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SPECI A L SECTION: LEGACY TU LSA January 2018

THE DONORS AND LEADERS BEHIND :

THE DONORS: WILLIAMS • QUIKTRIP CORP. • HALLIBURTON • H.A. AND MARY K. CHAPMAN CHARITABLE FOUNDATION • ONEOK BANK OF OKLAHOMA • GEORGE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION • CHARLES AND LYNN SCHUSTERMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION • JOE CRAFT FW MURPHY FAMILY FOUNDATION • HELMERICH FAMILIES • MAGELLAN MIDSTREAM PARTNERS • NADEL GUSSMAN LLC • SEMGROUP CHARLES AND PEGGY STEPHENSON • T.D. WILLIAMSON • RICHARD A. WILLIFORD FAMILY • CIMAREX • ZINKE FAMILY FUND • ZARROW FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AAON INC. • KATHY CRAFT • HILLE FAMILY • PAT AND DON HARDIN • LAREDO PETROLEUM • MCELROY MANUFACTURING INC. • WPX STUART FAMILY FOUNDATION • UNIT CORP. • WILL SMITH • BOVAIRD FOUNDATION • ANONYMOUS • ONEGAS • JOHN STEEL ZINK FOUNDATION • ANONYMOUS SUSAN AND WILLIAM, JILL AND ROBERT THOMAS FAMILIES • ANONYMOUS • DAVIS BROTHERS ENTITY • BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF OKLAHOMA JPMORGAN CHASE • BERNSEN FAMILY FOUNDATION • BUMGARNER FAMILY • FULTON AND SUSIE COLLINS FOUNDATION • MIKE AND PAT CASE DEKRAAI FAMILY FOUNDATION • D AND L OIL TOOLS • FRANK AND GAYLE EBY • HALE FAMILY FOUNDATION • STEPHEN AND SHELLEY JACKSON FAMILY FOUNDATION BONNIE KLEIN • MABEE FOUNDATION • PETE AND NANCY MEINIG • MELTON TRUCK LINES INC. • OMNI AIR INTERNATIONAL DTAG LEGACY FUND/SCOTT AND VANESSA THOMPSON • J.T. NICKEL FAMILY • FOUNDERS OF DOCTORS’ HOSPITAL INC. JUDITH AND JEAN PAPE ADAMS CHARITABLE FOUNDATION • STUART AND LINDA PRICE • PAM AND TOM RUSSELL • BRYAN CLOSE • MESHRI FAMILY BOB AND JACKIE POE • SHERMAN SMITH FAMILY FOUNDATION • JOHN SMITH • COX FOUNDATION • SARAH AND JOHN GRAVES ERNIE KIVISTO/JANE ANN MACONI KIVISTO • MABREY BANCORPORATION • JOE AND DARCEY MORAN • PETER WALTER • BECKY DIXON AND PAT KEEGAN FRED JONES FAMILY FOUNDATION • KATHY AND ED LEINBACH • SAMSON RESOURCES • DARDEN FAMILY FOUNDATION • MIKE TURPEN THE LEADERS: JEFF STAVA, SUZANNE SCHREIBER, JOSH MILLER OF THE GEORGE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION; TONY MOORE & THE GATHERING PLACE TEAM


HEALTH & WELLNESS

JOIN FOR FREE. Valid January 6 – 13, 2018.

SATU R DAY, JA NUA RY 13, 2 018

HEALTH ZONE FEATURES AND SERVICES:

Whatever you have promised yourself to do this year—trim down, tone up, eat healthier, exercise more— now is the time to get started. Join us on Saturday, January 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and sample everything the Health Zone at Saint Francis has to offer. The event is free and open to the public and will include fitness classes, cooking classes, free health screenings and wellness education. • 70,000 square-foot fitness facility

• Year-round swimming lessons

• Parents’ night out

• Full schedule of classes

• Indoor cycling

• Annual kids’ triathlon

• Premier cardio, weight training and strength equipment

• Zumba, barre and yoga

• Cooking classes for kids and adults

• Basketball and racquetball

• Kids Zone activity center

• Massage services

• Indoor walking track

• Weight loss and life balance classes

• Grab-and-go deli with smoothies, wraps and sandwiches

• A dedicated Pilates equipment studio • Boot camp, suspension training and CrossFit • Two indoor saltwater pools

5353 East 68th Street South | Tulsa, OK 74136 | 918-494-1671 saintfrancis.com/healthzone

• Locker rooms with steam room, sauna and towel service

• Summer programs for kids and teens


THANK YOU… ImageNet Consulting’s Digital Display group continues to provide clients with advanced audio and video solutions for boardrooms, conference rooms, video walls and digital signage solutions.

At ImageNet, we appreciated the recent opportunity to implement state of the art conference room technology in your new office building. We understand a company’s conference room is important because it is the place big decisions are frequently made, ideas developed, deals are signed, progress measured, and meetings are held. At ImageNet, we provide advanced audio and video solutions to make the process for collaboration and sharing digital content seamless. Call on us for ideas to make your conference room meetings more productive with advanced digital solutions.

Hogan’s headquarters building is a standout in downtown Tulsa. The company—which leads the world in personality assessment and leadership development—has products and services in 56 countries and is the industry leader serving more than half of the Fortune 500.

A conference room at Hogan

ImageNet Sales Manager Ben Berghall and Tulsa Market President Alan Webb.

7231 East 41st Street • 918-585-8686 ImageNetConsulting.com CONFERENCE ROOMS

BOARD ROOMS

DIGITAL SIGNAGE

VIDEO WALLS


Orthopedic Care

Standing: Dave Stoll, PA-C; Ashley Bruce, PA-C; Jason Joice, M.D.; Christian Luessenhop, M.D.; Zee Khan, M.D.; Chad Crawley, D.O.; and Jaclyn Jones, D.O. Seated: Mary Ferraro, APRN-CNP; Clint Cator, PA-C; and Jon Orjala, D.O.

The orthopedic health care providers at Utica Park Clinic offer exceptional care, diagnosis and treatment for a wide variety of orthopedic injuries, pain and disorders of the musculoskeletal system. This includes care of the:

Close to home.

Oologah

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Cleveland

Claremore Owasso 11 412

412

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• • •

44

Creek Tpk

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66 75

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Sapulpa

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Bristow Okemah

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• Bones • Nerves • Tendons

169

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Joints Muscles Ligaments

For health news, tips and information, join us on or text TIPS to 95159

918.579.DOCS • UTICAPARKCLINIC.COM

Pryor

Catoosa

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JANUARY 2018 | VOLUME 32 ISSUE 3

Local kindergarten-third grade classes will have the chance to experience the Gathering Place’s playgrounds before the park opens to the public.

FEATURED

26 Q&A Steve Bradshaw, president and CEO of BOK Financial; 2018 Tulsa Regional Chamber chairman BY STEVE BERG

28 Lives well lived TulsaPeople celebrates those we lost in 2017. BY MISSY KRUSE

The generous donors behind the Gathering Place give a record $400 million to create a park for all Tulsans. An all-star team has been working to make it a reality. BY CONNIE CRONLEY

4

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

113 LIFESTYLE

Remarkable kitchens and baths. Building wardrobes and friendships at Amaranth Collection. A tour of Claremore. Forgo the New Year’s slump.

133 TABLE TALK

Big-city dining at Oren. International cooking classes and food resolutions for the new year. Warm up with an Irish coffee.

SPECI A L SECTION: LEGACY TU LSA January 2018

SPECIAL SECTIONS 44 45 49

Event and Wedding Venue Guide National Association of Industrial and Office Properties’ 2017 awards Legacy Tulsa

TULSANS OF THE YEAR

COMPILED BY ANNA BENNETT

Where to find art after dark. Oral Roberts University’s new sports complex. Two nonprofits fight gender inequality. A quilter’s bonanza. A valuable perspective on domestic violence.

JANUARY 2018

Benefits and fundraisers in 2018

9 CITY DESK

TULSAPEOPLE

40 Charitable Events Calendar

SHANE BEVEL

31 A gift to generations

THE DONORS AND LEADERS BEHIND :

THE DONORS: WILLIAMS • QUIKTRIP CORP. • HALLIBURTON • H.A. AND MARY K. CHAPMAN CHARITABLE FOUNDATION • ONEOK BANK OF OKLAHOMA • GEORGE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION • CHARLES AND LYNN SCHUSTERMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION • JOE CRAFT FW MURPHY FAMILY FOUNDATION • HELMERICH FAMILIES • MAGELLAN MIDSTREAM PARTNERS • NADEL GUSSMAN LLC • SEMGROUP CHARLES AND PEGGY STEPHENSON • T.D. WILLIAMSON • RICHARD A. WILLIFORD FAMILY • CIMAREX • ZINKE FAMILY FUND • ZARROW FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AAON INC. • KATHY CRAFT • HILLE FAMILY • PAT AND DON HARDIN • LAREDO PETROLEUM • MCELROY MANUFACTURING INC. • WPX STUART FAMILY FOUNDATION • UNIT CORP. • WILL SMITH • BOVAIRD FOUNDATION • ANONYMOUS • ONEGAS • JOHN STEEL ZINK FOUNDATION • ANONYMOUS SUSAN AND WILLIAM, JILL AND ROBERT THOMAS FAMILIES • ANONYMOUS • DAVIS BROTHERS ENTITY • BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF OKLAHOMA JPMORGAN CHASE • BERNSEN FAMILY FOUNDATION • BUMGARNER FAMILY • FULTON AND SUSIE COLLINS FOUNDATION • MIKE AND PAT CASE DEKRAAI FAMILY FOUNDATION • D AND L OIL TOOLS • FRANK AND GAYLE EBY • HALE FAMILY FOUNDATION • STEPHEN AND SHELLEY JACKSON FAMILY FOUNDATION BONNIE KLEIN • MABEE FOUNDATION • PETE AND NANCY MEINIG • MELTON TRUCK LINES INC. • OMNI AIR INTERNATIONAL DTAG LEGACY FUND/SCOTT AND VANESSA THOMPSON • J.T. NICKEL FAMILY • FOUNDERS OF DOCTORS’ HOSPITAL INC. JUDITH AND JEAN PAPE ADAMS CHARITABLE FOUNDATION • STUART AND LINDA PRICE • PAM AND TOM RUSSELL • BRYAN CLOSE • MESHRI FAMILY BOB AND JACKIE POE • SHERMAN SMITH FAMILY FOUNDATION • JOHN SMITH • COX FOUNDATION • SARAH AND JOHN GRAVES ERNIE KIVISTO/JANE ANN MACONI KIVISTO • MABREY BANCORPORATION • JOE AND DARCEY MORAN • PETER WALTER • BECKY DIXON AND PAT KEEGAN FRED JONES FAMILY FOUNDATION • KATHY AND ED LEINBACH • SAMSON RESOURCES • DARDEN FAMILY FOUNDATION • MIKE TURPEN THE LEADERS: JEFF STAVA, SUZANNE SCHREIBER, JOSH MILLER OF THE GEORGE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION; TONY MOORE & THE GATHERING PLACE TEAM


Listening to you helps us see your whole picture. To get great care for your everyday life, you need more than an everyday doctor. AscensionÂŽ care teams at St. John Clinic take the time to listen so we can understand all aspects of you and your life.

And with convenient locations, online scheduling for urgent care and virtual visits, you can get the care you need, when and where you need it. Find a doctor who is right for you by calling 918.205.7895.


WHAT’S ONLINE TULSAPEOPLE.COM Follow us on Twitter @TULSAPEOPLE

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Follow us on Instagram @TULSAPEOPLE

Follow us. Use #MyTulsaPeople to tag your Instagram photos of the people who make this city great. WE’LL FEATURE OUR FAVES!

PLANNING A WEDDING OR EVENT? The 2018 Venue Guide is available at TulsaPeople.com/venueguide.

2017

NEW HOME PLAN BOOK & OFFICIAL GUIDE June 17-25, 1 to 7pm daily

FREE ADMISSION

SHOWCASING OVER 150 NEW HOMES FROM METRO TULSA'S TOP BUILDING COMPANIES

STONE CANYON - YORKTOWN - FOREST RIDGE

PUBLISHED BY

LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME THIS YEAR?

Visit TulsaPeople.com/POH for the New 2017 Official Parade of Homes Guide!

@lisa_svend

Being a Philbrook docent has been a wonderful, life-enriching experience. #mytulsapeople

@rachy_george

Our family has expanded by four paws! We are so excited to welcome Lulu to our pack!! #mytulsapeople #adoptdontshop

TulsaPeople on Pinterest Start the new year right with healthy tips, home decor ideas and much more at PINTEREST.COM/TULSAPEOPLE.

