robert Morris win three

Six Nations River Rats victorious in Nashville

TENNESSEE — After a hard-fought game, the Six Nations River Rats defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in a 4-2 victory to claim the first ever Nashville Invitational Championship. This was the first tournament hosted by Bearpaw Lacrosse in Nashville and it was considered PHOTO SUBMITTED “a great outdoor tournament.” As well, Roger Vyse received the tournament offensive.

Elementary 3-pitch SIX NATIONS — The Six Nations and New Credit Elementary 3-Pitch Tournament took place at the Ohsweken Ball Diamonds on Tuesday, September 10, 2019. I.L. Thomas, Oliver M. Smith, Lloyd S. King, Emily C. General, Jamieson and J. C. Hill Elementary Schools took part in friendly but determined competition in front of stands full of family and friends. Photos by Chezney Martin.

regular-season CHA titles. Hanley is entering her 12th season of officiating and is a licensed linesman with the IIHF, NCAA women’s hockey (Divisions I and III) and the National Women’s Hockey League. She is also entering her fourth season as a linesman in USA Hockey’s Officiating Development Program,

where she has officiated in the USHL, NAHL and NA3HL junior hockey leagues. The 35-year-old played Division III varsity hockey for Elmira College from 2005-07 and SUNY Oswego from 2007-09 while completing her Bachelor of Science in zoology. The four have been selected to officiate rookie tournaments in Irvine, California; Buffalo; Nashville and Traverse City, Michigan. A total of 30 officials from the combine were selected to work the rookie tournaments. This is the sixth year Exposure Combine participants have been officiating at the rookie tournaments, and 85 percent of the officials at the five rookie tournaments have attended an NHL Exposure Combine. The fast-paced environment at the rookie tournaments has proved to be a valuable step in developing the next generation of officials as well as accelerating the transition to a high level of officiating of a few elite hockey players.

Fishing derby to take place on the Grand

Bass are fun to catch as they put up a lot of fight for their size and the derby will award a first, second and third place winner for the PHOTO FILE biggest.

STAFF REPORT

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

SIX NATIONS — The Carney Elijah Johnson Foundation will be hosting their first ever fishing derby in the month of October. On October 5, fishermen are invited to visit the Grand River from 7 a.m., to 4 p.m., to try to hook some fish for prizes in the categories of largest

bass and largest fish of any species. First, second and third place will be awarded after participants put forward a $50 registration fee and $10 launch fee. As usual, all of the money raised will go back into the Six Nations community for mental health and suicide prevention. For more information contact Cody Johnson, 226-922-0717 to register or for more information.


September 11th, 2019

TWO ROW TIMES

25

151st Cowichan Exhibition includes new category: best home grown pot CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

VICTORIA — One of Canada's oldest fall fairs is putting a new twist on its annual showcase of local livestock, produce and fruit by adding a new category for best home-grown marijuana. The Cowichan Exhibition in Duncan, B.C., which dates back to 1868, has created a best cannabis category to embrace legalization and celebrate local pot growers, said exhibition vice-president Bud James. The fair starts Friday and the cannabis entries will be on display in the main hall at the Cowichan Exhibition Grounds along with the region's top vegetables, fruits and baked goods. First prize is $5, second is $3 and third place gets a ribbon. ``We just decided this year, because it's an agricultural product, and it's been grown in the valley for years, and now that it's finally legally grown, we would allow people to win a ribbon for the best,'' said James. He said fair officials believe the Cowichan cannabis category is the first of its kind in Canada. An official at the Canadian Association of

Fairs and Exhibitions, a non-profit organization representing rural and urban fairs, said she had not heard of any other cannabis judging contests prior to the Cowichan Exhibition, but couldn't confirm it was the first. A fall fair in Grand Forks, B.C., is also judging local cannabis, but the event starts Saturday, one day after Cowichan's fair. Those who enter the competition in Grand Forks can compete for best indoor- and outdoor-grown cannabis. James said fair organizers contacted the local council and RCMP prior to adding the cannabis category. The mayor and council did not oppose the contest and the RCMP referred organizers to B.C.'s Liquor and Cannabis Regulation Branch, the agency monitoring retail sales of non-medical cannabis, he said. Organizers decided to go ahead with the event after its plans were not rejected, James said. ``Our interpretation of the rules are you can't make it attractive to people under 19 years and we are not making it attractive,'' he said. James said the cannabis entries will be placed in a glass display case and the individual entries will be sealed in clear zip lock

plastic bags. ``It's being judged to the same standard of judging garden and field produce,'' he said. ``It's done by uniformity. You want all three buds to be the same size, same shape, same colour. It's also the dryness, texture and smell. It's exactly the same way you would judge apples or carrots or hay bales. It's all done the same way.'' James said the contest doesn't involve sampling the product. Bree Tweet, the manager of a medical cannabis dispensary in nearby Ladysmith, will judge the marijuana entries, said James. The exhibition received 18 cannabis entries and James said the contest created a buzz at the fair. ``The enthusiasm of the entrants, the people bringing their entry forms, they are so enthusiastic it's unbelievable,'' he said. ``They are so thrilled that it's happening, that we're doing it because they've been waiting for years for legalization and now, they finally got it and now they have a chance to show what they can do.'' James, who has entered his prized Dahlia flowers at past fairs, said the addition of the cannabis category has exceeded expectations with the 18 entries.

