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TUSAAYAKSAT MAGAZINE / SPRING 2017 / $5

STORIES THAT NEED TO BE HEARD

THE

HOCKEY ISSUE

DAVINA MCLEOD AND THE WOMEN OF THE GAME Q&A WITH TROY KASOOK CELEBRATING THE IRC CUP

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MORE

FACEBOOK.COM/TUSAAYAKSAT

TEAM POSTERS INSIDE


ON THE COVER: Editor-in-Chief Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison captured this portrait of Davina McLeod at the Sittichinli Complex in Aklavik. To read more about Davina’s success on and off the ice, check out our story beginning on page 14.

Published quarterly by ICS at Box 1704, 292 Mackenzie Rd, Inuvik, Northwest Territories, X0E 0T0. Contact us at +1 (867) 777 2320 or tusaayaksat.magazine@gmail.com PUBLISHER Inuvialuit Communications Society

TUSAAYAKSAT MEANS “STORIES AND VOICES THAT NEED TO BE HEARD.” WE CELEBRATE THE INUVIALUIT PEOPLE, CULTURE AND HERITAGE.

OUR MISSION:

TO EMPOWER, CELEBRATE, COMMUNICATE, HEAL AND BOND. TO BRING YOU THE BEST COVERAGE OF OUR NEWS, VIBRANT CULTURE AND PERSPECTIVES.

CONTENTS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison HEAD DESIGNER Vanessa Hunter EDITORIAL TEAM WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison COPY EDITOR Laura Worsley-Brown INUVIALUKTUN TRANSLATORS Albert Elias CONTRIBUTORS Dennis Allen, Joelle Charlie, Billie Jean Conley, Karis Dekwant, Allysa Felix, Janessa Blake, Tyra Cockney-Goose, Doll Larocque and Sheree Mcleod PHOTOGRAPHERS Faith Raymond, Weronika Murray, Nick Westover and Jana Kasparova

4.

THE FAN ZONE

14.

HOCKEY IN THE SOUTH WITH DAVINA MCLEOD

BORN TO SKATE

22.

Q&A WITH TROY KASOOK

MEET THE NEXT GENERATION

32.

NORTHERN GAMES SERIES : TWO-FOOT LOW KICK

SPECIAL THANKS TO Wilma and Donny Hendrick, Mina McLeod, Underwood Day, Donald Kuptana Jr., Steve Cockney Sr. and the Northern Games Society, the Arctic Winter Games International Committee, Beverly Amos, Barb Memogana and the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre, Megan McCaffery and the staff at East Three Secondary School, the Inuvik Minor Hockey Association, Larsen Nasogaluak and the staff at the Donald Kuptana Sr. Memorial Arena, Tuktoyaktuk’s women’s hockey team, the staff at the Midnight Sun Recreation Complex and the volunteers who help make the Gwich’in Cup and IRC Cup possible BUSINESS OFFICE Inuvialuit Communications Society BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT, INUVIK Lucy Kuptana VICE PRESIDENT, TUKTOYAKTUK Debbie Raddi TREASURER, ULUKHAKTOK Joseph Haluksit AKLAVIK DIRECTOR Colin Gordon PAULATUK DIRECTOR Denise Wolki SACHS HARBOUR DIRECTOR Jean Harry

20.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Veronica Kasook OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Roseanne Rogers

FUNDING MADE POSSIBLE BY Inuvialuit Regional Corporation GNWT (Education, Culture and Employment) GET SOCIAL Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

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FEATURES 2 A LONG HISTORY 4 FAN ZONE 14 BORN TO SKATE 22 TROY KASOOK 28 THE NEXT GENERATION 32 NORTHERN GAMES SERIES 37 IRC & GWICH’IN CUP POSTERS

COMMEMORATIVE POSTER

SUBSCRIPTIONS E-mail subscription inquiries to icsfinance@northwestel.net or phone +1 (867) 777 2320

37.


41.

HOCKEY 2.0

52.

A LIFE OF HOCKEY ON THE PEEL RIVER

66.

CELEBRATING THE IRC CUP

42.

54.

FEATURES 41 HOCKEY 2.0 42 TUK WOMEN’S HOCKEY 52 A LIFE OF HOCKEY 54 TYRA’S STORY 58 THE VOLUNTEERS 66 IRC CUP AWARDS 73 LANGUAGE GAMES 75 GET SOCIAL TUK WOMEN’S HOCKEY

HOCKEY: AN OUTSIDER’S PERSPECTIVE

73.

LANGUAGE GAMES: HAVE YOU MET..?

TUSAAYAKSAT UPINRAKSAMI TUSAAYAKSAT IN THE SPRING AAQANA! HELLO! On a sunny day in March, I threw my hockey bag in the back seat of my car and hit the ice road to Tuktoyaktuk. The official reason was to photograph the budding women’s hockey scene at the Donald Kuptana Sr. Memorial Arena; the unofficial reason was to lace up and hit the ice with a group of girls who love hockey as much as I do. There was just one catch: when I opened up my bag in the dressing room, my skates were missing. In most places, that omission would spell the end of my plans, but in Tuktoyaktuk things turned out differently. Within minutes I had a borrowed pair that fit almost as well as my own and offers for a stick, helmet, gloves and anything else I would need. While many of the women in Tuktoyaktuk are just getting started with hockey, Davina McLeod of Aklavik is already reaching some impressive milestones on the ice. Last year, as captain of Team NWT, she led the territory to a gold medal at the Arctic Winter Games. In May she will be competing in her seventh - and final - National Aboriginal Hockey Championships, but her hockey career at university is just getting started (page 14). Troy Kasook, on the other hand, has been playing hockey for

58.

THE VOLUNTEERS

75.

GET SOCIAL WITH INUVIALUIT

On the ice at the Donald Kuptana Sr. Memorial Arena

more than 40 years. From games of shinny on Inuvik’s Twin Lakes to the IRC Cup, Troy shared with us his memories from years past (page 22). And then there’s Wilma and Donny Hendrick, who work so hard and so selflessly behind the scenes to put on the IRC Cup every year in Inuvik. Twenty years ago they were passed the torch from Roy and Sandra Ipana, who had organized the tournament for the previous decade, and have continued to honour them as the regional event grows year after year (page 58). It’s no doubt that hockey is a popular sport in Canada, through and through – but in the Arctic we take it to the next level. Don’t believe me? Keep reading and find out.

QUYANAINNI THANK YOU, Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison Editor-in-Chief

P.S. To read our story about women’s hockey in Tuktoyaktuk, flip to page 42.


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H

ockey has long been a staple of the Inuvialuit diet. From games of gunny-sack hockey on the Mackenzie River to impromptu shinny matches on Inuvik’s Twin Lakes, it has been a source of pride, joy and good old-fashioned rivalries. But it wasn’t until 1989 when Roy Ipana and Harold Cook co-founded the IRC Cup that hockey took on a larger role – that of a community gathering and celebration, a place for friends new and old to meet and reconnect. Roy and his wife Sandra organized the tournament for a decade before passing the torch to Roy’s son, Donny Hendrick, and his wife Wilma. For nearly 20 years the pair, alongside a group of dedicated volunteers, have kept the tradition going, bringing together hockey players from across the North for a weekend of competition and fun. In 2002 the Gwich’in Cup was created for youth hockey players, and has now been going strong for 16 years. Let the games begin!