PLUS The all-new 2018 Charitable Events Calendar is online now: TULSAPEOPLE.COM/CEC2018

THE 2017 A-LIST DIRECTORY IS NOW ONLINE

AT TULSAPEOPLE.COM//A-LIST 6

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

@alexochsner

Good morning pumpkin #mytulsapeople

Follow the blog for fun quizzes and more interactive content: TULSAPEOPLE.COM/TULTALK Giveaways are back, and bigger than ever! Visit TULSAPEOPLE.COM/GIVEAWAYS to enter.


Mom, wife, daughter, cancer fighter. Jennifer Thigpen Breast Cancer Patient

“When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I wanted to fight with a team of doctors who were experts in my specific disease—just like the cancer specialists I found at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA). They explained all my options, answered my questions and had a real sense of urgency throughout my treatment. I also liked having everyone in one place working together focused on me. This kind of team approach is what made me want to come to CTCA®. And I’m so glad I did.” No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.

Call 800.515.9610 or visit cancercenter.com/tulsa Located in Tulsa

© 2017 Rising Tide

A Network Provider For


FROM THE PUBLISHER

TulsaPeople’s first issue of the year is a favorite of mine.

Volume XXXII, Number 3 ©2018. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. TulsaPeople Magazine is published monthly by

1603 South Boulder Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74119-4407 918-585-9924 918-585-9926 Fax

It has been that way since we began naming a Tulsan of the Year in our January issue 19 years ago. It is a joy to recognize a deserving Tulsan with “the front-cover treatment” for their efforts to make Tulsa a better place.  On only two occasions have we recognized a group instead of an individual as the magazine’s Tulsan of the Year. The other time was in January 2004 when we honored each of the 75,000-plus local voters who approved the Vision 2025 temporary 1-cent sales tax increase in Tulsa County to fund regional economic development and capital improvement proposals. If you’ve forgotten the significance of that Sept. 9, 2003 vote, passage ultimately generated over $600 million in tax revenue in a 13-year period to fund a long list of improvements, including construction of the BOK Center. This year TulsaPeople also recognizes a group: the incredibly generous donors and committed leaders who have earned our gratitude for making the Gathering Place a soon-to-be-completed reality. The $400 million public park — opening this summer — is the largest private, non-university and non-collegiate fundraising endeavor in Oklahoma history, and the largest private gift to a public park in U.S. history. As noted in Connie Cronley’s excellent cover story, words used to describe the Gathering Place include: “absolutely breathtaking,” “transformative,” “best public park in the nation.” And, “Tulsans will be blown away.” Leaders believe the riverfront park “will be a place that truly reflects the culture and spirit of Tulsa, brings people together and improves the city’s social, economic and environmental sustainability.” Thank you George Kaiser, the George Kaiser Family Foundation, 77 donors, and the GKFF and park leadership teams for making the Gathering Place a wonderful reality to be appreciated and enjoyed by millions of Tulsans and visitors far into our city’s future. Another annual story in our January issue spotlights a group of significant Tulsans we have lost in the past calendar year. Editor Emeritus Missy Kruse coordinates this signature feature each year, always doing it well. It begins on p. 28. The giving spirit of Tulsa is clearly reflected in the mission and work of the Tulsa Community Foundation, another monumental achievement 8

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

for our city that was sparked by George Kaiser’s critical thinking in 1998 and then engineered by GKFF. TCF is now the second-largest community foundation in the nation with over $4 billion in assets. In this issue, you will learn about a unique program created by TCF called Legacy Tulsa. Learn about the program and read profiles of the participating nonprofits in a special 64-page section within this issue. Thanks to The Advancement Group’s Mark Loeber, Chris Miller, Mindy Kuehn, Brittany Stokes and Debbie Wright for their leadership and efforts in creating the Legacy Tulsa special section. On a personal note, I extend my best New Year’s wishes to longtime friend Bob Renberg as he continues to battle a serious illness. Older Tulsans know the Renberg name as that of the family who owned and operated the iconic department store(s) in Tulsa from 1913 to 1998. Bob served as president and CEO of the company, following in the footsteps of his father, George, and grandfather, Sam, who founded the historic business in downtown Tulsa. I have long appreciated Bob for being one of the earliest supporters of this magazine, and for honoring me with his friendship for over three decades. I am hopeful and prayerful for his return to good health. As always, thank you for being a reader of TulsaPeople as we begin our 32nd year serving as Tulsa’s city magazine. TP

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon PRESIDENT Juley Roffers VP COMMUNITY RELATIONS Susie Miller EDITOR CITY EDITOR DIGITAL EDITOR ARTS & BENEFITS EDITOR ONLINE CALENDAR EDITOR

Anne Brockman Morgan Phillips Anna Bennett Judy Langdon John Langdon

EDITORIAL CONSULTING Missy Kruse, The Write Company CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER VIDEOGRAPHER ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES

CONTROLLER SUBSCRIPTIONS DISTRIBUTION COORDINATOR INTERNS

Madeline Crawford Georgia Brooks Morgan Welch Michelle Pollard Valerie Grant Greg Bollinger Andrea Canada Steve Hopkins Betsy Slagle Mary McKisick Gloria Brooks Amanda Hall Mason Beasler Ashley Riggs

MEMBER

TulsaPeople’s distribution is audited annually by

Langdon Publishing Company sets high standards to ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable manner. This issue of Tulsa People was printed on recycled fibers containing 20 percent post-consumer waste with inks containing a soy base blend. Our printer is a certified member of the Forestry Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and additionally, meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act standards. When you are finished with this issue, please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. We can have a better world if we choose it together. Disregard any TulsaPeople subscription solicitation that is not directly mailed from the Langdon Publishing office at 1603 S. Boulder Ave. Contact Langdon Publishing directly if you are interested in subscribing or renewing your TulsaPeople subscription.

Jim Langdon PUBLISHER


CITY DESK C A L E N D A R + C A U S E S + C U LT U R E

The quilt hanging behind Patti Coppock was inspired by a technique in “The Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters” by Sherri Lynn Wood. Coppock started the quilt in a class taught by Wood in summer 2017.

GREG BOLLINGER

Q

PEACE BY PIECE

uilter Patti Coppock gravitates to the “ugly” fabric overlooked at shops, estate sales and thrift stores. “I have a unique take on fabric,” she explains. “I put things together that people wouldn’t normally put together.” Coppock’s mother taught her to sew when she was 9, but she completed her first quilt more than 30 years later. It won first place in a competition’s first-time quilt category, and the 64-year-old has won at least one award for nearly every quilt she has made since.

A few of Coppock’s quilts will be displayed at the Southwood Quilt and Fiber Show, Jan. 5-6 at Southwood Landscape and Nursery. However nice the awards she receives, quilting gives Coppock something better. “It’s my happy place,” she says. “My brain shuts out everything I’m worrying about. It’s very cathartic.” TP See. p. 22 for more on the Southwood Quilt and Fiber Arts Show.

TulsaPeople.com

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JANUARY C OM PIL ED BY MA S ON BE A SL ER

1-7

Dust off your ice skates and kick off the new year with Arvest Winterfest just outside the BOK Center.

11

Mike Dillon’s New Orleans Pocket Percussion, featuring Jim Loughlin of the jam band Moe, hits the Shrine.

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27-28

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Watch the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards in good company at Circle Cinema’s viewing party.

10

Support the Tulsa Oilers as they take on the Wichita Thunder at the BOK Center.

10-13

Tulsans, start your engines: It’s time for the 2018 Chili Bowl Nationals at Expo Square.

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TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

Enjoy the musical masterpieces of “An Evening with Eric Whitacre” at the Tulsa PAC as he conducts the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra and Tulsa Oratorio Chorus.

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The Roundabout Theatre Co.’s “Cabaret” journeys through pre-World War II Germany at the Broken Arrow PAC. John Hiatt and the Goners celebrate the 30th anniversary of his song “Slow Turning” with a concert at the Brady Theater.

See the staff of the Oklahoma Aquarium feed beavers, otters, eel, piranha and archer fish throughout the day. The Moody Blues bring their English rock to Tulsans for a concert at the BOK Center. Experience an evening of musical contrasts as the Fly Loft hosts the Fridays in the Loft Chamber Series with Bartok, Beethoven and Harbison.

26-27

The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet brings its talent and global choreographers to the Tulsa PAC.

Signature Symphony presents “A Night at the Opera” at the TCC VanTrease PACE.

Support the young athletes competing in the first Oklahoma Golden Gloves State Championship at the Greenwood Cultural Center. The BOK Center hosts the annual Winter Jam Tour Spectacular, featuring musicians Kari Jobe and Building 429 and comedian John Crist. The Tulsa Boat, Sport and Travel Show at Expo Square will have you dreaming of balmy weather and adventure on the open road. Through Feb. 4. VISIT TULSAPEOPLE.COM FOR MORE LOCAL EVENTS.

WINTERFEST: COURTESY; WHITACRE: MARC ROYCE; HIATT: KAT VILLACORTA

Plan the big day at the Tulsa Wedding Show at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center.

Honor Martin Luther King Jr. as the 39th annual Tulsa MLK Parade winds through downtown.


Charitable giving made easy in Tulsa Thanks to the Tulsa Community Foundation

Tulsa is a giving city. Historically, we can trace much of our local philanthropy to family generosity… think Phillips, Gilcrease, Skelly, Williams, Helmerich, Zarrow…families whose fortunes were mostly created during the glory days of oil and gas-related successes in our region. Today, philanthropic giving in our city is built on a much broader base of donors to include hundreds of individuals, families, businesses and corporations. Hence, the generous giving is more solid and lasting, and for this we must singularly credit the creation, mission and work of the Tulsa Community Foundation (TCF). Founded in 1998, the idea of a local community foundation here was that of noted Tulsa oilman, banker and philanthropist George Kaiser who recognized Tulsa’s dependence on “unorganized private giving” was not a sustainable practice. Kaiser correctly believed we needed to fortify Tulsa’s philanthropic spirit in a new way, and he acted by creating the Tulsa Community Foundation and seeded it with funds from the George Kaiser Family Foundation. TCF was created to make it easier for donors, large and small, to set-up funds from which to charitably support the specific causes and non-profit organizations desired by each individual donor. The Tulsa Community Foundation is now a collection of over 1,300 funds varying in size from several thousands to multiple millions of dollars. Each fund, with its own identity and philanthropic purpose, benefits from being invested with other funds to create a lasting community resource. Today, TCF manages over $4-billion invested through donor advised and designated funds, charitable agency funds, scholarship funds and nine supporting organizations. Phil Lakin has skillfully served as the foundation’s CEO since inception. It is easy to set-up a donor-advised fund. Sue and I have done it to provide a more effective way to fund a recurring community need that is dear to our hearts. And it is efficient because TCF provides all administrative services, including accounting, auditing, financial management, due diligence, grantmaking and receipting—ever mindful of donor desires and goals. To learn more about the Tulsa Community Foundation, go to tulsacf.org. TCF also offers a great way for persons to engage in legacy giving, philanthropy through wills and estate plans. Legacy Tulsa is the name of the foundation’s Planned Giving Partnership Program, a one-of-a-kind model created in 2008. Legacy Tulsa’s mission is to inspire Tulsans to think beyond one’s lifespan in support of causes and organizations that mean the most to them. To learn more about Legacy Tulsa, go to legacytulsa.org. Thanks to the Tulsa Community Foundation, it is easy to be a charitable donor in Tulsa and be a difference-maker in ways that benefit others in our community.”

Tom Bennett, Jr. Chairman and Co-CEO

SOUTH - 100 S. Riverfront Dr. Jenks, OK MIDTOWN - 4110 S. Rockford Ave. Tulsa, OK FirstOklahomaBank.com


WHERE TO … The Refinery, 109 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., opens its street-level artist studios to the public from 6-9 p.m., the first Friday of each month, for the First Friday Art Crawl.

FIND ART AFTER DARK BY ABIGAIL SINGREY Instead of a typical dinner and a movie, take your Friday nights to the next level with three opportunities to enjoy Tulsa’s art offerings. From local works of art in progress to a behind-the-scenes look at a museum, there’s something for everyone.

Now in its 10th year, the First Friday Art Crawl brings 3,000 Tulsans together at galleries, studios and museums. Guests can get an inside look at the artist’s process through The Refinery, which houses the Tulsa Artist Fellowship studios. “The guest may see a work-in-progress in the studio one month, then see its final form displayed in a gallery the next month,” says Abby Mashunkashey, director of communications for TAF. “This allows for a multi-layered conversation to take place — both with the artists and with oneself.” 6-9 p.m., Jan. 5, and the first Friday of each month Most Tulsa Arts District galleries and museums offer free First Friday admission; visit thetulsaartsdistrict.org for a list of participants.

