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ISSUE #11

GETTING HEALTHY IT’S NEVER TOO LATE


ISSUE #11 PUBLISHER Hank Vander Veen GENERAL MANAGER Drew Savage

Your community’s nonprofit hospice, providing compassionate and quality care, education and support to terminally ill patients and their families, regardless of ability to pay since 1979.

Community Hospice is pleased to announce Community Care Choices, a palliative care program focusing on enhancing comfort and improving quality of life for individuals facing a serious illness.

Comprehensive support and care for patients and families 24/7

Palliative Care may be provided at any time during a patient’s illness and delivered while seeking curative and life-prolonging treatments.

Admissions 7 days a week

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Cohen Hospice House, the only 16 bed hospice inpatient facility serving the Central Valley

Harold L. George DESIGNER

For more information visit palliativeheart.org or call 209.578.6333

Sharon R. Hoffman

4368 Spyres Way • Modesto, CA 95356 • 209.578.6300 2431 W. March Lane, Suite 100, Stockton, CA 95207 • 209.477.6300

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Chuck Higgs

CommunityHospiceCV

SALES & MARKETING Chris Castro Beth Flanagan Dawn Hamilton Maddie Hayes Corey Rogers Melody Wann Charles Webber Jennifer Webber

To advertise in the next Senior Living, call Manteca • 209.249.3500 Oakdale • 209.847.3021 Turlock • 209.634.9141 138 S. Center St. • Turlock, CA 95380

©Copyright 2016. Senior Living All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher of Senior Living is strictly prohibited. The opinions expressed in Senior Living are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of Senior Living management or owner. Senior Living assumes no responsibility and makes no recommendation for claims made by advertisers and shall not be liable for any damages incurred.

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hospiceheart.org

CA100000783 | CA100000613


C O N T E N T S GETTING HEALTHY............................................ 6 MULTIGENERATIONAL LIVING ��������������������������� 7 ENCORE ENTREPRENEURS.................................. 9 BABYSITTING YOUR GRANDCHILDREN ������������ 10 DEHYDRATION................................................ 12 A LOOK AT ADVANCE DIRECTIVES ������������������ 13 WATCHING FOR MELANOMA ������������������������ 14

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ive us old snapshots and

we’ll give you a new way of remembering.

Video Tributes from Our Funeral Home

Our Video Tributess are more than a unique way to show the past–they’re a remarkable way to share memories. You provide old photos of family and friends and we’ll develop a one-of-a-kind video montage. It’s then set to music and shown at the service. Treasure it for the day. Keep it forever. Video Tributes…a moving experience.

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Serving the community since 1979 General Dentistry Dr. Bonnie Morehead Dr. Ron Joseph Dr. Rudy Ciccareli

Dr. Daman Saini Dr. Harneet (Neeti) Saini Dr. Elizabeth Grecco

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Dr. Mark Grecco

Pediatric Dentistry Dr. Mohammad El Farra

Valley Oak Dental Group is a multi-specialty group practice committed to excellence. Our Pediatric Department provides a comfortable, caring atmosphere for your children. We provide the latest General Dentistry procedures in a state-of-the-art dental suite. Our Oral Surgery Department provides general anethesia and I.V. sedation in a safe, professional environment. Members of • California Dental Association • American Dental Association • San Joaquin P.P.A.

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209 SENIOR LIVING | FITNESS

Getting Healthy: It’s Never Too Late

M

aybe you’ve been sneaking a few too many bites of red meat or skipping your morning walk lately. Before you come down too hard on yourself, realize that it’s never too late to redesign how you approach your lifestyle choices.

We all know the simple way to losing weight and finding more energy is through exercise and healthy eating. But what about a senior with a slower metabolism or even a physical disability? Everyone’s situation is unique and may call for a differentiated strategy to achieve healthier living. But one thing remains consistent throughout everyone’s personal journey: You can positively impact your well-being by making smart, healthfocused decisions. Here’s how:

TAKE CONTROL

EDUCATE YOURSELF

Sometimes, we are our own biggest obstacle to following through on our healthy choices. We make excuses, reschedule workouts and find reasons to indulge in foods that we know aren’t good for us. It might be time for a long look in the mirror. Are you serious about incorporating more exercise into your daily routine? Do you plan to execute your meal plan without any major slip-ups?