Duane Smith drops the puck for team captains James Blake and Davie Krengnektak to mark the start of the 29th annual IRC Cup in Inuvik.


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FAN ZONE THE

To see more photos, check us out on Facebook!

No matter who you’re cheering for at the Gwich’in Cup and IRC Cup, we can all agree on one thing: the Beaufort Delta has the loudest and proudest hockey fans around. Aarigaa!

Photo by Faith Raymond

The stands at the Midnight Sun Recreation Complex were full for the IRC Cup finals Sunday, February 19.

Caroline Loreen, Dolly Loreen and Chantal Gruben.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Irene Illasiak and Gabrielle Nogasak.

Lukas Lucas and Layton Kotokak take in a game.

Trudy Rogers angles to get a good view of the net.


Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Lennox Amos, Colsen Gordon and Seth Day.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Shawn Campbell, Bradley Firth and Donovan Koe. Photo by Weronika Murray


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Diezel Blake cheers on LJ’s Sabres with his cousin Emery Mcleod at his side.


Photo by Weronika Murray

Braydon Greenland.

Kenny Stewart and Justin Stewart.

Photo by Faith Raymond Photo by Weronika Murray Photo by Faith Raymond

Fans cheer on their favourites at the IRC Cup finals.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Tessa Dillon, Brianna Wolki and Cody Felix.


Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

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Dicky MistakenChief warms up.

Tye Ovayuak at the Gwich’in Cup.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Tyler Sittichinli, Deandra Greenland and Cassandra Paul.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Weronika Murray

Young fans get as close as they can to the action.

Brayden John cheers on Aklavik.

Colsen Gordon, Orlando Day and Thomas Campagna.


Photo by Weronika Murray Photo by Weronika Murray

Many fans took videos to share with friends and players after the game. To catch the IRC Cup finals again, visit the Tusaayaksat Facebook page!


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Photo by Weronika Murray

Tianna Gordon-Ruben nervously watches a game at the IRC Cup.

Young fans line the glass.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Mariyah Snowshoe of Fort McPherson.

Photo by Weronika Murray

Carla Bernhardt stays warm at the arena.

LJ’s fans show off their sweaters.


Photo by Weronika Murray Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Lucas Pokiak lines up to hit the ice at the Gwich’in Cup.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Katrina Cockney cheers on Malena.

Andy Albert and Seth Day with friends.

Photo by Weronika Murray

Photo by Weronika Murray

Kathy Wolki greets a friend with a hug.

Stephanie Charlie and Katelyn Storr.

Players head to their dressing rooms after the game.


Shawn Campbell jokes around with friends at the Gwich’in Cup.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Faith Raymond

Janelle Pascal, centre, with Lori Anne Elanik and Mary Gordon.

Nathan Lennie.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Photo by Weronika Murray

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Rhyan Wolki.

Photo by Faith Raymond

Letters from down south:

the good ole hockey game

Anthony Siloutsiak, Davey Kuptana and Medric Lavallee.

Photo by Faith Raymond

WORDS BY DENNIS ALLEN

When we were kids, we had two things on our mind at all times: hockey and hockey. Our favourite pastime was playing street hockey. Co-op Hill was a hotbed for street hockey with Pete Smith organizing teams and making goalie pads out of his mom’s couch cushions. Grollier Hall had two outdoor skating rinks – one for boys and one for girls. All of us town kids used to play pickup hockey on the boy’s side. My most painful memory is getting a slap shot in the shin with a hard puck from Foster Arey. No one had hockey equipment other than a pair of dull skates. Whenever I see Foster, I still limp to rub it in.

Minor hockey was a big thing in Inuvik. All the kids played. We had both hostels, Grollier and Stringer, plus all the kids from the Canadian Forces Services (CFS), and all the town kids. So each division had at least three or four teams. My first team was the Polar Arcs. I remember writing to my brother Gerry who was working at a seismic camp and asking him to buy me hockey equipment. I had no idea he was north of Tuk and there was nowhere to buy hockey equipment. But my mom scrounged around and came up with enough money to buy me some used hockey equipment from the Opels. I remember how proud I was to finally have shoulder pads and shin pads. My dad had a CFS friend named Don Young who gave him his old pair of hockey gloves. They were men’s large but I felt like Rocket Richard when I had them on. I remember the arena had no indoor heating and often times we had to use our parkas under our sweaters to keep from freezing. But that was just in Mites Division ‘cause we were just learning how to skate. I do remember Ronnie Aleekuk got so cold that the next game he used his mukluks inside his skates to keep his feet warm.

Derek Ipana.

Photo by Faith Raymond

The thing about hockey back then was that it was full contact. And no one really ever got hurt, other than a bloody nose or a Charlie Horse from Ebun Harry’s hip checks. Even years later when I played shinny, I found myself creaming guys into the boards. It’s just something that stays with you, I guess. The most exciting hockey was senior hockey. There were several teams, but the ones that stand out the most were Grollier Hall, the Town Okpiks and the CFS team. The guys from Grollier were just high school kids playing against grown men, often overshadowed and outweighed by a foot in some cases and a hundred pounds in another. But they were fast and exciting to watch. Guys like Ruben Green, who invented the trick shot, or Pat Kuptana’s blistering slap shot, or Norman McDonald’s speed. The Town Okpiks had a guy named Big Larry Fiddler who used to smile when he was scrapping with the CFS guys. CFS has some really good players, too. Like Wilf Chaisson who had a head deke kids still imitate today. Or Dave Kemp who played net. My favourite memory of him in net is robbing two Town Okpik guys with a glove save on a two on O break away. I still get the itch to lace up from time to time, but my bum knee and bad eyes keep me on the bench. Maybe when we all go to the old folks home we can sit around all day and brag about the good old days.


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o t n r o B

Skate DAVINA MCLEOD LEADS TEAM NWT TO A GOLD ULU, SETS HER SIGHTS ON HOCKEY IN THE SOUTH WORDS AND PHOTOS BY NATHALIE HEIBERG-HARRISON


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D

avina McLeod can’t even remember learning how to skate, or lacing up for the first time. As far as she knows, she’s been doing it her whole life. Her mother, Mina McLeod, remembers it a bit differently.

at the [annual Yukon Native Hockey Tournament]. You could notice her on the ice. Everyone would be saying, ‘Who’s that girl?’”

“She must have been four or five when she first started going to public skating, and she couldn’t wait to start playing hockey,” Mina remembers. “Right from the start she wanted to play hockey. She was excited to play all the time. She was raring to go.”

The highlight of Davina’s hockey career came in 2016 when she captained Team NWT hockey to a gold ulu at the Arctic Winter Games, but she would have to journey through the Yukon, Alberta and Ontario to get there.