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TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

Philbrook Museum of Art Imagine unwinding after a long day with a starlit view of the Philbrook gardens. Communications Manager Jeff Martin says the museum is striving to make its collection more accessible to those with busy, modern lifestyles by recasting itself as a Friday night destination. Visitors can go behind the scenes with “Museum Confidential,” an innovative exhibit on display through May 6 that turns Philbrook inside out. “Museums on average only show 5 percent of their holdings,” Martin says. “Want to see the other 95 percent?” Open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. on Fridays; check website for additional museum hours; $7, general admission; $5, seniors; $5, groups of 10 or more; free, museum members, youth 17 and younger, college students with valid ID and active-duty military members with ID 2727 S. Rockford Road | philbrook.org

Gilcrease Museum Young professionals are invited to gather at Gilcrease Museum for a free after-hours networking event. The monthly meetup starts back up in February and is an opportunity to explore the museum grounds, support local artists and drink cocktails while enjoying Gilcrease’s collection. Opening Feb. 17, Gilcrease Museum’s new exhibit is taking a behind-the-scenes look at one of America’s most famous, yet most relatable, artists: Norman Rockwell. Through the reference photos used to create his paintings, guests can get a rare glimpse of the artist’s inspiration. The exhibit is on display through June 10. Next Gilcrease After Hours: 7-9 p.m., Feb. 23; check website for regular museum hours; $8, adults; $6, seniors, active-duty military and groups of 10 or more; $5, college students with valid ID; free, children 18 and under 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road | gilcrease.org TP

TULSA ARTS DISTRICT: VALERIE GRANT; PHILBROOK: MORGAN PHILLIPS; GILCREASE: ERIK CAMPOS

Tulsa Arts District


We hadn’t heard much about Episcopal education. We’re a Christian family. Living in a city full of good faith-based schools. Comfortable with our beliefs. We were looking for a school that honored our convictions, a community that celebrates difference, AND an atmosphere of inquiry where our kids witness many traditions.

Holland Hall spoke to us— as the one school in Tulsa offering all they need for ALL they’re becoming.

The possibilities of and. The assurance of all.

Jeff

Primary and Upper School parent

Tulsa’s PreK through Grade 12 Independent Episcopal School hollandhall.org


NOTEBOOK BY MORGA N PHILLIP S

GROUP HONORS ‘MOTHER OF THE TULSA ARTS SCENE’ Jane Heard Clinton and her friends in an undated photo

Rowing club floats

— Tulsan Ella Marshall, who lives near East 61st Street and South Peoria Avenue. In late 2017, residents of apartment complexes in the area submitted name ideas as part of community outreach activities envisioned in a grant from the U.S. Justice Department for Community-based Crime Reduction. Area students chose the winning name, which will be announced this month.

NEW BOATHOUSE

Founding members of Arts Alliance Tulsa’s Jane Heard Clinton Society

A group of female arts supporters are celebrating and continuing the legacy of early Tulsan Jane Heard Clinton through a new society named for her. Its goal is to build a community of diverse and inclusive female philanthropists who inspire and encourage other women to strengthen the arts and cultural environment of Tulsa, organizers say. “We wanted to develop a women’s leadership group to recognize the extraordinary role women play in the arts and in supporting the arts in Tulsa,” says Todd Cunningham, executive director of Arts Alliance Tulsa. AAT provides supplemental funding and audience support to 40 local performing arts groups and arts institutions. Cunningham calls Heard Clinton “the mother of the Tulsa arts scene.” A cultured aristocrat from Georgia, she was the wife of Dr. Fred S. Clinton, who built the first hospital in Tulsa. She was a charter member of the Philbrook Art Center, the Tuesday Book Club and the Hyechka Club, helped bring the New York Symphony to Tulsa in 1911 and fundraised to build the Convention Hall (now the Brady Theater) in 1914. The Jane Heard Clinton Society has more than 50 members, who attend activities throughout the year, including behind-the-scenes tours of Alliance member organizations. JHCS membership starts at $250 per year. For more membership information or to join, contact Anna Inhofe at anna@artstulsa.org or 918-289-0222.

The Tulsa Rowing Club hopes to have a new boathouse late this spring or early summer to replace the one destroyed by arson in 2016. The club recently unveiled renderings of the new facility designed by Fritz Bailey Architects. It will occupy the same site as the previous structure near River West Festival Park. Insurance will cover the majority of the new build, but not the increased cost of a design that meets the requirements of the city’s new River Design Overlay, passed after the original boathouse was destroyed. Rowing club member Claudia Brierre estimates the club must raise $150,000 to complete the new facility. Additional funds, approximately $120,000, could be raised to add “extra” amenities such as a mezzanine, a workout space and training areas. The Tulsa Rowing Club has more than 100 members ages 13-75. Boathouse donations can be made at tulsarowing.org.

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TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

VOICES AND JHCS: COURTESY; ROWING CLUB: FRITZ BAILEY ARCHITECTS

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LOCAL TALENT

Musician Phil Streets is an educator by day. He recently released a jazz-pop album.

‘HYPOTHETICAL’ HYBRID New album was a collaboration for longtime Tulsa musician. BY TIM LANDES

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hil Streets has always loved jazz. It started as a child when his dad would perform with his band in their living room. Streets says he instantly fell in love with the refined harmonies and subtlety of the music. He soon started learning how to play the keys. In the early ’80s, Streets was a member of the Tulsa-based band Fantasy that played venues throughout the region. He started writing his own compositions and eventually began using a computer to record his own music and share it. In 2005, Streets released his first album, “Layers.” This past year, he partnered with producer Steve Thornbrugh for a new project. They assembled a group of musicians from across the U.S. and Finland to record the songs Streets wrote. Some met in the studio, but others traded audio files to complete the process. It resulted in “Hypothetically of Course,” which Streets describes as a hybrid of jazz and pop. He played the keyboard and sang lead vocals on the album, which can be found on Amazon, iTunes and CDBaby.com. It also can be streamed on Spotify and YouTube. “There is nothing more satisfying than to hear some great musicians interpret your music,”

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Streets says. “It inspires me to keep writing new songs and gets me excited to go back in the studio and record more stuff soon.” Streets has dedicated his career to public education. He’s currently the principal at Bixby North Elementary School, and he has the option to retire after next year. He’s not sure if it will be then, but when he does retire, Streets says he will devote his time to creating more music and maybe play live again. TP

Memorial High School Chorale will celebrate the 100th anniversary of composer Leonard Bernstein’s birth with a performance of Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms,” sung in Hebrew, at the group’s 35th annual Masterworks Concert at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 11, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 501 S. Cincinnati Ave. The occasion is being celebrated all year with performances by music ensembles all over the world; however, MHS Vocal Director Kevin Pearson says Memorial Chorale is the only Oklahoma group participating. MHS has had a chorale since the early 1960s. Each year, the chorale — comprised of 65 students who rehearse during the school day — performs two concerts, including the Masterworks concert and a full-scale musical. Pearson says state budget cuts have affected Memorial music programs. “While our students are constantly engaged in fundraising, (it) has become increasingly difficult,” he says. “Even when we slim down our budget, it costs approximately $20,000 to run the vocal music department here.” Fortunately, the Crowne Plaza Southern Hills will underwrite the Jan. 11 concert, allowing the chorale to continue its longstanding tradition. “A masterwork is a large-scale work, typically from the Western classical tradition and with multiple movements or sections,” Pearson says. “We hire various members of the Tulsa symphonic community to accompany the choir and perform in an acoustically resonant space in order to maximize the value of the experience for the students. “The importance of this activity cannot be overstated. We set the bar very high. Often the students think they cannot reach it, but they excel through hard work and dedication, coming together to truly move a mountain one pebble at a time.” — JUDY LANGDON MHS Director Emeritus Dan Call set up a taxexempt vocal music endowment in the early 1990s. Donations can be mailed to: Memorial High School Vocal Music Endowment, 5840 S. Hudson Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74135

LOCAL TALENT: VALERIE GRANT; CHOIR: GREG BOLLINGER

STUDENT CHOIR PREPS FOR CELEBRATION


CHANGEMAKERS

BY THE NUMBERS

Hunger-Free Oklahoma, an advocacy organization, is approaching its second anniversary in 2018. The organization works to end hunger through research, policy-making and collaboration with nonprofits, schools, and state and local government agencies to ensure communities have the information and tools to end hunger. According to hungerfreeOK.org, nearly one in four Oklahoma children (24 percent) is food insecure, meaning they have limited or inconsistent access to adequate food. Food-insecure children have lower reading and math scores, more significant behavior and social problems, and lower high school graduation rates.

Tulsan’s vision provides hundreds each year a place to die with dignity. BY CONNIE CRONLEY

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elley Scott wanted to be a nurse since she was a little girl in Oklahoma City. “My mother and my two aunts were nurses,” she says, “and I loved the stories they told me about their nursing school days. My heart has always been in nursing.” For her first nursing job, she had a choice between a surgical floor and oncology. Her mother advised against oncology. “She said it would be too hard on me,” Scott recalls. Perhaps out of youthful rebellion, Scott chose the oncology job. She learned how to manage emotional attachments and establish boundaries. That has enabled her to maintain her intensity and passion for hospice work. “Providing end-of-life care,” she says, “is a privilege.” Even with medical visits from hospice workers, many families are unable to provide the 24/7 care that enables people to die comfortably at home. Scott had a dream of how to fill the gap. She envisioned a caring and compassionate home (not a “facility”) where guests (not “patients”) could die with dignity. What’s more, it would be free of charge. Every expert she consulted laughed at her.

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“It will never work,” they told her. With the support of volunteers, she did it anyway. Today, Scott is executive director of 13-yearold Clarehouse, a 10-bedroom, wooded campus in south Tulsa where more than 300 individuals die every year surrounded by family and friends. Education is her current passion. Scott spends time with the health care students who rotate through Clarehouse, personally urging them to find their passion. She is working to replicate the Clarehouse model for end-of-life care homes in other communities. (See her website, omega homenetwork.org.) “Isn’t it depressing?” is the question she is asked frequently. “Clarehouse is full of light, love and laughter,” she says. “Someone dies here almost every day, but there’s so much living going on here, too.” The need is great. “We have a tsunami of aging baby boomers,” she says. “Who will be at their bedside?” TP For more information, visit clarehouse.org.

• 22.7 percent of Tulsa County children are food insecure. • Oklahoma is No. 1 in the U.S. for its extensive coverage and use of the child nutrition programs in the statewide Every Student Succeeds Education (ESSE) Plan. However, funds are underutilized because people don’t know about the available programs. • Oklahoma leaves $400 million in unclaimed federal funds “on the table” each year for nutritional programs. • 80 percent of all TPS students are eligible for free-and-reduced lunch. • Breakfast and lunch were served to children at 128 sites during summer 2017. • 53 TPS elementary schools, representing 62 percent of schools in the district, participate in the Community Eligibility Provision for free breakfast and lunch to all students, as of November 2017. The CEP allows high-needs schools to offer school meals at no cost to all students. — JUDY LANGDON

VALERIE GRANT

LIFE AND DEATH

• Hunger costs Oklahoma more than $1.4 billion annually because of increased illness and decreased academic achievement.


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WRITER SPOTLIGHT

Kristi Eaton is a freelancer for TulsaPeople Magazine. For more information on the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, visit tulsaartistfellowship.org.

Local writer lands fellowship to explore important state issue. BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

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or more than a decade, Kristi Eaton has traveled the world in search of a story. From India to Indonesia, she’s covered issues ranging from women’s rights to global poverty. Now her journey has brought her home. This month, Eaton joins a class of six literary artists from across the country as a Tulsa Artist Fellow. The fellowship, which was established by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, provides a stipend, housing and a workplace, allowing Eaton to focus on a topic near and dear to her heart: social justice in her own home state. Oklahoma’s incarceration rate for women is one of the highest in the nation, and Eaton wants to use her year as a fellow to explore the issue. At the end of 2018, she will have the option to apply for a modified second and third year.

Jan. 18 “An Evening with Jeannette Walls” 6 p.m. Bond Event Center, 608 E. Third St. $200, tickets; $2,500-$25,000, sponsorships. Benefits Project TCMS. Call 918-743-6184 or visit tcmsok.org. 20

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

“I want to highlight some of the organizations that are working with these women — organizations like ‘Poetic Justice,’ which teaches poetry to women in prison, or the Girl Scout program that brings young girls to visit their mothers in prison,” Eaton explains. “I’d like to tell the stories of the women who are in there for minor infractions to show why we have this problem and how some organizations are trying to change the outcomes.” Although this 32-year-old journalist has written her way across the globe ever since she landed her first reporting job on Saipan, she’s happy to find herself back in Tulsa. “This fellowship will give me the time and resources to be able to focus on this issue and dig a little deeper,” she says. “I like writing about women’s rights, and this is something in my own backyard.” TP

‘THE GLASS CASTLE’ AUTHOR COMES TO TULSA Author Jeannette Walls, whose 2005 bestselling memoir, “The Glass Castle,” tells her personal recount of growing up in a nomadic, often homeless family, will be the guest speaker at Tulsa County Medical Society’s Jan. 18 fundraiser. “The Glass Castle” spent 261 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller List, has sold more than 2.7 million copies and was translated into 22 languages. It opened this past August as a movie starring Brie Larson. Wall’s appearance at the dinner replaces TCMS’s previous fundraiser, Art RX, says Kim Morris, program manager of Project Tulsa Charitable Medical Services, a service of the Tulsa County Medical Society Foundation. Project TCMS provides non-emergent medical specialty care in a traditional clinic or hospital setting to uninsured, low-income adults residing in Tulsa County. All care is donated by volunteers in the medical community. Morris says Walls’ experience growing up in poverty with many basic needs unmet “relates to the people we serve through our program.” — JUDY LANGDON

NAME: Peggy White AGE: 30 KNOWN FOR: Creating Chateau Blanche Design, a company known for its quirky cards. Her stationery and other products are sold at various local shops, including Dwelling Spaces, the Tulsa Artery and Stash in Brookside.