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If the answers to the aforementioned questions are no, remember that unhealthy choices are major catalysts in the worldwide increase of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. These diseases lead to a substantial number of preventable deaths and disabilities, as well as negative effects to our healthcare system. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 75 percent of our healthcare dollars go to the treatment of chronic diseases. LIVING

DON’T FORGET MENTAL HEALTH

Being healthy isn’t constrained to physical well-being. Seniors should maintain their mental sharpness as the years go by to achieve increased vitality, social function and life satisfaction. Doing so requires a little extra attention to the things that can stimulate your brain – such as reading the newspaper, watching a live play or solving a crossword puzzle. Conversing with others about current events also can help you maintain your mental health.


209 SENIOR LIVING | AT HOME

Multigenerational Living

B

y the time people reach senior citizen status, they have likely cared for children, making sure they were safe, sound and healthy.

So when the time comes to consider late-in-life living situations, it’s no wonder that their adult children are opening their homes to return the favor.

MULTIGENERATIONAL LIVING: BY THE NUMBERS

According to a Pew Research Center analysis, approximately 51 million Americans (16.7 percent of the population) live in a house with at least two adult generations – such as a grandparent and at least one other generation – under one roof. The Pew analysis also reported a 10.5

percent increase in multigenerational households from 2007 to 2009. A survey by national home builder PulteGroup found that 32 percent of adult children expect to eventually share their home with a parent.

WHY THE GROWTH?

A 2012 MetLife Mature Market Institute Survey put the average annual cost of a private nursing-home room at $90,520, a semiprivate at $81,030 and assisted living at $42,600. Retirement shortcomings, high medical bills and other financial challenges can put these

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prices out of reach for many seniors. Eliminate those costs and add the value associated with knowing that an elderly loved one is cared for by family members. That is the primary reason that so many people choose multigenerational living.

MULTIGENERATIONAL HOME PLANS

In 2011, national builder Lennar introduced its first Next Gen house geared for more than one generation. The company and many others now offer floor plans in hundreds of communities LIVING

across the United States to meet an uptick in demand. Space is the main feature of a home built specifically for multigenerational living. Generally, the main home has three or four bedrooms with an attached unit that has its own front entrance, kitchen, bedroom and bathroom. An adjoining door is usually added so the house does not have to appear as two separate homes. Because, though fostering an accommodating environment is important in a multigenerational home, privacy can be just as paramount.


When adventure calls,

Astoria answers.

At Astoria, we know that even when seniors need assisted living or memory care, their desire for adventure and new experiences never ends. With our LifeCycles programming, our residents enjoy vibrant, engaging days.

Discover the difference a vibrant lifestyle makes. Call us today.

209•323•2089

700 Laurel Ave. | Oakdale, CA AstoriaSeniorLiving.com Astoria Senior Living is part of the Agemark family of senior living communities. RCFE #507005604

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209 SENIOR LIVING | BUSINESS

Encore Entrepreneurs

W

 en would you guess is h the best age to start a new business? 25? 30? 40? How about 60?

A 2010 survey conducted by the Kauffman Foundation found that Americans ages 55 to 64 launch a new business venture at a higher rate than any other age group. In fact, nearly one-quarter of all people 44 to 70 are interested in starting their own company or nonprofit organization within the next five to 10 years. This new class of “encore entrepreneurs” is taking the business world by storm – and you can easily become one of them.

With pre-planning, you will help minimize your family's financial and emotional burdens.

THE MOTIVATION

So why are more seniors starting their own companies? Senior citizens have long been a driving factor in new business development because they have more free time and financial flexibility after retirement. They may have had an idea for many years and are now ready to act on it. Also, with most baby boomers in their 50s and 60s, there has been a rapid growth in the senior population. More people mean more business ideas, especially for a generation most known for its free spirit and redefinition of traditional values.