As soon as Davina was old enough, she started playing minor hockey at the Sittichinli Complex in Aklavik. For extra practice she would jump on the ice with her older brother, David. Because he was a year and a half older, she was always one step behind him, which pushed her to skate faster, fight harder for the puck, and play aggressively – all trademarks she is known for today. Davina may have been an underdog, growing her skills in her hometown of Aklavik, but she didn’t let that stop her. Soon enough, she was attending her first Gwich’in Cup in Inuvik and proving that she had the talent to rival her peers from across the Mackenzie Delta. “She must have been about nine or 10 years old,” remembers Mina. “She won the fastest skater competition. Out of everyone, including the boys, she was the fastest skater. I could tell right away that she was going to play hockey all of her life.” Davina kept pushing herself to get better and better and looked forward to the times that John Chabot, a retired NHL player, visited Aklavik to put on clinics for the community’s youth. Her next big challenge was taking on players from across the North in 2010. “As soon as she was old enough to play in Whitehorse she played

In Grade 10, at the age of 14, Davina moved away from Aklavik – and her parents – to study and play hockey in Whitehorse. She moved in with her older sister, Karlyn, and played for her first all-female team, the Mustangs, while attending Porter Creek Secondary School. Mina says that her daughter’s move to the Yukon gave way to her biggest developments both on and off the ice. “When I left her there I thought, ‘What am I doing?’ But I’m glad that I did,” she explains. “She played hockey every day, had dry land practice, and went to tournaments.” It was also a significant change for Davina in that for the first time she wasn’t playing with her older brother or the other boys in Aklavik, but with girls her own age. “It’s definitely a different environment. I think the biggest thing for me was just the encouragement you get from girls. When something goes wrong, playing with guys, it’s just a lot of putting blame on other people and a lot of frustration. Playing with girls, everyone is so encouraging and you just learn from your mistakes in a better environment,” she says. Davina attended Athol Murray College of Notre Dame, a Saskatchewan boarding school known for its hockey, for the first semester of Grade 11. Once the season was finished, she returned to Porter Creek for her second semester. After being spotted by a scout


FROM THE START SHE “ RIGHT WANTED TO PLAY HOCKEY. SHE WAS EXCITED TO PLAY ALL THE TIME. SHE WAS RARING TO GO.

-MINA MCLEOD


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at the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships in Halifax, she was offered a spot at the Hockey Training Institute in Mulmur, Ontario for the 2015-2016 season. Playing for the HTI Stars was no small feat. The travel team competes in Intermediate AA, the highest level of under-20 women’s hockey in North America, and regularly plays against teams in the United States. The training institute is also unique, as students eat, breathe and play hockey, and complete their high school courses online with the help of tutors. They stay in dorms, work out at a gym just down the hall, and are put on the radar of hockey scouts across the country. “It was kind of surreal, but I’m almost used to it at this point,” Davina explains. “I haven’t stayed in one place for a long amount of time since I was in Grade 9. It was scary, but at the same time I felt ready for it.” After the hockey season had wrapped, Davina returned to Whitehorse, living on her own and attending F.H. Collins Secondary School for her last semester of Grade 12. Through all of this, Davina was also travelling the country to compete in national tournaments. She first played for Team NWT at the 2012 Arctic Winter Games in Whitehorse, and later at the 2014 games in Fairbanks, Alaska. She represented Team North at the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships in 2011 and has played with the team ever since, competing in Saskatchewan, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Ontario. The culmination of all her hard work came at the 2016 Arctic Winter Games, where Davina and her teammates battled Alberta North in the finals to win gold. “It was the first time we’ve ever won a gold ulu, and to be able to captain the team was really special to me,” she says. “For my first two years (on Team NWT) we honestly weren’t even contenders. It was just amazing to make that happen.” “We had a mission from day one that we were going to go there and do the best we could,” says Team North coach John Hill. “Davina and the older girls, they

Photos courtesy of the Arctic Winter Games International Committee

played their hearts out and left everything on the ice.” Although it was John’s first time coaching Davina, he first saw her play in 2012 when she was trying out for the Arctic Winter Games alongside his daughter Bryn. He recognized Davina’s skill right away and has seen her grow as a centre and winger ever since. “She’s very deceiving with the puck. You think she’s going to go one way and all of a sudden she’s spun around and gone back the other way. It’s very sneaky, unexpected moves. She’s a very good stick handler. She does a lot of uncommon things that work very well for her. She seems to twist and turn and do things with the puck that a lot of other players can’t do,” he explains. “The sky’s the limit for her. She’s a great listener and a good learner. She’ll go places.” • After graduating from F.H. Collins Secondary School in 2016, Davina enrolled in Business Administration at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) in Edmonton. Eager to play hockey, she attended tryouts for the Ooks, the school’s team that competes in the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference. “She showed up at my door back in September and asked what the process was to try out for the women’s hockey team,” remembers head coach Deanna Martin. “Do they always make it, or have the impact that Davina had? Not always.” Deanna says that Davina fit into the team right away, and has welcomed her back for a second season. “She’s funny. She’s got a great sense of humour,” she says. “She’s coachable in that she wants to get better. She wants to work hard. She’s very purposeful in what she does. She’s focused. She doesn’t waste a lot of time. She comes out on the ice, and she’s there to get better. She gets to work right away.” The team is made up of girls from across Western Canada, and Deanna admits it’s not often that a northerner is part of the mix. Being a member of the Ooks hockey team is no small commitment – players


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practice Monday through Thursday, have two games and two off-ice training sessions per week, in addition to a sports psychology seminar, video training session or opponent breakdown meeting. Over the summer they are expected to take part in a training program with the school’s strength and conditioning coach, either on campus or back home. Davina’s biggest success with the Ooks came in their final playoff game. They were down 3-0 at the start of the game, but in the third period she scored a breakaway goal to make the game 4-3. (They ended up losing 5-4 in overtime.) “She’s just so dedicated to the process and the team. You just had this feeling she was going to score,” Deanna says. • Mina knows that her daughter has been lucky. Not every athlete in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region gets to realize their potential, and Davina benefitted from a lot of support. Her father Dave was able to help financially, her sister Karlyn looked after her in Whitehorse, driving her to early morning practices, and her brother David acted as a role model and competitor on the ice. Her 8-year-old brother Kendyn is her biggest fan, and counts down the days until she back in Aklavik. Her aunt Joyce Blake has encouraged and supported her, Darius Elias has coached her since she was 12, and her grandparents – Margo and Eddy McLeod, and Lorna and Billy Storr – have cheered her on. “I cried for her, and I missed her, but then watching her come back and just watching her grow better as a player and watching her become more independent, that makes it worth it,” Mina says. “She’s been living on her own since she was 15. I think all of it has helped her to be more independent and responsible.” “I would not have been able to do a lot of the things that I’ve gotten to do if it wasn’t for hockey,” Davina says. “There’s so much purpose behind it. It’s kept me on track and it’s kept me grounded. I really encourage young Inuvialuit girls to pursue hockey and keep playing.”

• Davina will be competing in her seventh and final National Aboriginal Hockey Championships in May in Mississauga. Follow Tusaayaksat on Facebook to find out how she did!


I WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN ABLE TO DO A LOT OF THE THINGS THAT I’VE GOTTEN TO DO IF IT WASN’T FOR HOCKEY. THERE’S SO MUCH PURPOSE BEHIND IT. IT’S KEPT ME ON TRACK AND IT’S KEPT ME GROUNDED. I REALLY ENCOURAGE YOUNG INUVIALUIT GIRLS TO PURSUE HOCKEY AND KEEP PLAYING.