Humble beginnings: Necessity is the mother of invention. When I moved here, I had a difficult time finding a job I knew I would enjoy. I decided to make what was once a small Etsy shop with only a handful of card designs into something more. Card-making motivation: I went to the Kansas City Art Institute and graduated in 2009. Some of my favorite drawings came from the doodles in the margins of my class notes and not always the “real” art I produced for critiques. I’ve always loved paper goods and stationery products, so it was a natural fit. Her candid cards: Aside from being honest, I would have to say they’re playful and snarky. Card of choice: Right now, I really love the dinosaur birthday card that says, “I’m glad you’re not so old you’re dead.” Tulsa’s small biz scene: The small business community here is one of support and connectivity. It has been the heart of those businesses and their desire to see others succeed that has allowed Chateau Blanche to grow. — ASHLEY RIGGS Visit chauteaublanchedesign.com.

WRITER SPOTLIGHT: VALERIE GRANT; MEET AND GREET: GREG BOLLINGER; WALLS: KEPPLER SPEAKERS

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PASSIONS

FRESH START

TV anchor supports a cause she experienced first-hand. BY MORGAN PHILLIPS

B

more about the mission of Domestic Violence ooker T. Washington graduate Neile Intervention Services: rebuilding lives affected Jones has accomplished a lot since by domestic violence and sexual assault through leaving an abusive relationship early in advocacy, shelter, counseling and education. This her broadcasting career. For example, the anmonth, Jones will emcee DVIS’ Monarch Ball. chor for KTUL Tulsa’s Channel 8 has won an Jones found safety among friends after Emmy award, has run the Chicago Marathon, participated in a body-building competition leaving her abuser and credits faith and her supportive family for helping her through an and gone on a book tour. incredibly difficult time. She, more than most, She prefers to dwell on those positive expeunderstands the signifiriences rather than what cance of DVIS’ services she endured while in JAN. 26 — MONARCH BALL that relationship. “I’m to other survivors. 6 p.m. Southern Hills Country Club, 2636 E. 61st St. in a club you never real“In life, at different Cocktail hour, live music from Professor D, silent times we will all need ly want to be a part of,” auction and raffle. $250, tickets in advance; $2,500a little help, and we Jones says of being a do$50,000, sponsorships. will all be able to offer mestic abuse survivor. a little help,” Jones says. Several years ago, she JAN. 27 — BEST OF BRUNCH 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mayo Hotel, 115 W. Fifth St. began telling her story to “DVIS — they are the Enjoy menu items from Tulsa’s favorite brunch spots. real story. They’re makhelp others and herself $75, tickets; $100, VIP tickets; ing a difference, helping heal, and she wrote about $500-$10,000, sponsorships. people make a fresh it in her 2010 memoir. start. If someone hadn’t Since moving to Tulsa Both events benefit DVIS. Contact Joan Anderson, done that for me, I don’t from northwest Ar918-508-2709 or janderson@dvis.org. Visit dvis.org. kansas, she has learned know where I’d be.” TP

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MASTERPIECES AT SOUTHWOOD

Quilts and other textiles on display at the 2016 Southwood Quilt and Fiber Arts Show

In 2011, Joe Schulte, then-president of Southwood Landscape and Nursery, met with quilter Debi Pickens to discuss a new type of show in Tulsa: one that would showcase quilts in a greenhouse. After Pickens talked with her quilting friends from around the city, the idea began to take form. Southwood offered free space for the event, and the Southwood Quilt and Fiber Festival was born. “I wanted the show to be an opportunity for quilters and fiber artists to show and sell their art,” Pickens says of the festival’s beginnings. Since then, she says, “The show has grown from 35 quilts the first year to over 160 quilts (in 2016).” Now called the Southwood Quilt and Fiber Arts Show, the event has expanded beyond quilts to include handmade clothing, weaving, jewelry, bowls and thread art. Quilters Briana Shepard and Paula Klassen are the featured artists for 2018. Over the years, the festival also has hosted numerous demonstrations, such as felting, surface design, weaving, dyeing and block making, along with showing sheep and alpaca. The show gives Tulsans the opportunity to witness these creations and vote on a people’s choice award winner. Patti Coppock, who won the award last year, says the show is a “perfect place for people of all ages, quilters or not.” The free show is 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Jan. 5-6, at Southwood Landscape and Nursery, 9025 S. Lewis Ave. — MASON BEASLER

PASSIONS: VALERIE GRANT; SOUTHWOOD: COURTESY

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APPLAUSE

ORU TENNIS AND TRACK TEAMS

‘COME HOME’

In March, Tulsans Jenifer White and Victoria McArtor will speak at the U.N. Headquarters in New York City. The opportunity came about as a result of White’s Project 1948 receiving special consultative status as a non-governmental organization from the U.N. Economic and Social Council this past summer.

Two Tulsa groups collaborate on the path to gender equality. BY MORGAN PHILLIPS

Joe Dial, track coach at Oral Roberts University, at the campus’ new 8-lane track

on therapeutic arts. “Jen is giving young people ulsa women will have a voice at the a camera, and I’m giving them a piece of paUnited Nations Headquarters this per and a pen,” McArtor says, “but the impacts spring, thanks to the collaboration of are similar: amplifying voices and encouraging two Tulsa-based organizations. participation.”  Jenifer White is the founder of Project 1948, a In preparation to address  the Commission photo-voice initiative focused in Bosnia and Herzegovina. She and Victoria McArtor, co-founder on the Status of Women, the pair are asking of the MUSED. organization, a poetry and colTulsa women to host “Mrs. Jeffersonian” dinners: laborative arts nonprofit, will speak about gender small gatherings of engaged citizens who meet to discuss a shared interest or theme — in this equality at the 62nd Commission on the Status of case, gender equality. Unlike a traditional dinner Women March 12-23 in New York City. party, guests will be encourProject 1948 gives donated cameras to young adults aged to address the entire To host a Mrs. Jeffersonian dinner in Bosnia and Herzegovina group when speaking and to around the topic of gender equality, visit avoid side conversations. and asks them to documusedorganization.org/UNwomen. ment daily life in an effort White and McArtor will facilitate the dinners, gathto bring an understanding ering ideas on how to create gender equality in of issues surrounding the Bosnian genocide of the 1990s. According to White, photography Tulsa. They also plan to circulate surveys in the provides young Bosnians a channel to express community. The pair say they will present their findings at the conference; forge partnerships there concerns about their community. The MUSED. organization offers many with international citizens, diplomats and member states; negotiate an outcome document to further events and programs, including the Reverse Selfie Project, a six-week creative-and-critical push the women’s rights agenda forward; and rethinking workshop hosted in Tulsa Public midturn to Tulsa with a plan to increase leadership and dle and high schools. participation among girls and young women. “We want every woman in Tulsa to say, ‘I have Although the missions of Project 1948 and a voice at the U.N. this year,’” White says. TP MUSED. differ, McArtor says they both center

After 25 years, Joe Dial’s dreams have finally been realized. That’s how long he has been head coach of the Oral Roberts University men’s and women’s track teams. Now, his teams have a home track at the campus’ new ONEOK Sports Complex. Before ONEOK and other donors made Dial’s wish come true, ORU Track never had a home meet. Likewise, ORU Tennis played “home matches” at a number of local tennis complexes, including Philcrest, the University of Tulsa and LaFortune Tennis Center. In October, the women’s tennis team had its first home tournament at the facility comprised of six tennis courts and a world-class, eight-lane track sporting ORU’s blue and gold. On Feb. 16, ORU will host its first men’s home tennis match against the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff. ORU Track will host its inaugural meet March 30 with a high school meet followed by a major collegiate competition the next day with teams from ORU, TU, Oklahoma State, Kansas, the University of Missouri-Kansas City and Arkansas. At the recent dedication of the sports complex, Dial, men’s tennis coach Mark Milner and women’s tennis coach Beverly Dawson praised the new complex. “This is a huge development,” Dial said. “We’ve enjoyed our best year in recruiting mainly due to this new track. The attitudes of our athletes are at an alltime high.” — DOUG EATON

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VALERIE GRANT

EQUAL PARTNERS


Cooking for a Cause

ANDRIAH BEDFORD

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Twelve Tulsa chefs demonstrated how to prepare some of their signature dishes at Iron Gate’s Cooking for a Cause fundraiser Oct. 19 at Metro Appliances and More. Wines were paired with tastings for patrons’ enjoyment. Approximately 250 people attended. Chef Jonathan Moosmiller of Southern Hills Country Club won the judge’s choice award, and chef Devin Levine of the BOK Center won the people’s choice award. Artist Chris Mantle created two paintings at the event, which were then sold during the live auction to benefit the food pantry and soup kitchen. Cooking for a Cause raised $150,000 for Iron Gate.

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1. John Oakley and chef Elizabeth Howe, both of US Foods 2. Hugh Robert and Chris Mantle, who painted the Tulsa skyline in the background 3. The Tulsa Symphony Orchestra Quartet provided music. 4. Chef Shannon Smith, center, of Beads and Basil

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Cattle Baron’s Ball

BOX PHOTOGRAPHY

On Sept. 29, the western bank of the Arkansas River was filled with approximately 600 patrons of the Cattle Baron’s Ball. The benefi t at RiverWest Festival Park raised $205,000 for the American Cancer Society. The evening included live music from McKenzie’s Mill, Western-themed activities, and silent and live auctions. Food was provided by Burn Co., Mahogany, Olive Garden, Dilly Diner, Baxter’s Interurban Grill, McNellie’s, The Melting Pot and Nothing Bundt Cakes.

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1. Richard Heinrich performed rope tricks for patrons. 2. Several bars scattered throughout the event served drinks. 3. Burn Co. dished up a variety of smoked meats. 4. Rocky Goins and Lynn Flinn, 2018 event chairs 5. Volunteers Connie Lewis and Anna Paquette at the “Lights of Hope” table. Guests could purchase a light to honor or remember a loved one. The lights were used to illuminate the event stage.

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VALERIE GRANT

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S

teve Bradshaw, who takes over as the chairman of the Tulsa Regional Chamber in 2018, grew up in nearby Bartlesville, graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond and worked for a few years in banking and investments in Oklahoma City. He has made Tulsa his home since 1984. He joined Bank of Oklahoma in 1991, not long after George Kaiser purchased the bank and helped resurrect it into the thriving $33 billion Tulsa mainstay that it is today. He took over as president and CEO of BOK Financial in January 2014. Bradshaw has devoted immense time and effort to a multitude of institutions and charities, including the University of Tulsa Board of Trustees, the Tulsa Community Foundation, the Tulsa Area United Way, the Tulsa River Parks Authority, Junior Achievement and DVIS, to name only a few. In 2016, he and his wife, Marla, became the first couple since the 1980s to co-chair the United Way fundraising campaign. He has two grown children and five grandkids, but Bradshaw says he and Marla have a 9-year-old English bulldog, who he says thinks she’s a child. An avid foodie who greatly enjoys experimenting in the kitchen (more on that later), he thinks he has the right recipe for Tulsa’s future success.