HELPFUL RESOURCES

As with any entrepreneur, one of the most helpful resources at the disposal of a senior citizen business owner is the U.S. Small Business Administration. The organization is passionate about helping foster and advance creative ideas – especially ones that come from the largest population of new business owners. The SBA recently partnered with the American Association of Retired Persons to form National Encore Entrepreneur Mentor Month, which brought nationwide training to 119,000 individuals in April 2013. The organizations offered workshops, conferences and seminars throughout April to help guide entrepreneurs ages 50 and older in starting their own business.

Ashley Vella, Managing Partner, FDR 3639, Jack and Joanne Deegan, Ambassadors

Ripon (FD987) 111 S. Palm Ave. 209-599-3413

Escalon (FD932) 1441 San Joaquin St. 209-838-7321

www.deeganfuneralchapels.com SENIOR 9

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209 SENIOR LIVING | HELPING

Babysitting Your Grandchildren

G

randchildren can be some of the greatest blessings that life has to offer. Though the primary care responsibilities will go to the parents in most cases, grandparents also can play a pivotal role in the upbringing of a child. If you’ve recently joined the grandparent club, it is only a matter of time before you are recruited as sitter. Are you ready? Things have certainly changed since you brought up your children, but you are still more than capable of doing the job in today’s world.

CRIB CHANGES The 1994 Back to Sleep campaign marked on one of the biggest changes to infant care in the past 20 years. The nationwide partnership promoted the practice of always placing an infant who is less than 1 year old on his back in the crib. The research guiding the recommendation was conducted by high-level institutions such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and the United States Public Health Service, which found that babies who slept on their stomachs were more likely to fall victim to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

CAR SEATS Unless you’ve used a car seat in the past five to 10 years, you may be surprised at how far they have come – especially considering they probably weren’t even a requirement when you were raising your children! Today, all infants must ride in rear-facing seats with multi-point harnesses. Consider purchasing one for day trips with your grandchild, and be sure to install it correctly. Most cars are equipped with

the latch system for easy installation, but check with the seat’s manufacturer manual to find out how to safely set it up.

DISCIPLINE CONSISTENCY There is nothing wrong with spoiling your grandchildren – in fact, it is an expected rite of passage for all new grandparents. But when baby turns into a

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toddler it is important to carry over the same discipline he or she receives at home. This will require a quick sit-down with your children to understand how they handle certain situations at home. Maintaining this consistency will keep your grandchild from being confused about certain rules and will lead to a more structured upbringing.


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209 SENIOR LIVING | HEALTH

Dehydration: A Real Concern

L

i stening to your body is crucial for senior citizens. This especially rings true when you’re feeling thirsty or dry-mouthed.

This can be a sign of your

it is important to talk with your

body becoming dehydrated, most

physician. Together, you can put

commonly during hot, humid

together a plan of action for

weather.

avoiding future dehydration-relat-

Seniors’ signaling mechanism

ed issues.

for thirst start to weaken as we age, making it harder to stay properly hydrated, according to

WAYS TO AVOID IT Staving off dehydration

the Mayo Clinic. If we don’t feel

requires you to bring a bottle of

that urge to drink water, it may be

water with you wherever you go –

too late by the time our thirst

whether you’re taking in an after-

actually kicks in.

noon baseball game or raking

Dehydration is a serious health

leaves in the yard. Drink from it

issue that must be addressed

often to keep your body properly

quickly and comprehensively

hydrated.

should it occur to you.

WARNING SIGNS

The Mayo Clinic also recommends drinking a glass of water

DANGER OF DEHYDRATION

or juice while you enjoy a meal or

Real dangers are associated

snack. This will combine with the

with becoming dehydrated, most

natural liquids in your food to

notably an increased risk of falls,

keep your body up to speed.

urinary tract infections, kidney

If you’re taking a bike ride or

stones, constipation, dental dis-

going for a walk, be sure to take

ease and impaired cognitive func-

along a water or sports drink.

tion.