-DAVINA MCLEOD


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29 YEARS AND COUNTING Troy Kasook hasn’t missed an IRC Cup since its inaugural year in 1989 – and he isn’t planning on stopping anytime soon

TRANSLATION BY ALBERT ELIAS

T

roy Kasook first laced up his hockey skates 42 years ago. He was five years old and joined in on games of shinny at Twin Lakes in Inuvik. He remembers looking up to the likes of Roy Ipana, Lawrence Rogers, Freddy Rogers, Butch Kasook and Ebun Harry as he watched them play five-on-five. “I was too little to play with them until I was older,” he said. Now, Troy is a veteran on the ice, playing with many of his old teammates’ sons. Tusaayaksat sat down with him to reflect on how the IRC Cup has changed over the years and helped shaped the Arctic hockey community into what it is today.


TAMAITA

29 UKIUT NAALUGIT

1989-mingaaniin Troy Kasook ilausuuyuq tajvani IRC Cup hockey-qtuani. Tamaita 29 ukiut naalugit. Naagata nutqarluni qanikkun isumasuittuq.

MUMIKTANGIT: ALBERT ELIAS

T

roy Kasook 42 ukiut naatait sivullirmik quasiyautingni atigamigik. Tallimanik ukiulik taimani. Twin Lakes-mi Inuvingmi quasiyaqpaktuat. Angayuklini takunnakpagait ukuat: Roy Ipana, Lawrence Rogers, Freddy Rogers, Butch Kasook, Ebun Harry. “Mikiblunga taimani piuyaqatigisuitkitka”. Qangma Troy ilinaalunguqtuaq. Taapkuat irnitik quasiyaqatigivagait qangma. Tusaayaksat savaktingit uqaqatigiyait qanuq IRC Cup ijusiagun qangma.


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What was the first IRC Cup like in 1989? We played at both the Dave Jones Arena and the Grollier Hall rink. I can’t really remember the number of teams, maybe eight or so. There were lots of people watching. The players were all from their own community, all proud to represent their community and team.

Who did you play with at your first tournament? The IDC Huskies. I was maybe 18 or 19. Some of them still play, but now I mostly play against their kids.

How has the IRC Cup changed over the years? Competitive wise not much, but it used to be contact hockey. Now you can hold on to the puck longer knowing you’re not going to get hit. There are more pick-ups now and more players are faster. In the beginning we put our teams together from players in town. Now it’s, like, who to cheer for? Hopefully it gets back to how it used to be.

What teams have you played with over the years? I’ve played with the IDC Huskies, Rowes Rustlers, Northwind, Old Dogs, Aklavik Knights, Aklavik Killer Bees, Aklavik Outlaws and Inuvik Posse West Wind Rec.

How many times have you won the IRC Cup? I’m not sure, maybe 10 times winning A-Division or B-Division, and this year we won C-Division. I think there were maybe three years I didn’t place for medals.


Qanuq itpa sivulliq IRC Cup 1989-mi? Dave Jones Arena-milu Grollier Hall-milu hockey-qpaktuanni. Qapsiutilaangit hockey-qtuat puiguqlugit. Qulitkiaq qaningani. Qunngiaqtuat inugiaktut. Hockey-qtit inimingnin qaiblutik. Quviasuktut.

Kitut hockey-qatigivigit sivullirmik? 18/19-nik ukiunikkama IDC Huskies piuyaqatitka. Ilangit suli nutaqatik hockey-qatigisuugait.

IRC Cup ijusinga qanuq itpa qangma? Palangayuq taimani. Akisaruuyut qanurliqaa. Qangma taimaliuyuitut. Qangma hockey-qtit kayumiksiyuat akijutalutik. Taimani kinaliqaa ilaulayuq. Qangma allanguqtuaq. Inuit qunngiaqtuat nipituyut. Ingilraatun ijusiruaqtuksaraluat isumamni.

Kitut piuyaqatigivakpigit taimangaaniin? Ilauvaktuami ukuannun: IDC Huskies, Rowes Rustlers, Northwind, Old Dogs, Aklavik Knights, Aklavik Killer Bees, Aklavik Outlaws ukuallu Inuvik Posse Westwind Rec.

IRC Cup qapsiiqtuaqlutin akimavakpiung? Puigungasiyuami qulinikiaq. A-Division, B-Division, ilaanni. Ukiuriaq kingullirmik C-Division akimayaqput. Pingasunikiaq ukiuni akimatqingituami.


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What’s your favourite part of the IRC Cup? It’s good hockey, and we see lots of relatives and friends, and it’s a good challenge. What I like most is the game. It’s the best game in the world. It just is the whole team - all players either win or lose, and it’s fun.

What are some highlights from your 29 years playing in the tournament? Winning, and still being able to compete with all the players. I don’t really think of highlights and memories - just playing is a highlight for me.

Who are some memorable players over the years? Roy Ipana, Pat Kuptana, Donald Kuptana, Butch Kasook and Noel Gordon. They played good hockey, and Noel still plays yet.

When do you think your last IRC Cup will be? Maybe IRC Cup 2039, and I’ll play hockey as long as I can – gonna play in heaven, too.

IRC CUP WINNERS 1989 – MACKENZIE BANDITS 1990 – IDC HUSKIES 1991 – TUK ALL STARS 1992 – IDC HUSKIES 1993 – TUK ALL STARS

1994 – TUK YUCKIES 1995 – TUK DOWLAND NANOOKS 1996 – AKLAVIK OUTLAWS 1997 – TUK DOWNLAND NANOOKS 1998 – IDC HUSKIES

1999 – DELINE CHIEFS 2000 – TUK EGT NANOOKS 2001 – TUK EGT NANOOKS 2002 – TUK EGT NANOOKS 2003 – NORTHWIND


Suna alianaigivakpiung IRC Cup Hockey-qmata? Alianaittuq hockey. Ilavullu ilannavullu takugainni nakuuyuq. Alianainniqsaq hockey uvamni. Nakurniqsauyuq tamaptingnun. Akimagayuni, akimangituni sunngituq alianiattuq.

Sut ilangit alianainiqsauvat 28 ukiuni ilauvakkavit? Taksiyuni iligiiktuanni alianaittuq. Alanik isumasuittunga, kisian tajva hockey.

Kitut piuyaqatitin puiguyuitpigit taimangaaniin? Roy Ipana, Pat Kuptana, Donald Kuptana, Butch Kasook, Noel Gordon. Hockey-lguyut. Noel hockeyqpaktuq suli.

Qakugu isumangni taksisarugiviung IRC Cup? Ukiumi 2039-miluuniin. Sivituyumik hockey-ruktunga suli. Qilangmigaluaq.

IRC CUP WINNERS 2004 – NORTHWIND 2005 – NORTHWIND 2006 – TUK EGT NANOOKS 2007 – NORTHWIND 2008 – NORTHWIND

2009 – TUK EGT NANOOKS 2010 – NORTHWIND 2011 – NORTHWIND 2012 – NORTHWIND 2013 – EGT

2014 – EGT NANOOKS 2015 – K&D OUTLAWS 2016 – LJ’S SABRES 2017 – LJ’S SABRES


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THE NEXT GENERATION Meet some of the IRC Cup’s newest competitors Interviews by Joelle Charlie and Billie Jean Conley Photos by Faith Raymond and Weronika Murray

LUKE STEEN, MALENA SELECTS How many times have you played in the IRC cup? Twice.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? Because I like to play hockey.