WHAT’S YOUR PRIMARY FOCUS FOR THE CHAMBER GOING INTO 2018? My view of the Chamber is that it has kind of two clear roles: The Chamber has to be the best presenter of the attributes of the city in terms of the business climate (and) of the quality of life here in the city, and (it must) be able to present that on an outreach basis to attract talent and also help existing businesses here retain talent. And the other is really eliminating barriers to that, identifying things that today can be a challenge for either growing jobs here in the market or attracting jobs and companies to the market. So, to me it’s playing both offense and defense as an effective Chamber. YOU WERE PART OF THE GROUP THAT WENT DOWN TO FORT WORTH IN OCTOBER TO GET SOME IDEAS, TO SEE THE THINGS THEY’RE DOING DOWN THERE. We did and we chose Fort Worth carefully and there were some interesting parallels. They’re doing some pretty interesting things with their Trinity River project and some pretty bold initiatives that I thought would be aspirational and inspirational for the group that went there. They’re real strong in tourism and as a sports hub and compete with us for a lot of events and shows, so it’s always good to get kind of a firsthand glance at your competition. They’ve done a lot with their downtown, and there are some parallels with what we’ve seen in terms of downtown development here, especially

Q&A

STEVE BRADSHAW President and CEO of BOK Financial; 2018 Tulsa Regional Chamber chairman BY STEVE BERG

in the Tulsa Arts District area. So all those things together, I thought, made it a really good trip and really sparked some great brainstorming ideas when we got back. So now it’s time to boil those down into some action items. ARE THERE THINGS THEY’RE MAYBE DOING A LITTLE BIT BETTER THAN WE ARE? AND ARE THERE SOME THINGS THAT WE’RE DOING BETTER? I think it’s both. They’re probably a little bit ahead of us in terms of their downtown development and how they control the development there and created some public transportation, some solutions for public parking and some of those kinds of things. I think we saw some items that will be helpful to us as we look to better connect these “pod areas” downtown, whether it’s the East Village or the Pearl District or the things going on in the Arts District. From a river perspective, their project is very bold, but I think with what we’re already doing on our river and with the impact of the Gathering Place, I’d say we’re absolutely parallel if not ahead of them in that regard. But there were absolutely some learning points there, too. WHAT DOES THIS ROLE MEAN TO YOU? I BET THEY’VE APPROACHED YOU BEFORE. I have some experience here because I was the board chair for Visit Tulsa, and I did that for a couple of years, and we’ve really seen that pivot. I mean, our hotel nights now are triple what they were then. That was my apprenticeship, if you will, for this role. I was asked by Mike Neal in maybe the latter part of 2014 to consider for ’18, and for me, it was a no-brainer.

The way I look at it is, we have 2,200 employees here at Bank of Oklahoma and in the region, and we have thousands of customers. They all care deeply about the quality of life here, so it’s very important that the bank remain involved in that and important for me to take my turn, if you will. WHAT DO YOU FEEL IS GOING TO BE YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE AS CHAIRMAN? AND WHAT DO YOU THINK THE CHAMBER’S BIGGEST CHALLENGE IS GOING TO BE? One’s a very pragmatic one, but it’s an issue that comes up anytime you’re talking to existing large employers here in town or prospective companies coming here, and it’s direct flights. I think we’ve got some momentum there. It’s real important that we establish some direct link to the “business-centric”-type cities — New York, Washington, L.A., perhaps Philadelphia — because of all their international connections. Another one for me, and I think this is a significant issue or barrier, and it’s really the lack of proper education funding — public education especially. It doesn’t take great Google search skills to quickly come to the conclusion that we have a problem. Everyone is nodding in the right direction, which means the frustration level is very high, because we haven’t come up with a solution. Finding a solution starts with responsible actions from the State Legislature. And the mayor is actively engaged in looking at a process that could potentially find some alternative funding opportunities here, which will further the dialogue and spur action to find a sustainable solution. The third one is, I’d say, more along the lines of going on offense or being aspirational, and it’s creating more “new economy” jobs here. And by new economy jobs, I would define that as those that are generally technology-driven. Bank of Oklahoma is a good example of a company that is growing its base of technology jobs and seeing it as a challenge with the limited pool of available talent in Tulsa. And there’s not generally a project that’s been presented to me in the last five years that either isn’t a technology investment or isn’t supported by a technology investment. I think the decision oftentimes for companies like ours and others is, do I create those jobs in Tulsa, Oklahoma, or do I create them in other markets where I think the talent pool might be a little bigger? I want the answer to be, the talent pool is growing and we’re gaining a reputation here in Tulsa for having the kind of quality of life and the kind of support for entrepreneurs and for technologists to thrive here. WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME? I love to cook. And I’ve done a number of charity-type events where I cook dinner for eight people. I wouldn’t say that I’m a gourmet, but I challenge myself and really that’s a relaxation for me. If I’ve got a free Saturday night, we’re probably going to stay home, and I’m going to try to make something new. TP TulsaPeople.com

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TOMMY ALLSUP Nov. 24, 1931-Jan. 11, 2017 Guitarist and music producer

“Not many musicians have been involved in major events in two diff erent musical genres. But as the Buddy Holly sideman who gave up his airplane seat to Ritchie Valens as well as the producer of Bob Wills’ famous last recordings, Tommy Allsup left his lasting footprint on both rock ’n’ roll and Western swing.”

Each January, TulsaPeople remembers some of those we have lost in the past year — individuals who made the city great with their talent, passion or philanthropy. Several were educators, ministers or mentors. All gave of themselves to make this community a more vibrant and viable home for us all.

— John Wooley, music historian

STEPHEN CRANFORD

Oct. 16, 1942-Dec. 6, 2016 Former executive director, Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry Considered a pillar of Tulsa’s interfaith community, he was pastor, teacher, mentor and civil rights advocate. A denominational executive for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), and a trustee emeritus of Phillips Theological Seminary, he served on the National and World Council of Churches, and as a member of the Oklahoma Conference for Community and Justice and Tulsa Interfaith Alliance.

BY MISSY KRUSE

JAY CRONLEY

Nov. 9, 1943-Feb. 26, 2017 Journalist, novelist and humorist An inductee into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame and Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame, the longtime columnist for both the Tulsa World and the Tulsa Tribune provided smiles and laughter to Tulsans with his quirky take on everyday life. He wrote eight novels, several of which were adapted into films, including “Funny Farm,” “Good Vibes,” “Hold Up” and “Cheap Shot.” “Every newsroom needs one, and probably only one, Jay Cronley. Something about his personality would draw people to try and win his approval. I was lucky enough to have my desk near his for more than a year, which meant every day there would be some argument about a TV show, or a movie, or a basketball game. I wanted to work at the Tulsa World my whole life, and I’m thankful I’ ll always be able to say that I worked with Jay.” — Dylan Goforth, editor in chief, The Frontier

“Stephen Cranford was a great statesman of interfaith work. He combined perfectly the clear head and the warm heart. Quiet and courageous, Stephen lived as if the truth were true.” — Keith O. McArtor, president of Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry

MILLARD HOUSE

Jan. 28, 1944-Sept. 3, 2017 Retired associate superintendent, Tulsa Public Schools; president, Tulsa Urban League In 1970, as the school system’s first director of human relations, the former social studies teacher was tasked with responding to the federal government’s order to racially integrate Tulsa’s schools. It was a massive, multi-year undertaking that involved moving both teachers and students. As associate superintendent, he continued the effort by recruiting minority teachers and staff, then retired to head the Tulsa Urban League. “ … His desire was to see our education system achieve the excellence he believed possible with change and true equality. He often stated that until every student in every school in the city of Tulsa was considered … real progress will not be made.” — Jennettie Marshall, Tulsa Public Schools Board of Education member and longtime friend

CAROL “JERRI” JONES April 16, 1937-Jan. 11, 2017 Community leader

Her involvement in civic and nonprofit work covered every aspect of Tulsa. Most notably, she served as the first female president of All Souls Unitarian Church and as vice president of Planned Parenthood. She was a founding member of the Tulsa chapter of Association for Women in Communications, and worked with Tulsa Junior League, Leadership Tulsa and as a docent for Philbrook and Gilcrease museums. But she also saw the world, visiting all seven continents and more than 100 countries. 28

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“Jerri was more than a sister-inlaw. I was lucky to know her for more than 50 years. A true artist in ceramics and the culinary arts, she was also a consummate volunteer; a deep, compassionate friend; an adventuresome traveler; and a source of laughter and light. I will miss her.” — Georgia Snoke, sister-in-law

JAY CRONLEY: COURTESY CONNIE CRONLEY; TOMMY ALLSUP: COURTESY OKLAHOMA MUSIC HALL OF FAME; STEPHEN CRANFORD: COURTESY PHILLIPS THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY; CAROL “JERRI” JONES: COURTESY M. TERESA VALERO; MILLARD HOUSE: COURTESY SIGNEE BLAND

An Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame inductee and Grammy Award winner, he was considered a renaissance musical genius, influencer and mentor who played with or produced the work of other greats, including Buddy Holly, Bob Wills, Willie Nelson and Hank Thompson.


OLIVIA JONES

Jan. 10, 1941-June 1, 2017 Community leader and entrepreneur The wife of U.S. Rep and Ambassador to Mexico James R. Jones, she carved her own path. A graduate of Harvard Law School, she was a partner in her husband’s political career. She worked as a law clerk and ran two businesses. She served on several boards and co-authored a book on English ceramics. Tulsans recall her fascinating stories, her sense of style and her practicality, from doing repairs on their home (the old Skelly Mansion) to riding her lawnmower to the nearby service station. “Olivia dabbled in nothing. If a subject seemed interesting, she researched it exhaustively and became an expert in that subject … from residential reconstruction to knitting, needlepoint and sewing, to English and Chinese pottery and ceramics. She was a true scholar and renaissance woman. Alas, her last subject of intensive study was multiple myeloma, to which she ultimately succumbed.” — Jim Kincaid Sr., longtime friend

PETER MEINIG

OLIVIA JONES: COURTESY JAMES JONES; DUANE KING AND PETER MEINIG: COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF TULSA; PHYLLIS RADCLIFFE: COURTESY BECKY FRANK

July 15, 1939-Sept. 25, 2017 Chairman and CEO, HM International; philanthropist A past director of the Williams Cos., Williams Communications and Purolator, he also served as board chairman of his alma mater, Cornell University, where he and his wife, Nancy, founded the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering. He also was a trustee of the University of Tulsa, to which he and his wife gave generously, and where he was named to the Business Hall of Fame as an outstanding entrepreneur. “Peter Meinig’s life was marked by remarkable accomplishments, immeasurable generosity and unfailing kindness. He always made you feel like his friend. Simply put, Peter Meinig was a wonderful human being.” — Linda Frazier, longtime friend

PHYLLIS RADCLIFFE

Aug. 13, 1926-July 18, 2017 Former vice president, First National Bank; civic leader Beloved by decades of Tulsa’s younger professional women for her mentorship and encouragement, she used her public relations skills to promote the Tulsa Area United Way, the Red Cross and American Diabetes Association. She was president of Tulsa Press Club and was honored with a Saidie Lifetime Achievement award by the Tulsa chapter of the Association for Women in Communications. She was named Advertising Executive of the Year by the American Advertising Federation. “Phyllis was not only a trailblazer for women in leadership, but an icon in the business community as a whole, leaving a signifi cant imprint on the Tulsa area. She taught us through her example the importance of being professional, ethical and giving back to the community. And she did it all with such grace and style.” — Becky Frank, chairwoman and CEO, Schnake Turnbo Frank

DUANE KING

May 18, 1947-Sept. 17, 2017 Former executive director, Gilcrease Museum; director Helmerich Center for American Research; vice president, museum affairs, the University of Tulsa Known as a gentleman and a scholar, he was a widely recognized authority on Native American history, particularly Cherokee and Native American language and art. He began his tenure at TU in 2008. Among his other accomplishments were as founding editor, Journal of Cherokee Studies; executive director, Cherokee National Historical Society; and advisor to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum for the American Indian. “Duane King was a remarkable man. His extraordinary intellect was matched by the strength of his character and gentle spirit. There’s no replacing Dr. King, but we are fortunate to be inspired by his memory to achieve excellence at Gilcrease Museum and the Helmerich Center for American Research.” — Susan Neal, executive director, Gilcrease Museum; vice president, public affairs, the University of Tulsa

MABLE RICE

Dec. 31,1933-Oct. 6, 2017 Longtime community leader

She was a woman of firsts: founding the city’s first Black Arts Festival — which became Juneteenth — and starting the Oklahoma chapter of the National Association of Sickle Cell Disease. An arts lover, she was a founding member of the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, the Simon Estes Education Foundation and a member of the Tulsa Arts Commission and Tulsa Performing Arts Center Authority. She helped develop the North Tulsa Heritage Foundation and the Greenwood Cultural Center. Among her numerous honors was the League of Women Voters Pathfinder Award.

“What made Mable and I friends? It was feeling at ease and comfortable in conversation when we first met. Our journey began speaking our true sentiments, sharing our joys, our sorrows; staying out late at night — lots of fun; having the ability to accept one another’s weaknesses; recognizing one another’s talents. But more importantly, maintaining our love and loyalty for one another for 70 years. I will truly miss my best friend.” — Maxine Horner, former Oklahoma state senator TulsaPeople.com

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July 3, 1945-Aug. 20, 2017 Former superintendent, Tulsa Public Schools

He spent 47 years in public education, serving five school districts across the country as superintendent. During his time in Tulsa (2000-2006) he was noted for his ability to listen to other viewpoints, especially those of the children he served. Navigating TPS through tough financial times, his proudest achievement was the implementation of a new district staffing plan, which included increases in art, music and physical education offerings. Through all this, he took time for his own arts education, learning and playing the banjo at church and school events.