Miss Teen Best Traditional Presentation: Grayce Anderson

1st Runner Up – Erieauna Barnhart 2nd Runner Up- Ehsgenha Dale Best Little Miss Personal Introduction: Erieauna Barnhart

Official list of Ambassador titles

Submitted by the Six Nations Agricultural Society The Six Nations Agricultural Society is proud to announce the winners of our 2019-2020 Six Nations Ambassador titles:

Miss Six Nations Aleria McKay 1st Runner Up – Alyssa Green 2nd Runner Up- Lainee Farmer Miss Best Traditional Presentation: Alyssa Green Miss Teen Six Nations Madison Miller 1st Runner Up- Cloe Vanevery 2nd Runner Up- Grayce Anderson

Miss Preteen Six Nations Westyn Myers 1st Runner Up – Florence Barnhart 2nd Runner Up- Adin Greene Best Preteen Public Speaker: Westyn Myers

Miss Mini Six Nations Rayna Isaacs 1st Runner Up – Tori Smith 2nd Runner Up- Ciceleigh Martin Best Miss Mini Personal Introduction: Teyanna General Little Miss Six Nations Emme loft

We are also proud to announce the winners of:

- 2019 Citizenship Award – Raynee Smith - 2019 Miss/Teen Congeniality- Alyssa Green - 2019 Highest Points Overall - a new award that shares the highest overall points percentage in the entire competition: Westyn Myers with 92% overall

J O B POSITION

Supply Teacher STEAM Academy Secondary School Teacher – English and Geography STEAM Academy Indigenous Student Success Leader Housing Coordinator Medical Transportation Assistant Community Wellness Assistant Human Resources Manager Full Time Registrar Community Cultural Homelessness Prevention Facilitator Senior Environmental Communications Analyst Administrative Assistant (2 Positions) Executive Administrative Assistant Community Relations Manager Business Development Officer Youth Concurrent Disorders Worker Landlord Liaison (2) Endaayaang Journey Coach HVAC Technician (2 positions) Kitchen Cook & P/T Cook & P/T Kitchen Help

B O A R D

EMPLOYER/LOCATION

TERM

SALARY CLOSING DATE

Indigenous Education Centre, Niagara College Term Oneida Nation of the Thames, Southwold On Full Time

Sept 11 2019 Sept 12 2019

Six Nations Polytechnic, Six Nations Six Nations Polytechnic Six Nations

Term Contract

TBD TBD

Sept 11 2019 Sept 11 2019

$28.71 Hr $21.40 $22.50 Hr Oneida Nation of the Thames, Southwold On P/T Permanent $17.00 Hr The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation F/T Permanent $16.90 Hr Six Nations Polytechnic, Six Nations Full Time TBD Ogwehoweh Skills & Trades Training Ctre Full Time TBD Niwasa Kendaaswin Teg, Hamilton, On Contract TBD

Sept 12 2019 Sept 12 2019 Sept 13 2019 Sept 13 2019 Sept 13 2019

Chiefs of Ontario, Toronto, On

Contract

TBD

Sept 13 2019

Indspire, Six Nations & Toronto, On Walpole Island First Nation, Wallaceburg, On Brantford Native Housing, Brantford, On Chippewas of the Thames Development Corporation Hamilton Regional Indian Centre, Hamilton, On Hamilton Regional Indian Ctre. Hamilton, On Hamilton Regional Indian Ctre, Hamilton, On CityHousing, Hamilton, On

Full Time Full Time Full Time Contract

TBD TBD TBD TBD

Sept 17 2019 Sept 17 2019 Sept 20 2019 Sept 20 2019

Full Time Full Time Full Time Full Time

$46,904 Yr $46,904 Yr $46,904 Yr $33,950 $38,580 Yr TBD

Sept 20 2019 Sept 20 2019 Sept 20 2019 Sept 25 2019

MJ’s Diner, New Credit

POSITION

Community Energy Champion Physiotherapist Early Childhood Development Worker Healthy Lifestyle Coordinator School Caretaker Registered Early Childhood Educator/ Cultural and Language Instructor (2 positions) Coordinator for Elected Chief and SAO Director of Policy, Communications and Records Education Finance Analyst Receptionist/ Filing Clerk Child and Youth Health Case Manager Registered Early Childhood Educator Registered Early Childhood Educator (3 positions) Urban Support Team Member (4 positions) Psychosocial / Bereavement Spiritual Counsellor Food Service Worker Cook (2 positions) Food Services Supervisor Child Care Supervisor Accounts Payable/ Payroll Clerk Kitchen Helper