What is your favourite part of the game? Having fun and scoring goals.

What’s your favourite team? The Pittsburgh Penguins.

What made you decide to start playing hockey? My dad and siblings encouraged me to play.

Luke Steen first started playing hockey after encouragement from his family. His favourite team is the Pittsburgh Penguins.

DEERON VITTREKWA, THE DUCKS Did you have to fundraise? How? We just got players to pay an entry fee and I had to help referee the Gwich’in Cup.

How many times have you played in the IRC cup? This is my fourth year.

What is your favourite part of the game? The crowd.

What’s your favourite team? The Oilers.

How has the tournament changed over the years? It’s getting bigger and bigger, and more people are showing up.


Donald Kuptana heads to the dressing room to get ready for the Malena Selects’ next game. This was his third time playing in the IRC Cup.

DONALD KUPTANA, MALENA SELECTS How many times have you played in the IRC cup? Three times.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? To win the A-Division.

What is your favourite part of the game? Setting up Luke Steen.

What’s your favourite team? Chicago Blackhawks.

What made you start playing hockey? Pat Kuptana.

Cody Greenland watches from the stands at the Midnight Sun Recreation Complex.

CODY GREENLAND, THE DUCKS How many times have you played in the IRC cup? This is my second year.

What is your favourite part of the game? My favourite part of the game is snagging, dangling, and snipping.

What’s your favourite team? My favourite team is the Vancouver Canucks.

Cody Greenland and Deeron Vittrekwa both played for the Ducks. This was Cody’s second time playing in the IRC Cup and Deeron’s fourth.


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JOE DAVID NASOGALUAK, NDN ARMY How many times have you played in the IRC cup? This is my first year.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? I love hockey.

What is your favourite part of the game? Playing with the team and having fun.

What’s your favourite team? The Pittsburgh Penguins.

What made you start playing hockey? My dad and uncles encouraged me to play. Brothers Joe David and Henson Nasogaluak collect their bronze medals at the IRC Cup closing ceremonies.

HENSON NASOGALUAK, NDN ARMY Did you have to fundraise? How? No, I didn’t have to fundraise because we got funds from Vince Sharpe, Laverna Smith and Nellie Cournoyea.

How many times have you played in the IRC cup? I played my first IRC game when I was 15. This is my second time playing in the IRC Cup.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? I came because I want to play hockey and try to win the IRC Cup.

What is your favourite part of the game? Having fun and winning.

What’s your favourite team? The Washington Capitals.

What made you start playing hockey? Watching the hockey players on TV.


The Next Generation

Parker Carpenter catches a game with friend Melanie Bonnetplume.

PARKER CARPENTER, THE DUCKS How many times have you played in the IRC cup? This will be my first year in the IRC Cup.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? To get off work and the girls said I should.

What is your favourite part of the game? My favourite part of the game is having fun with my friends.

What’s your favourite team? The Washington Capitals.

What made you start playing hockey? I moved to Ottawa and got the opportunity to play hockey because there was no hockey in Fort McPherson when I lived there. Nathan stands with his team during the IRC Cup opening ceremonies on Friday.

NATHAN KUPTANA, MALENA SELECTS How many times have you played in the IRC cup? Twice.

Why did you decide to come to the tournament? Because it’s fun.

What’s your favourite team? Toronto Maple Leafs.

What made you start playing hockey? My Dad.

Nathan stands with his team during the IRC Cup opening ceremonies on Friday.


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TwoFoot Low Kick

The two-foot low kick is an Inuit game that challenges participants to be quiet and light on their feet – an important skill while hunting on the land. In competition, participants encourage each other to kick further and further out while also landing lightly on their feet. This event is a demonstration game used to warm up athletes, but is not used in competition. As always, the main point of the game is to have fun and do your best.

Words by Northern Games Society Photos by Nick Westover

Underwood Day demonstrates the two-foot low kick.


NORTHERN GAME SERIES PART 9


DO TRY THIS

34

1

2

Participants begin in a standing position.

They crouch with their feet together and knees apart.

3

They balance on their toes and bounce slightly to gain momentum.

Northern Games &


AT HOME 4

5

Next, participants kick the ball with their toes stretched out straight.

Afterwards, they bring their feet back to the starting position, landing lightly on their toes.

6

As a challenge, the ball is placed further and further from the starting point. The participant who kicks furthest from the starting point while also landing back on their toes is the winner.

Proper Techniques


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Arctic Eagles

Arctic Ice Storm

Delta Raptors

2017

Polar Vortex

Beaufort Braves

GWICH’IN CUP

Ice Bandits

COMMEMORATIVE TEAM POSTER


IRC CUP 2017

LJ’s Sabres

Killer Bees

Ducks

AK Knights

Malena Selects

K&D Outlaws

Gwich’in Flames

Aklavik

Inuvialuit Regional Corporation

COMMEMORATIVE TEAM POSTER


1.LJ’s Sabres 2.K&D Outlaws 3.Tuk Bulldogs

A-DIVISION

1.AK Knights 2.Gwich’in Flames 3.NDN Army

B-DIVISION 1.Old Dogs 2.Aklavik 3.Wolverines

OLDTIMERS

LJ’s Sabres Malena Selects Rocky Canadians K&D Outlaws Tuk Bulldogs

A-DIVISION TEAMS

Wolverines

Tuk Bulldogs

FINAL STANDINGS

Slyck Stars

PCM Pros

Old Dogs

Rocky Canadians

Paulatuk Storm

NDN Army

Gwich’in Flames Paulatuk Storm Slyck Stars NDN Army

AK Knights PMC Pros Ducks Killer Bees

B-DIVISION TEAMS

Aklavik Old Dogs Wolverines

OLDTIMER TEAMS


THE TEAMS

Lynx Lightning

Beaufort Delta Blizzard

Tundra Tornado

Wolverine Warriors

Mackenzie Hawks

Polar Storm

PEEWEE TEAMS

Beaufort Braves Ice Bandits Permafrost Warriors

MIDGET TEAMS

Delta Heat ATOM TEAMS

Wolverine Warriors Delta Heat Lynx Lightning Polar Storm Northern Wolf Pack (not pictured) Tundra Tornado