REV. JOHN WOLF

Sept. 6, 1925-Sept. 19, 2017 Former longtime minister, All Souls Unitarian Church An outspoken, impassioned voice for personal and civil rights, he spoke for the needs of education, the arts, racial equality and the rights of women and the LGBT community. In 1965, he led a march through downtown Tulsa in response to the one in Selma, Alabama. He served All Souls for 35 years before becoming minister emeritus and was named to TulsaPeople’s 100 Tulsans Who Made a Difference during the city’s centennial year. “Dr. Wolf was both a theologian and a preacher, who loved church but mistrusted religion. He rebelled against human indifference to other humans and exemplified a socially and politically engaged faith. He built the largest Unitarian Universalist church in North America here in Tulsa, Oklahoma.” — Rev. Marlin Lavanhar, senior minister, All Souls

LEE WOODWARD

Sept. 22, 1931-June 19, 2017 Longtime weather broadcaster, KOTV

“Dr. Sawyer’s superintendency had a tremendous impact on Tulsa Public Schools and the community. He led with his heart and keen instincts for what was ‘ best’ for all students and staff. He never diverted from challenging situations or policies that hindered the district from becoming the leading school district in the state of Oklahoma.”

A seasoned broadcaster, Woodward filled a variety of roles for KOTV. He and his droll puppet sidekick, Lionel, first appeared on one of the station’s children’s shows. When it ended, demand was so great for the pair, Woodward brought him back to help announce the weather. Their banter helped KOTV dominate the evening news ratings during the 1960s and ’70s. An arts lover, Woodward was a talented painter, sculptor and tenor. He and Lionel emceed more than 26 children’s benefit concerts for Tulsa Public Schools.

— Oliver Wallace, director of student and family advocacy, Tulsa Public Schools

STEADMAN UPHAM

April 4, 1949- July 30, 2017 President emeritus, the University of Tulsa Affectionately known as “Uncle Stead” by students, the anthropologist-turned-universitypresident served two terms at TU (2004-2012) and (20122016), during which the institution grew significantly on all fronts. From housing to new classroom buildings, from community service to cuttingedge programs, campus life and a diverse student body, he helped transform a small university into a one of the top 50 private universities in the country.

“Lee Woodward never turned down anybody for a chat, and with King Lionel, a friendly greeting, somehow making a frozen-faced puppet sound as if it were smiling. He loved his own children, of course. He connected with others only with wires in a box and pictures that fl ew through the air.” — Clayton Vaughn, longtime KOTV newsman and friend

YEVGENY YEVTUSHENKO July 18, 1933-April 1, 2017 Internationally recognized poet

Hailed by some as the greatest poet of his generation, he was a former Soviet dissident and human rights advocate who was known for his fearless criticism of his country’s repressive regime. His inspirational voice landed him on the cover of Time Magazine in 1962. The country changed, and from 1989-1991 he served in the Soviet Parliament. After some time teaching in New York, he moved to Tulsa in 1992, where he spent 25 years as a literature professor at the University of Tulsa.

“Stead was always interested in not only making TU a great university but also making Tulsa a great city. He made connections. He saw opportunities. He sought ways to make everything he touched better through compassion and competition. The university lost a visionary leader when my predecessor passed, and the city lost an unwavering advocate.”

“Yevgeny Yevtushenko became a literary sensation early in his career as he challenged his country to think critically about Soviet bureaucracy and the horrors of Stalin’s regime. Always outspoken and known for his colorful personality, (he was) yet a kind and compassionate friend to orphans and widows.”

— Dr. Gerard P. Clancy, president, the University of Tulsa

WE ALSO REMEMBER 30

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— Sue Bennett, friend

RICK HADER

GINNY HOWLAND

Cover: May 2007

Cover: November 2012

March 31, 1958-Nov. 1, 2017 Many knew the Union Public Schools teacher by his alter ego, Myron Noodleman.

April 8, 1923-Sept. 17, 2017 A real “Rosie the Riveter” during World War II, Howland was a former TulsaPeople coverwoman.

DAVID SAWYER: COURTESY GRAHAM FUNERAL HOME; REV. JOHN WOLF: COURTESY ALL SOULS UNITARIAN CHURCH; LEE WOODWARD: COURTESY TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM; YEVGENY YEVTUSHENKO: COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

DAVID SAWYER


A gift to generations THE GENEROUS DONORS BEHIND THE GATHERING PLACE GIVE A RECORD $400 MILLION TO CREATE A PARK FOR ALL TULSANS. BY CONNIE CRONLEY

F

RENDERINGS COURTESY MICHAEL VAN VALKENBURGH ASSOCIATES

or only the second time in the history of TulsaPeople, the Tulsan of the Year is not one individual. It’s Tulsans plural. The only other time was in 2004, when the magazine honored voters who approved the Vision 2025 sales tax increase — a move that kept jobs in Tulsa and built the BOK Center, to name a few benefits. This year, TulsaPeople recognizes the contemporary visionaries — corporate donors, philanthropists and park leaders — of the Gathering Place, Tulsa’s iconic public park opening this summer, as the Tulsans of the Year for 2018. They have earned their place in history. Here’s why.

TulsaPeople.com

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The Gathering Place team: Daiva Neal, executive assistant to the park director; Jimmy Cruz, director of operations; Kirsten Hein, senior programming officer; Albert Popalis, creative director; Tony Moore, executive director; Jillian Childress, community relations director; Amanda Murphy, senior marketing officer; Ken Sutter, director of maintenance; Josh Henderson, senior operations officer; Richard Shoucair, business analysis director; Shannon White, special events manager; Stacie Martin, director of horticulture; and Bailie Brown, marketing coordinator

TRANSFORMING TULSA Nearly 80 donors have joined the George Kaiser Family Foundation to contribute $400 million to create and endow the Gathering Place, comprised of 100 acres facing the Arkansas River and linked by two unique land bridges across Riverside Drive to River Parks. Phase I of the park, which will be completed in summer 2018, is 66.5 acres from East 27th to 31st streets on the east side of Riverside Drive and from 27th to almost 35th along the west side. The donors’ collective gift is the largest to a municipality in the history of the United States. The second biggest gift was $100 million for New York City’s Central Park in 2012. Why would Tulsans build such a costly park? The late John H. Williams, CEO of Williams Cos., summed it up when the idea was broached four years ago. This will be transformative for Tulsa, he said. Williams himself had transformed downtown

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Tulsa in the 1970s with the Williams Center skyscraper, the Williams Center Green and, with then-Mayor Robert LaFortune and others, promoted public-private financing to build the Performing Arts Center. In 2013, more than 40 years later, Williams saw plans for a new public-private partnership that would again change the city. Echoing Williams, many believe the Gathering Place can change Tulsa’s national identity. “We hope that it will help our companies recruit and retain employees,” says project mastermind George Kaiser, the Tulsa oilman, banker and philanthropist. “We hope it will be a place where all of our children and grandchildren want to return as they raise their children.” It also has the potential to be a unifying element in the community. “What great urban parks do today is bring people out of isolation,” says Gathering Place Executive Director Jeff Stava. “People have grown apart. We want to bring Tulsans together for a better community.” More than 1 million visitors are expected to visit the Gathering Place annually. “It will bring people from around the world to our city and set the stage for an even brighter future for Tulsa,” says Mayor G.T. Bynum.

HOW IT BEGAN Kaiser didn’t envision a central gathering place out of a nostalgic memory of a park. “I try to divorce my charitable investments from my life experiences and personal preferences,” he says. What he wants to do is “solve problems that reflect larger community needs.” In 2013, Tulsa had lost the spring in its step, Stava says. The 2007 bond issue for development of the Arkansas River had failed, largely because of suburban votes. Downtown revitalization of the Arts District and Guthrie Green had not yet begun. It was a time of economic decline. “True visionaries realize what great cities need,” Stava says. “Great cities have great gathering places.” Enter Kaiser and GKFF. “Tulsa was losing its strong sense of community,” Kaiser says. “We were more divided by geography, race and class than before. A large central park might heal that divide.” Additionally, the city needed a powerful draw for corporate recruitment and economic development to help it compete with Houston, Dallas


MAGNITUDE OF THE PARK

Josh Miller, project manager; Jeff Stava, executive director and trustee; and Suzanne Schreiber, donor relations manager, are part of the George Kaiser Family Foundation team that have been working on Tulsa’s Gathering Place.

and other metropolitan areas. Looking for solutions, Kaiser and GKFF saw the need to revitalize downtown, especially for young singles and arts patrons, and then marshal public-private funding to accentuate the power of the river for families. In 2014, GKFF pledged $200 million for the park. Williams Cos. became the lead donor with a $16 million challenge. Other corporations followed, and so did the city’s famously generous philanthropic foundations and families for a total of nearly $200 million. The City of Tulsa and Tulsa County joined with $65 million for infrastructure improvement of the park area funded through an Improve Our Tulsa and Vision 2025 sales tax extension.

RESEARCH AND DESIGN Planning for the park had begun in 2011 with community engagement and public meetings that addressed issues from design to food and drink in the park. The Brooklyn-based Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates has designed public spaces — parks, gardens, campuses — around the world. The founder’s philosophy is that urban parks should be made for people to use, not just for beauty and meaning. The New York company was hired. Consultants included the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Army Corps of Engineers, the City of Tulsa, INCOG, Tulsa County, the River Parks Authority, a scientific team (comprised of a soil scientist, an ecologist, a hydrologist and a sound engineer) and an economic team of restaurant and park management consultants. Germany’s Richter Co., known for trend-setting playgrounds, was chosen for its daring European outlook on outdoor play. Its wooden playground equipment includes giant climbing towers. California Skateparks, which has built creative skateparks from China to Australia, customized a skateboard park specifically for Tulsa. Crossland Construction enabled the historic project to be built within budget and of the highest quality, Stava says. Safety and security have to be top of the line, he adds. The Gathering Place operations team consulted with experts from the Department of Homeland Security to local law enforcement agencies and settled on a security system with ample surveillance and staff. Stava says the result will feel more like “guest services” and less like Fort Knox.

For now, we can only imagine the magnitude and grandeur of the space. The property has been under construction for three years. Once the park is open to the public, JEFF STAVA says visitors will discover that world-renowned landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates has designed a Central Parktype space popping with “wow” features for recreation, nature and culture. Those of us who have been around Tulsa for a while can remember the iconic B.B. BLAIR mansion with its large, level front lawn stretching to Riverside Drive to mimic a Southern plantation. AMANDA MURPHY, the park’s senior marketing officer, is a native Tulsan who says topography is one of the most startling changes of the Gathering Place. “It’s not flat anymore,” she says. Building this park wasn’t done by timid mice scratching in the grass. It was more like the brawny work of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox. During peak construction, 650 people were employed. Massive amounts of earth were evacuated, moved and hauled in to build hills and valleys, to construct elevations reaching 53 feet and to reconfigure the river bank so that it swells out into the water. The QuikTrip Corp.’s Great Lawn, the former Blair private property, is the center of the park. Its heart is the 5-acre Chapman Charitable Foundations’ Adventure Playground, with playground equipment and installations never before seen in the United States. The dramatic Williams Cos. Lodge, with a threestory fireplace and floor-to-ceiling plate glass windows, offers views of Oklahoma’s spectacular sunsets. The contemporary ONEOK Boathouse with a pavilion roof includes a restaurant and panoramic views. The lodge and the boathouse are extraordinary, says GEORGE KAISER, “but it may be the peaceful pocket parks and the hidden discovery areas that provide the distinguishing ambience.” Visitors will see 8 miles of paths and nature trails in a landscape planted with 5,789 trees of 118 different species and 16.75 acres of wildflower gardens. The areas have romantic names designed for Oklahoma’s summer heat: Sky Garden with seasonal plantings to please gardeners; the Four Seasons Garden with walls of natural stone; the Wetlands Gardens with aquatic plantings; and Swing Hill, the park’s highest point, which has a variety of swings for adventure lovers of all ages and abilities. Water features in the park include kayaking and canoeing at Peggy’s Pond. Guests will keep cool at Mist Mountain, home to the Flying Fish feature and the water maze, a children’s play fountain, two of Kaiser’s personal favorites. The Adventure Playground is designed for every stage of childhood development and robust interaction with nature, from the Ramble sensory garden with labyrinths and a hedge maze to the Land of River Giants with colossal depictions of native wildlife, to the Fairyland Forest infused with fantasy. Teens and young adults will appreciate the BMX bike track and the skatepark for skateboarders. The Riverview Passage land bridge will be an unrivaled place to watch Fourth of July Fireworks. TulsaPeople.com

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DONORS

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HOW MUCH IS $400 MILLION? Alan Armstrong, Williams

Chet Cadieux, QuikTrip Corp.