Your body needs to be replen-

If you have recently experienced any of the above symptoms,

• Little or no urine • Urine that is darker than usual

• Dry mouth

ished during exercise as it releases sweat.

THE MAYO CLINIC IDENTIFIES THE FOLLOWING AS WARNING SIGNS FOR DEHYDRATION:

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• Fatigue

• Headache • Dry Skin • Disorientation • Confusion • Light-Headedness


209 SENIOR LIVING | LEGAL ISSUES

A Look at Advance Directives

D

 ciding to create advance e directives can be one of the most important – and complicated – decisions one can make.

Advance health care directives offer you a way to give consent for certain situations for which you may or may not want medical treatment. This can be a touchy subject for many people, but they can be extremely useful documents that outline and facilitate your wishes should the circumstance arise.

TIMING OF ADVANCE DIRECTIVES

The best time to create an advance directive, obviously, is before you need one. If you become ill or are near the end of your life, it may be too late to cognitively make your own decisions about what medical care you may want in certain situations. Along those lines, if you make an advance directive early in your adulthood, you are allowed and even encouraged to review and update your documents if you are diagnosed with any type of serious illness.

LIFE-SUSTAINING TREATMENT

The American Cancer Society defines life-sustaining treatment as anything mechanical or artificial that sustains, restores or substitutes for a

vital body function. It can include: • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). • Artificial respiration (mouth-tomouth breathing, manual ventilation or a ventilator). • Medicine to help with blood pressure and heart function. • Artificial nutrition or hydration. • Dialysis. 
• Certain surgical procedures such as amputation, feeding tube placement or tumor removal).

PUTTING SOMEONE IN CHARGE

Sometimes, family members make tough medical decisions for spouses, parents, or adult children who can no longer speak for themselves. Many states have passed laws that say which family members may act on behalf of someone in this situation. A variety of documents can be considered advanced directives, including power of attorney, living wills, do-not-resuscitate orders and other agreements. Since laws vary state by state on such documents, be sure to check in with your local healthcare agency to find out what your state requires.

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209 SENIOR LIVING | DISEASE

Watching for Melanoma

M

elanoma, the leading cause of death from skin disease, is not to be taken lightly. The cancer is less common than other types, but it is extremely dangerous if not found early.

Melanoma accounts for less than 2 percent of skin cancer cases, but the vast majority of skin cancer deaths, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Seniors are urged to be extra cautious, because the risk of developing melanoma increases with age. Other risk factors for melanoma include fair skin, certain types of moles, multiple birthmarks, using tanning devices, having relatives with a history of melanoma and a weakened immune system.

CHECKING YOURSELF

Self-examinations can help you spot potential skin cancers early, when they can almost always be completely cured. The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends you examine your skin from head to toe once a month, even in the fall and winter. Take note of any new moles or growths during your self-check, as well as any changes to existing growths. Lesions that change, itch, bleed or don’t heal are signs you need to take seriously. Make an immediate appointment with your physician to have it checked. Another smart practice to consider is regularly using an SPF 15 or higher sunscreen. People who do so reduced their risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

THE ABCDE SYSTEM

To help people identify and seek treatment for this deadly cancer, physicians have developed the ABCDEs of Melanoma: • ASYMMETRY: One-half of the abnormal area is different from the other half. • BORDERS: The edges of the growth are irregular. • COLOR: Color changes from one area to another, with shades of tan, brown or black • DIAMETER: The spot is usually larger than 6 millimeters in diameter • EVOLUTION: The mole keeps changing appearance.

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Call (209) 239-4531 to schedule your memory screening today. Prestige Senior Living at Manteca

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1130 Empire Avenue Manteca, CA 95336

License# 397004125

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See the world as it was meant to be seen.

CATARACT SURGERY • GLAUCOMA CARE • RETINAL SERVICES EYELID SURGERY • LASIK • VISION EXAMS • GLASSES • CONTACTS

Joseph T. Zelter, M.D.

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Richard M. Wong, M.D.

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Robert Dupree, O.D.

209 Senior Living - Issue #11  

An MNC Publications

209 Senior Living - Issue #11  

An MNC Publications

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