Permafrost Warriors NOVICE TEAMS

Polar Vortex Arctic Ice Storm Beaufort Delta Blizzard

BANTAM TEAMS Arctic Eagles Delta Raptors Mackenzie Hawks


HOCKEY 2.0 HOW TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING THE WAY WE PLAY - AND WATCH - THE GAME

Words by Karis Dekwant

O

ctober 11th, 1952: a rousing game between the Montreal Canadiens and the Detroit Red Wings was the spark that revolutionized hockey. It was the first televised game in history and created millions of crazy hockey fans across the country. The game soon became a Canadian favourite. Fast forward to the near future; we’ll call it “Hockey 2.0,” the evolution of one of the greatest sports in Canada and the game that changed our perspective of the world and the media. Since that day, the National Hockey League and the various media companies who broadcast their games have evolved and developed products that cater to the increasingly sophisticated and demanding viewing audiences across the globe. They have increased our user connectivity with the internet; there are apps and programs available to check out the latest rankings of our favourite team. On the National Hockey League’s app you can see, with a single touch, up-to-the-moment news, scores, stats and exclusive highlights. If you wanted to check up on the North’s favourite team, the Edmonton Oilers, you could download the Edmonton Oilers Mobile app which lets you watch select key plays and pivotal moments from every game and post-game highlights, seeing the stats and live games. Now let’s widen our view to the fate of hockey. A media company called Silver Oak has developed an idea that could

change the way we see the game. In theory, viewers could select various camera angles to get the best view of the game. These include a behind-the-net camera, a rail cam, an action cam as well as the sky cam. Deluxe members, those who pay for membership, may receive options to hear various arena microphones placed on team benches, in locker rooms, and on coaches and referees. (Some additional camera views that they are looking into adding are a goalie cam, a player cam, a referee cam and also a camera beneath the ice surface facing upwards in the goalie’s crease.) Another experiment on the table is the idea of adding a chip to the core of the puck, which would not impact the puck’s performance but would detect if it had completely crossed the goal line or not. These new and improved technologies have expanded my views and possibly added another hockey fan to the books. Personally I’m not the biggest hockey fan, but hearing about this future technology is making me more interested in the game by the minute. Being able to potentially see the different views of the arena or the perspective of the players shooting a goal or passing the puck gives a new dimension to the game, making it interactive and appealing to viewers of all stripes. This software will integrate newscasts, viewers and social media, making it even more accessible to fans in the North.


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MEET THE


TEAM

Tuktoyaktuk’s women’s hockey finally gets a place of its own Words by Allysa Felix Photos by Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison


44

C

anadian goaltender Manon Rhéaume was the first - and only - woman to play in the NHL. She played in two exhibition games with the Tampa Bay Lightning. Out of all the names on the Stanley Cup over the years, there are only 12 who belong to women. The first woman was Marguerite Norris in 1955, the president of the Detroit Red Wings when they won the Stanley Cup. All the women are owners or team executives. After Team USA won the inaugural 1998 Olympic women’s gold medal in Nagano, Japan, they appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and got to read out a humorous Top 10 list about the benefits of their accomplishments. Defenseman Colleen Coyne joked, “(It’s) fun to set off an airport metal detector, then say, ‘I’m sorry - that must be my Olympic gold medal.’”


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Women’s hockey has been around since the 1800s, yet many people still believe it’s a man’s sport. They say girls are too fragile, or they are too distracting for boys, or they ruin the opportunities for boys to succeed higher. There are stories of girls who hid their gender and their hair to play on a boys’ team, including Hayley Wickenheiser. As women and girls hockey began to grow in popularity during the 1950s and 60s, many men-only leagues stubbornly remained. It was only during the 1980’s and 90s that women’s hockey began to get recognized. Then, a breakthrough happened in 1998, when women’s ice hockey made its first appearance at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, as a full medal sport. Though women’s hockey is becoming more appreciated, it is still not as respected as men’s hockey, and professional women’s hockey players are paid a fraction of their male counterparts. Why? My guess is that it goes back to the underlying problem that we’ve been teaching girls throughout history, that woman should be housewives and men should be breadwinners. In the words of feminist writer and activist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage, when we don’t teach boys the same? We teach girls that they cannot be ‘macho’ or ‘sexual’ beings in the way boys are. All throughout history, society tried to persuade girls and women to keep their efforts back, saying, “you can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful otherwise you will threaten the man.” It was very similar for Aboriginal women. When attending residential schools, girls were not allowed to play hockey and were taught more traditionally feminine activities such as beadwork, cooking, cleaning and knitting. However, after many long years, there was a women’s team put together recently in Tuktoyaktuk, as there was a growing demand for girls wanting to play. Hockey can bring joy and a sense of community to anyone who plays, no matter the gender. It’s a great way to pass the time in small communities like the ones we have here in the Northwest Territories. Women’s hockey has come a long way from the days when the standard uniform consisted of long wool skirts, turtleneck sweaters, hats and gloves. Now, the Canadian women’s team regularly accessorizes their jerseys and gear with gold medals. But we still have a long way to go. The truth is that it isn’t a really big deal that girls play hockey because girls can play any sport they want to play. Why? In the words of Justin Trudeau, “because it’s 2015.” So, we took our first small step in Tuktoyaktuk and a giant leap for women’s hockey in the Northwest Territories.


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A quick interview with Courtnee Keevik of Tuktoyaktuk What position do you play? Forward.

Do you have a name for your team? No, we are currently looking for a name.

What do you like about hockey?

I’ve never really liked any other sport but hockey because it’s very competitive and so much fun.

Why do you play it?

There was a women’s team so I decided to try it out, but I’ve always gone to public skates.

Are you glad there is a girls’ team? Why?

Yes, young teen girls don’t really have anything to do in our small community and this team really brought us close together.

How does it feel to be part of a team?

It feels great training with local girls and learning together, teaching each other new things. I love it!

A few words with Breianna Lavallee of Tuktoyaktuk What position do you play? Centre or defense.

What’s your favourite team? Malena Selects!

When did you start playing hockey?

I started hockey in 2012, I think. I played in the Gwich’in Cup. I joined again at the start of the season when they started up women’s hockey.

What do you like about hockey?

I like that it’s a fun sport to play, and I get to play with all the girls. It’s active and when someone one-times it to me I can do a killer slap shot.

How did you feel when women finally got their own ice time? We were happy to finally play. We waited since last year to play.

How does it feel to be on the ice with the other girls?

It’s pretty good. We get along well. We’re always having a good time on the ice.


CUT YOUR HOCKEY CARDS OUT BY FOLLOWING THE DOTTED LINE

TEAM CARDS!


50

TEAM CARDS! CUT YOUR HOCKEY CARDS OUT BY FOLLOWING THE DOTTED LINE PHOTOS BY NATHALIE HEIBERG-HARRISON & JANA KASPAROVA


52

A LIFE OF HOCKEY on the Peel River Janessa Blake doesn’t play hockey any more, but like so many others in the North, it has impacted her life in countless ways Words by Janessa Blake Photos by Nathalie Heiberg-Harrison and Weronika Murray


Sean who motivated me to skate faster because he would always skate around me backwards. I was older and I wanted to be better than him so it was always a battle between us both, which we continued on for the rest of the three years I played. I played in the Gwich’in Cup one year and it was so fun. I met new friends from all over and got to play with other kids from other communities. Although we never won one game, we still received bronze medals and I have lots of great memories. Hockey made me feel so connected with my teammates and my family. My older brother James started playing hockey when he was 12 years old and instantly fell in love with the sport. Hockey became his main priority. Throughout the years James made great progress in the sport. He even made Team NWT for the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships twice. The first year it took place in Ottawa and the second year it was held in Saskatoon. James played his first year of the IRC Cup in Inuvik with the Gwich’in Flames, which is a team from our hometown Fort McPherson. For the next four years he played with the LJ’s Sabres, which is another team from our community, and this year will be his third year with the Aklavik Outlaws. In April of 2016 my brother welcomed his first son, and as we all expected, he put a Calgary Flames player’s name – Monahan - as his son’s middle name. James also has a daughter who just turned six years old. She is also a huge fan of her dad playing hockey. She plays hockey in their hometown Aklavik, and she has also played one year of the Gwich’in Cup.