Jerry Dickman, H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Foundation

The cost of this elaborate park is more than the annual budget of some nations. It’s almost as much as the government budget of the Solomon Islands, more than that of Vatican City, and of Grenada and Saint Lucia combined. Why did Tulsans give so generously? For Williams Cos., the answer is three-fold: commitment to Tulsa’s river development, a corporate belief in being the best and paying homage to its two great leaders, John Williams and Joseph Williams. “Tulsa has always been a city of people who dream big, take chances and make it happen,” says Alan Armstrong, president and CEO. “It will be the best public park in the nation.” For Haliburton, the park honors the company’s deep roots in the state — it employs 3,600 Oklahomans, 300 of them in Tulsa — and celebrates its thousands of employees, says Vice President Eric Williams. He says the park’s size and potential impact exceeded expectations. “The river seemed like a boundary, not a feature, but the Gathering Place remakes that story,” Williams says. For the H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Foundation, the park is a spectacular amenity that will add to the quality of life in Tulsa, says Trustee Jerry Dickman. “It is so extraordinary, it will draw those searching for the best place to work, live and raise their children.” He says it will appeal to people of all ages, all economic levels and a wide variety of interests. This is precisely what Kaiser had in mind. “We thought we could help rebuild a sense of community,” he says, “by gathering together people from all parts of the city and from all backgrounds and experiences and rediscover that we are more alike than we are different.”

PEOPLE BEHIND THE PARK

George Kaiser

ERIC WILLIAMS: COURTESY; GEORGE KAISER: JIM LANGDON

Williams QuikTrip Corp. Halliburton H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Foundation ONEOK Bank of Oklahoma George Kaiser Family Foundation Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation Joe Craft FW Murphy Family Foundation Helmerich Families Magellan Midstream Partners Nadel Gussman LLC SemGroup Charles and Peggy Stephenson T.D. Williamson Richard A. Williford Family Cimarex Zinke Family Fund Zarrow Family Foundations AAON Inc. Kathy Craft Hille Family Pat and Don Hardin Laredo Petroleum McElroy Manufacturing Inc. WPX Stuart Family Foundation Unit Corp. Will Smith Bovaird Foundation Anonymous ONEGas John Steel Zink Foundation Anonymous Susan and William, Jill and Robert Thomas Families Anonymous Davis Brothers Entity Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma JPMorgan Chase Bernsen Family Foundation Bumgarner Family Fulton and Susie Collins Foundation Mike and Pat Case Dekraai Family Foundation D and L Oil Tools Frank and Gayle Eby Hale Family Foundation Stephen and Shelley Jackson Family Foundation Bonnie Klein Mabee Foundation Pete and Nancy Meinig Melton Truck Lines Inc. Omni Air International DTAG Legacy Fund/Scott and Vanessa Thompson J.T. Nikel Family Founders of Doctors’ Hospital Inc. Judith and Jean Pape Adams Charitable Foundation Stuart and Linda Price Pam and Tom Russell Bryan Close Meshri Family Bob and Jackie Poe Sherman Smith Family Foundation John Smith Cox Foundation Sarah and John Graves Ernie Kivisto/Jane Ann Maconi Kivisto Mabrey Bancorporation Joe and Darcey Moran Peter Walter Becky Dixon and Pat Keegan Fred Jones Family Foundation Kathy and Ed Leinbach Samson Resources Darden Family Foundation Mike Turpen

Eric Williams, Halliburton

Historian David McCullough famously said history is people. The same might be said of the Gathering Place. The park is the people who conceived, funded, designed, built and now operate the extraordinary attraction. The park will employ about 45 full-time park management positions and up to 200 part-time employees during peak summer activity. Proceeds from the park’s $100 million endowment will pay for all park operations, programming, maintenance and security. The 14 leaders recruited to run the park represents a dream-team combination of large park industry veterans and professionals with Tulsa and Oklahoma roots. Tony Moore, executive director of the Gathering Place, is a Jamaica native who comes to Tulsa from Florida, the theme park capital of the world. His professional background — working for Tampa’s zoo, Orlando’s SeaWorld and Universal Studios — was heavily revenue-driven, so he arrived asking, “What’s the business model? What’s the return on investment?” He could barely believe the Gathering Place would have no admission charge. “It will redefine the mindset of a public park,” Moore says. “It’s not a theme park; it’s a public park with theming.” Toddlers to seniors


January 2017

TULSAPEOPLE JANUARY 2017

Annual Charitable Events Calendar

Tulsan of the

YEAR

TULSAN OF THE YEAR

will return for educational, cultural and sports activities, including big production shows. Other cities will emulate Tulsa’s private-public collaboration, he says, but for now the Gathering Place is one-of-akind. Josh Henderson, senior operations officer, is a University of Arkansas graduate who previously worked at Myrtle Beach Water Park in South Carolina. He is responsible for all physical aspects — everything from security to cleanliness. “When I give tours,” he says, “people are speechless. The entire experience, from scale to design, is one of awe. Tulsa will be blown away when they see what this park has to offer.” Heavy landscaping filters the noise, Henderson says. There’s no sense of being in the middle of a city. “I can’t wait to see kids playing in the park with their friends and family,” he says. His personal favorite area is the overlook at the ONEOK Boathouse, “a special place to have a cocktail and look at the skyline and river.” The boathouse’s full-service restaurant, with its stunning overview of the park, river and downtown, also is a favorite of Richard Shoucair, director of business analysis, another Tulsa transplant from Florida. “A lot of dreams and hard work went into this before we got here,” he says. “In Orlando, I’d seen it all, but what we have here is so unique it is absolutely breathtaking.”

PAST TULSANS OF THE YEAR

DAMARIO SOLOMON-SIMMONS Inspiring and mentoring a generation of boys

Q&A WITH Phil Albert

2017 Tulsa Regional Chamber chairman

2017: DAMARIO SOLOMON-SIMMONS

2016: MARQ LEWIS

2015: STEADMAN UPHAM

2014: BECKY FRANK

2013: PHIL LAKIN

2012: KEITH BALLARD

2011: MIKE NEAL

2010: KATHY TAYLOR

2009: GERRY CLANCY

2008: TOM MCKEON

2007: TOM KIVISTO

2006: GINNY CREVELING

2005: BERYL FORD

2004: VOTERS FOR VISION 2025

2003: KATHLEEN COAN

2002: GEORGE KAISER

2001: PETE CHURCHWELL

2000: KEITH BAILEY

1999: ED KELLER

IT’S ALL FOR PEOPLE The magic of the innovative park is its combination of place and programming. Kirsten Hein, senior programming officer, has 15 years of experience with parks and recreation in Prince George’s County, Maryland, and the Chicago Park District, two of the nation’s stellar park venues. “My heart is in free programming for children to gain new experiences,” she says. “We’re providing new places for kids to learn.” The Gathering Place’s programming will range from large-scale events for 300-plus to smaller educational programs for about 20 individuals. With GKFF’s signature dedication to early childhood education, it is no wonder that the first Tulsans to have a sneak preview of the Gathering Place were groups of elementary school children. They visited the park’s Reading Tree, the oldest and biggest cottonwood tree in the park and the site of a puppet stage for storytelling and reading events. The tree also is the symbol of an online campaign to encourage literacy, illustrating GKFF’s emphasis on reading and support of Tulsa area schools. One of the more unusual features is the art to be showcased in the park. “Local and internationally renowned artists will be a feature,” Hein says, “including performances not seen before in Tulsa, and all free and open to the public.” Performances might include dance, theater, musicians, acrobats, magicians, jugglers and more on the Great Lawn’s big stage, mobile stages through the park and the round stage in the children’s playground. “We are challenged to provide world-class experiences, and our team is committed to that,” Hein says. “The sky is the limit.” The grand opening this summer will include special events, Hein says, but details are secret and tantalizing. “We’re planning big,” she teases. “Something big and something special.” Big and special — just like the Gathering Place itself. TP

TulsaPeople.com

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S u p p or t q u a l i ty a rt s e n te r t a i n m e n t i n Tu l s a a n d st re ng t h e n Si g n a tu re Sy m p h ony’s e d u c a t i o n a n d co m m u n i t y o u t re a c h p rog ra m s .

M A R C H 3, 201 8 | 6 :00 PM B O ND EV E N T CE N TE R Joi n u s for a Sp e a ke a sy ex p e ri e n ce a s we e n j oy d i n n e r a n d l i b a t i on s i n a p roh i b i t i o n e ra a t m os p h e re w i t h Ro a r i n g 2 0’s mu si c fe a t u r i n g Tu l sa’s ow n m u s i c i a n s.

TICKETS S TA R T AT $150

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVA I L A B L E

Sig nat ur e Symp h on y.or g/Ov ertu re

|

918 -595 -78 3 6

|

tccfoundat i o n @ tu lsa cc.e du


2017 ANNUAL REPORT In 1998, Tulsa Community Foundation (TCF) was established to assist nonprofit agencies, corporations, individuals and families with flexible charitable giving solutions.

DONOR DESIGNATED FUNDS

DONOR ADVISED FUNDS

>

> Recommend

grants over time to your favorite charitable organizations

WHAT DOES TCF DO? TCF is a collection of over 1,300 funds, varying in size from a few thousand to multiple millions of dollars. SCHOLARSHIP Each fund has its own identity FUNDS and philanthropic purpose and > Establish your approved benefits from being invested scholarship criteria > TCF manages the with other funds to create a application and award process lasting community resource.

Choose a focus area or create a program benefitting specific charitable organizations or causes

AFFILIATE FUNDS > Focus (as a group of area leaders) on charitable community efforts

TCF oversees administrative and financial operations >

EMPLOYEE DISASTER RELIEF FUND

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS excellent alternative to a private foundation affiliated under provisions of Section 509(a)(3) of the IRC

> Establish

(by employer) guidelines to assist employees in the event of unexpected and unavoidable emergencies or disasters

> An

>

FISCAL SPONSORSHIP FUND

> Establish

CHARITABLE AGENCY FUNDS

> TCF

> Establish

a charitable vehicle (emerging nonprofit) under TCF provides administrative support

Tulsa Community Foundation

TCF manages the application and award process

(by nonprofit agency) a permanent pool of assets or operational (reserve) dollars

TCF provides services to individuals, businesses, community groups and nonprofit organizations to deliver easy, low-cost philanthropic solutions to benefit the community.

Fund contributions are tax-deductible.

7030 S. Yale, Suite 600 Tulsa, OK 74136 | (918) 494-8823 | www.tulsacf.org


TCF FUND AND PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS SUPPLIED FOR SUCCESS | Collaborating Resources Since 1997, Supplied for Success (SFS) has provided free educational supplies to every student in Tulsa Public and Union Public elementary schools where at least 75% of the students are eligible for the Free or Reduced Price Lunch programs. TCF administers this program through a collaborative effort with Tulsa Public Schools, Union Public Schools, the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, George Kaiser Family Foundation and many other generous donors. SFS ensures that children walk into school each fall with the materials they need to succeed and that economic inequality does not lead to inequality within the classroom. In the 2016-2017 academic year, SFS provided free school supply kits to over 25,000 students at 53 elementary school sites. TCF is proud to be involved in SFS, helping Tulsa’s youngest citizens have all the proper and necessary tools to succeed in the classroom and in life.

DAVID AND MAX CAMERON FUND/CAMERON CLASSIC | Celebrating Legacies David and Max Cameron (Father and Son) were unique and amazing people with many excellent qualities: they kept all entertained with an incredible sense of humor, they enjoyed being involved in projects bigger than themselves, they cherished their diverse circle of friends, and they placed the highest importance on family. In 2012, friends and family of David and Max Cameron established the David and Max Cameron Fund by opening a Donor Designated Fund at TCF to celebrate their legacies and to give back to the community. Each year, friends and family host the Cameron Classic, an annual fundraising golf tournament in which the proceeds benefit the David and Max Cameron Fund. These dollars are then granted to The First Tee of Tulsa, a nonprofit organization that teaches life skills and character development to youth participants at no cost through the game of golf, the sport that David and Max both loved so much. Since the first year of the Cameron Classic, approximately $50,000 has been granted to The First Tee of Tulsa in memory of David and Max Cameron.

PAWHUSKA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION | Promoting Communities In 2009, Pawhuska Community Foundation (PCF) became an affiliate of TCF. This partnership has allowed PCF, which was originally established in 1993, to invest more of its resources back into the community and spend less on its administrative and operational costs. TCF assumes the investment management and administrative functions and PCF is able to focus on providing support, programs and projects for the Pawhuska community. Since it was established, PCF has been hard at work pursuing this mission through local community projects like the Ben Johnson Memorial Project, National Indian Taco Championship and Skate Board Park. Currently, PCF leads a competitive grants program for nonprofits serving the Pawhuska community. In 2017, it awarded $25,000 in grants to the following organizations: Osage Ballet, Osage Nation Foundation, Pawhuska Hospital Foundation, Pawhuska Public Schools Foundation and Preserving Arts in the Osage.