Youth Life Promotion Worker/ Kanikonriio Advisor Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

EMPLOYER/LOCATION

Full & Part Time

Public Works, Six Nations Therapy Services Health Services Early Childhood Development, Health Serv. Health Promotions, Health Serv. School Maintenance, Public Works Family Gatherings, Social Services

TERM

SALARY CLOSING DATE

Contract $45,000 Yr Contract $39.56 Hr Full Time TBD Full Time $20 - $24 Hr Part Time $18 Hr Full Time $22 Hr

Central Administration Full Time Administration Policy & Communications Full Time Central Administration Contract Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full Time Child and Youth Health, Health Services Contract Child Care Services, Social Services Part Time Child Care Services, Social Services Full Time Ogwadeni:deo Social Services

TBD TBD $65K Yr $36,275 Yr TBD $20 Hr TBD

Full Time Up to $56,650 with BSW Home & Community Care Health Services Full Time $55,000 $67,000 Yr Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part Time $14 - $15 Hr Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part Time $16.00 Hr Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part Time TBD Child Care Services, Social Services Full Time TBD Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full Time Up To $54,550 Yr Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Part Time $14.00 Hr

Administration, Social Services

Full Time

Open Until Filled

Sept 11 2019 Sept 11 2019 Sept 11 2019 Sept 11 2019 Sept 11 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019

Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 18 2019 Sept 25 2019 Sept 25 2019 Sept 25 2019

TBD Sept 25 2019

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


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TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

September 11th,2018 2019 NOVEMBER 28TH,

Obituaries

In Memoriam

In Appreciation

BUTLER: Logan Vernon November 20, 1993 - September 7, 2019

Memoriam

We would like to thank all the people who came to the open house to celebrate our 50th Wedding Anniversary.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Logan Vernon Butler. Son of Jason Butler and Nancy Vince. Grandson of Beverley Butler. He leaves behind his heartbroken brothers and sisters Jenny (Adam), Dan Hill, Lucas, Kaitlin, Corrina, Shelandris, and Landon. Also survived by many aunts, uncles, and cousins. Special uncle to Kinsley, Raiden, Elizah, Carmen, and Grayson. Resting at 9 Bicentennial Trail, Ohsweken after 7pm. Tuesday until 10 am. Thursday then to Styres Funeral Home, 1798 4th Line Rd., Ohsweken where funeral service will be held at 2pm. Thursday September 12, 2019. Cremation to follow. www.rhbanderson.com

Thank You

I would like to give a huge thank-you to the Dream Catcher’s Foundation for assisting me in piano lessons. I simply love playing the piano and have competed again in the Simcoe Music Festival this year placing 2nd in my division. If it was not for this foundation I would not be able to do this.

Smith: Russell Wayne In loving memory of my Dear brother and Uncle, left us on Sept 27/2017. Time goes by but memories stay As near and dear as yesterday No longer in our Lives to share But in our hearts you are always there.

Sadly missed by Annette and Family

Thank you for the cards of well wishes and thoughtful messages. Thank you again to everyone for everything Sam & Rose

Dance Registration In Memoriam Sept 10, 2018 Smith Myrtle: In Loving Memory of our dear Mother, grandmother and great grandmother, who left us Sept 10, 1992. There is a special kind of Love That’s meant for you alone. A Special place within our hearts, That only you can own. You know that we still love you, That we miss you everyday. We still feel lost without you And will always feel that way. Precious memories never fade, Despite the passing years.

Lovingly remembered and sadly missed by Annette, Jim & Joan, Bob, Kathy & Scott and Mike & Sandi and all their families, Bob and the late Robbin.

Hill’s Snack Bar

Land Wanted Band Member looking for 1-3 acres of land Contact is 519-7558274

Workers Wanted

Factory Workers wanted. Drop resume at 196 Chiefswood.

For Sale

Come and enjoy the excellent food that Hill’s Snack Bar is famous for!

Dance & Modelling Registration 45TH Anniversary Season Michelle Farmer’s Studio of Dance & Modelling Wednesday September 11th - 5:00-7:00pm Thursday September 12th - 5:00-7:00pm Saturday September 14th - 10:00-12:00 noon 1824 4th Line road Ohsweken #519-717-9099 michellefarmerfuller@gmail.com

Free Classes

FREE

For Adults 19+

“New Date” The Achievement Centre is offering six sessions of Crafting for Income Fundamentals. Next six sessions begin: September 24 – October 3, 2019, Tues. – Thur. 1:00pm – 3:00pm. We also offer one-to-one or online training for adults who want to improve their English, math or computer skills for employment or education. For more information please call: 519-445-0023, ext. 6902 or text: 519-757-5989.