Janessa’s brother James with his wife Karlyn and son Layten at the 2017 IRC Cup

J

ust like almost any other kid in the North I grew up always hearing about hockey, and for a few years I even got involved in playing. In our house my two brothers’ favourite teams are the Calgary Flames, and my Dad, sister and I like the Edmonton Oilers. It’s always the “Battle of Alberta” in the house when they play against each other. I never really took notice of hockey until I was about seven years old. That’s when I started hanging out with my older cousin Morgan and his girlfriend Joyce. Joyce played hockey and I always watched her at practice. She was the one to buy me my very first set of hockey gear when I was nine, and she helped me learn quickly the process of how things went in practice. I played for three years with my little brother

My younger brother Sean started playing hockey when he was seven years old. Sean and I were both influenced by our older brother James. Just like James, Sean likes the Calgary Flames. This year was Sean’s fourth year playing in the Gwich’in Cup with our cousin Ajay Peterson. Sean has won two gold, one silver and two bronze medals along with the awards for MVP, heart and hustle and sportsmanship. I look forward to watching Sean grow with this sport. I hope hockey will open as many opportunities for him as it did for James.

Hockey in my community has always been a big thing. My mom Tena sits on the Fort McPherson Youth Hockey Committee, which organizes events, fundraises for kids to go to the Gwich’in Cup (this year 33 youth went!) and also fundraises for the McPhoo Hockey Day that is taking place here for the fourth year. Hockey Day revolves around bringing in kids from all over the Mackenzie Delta, and this year will be the first year they make it two days long. The event provides accommodation to the out of town travellers and the gym is open to the youth when they aren’t playing hockey along with games. In total there will be 75 youth from Fort McPherson, Aklavik and Inuvik participating in the two days of fun hockey. I guess you can say hockey is and probably always will be a big part of my life!


54

IT T E G ! N D N O G S ’ “ LET ! !” ! K C A B IT T E G ! K BAC


HOCKEY: An Outsider’s Perspective Words by Tyra Cockney-Goose Illustration by Doll Larocque

So, what is the big hype about it? I mean, I know it’s practically common knowledge that if you don’t like hockey, then you aren’t even a “real” Canadian (just kidding). But really, what is so fascinating about sitting on a cold bench and watching a puck fly across the ice, with a bunch of people on skates with sticks chasing it like wild animals. (Sorry if I offended you, but I’m sure my other non-athletic, introvert friends out there somewhere in their little hole in the ground understand where I’m coming from). When I think about entertainment, personally, the first thing that comes to mind is wrapping myself in way too many blankets and reading for hours on end. I can honestly think of a million things I’d rather do than sit down and watch a game of hockey (or any sport for that matter).


56

Before I continue, I’ll have to admit that when I So I’m not really looking forward to the experience, was 12 years old I did play hockey for a year and I but I am willing to keep somewhat of an open mind actually enjoyed it - but playing hockey is a lot more about it. Let’s be honest though, I’ll probably end up entertaining than watching it. I recently tried to play drinking way too much hot chocolate then shortly again, but let’s just say I’m a little rusty. (Translation: after curling up in a ball with a sore stomach and a I suck.) In the years since I quit hockey, I’ve become headache. (If you missed it, that’s me failing to keep very dependent on my glasses, and they didn’t exactly an open mind.) For real though, watching hockey or fit with my helmet on. Because of that, I wasn’t able any sport, in general, contains all the things that I to see the puck half the time, and when I did manage hate: large crowds, shouting, unnecessarily loud to see it, my hand-eye coordination buzzers, cold/hard benches and the wasn’t doing me any favours. (I’m “I don’t know what list goes on. going to stick to that excuse and exactly to expect, not the fact that the most exercise • I get is my walk home after school.) but I imagine myself I hated almost the entire experience; sitting there feeling One other thing you should know from the moment I walked into the about me is that I judge things uncomfortable, ice rink the smell of sweaty hockey before I try them. For example, when gear hit me like a wall. So, my first surrounded by people I I was younger I had never eaten impression of the game wasn’t the an avocado before, but when my don’t know - and very, best, but I was still trying to keep friend’s mom asked me if I wanted an open mind about the current very cold. ” to try it, I lied and said that I didn’t situation. I decided to brush it off like them. (I’m also a pathological liar, the best I could. After all, it couldn’t just kidding… I think.) After I tried one, I realized that possibly get worse than that, right? I was wrong. It I actually really liked them. (My mom can testify to got worse. that. You should see my eyes light up when she brings some home from the store.) Anyway, the point I’m I was lucky enough to go to a 10:30 a.m. IRC Cup getting at is that I’ve never actually watched a live game during English class when the arena wasn’t so hockey game before. If I am forced to go to hockey full. There wasn’t such a large number of people that games, I sit next to a friend and talk and talk and talk, I started feeling so anxious that I wanted to vomit, or I zone out and by the end I can’t tell you who won, but there were still enough people that if the fire bell or even what teams were playing. So, I have decided rang, I would be trampled over if I tripped. (I was only that I am going to attend an actual hockey game and feeling about 90% uncomfortable, which is pretty low to see if I truly don’t like hockey, or if it is just another for me.) I settled in (well, about as settled as you can avocado I have misjudged. get on a metal bleacher that was probably as cold as the ice itself) with a hot chocolate in hand and a I don’t know what exactly to expect, but I imagine couple of friends by my side. myself sitting there feeling uncomfortable, surrounded by people I don’t know - and very, very cold. In case Together we watched the game between the Slyck you didn’t know, I get miserable when I’m cold, and I Stars and NDN Army, but since I live in a little hole sometimes cry. (I really wish I was kidding this time.) in the ground, I didn’t know anybody on either team.


(Shocking right?) I had trouble choosing a team to Now, I will have to admit that the whole experience cheer for, but in the end I chose the Stars because I wasn’t completely awful. Once I had a team to cheer liked the team’s jerseys better. for, I started getting a little more into the game hoping the Stars would win. I did have to leave early One thing I was not aware of was how excited and because my ride was leaving, and waiting five or ten passionate (dare I say out of hand?) fans got over more minutes and having to walk home so I could see watching them. Although there were probably only who won didn’t seem worth it to me. (I will have to 30 to 40 people spread out across the bleachers, it admit that leaving was my favourite part of the whole felt like a full stadium NHL hockey game. (Not that I experience.) would know what an NHL game is like, but I digress.) All in all, I think that it is safe to say To explain, the ladies behind “Personally, sports, in that I do not enjoy watching hockey, me were stomping their feet and if given the opportunity to watch general, are not my forte. so hard, and shouting so another game I wouldn’t take it. loud, that I am surprised an None the less, if you Personally, sports, in general, are earthquake didn’t occur. If I not my forte. None the less, if you enjoy watching hockey had a dime for every time the enjoy watching hockey and screaming three or four ladies behind and screaming “DEFENSE! “DEFENSE! DEFENSE!” then me chanted, “LET’S GO go for it. I’m not here to tell you if DEFENSE!” then go for it. ” NDN! GET IT BACK! GET you should like sports or not. (We IT BACK!!!” I’d be filthy rich. certainly do not need more people On top of that, I couldn’t believe all the curse words like me in the world.) I’m just providing my perspective that were exiting the mouths of these ladies. Not to on what I think about them sports. Personally, I will mention their constant yelling of, “You dirty players!” It be doing things I enjoy in my spare time like reading got to the point where one of them ran down to the a 500-page book in one night and dancing when I other end of the ice, shaking their fists and yelling, think nobody’s watching. (Again, my mom can testify.) “HEY! HEY!!” (and I’m not going to lie, I feared for If there is anything I would like for you to take out my life a little.) of reading this, it is not to judge things before you try them. You never know, it could turn out to be an The three or four ladies that were cheering a little too avocado experience. (I mean, it wasn’t in my case, but passionately ruined the experience for me, but I guess still, you never know.) that is just mob mentality for you. I’m sure if you sat down and talked to any them face to face they would be less rowdy. None the less, I was uncomfortable, and their constant stomping gave me an extreme headache. To put the rotting cherry on top of the already melting ice cream, the hot chocolate I drank did, in fact, give me a bad stomach ache. (In detail: it felt like somebody stabbed me with a rusty spoon, took it out, then stuck their finger in and yanked my insides out.)


the

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volunteers


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SPOTLIGHT ON DONNY & WILMA HENDRICK Donny Hendrick volunteered at the IRC Cup for the first time when he was just 13 years old. Three years later he played in his first tournament, and over the years has represented the Inuvik Huskies, Team Northern and the Northwind Old Dogs. Now wrapping up his second decade as event organizer with his wife Wilma, the pair took the time to answer some questions from Tusaayaksat. How did the IRC Cup get started? Roy (Ipana) started the IRC Cup to showcase all the talent we have here in the Beaufort Delta region. The Inuvik Huskies would send a team to the Yukon Indian Native Hockey tournament in Whitehorse every March. The team consisted of players from Inuvik, Paulatuk, Aklavik and Tuktoyaktuk.

What is your favourite part of organizing the tournament? The favourite part of organizing this tournament is all the players enjoying the games and meeting up with everyone that come into Inuvik for the tournament. I continue to organize this tournament as I enjoy the competition and look forward to some great hockey games.


62


64


What are some highlights from over the years? There are too many to choose from. Every year there are great memories from all the games.

What people have been integral in making the tournament happen? The following have helped out in making this tournament happen: Roy Ipana, Sandra Ipana, Donny Hendrick, Wilma Hendrick, Shelly Hendrick, Peggy Day, James Day, Tim Gordon and Shawna Kaglik.

What are your goals for the IRC Cup in the coming years? Our goal in the years to come is some fair and good hockey.

How much time goes into organizing the tournament? Preparation for this tournament starts in early January as we have to get officials that come in from Yellowknife and Fort Smith. We must also secure the flights for them as well. Once the notices are out on the dates for the tournament, teams have a deadline to register. We need to supply the town with the times of the games and when we start and finish the tournament. Once all teams are registered I try to have a schedule for the games to them a week before the tournament starts as they have to prepare for the teams travel. So you can say I put in at least 50 hours even before the tournament starts.

What can people do to get involved? If people would like to help out in any way they can contact us.


66

LJ’s Sabres celebrate after a goal.

IRC Chair Duane Smith with Lawrence Wolki, Dave McLeod, Donny Hendrick and Eddie Greenland.

James “Hammer” Keevik with Sam Gruben, Austin Elias and Riland Keevik.

The Outlaws line up before the opening ceremonies.


CELEBRATING

THE IRC CUP

PHOTOS BY FAITH RAYMOND AND WERONIKA MURRAY


68

James Blake receives his silver medal.

LJ’s captain Darby Blake receives the IRC Cup from Chair Duane Smith.

Kenny Semmler picks up his trophy for top B-Division goalie.

Mike Snow and Ray Wainman of K&D Outlaws.

Chris Smith of the Slyck Stars.


Taylor Giffin of LJ’s Sabres.

K&D Outlaws celebrate a goal.

LJ’s and the Outlaws shake hands after the A-Division final.

Mickey Ipana at the IRC Cup closing ceremonies.


AWARDS

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Oldtimers division winners - the Old Dogs.

A-DIVISION WINNERS GOLD – LJ’S SABRES SILVER – K&D OUTLAWS BRONZE – TUK BULLDOGS

B-DIVISION WINNERS GOLD – AK KNIGHTS SILVER – GWICH’IN FLAMES BRONZE – NDN ARMY

OLDTIMERS WINNERS GOLD – OLD DOGS SILVER – AKLAVIK BRONZE - WOLVERINES

B-Division second place winners the Gwich’in Flames.

A-DIVISION INDIVIDUAL AWARDS MVP - KIRK SANGRIS TOP GOALIE - JORDAN NIGHTTRAVELLER TOP SCORER - SEAN POITRAS

B-DIVISION INDIVIDUAL AWARDS MVP - AJ CHARLIE TOP GOALIE - KENNY SEMMLER TOP SCORER - CODY GREENLAND

B-Division third place winners - NDN Army.


B-Division winners - the AK Knights.

VOLUNTEERS WILMA & DONALD HENDRICK ASHLYN HENDRICK TORI HENDRICK LAWRENCE & REBECCA KAGLIK

SHAWNA KAGLIK PEGGY DAY LIZ & TYLER GORDON MARTHA BLAKE BLAISE OVAYUAK

SPONSORS

INUVIALUIT REGIONAL CORPORATION CANADIAN NORTH A-Division second place winners - K&D Outlaws.

A-Division winners - LJ’s Sabres.

STANTON DISTRIBUTION SERVICES


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James Williams took home a silver medal and a new nose! - from the IRC Cup.

The K&D Outlaws line up at the opening ceremonies.

LJ’s celebrates a goal.


HAVE YOU MET..?

The IRC Cup and Gwich’in Cup may be about hockey on the ice, but off the ice the main event is visiting with family and friends from afar. In Tusaayaksat’s latest edition of language games, see how many family members you can identify in Inuvialuktun’s three dialects: Kangiryuarmiutun, Siglitun and Uummarmiutun. Illustrations by Sheree Mcleod

1. Kina una?

KANGIRYUARMIUTUN

2. Una amaamaga.

3. Una apaapaga.

4. Una anaanaga.

5. Una ataataga.

6. Una aniqatiga.


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HAVE YOU MET..? SIGLITUN

1. Kina una?

2. Una amaamaga.

3. Una aappaga.

4. Una anaanaga.

5. Una ataataga.

6. Una aniqatiga.


1. Who is this? 4. This is my grandmother.

2. This is my mother. 5. This is my grandfather.

3. This is my father. 6. This is my sibling.

4. Una anaanaga.

5. Una ataataga.

6. Una aniqatiga.

Answers

3. Una aapaga.

2. Una aakaga.

1. KiĂąa una?

UUMMARMIUTUN Inuvialuktun language games #10

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Tusaayaksat Magazine – Spring 2017  

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