Place Your CLASSIFIED ADS

ALL DAY BREAKFAST Offering Smoking and Non-Smoking Rooms

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

Special Thanks to our daughters for organizing the celebration.

905-765-1331 3345 6th Line Road, Six Nations

Pepsi cooler/fridge with removable racks (not shown). $550 OBO Call for further details. (519) 900-5535

at: Oneida Business Park Suite 124 50 Generations Drive

(at the back of the building) off 4th Line


TWO TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES

September 11th,2018 2019 DECEMBER 19TH,

CLUES ACROSS 1. Babies’ eating accessories 5. Charge on a coat of arms 9. Set of five 11. California town 13. One who cites 15. Elected official 16. Japanese delicacy 17. Couldn’t be happier 19. Enormous 21. Hunter’s tool 22. Georgia rockers 23. Cold wind 25. Beginner 26. Where you sleep 27. Without 29. We all have them 31. Spoiled 33. Platform 34. Drama and horror are two 36. In abundance 38. Turf 39. Inventor Musk 41. Negative answers 43. French river 44. Saps of energy 46. Type of sandwich 48. Sets apart again 52. Engage in a contest 53. Sufferings 54. Freestanding sculpture 56. Digs into 57. Fish have them 58. Speaks 59. Storage unit CLUES DOWN 1. Spread over 2. Dyes 3. British thermal unit 4. Small city in Maine

27 27

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, it is time to take charge. Do not allow obstacles to get in the way of your grand goals. Don’t hold back at all, and attack every project with full force. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, concentrate on what you already have instead of trying to attain more. When you analyze the things around you, you’ll discover you already have what you need.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 The more you let your emotions show this week, the more prosperous you can become, Gemini. Try new things, even if they scare you a little.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, if it seems as though people aren’t taking you as seriously as you’d like, you may have to adjust your tactics a little bit. Perhaps the delivery is just wrong.

5. Having an affection for 6. Welsh for John 7. Plays that ridicule 8. Not of your right mind 9. A way to get there 10. Hideaways 11. Relating to neurons 12. “Family City USA” 14. Proof of payment (abbr.) 15. Flew high 18. Wreaths 20. Got rid of 24. Shortly 26. Confer 28. Monies given as support 30. German electric car

Answers for September 11th, 2019 Crossword Puzzle

32. Objects of an earlier time 34. Flat-bottomed boats 35. Small waterbird 37. Willingness to please others 38. Military actions 40. Brooklyn hoopsters 42. Took to the seas 43. Romanian city 45. What the sun eventually does 47. Titans’ DC Dean 49. Resentful longing 50. Ceases to live 51. Pouches 55. Humbug

SUDOKU

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Do not turn down any opportunities that come your way, Leo. Even if they seem like they may not amount to anything, they can get you the kind of exposure that you need right now. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, put your plans in motion and get as many helping hands as you can muster while you’re at it. This will only make the work go that much more quickly.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Always aim for the gold, Libra. You are in a position right now where you do not have to settle for anything less than the best. Use every tool at your disposal to get what you desire. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, take a decisive stance on a problem that has been lingering and be confident about the choices you make; otherwise, things will just stall out indefinitely.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Arguments can turn into bigger battles if someone doesn’t concede their position, Sagittarius. Communication is a key thing for you right now.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Everything in your life seems to be going in different directions, Capricorn. Seek Pisce’s help as you figure out a way to get everything pointed in the same direction. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 An idea can grow into something much bigger if you just give it a chance, Aquarius. With a little nurturing, you may see your idea grow into something much bigger.

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS AT

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 construction@sitnbull.ca

Oneida Business Park ♦ 50 Generations Drive Suite 124 (at the back of the building) MON - FRI 10-4 or email us at tworowtimes@gmail.com

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Take a step back from a problem that has been tough to solve, Pisces. There’s nothing you can do right now, so a break makes sense.

3304 Sixth Line Rd. Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: (905) 765-7884 Fax: (905) 765-3154 RIMS & BATTERIES • UNBELIEVABLE PRICES


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TWO ROW TIMES

September 11th, 2019

CONGRATULATIONS

The winner of the truck was

TO

Raymond Neddow from Caledonia. CONGRATULATIONS TO $500 draw winners Miranda Steele; Joy Owen; Mikayla Ritchie; George Atkins; Verna Parent; Rod Bomberry; Don McNeil; Donna Kyle; Nolan Hill; Mike Kasurak; Johnson Sandy; Allison Gowling; Wayne Miller; Jamie Rossignol; Tammy Smith and Shaun Armstrong.

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Two Row Times, September 11, 2019  

September 11, 2019

Two Row Times, September 11, 2019  

September 11, 2019

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