FINANCIAL SUMMARY GRANTS MADE 2016: $150,332,000

2017 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Jerry Dickman

(GRAPH IN THOUSANDS)

Chapman Foundations Management (Chairperson of the Board)

Fred Dorwart Frederic Dorwart Lawyers (Secretary/Treasurer)

Peter Adamson III Autumn Glory Partners, LLC

Jim Adelson Nadel & Gussman Energy, LLC

Phil Albert Pelco Structural, LLC

Alison Anthony Tulsa Area United Way

Steve Bradshaw

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

Bank of Oklahoma

(As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, in thousands)

ASSETS Cash and investments Receivables and other assets TOTAL ASSETS Liabilities

FY 2016

FY 2015

$3,873,120

$4,164,089

262,382

251,319

$4,135,502

$4,415,408

$356,747

$790,973

3,670,361

3,515,208

Restricted TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

City of Tulsa

Stephanie Cameron OK2Grow

Katherine G. Coyle Connor & Winters

Barry Davis

Net Assets Unrestricted

G. T. Bynum

108,394

109,227

3,778,755

3,624,435

$4,135,502

$4,415,408

Davis, Tuttle Venture Partners

Stephen Fater QuikTrip Corporation Phil Frohlich Prescott Group Capital Management, LLC

Elizabeth Hagans Madrona Consulting

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES

Hans Helmerich

(For Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, in thousands)

REVENUE Contributions

FY 2016

FY2015

Helmerich & Payne

Judy Kishner

$153,042

$175,181

Investment gains (losses)

198,239

(226,614)

TOTAL REVENUES

351,281

(51,433)

Marcia MacLeod

155,332

250,990

Sanjay D. Meshri

Investment services and other

30,043

22,913

Advance Research Chemicals, Inc.

General and administrative

11,148

10,438

Charles S. Monroe

438

376

EXPENSES Grant services

Fundraising TOTAL EXPENSES

196,961

284,717

TOTAL INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

154,320

(336,150)

3,624,435

3,960,585

$3,778,755

$3,624,435

NET ASSETS, BEGINNING OF YEAR NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR

CONTACT INFORMATION

TCF staff is dedicated to maintaining the charitable efforts of its funds and working with those who are interested in new charitable initiatives. We collaborate with individuals, families and companies to simplify charitable giving, identify important community services, and administer charitable programs. To find out more about TCF, visit www.tulsacf.org. To set up a meeting with our staff, please contact our offices at (918) 494-8823.

The Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation Community Volunteer

Charles S. Monroe, CPA PC

Dennis Neill Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation

Pierce Norton ONE Gas

Julius Pegues John Hope Franklin Center

E. C. Kip Richards Core Associates, LLC

Meredith Siegfried NORDAM Group, Inc.

Stuart Solomon AEP/PSO


JANUARY

TBA Eat Drink and Be Giving: Biga Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER .ORG TBA Newsies Benefits Tulsa Press Club. TULSAPRESSCLUB.ORG 1/8-13 Get Sm’ART Benefits Oklahoma Performing Arts Inc. OPAN 2 ART.ORG

2018 CHARITABLE EVENTS CALENDAR PUBLISHED IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE TULSA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION COMPILED BY ANNA BENNETT

1/12-14 The Dream Meet Benefits Aim High Academy. AIMHIGHGYM.ORG 1/13 The Runway Run Benefits Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium. TULSAAIRANDSPACEMUSEUM.COM 1/18 An Evening with Jeannette Walls, NY Times Best-selling Author Benefits Project TCMS, Tulsa County Medical Society Foundation. TCMS @ TCMSOK .ORG 1/19 Trivia Night Benefits Cascia Hall Preparatory School. CASCIAHALL .COM 1/20 Toyland Ball: Under the Sea Benefits the Parent Child Center of Tulsa. TOYLANDBALL .ORG 1/20 Trivia Night Benefits Bishop Kelley High School. BISHOPKELLEY.ORG / TRIVIA 1/25 Mentorship Luncheon Benefits Junior League of Tulsa. JLTULSA .ORG / FUNDRAISERS / MENTORSHIP - LUNCHEON 1/25-26 Beyond Awareness Summit Benefits the Demand Project. THEDEMANDPROJECT.ORG 1/26 Monarch Ball: The Wonder Of It All Benefits Domestic Violence Intervention Services. DVIS.ORG / WONDEROFITALL 1/27 Best of Brunch Benefits Domestic Violence Intervention Services. DVIS.ORG / BOB 2018

FEBRUARY

2/1 Take A Seat Benefits Town and Country School. TANDCSCHOOL .ORG 2/2 JA Beach Bowl Benefits Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. JAOK .ORG

40

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

3/15 TBH Women’s Association Bingo, Beer and Popcorn Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG 3/17 St. Patrick’s Day Run Benefits Special Olympics Oklahoma. MYSOOK .ORG 3/21 Oklahoma Nonprofit Advocacy Day Benefits Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits. OKLAHOMACENTERFORNONPROFITS.ORG / EVENT / OKLAHOMA-NONPROFIT-ADVOCACYDAY- 2018 3/24 Carnivale Benefits Mental Health Association Oklahoma. BESTPARTYINTOWN.ORG

2/3 Icons and Idols: The Golden Age of Gershwin Benefits Tulsa Ballet. ICONSANDIDOLS.ORG 2/3 Sing for Our Schools Benefits Partners in Education. ALLSOULSCHURCH.ORG / SERVE / PARTNERS-IN- EDUCATION 2/8 Hearts Rebuilding Homes Benefits Rebuilding Together Tulsa. TINYURL .COM / HEARTSHOMES 2018 2/9 Cookies and Cocktails Benefits Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma. GSEOK .ORG 2/9 Fire and Ice Gala Benefits Little Light House. LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG 2/9 40th anniversary Ruby Gala Benefits Restore Hope Ministries. RESTOREHOPE.ORG 2/10 Cooking Up Compassion Benefits Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma. CCEOK .ORG / CUC 2/10 The Heart of Henry Benefits Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. TULSADAYCENTER .ORG / FUNDING / UPCOMING -EVENTS 2/11 My Furry Valentine Benefits StreetCats Inc. STREETCATSTULSA .ORG 2/13 Live United Luncheon and Awards Benefits Tulsa Area United Way. TAUW.ORG / AWARDS 2/15 TBH Women’s Association Annual Bunco Party Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG / TULSABOYS / EVENTS.ASP 2/15 Whiskey Social Benefits Lindsey House. LINDSEYHOUSE.ORG

2/17 Tulsa Heart Ball Benefits American Heart Association. TULSAHEARTBALL .HEART.ORG 2/17 Tulsa Polar Plunge Benefits Special Olympics Oklahoma. MYSOOK .ORG / TULSAPOLARPLUNGE 2/22 Night of Dreams Gala Benefits Tulsa Dream Center. TULSADREAMCENTER .ORG 2/22 Puttin’ on the Dog Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG 2/23 CASA Casino 2018: Pearls and Prohibition Benefits Tulsa CASA Inc. CASACASINO.ORG 2/23 Street Party Benefits Street School Inc. STREETPARTYTULSA .COM 2/24 Buttercup Bash Casino Royale Benefits Junior Women’s Association of the Tulsa Boys Home. TBHJUNIORWOMEN.COM / FUNDRAISERS 2/24 Jenks Public Schools Foundation Dinner and Auction Benefits Jenks Public Schools Foundation. JENKSFOUNDATION.ORG 2/24 Lunar New Year Gala Benefits Dillon International. DILLONADOPT.COM 2/24 Orange Peel Benefits OSU Alumni Association Tulsa Chapter. ORANGECONNECTION.ORG / ORANGEPEEL 2/25 Polo Grill Dinner supporting Saint Simeon’s Benefits Saint Simeon’s Foundation. SAINTSIMEONS.ORG

MARCH

3/1 Niles Night at the Round-Up Benefits Will Rogers High School Community Foundation. WILLROGERSFOUNDATION.NET HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS DENOTE ADVERTISERS.

3/2 Harwelden Awards Luncheon Benefits Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa. AHHATULSA .ORG

3/24 Sip for Sight Grand Wine Tasting Benefits Vizavance. SIPFORSIGHT.COM

3/2 Memory Gala Benefits Alzheimer’s Association. MEMORYGALA .ORG

3/26 Hawaiian Dinner at Bluestone Steakhouse and Seafood Benefits Dress for Success Tulsa. TULSA .DRESSFORSUCCESS.ORG

3/3 Opera Ball Benefits Tulsa Opera. TULSAOPERA .COM

3/29 Havana Nights Benefits American Red Cross. REDCROSS.ORG

3/3 Pennies for Pearls Music Trivia Charity Event Benefits American Parkinson Disease Association — Oklahoma Chapter. APDAPARKINSON.ORG / OKLAHOMA

3/29 Theatre Tulsa Season Announcement Party Benefits Theatre Tulsa. THEATRETULSA .ORG

3/3 Red Ribbon Gala Benefits Tulsa CARES. REDRIBBONGALA .ORG

3/30 Popping Bottles Benefits Emergency Infant Services. EISTULSA .ORG / EVENTS

3/3 Sapphire Celebration: Santorini Nights Benefits Riverfield Country Day School. RIVERFIELD.ORG

APRIL

3/8 Annual Banquet Benefits Mend Medical Clinic and Pregnancy Resource Center. MENDPREGNANCY.ORG / BANQUET

TBA Babypalooza Benefits Emergency Infant Services. EISTULSA .ORG / EVENTS TBA Bowl For Kids’ Sake Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. BFKSTULSA .ORG

3/8 Women of the Year — Pinnacle Awards Benefits YWCA Tulsa. TULSAPEARLPARTY.COM

TBA Citywide Baby Shower Benefits Emergency Infant Services. EISTULSA .ORG / EVENTS

3/9 Brainiac Ball Benefits Family and Children’s Services. BRAINIACBALL .COM

TBA Great Plains Journalism Awards and Conference Benefits Tulsa Press Club. GREATPLAINSAWARDS.ORG

3/9 Vintage ’53 Benefits TSHA. TSHA .CC 3/10 Dance of the Two Moons: Wild Wild West Benefits Indian Health Care Resource Center. IHCRC 2 MOONS.ORG 3/10 Sip for Sight Gala Benefits Vizavance. SIPFORSIGHT.COM

TBA Hispanic Student Scholarship Luncheon and Career Fair Benefits Hispanic American Foundation. HAFTULSA .ORG TBA It’s a Mystery! Spring Fundraiser Benefits Owasso Community Resources. OWASSOHELPS.ORG


TBA The Humanitarian Awards Dinner Benefits the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice. OCCJOK .ORG / EVENTS / HUMANITARIANAWARDS-DINNER .HTML TBA ZooBrew Benefits Tulsa Zoo. TULSAZOO.ORG 4/1 Knock Out Violence Benefits Domestic Violence Intervention Services. DVIS.ORG 4/3 Are You Smarter than a KIPPster? Benefits KIPP Tulsa College Preparatory. KIPPTULSA .ORG 4/5 Dinner and Auction Benefits Metro Christian Academy. METROCA .COM 4/5 Founder’s Dinner Benefits Iron Gate. IRONGATETULSA .ORG 4/5 Oysters and Ale Benefits Hospice of Green Country. HOSPICEOFGREENCOUNTRY.ORG / OYSTERSANDALE

4/5 Showcase Premiere Party Benefits Foundation for Tulsa Schools. FOUNDATIONFORTULSASCHOOLS.ORG 4/5 TBH Women’s Association Spring Luncheon Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG / TULSABOYS / SPRING _ LUNCHEON. ASP

4/7 Garden Party Benefits Little Light House. LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG 4/7 The Kelley Derby, Bishop Kelley’s Auction Benefits Bishop Kelley High School. BISHOPKELLEY.ORG / AUCTION 4/7 Pranks and Paws Benefits Tulsa SPCA. TULSASPCA .ORG 4/8 Superhero Challenge Benefits Child Abuse Network. FACEBOOK.COM / CANSUPERHEROCHALLENGE 4/10 Redbud Celebration Benefits OK2Grow. OK 2 GROW.ORG 4/13 Battle of the Bands Benefits Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. OKFOODBANK .ORG / EVENTS / BATTLE-BANDS 4/13-14 BOTANICAL! Benefits Tulsa Botanic Garden. TULSABOTANIC.ORG 4/13 Garden Party Benefits A New Leaf. ANEWLEAF.ORG 4/13 Project Cuffway Benefits National Pancreas Foundation. PROJECTCUFFWAY.COM 4/13 SpringFest Garden Market and Festival Benefits Tulsa Garden Center. TULSAGARDENCENTER .COM

4/6 ARTSCAPE Benefits the Tristesse Grief Center. ARTSCAPETULSA .COM

4/13 Tulsa New Leaders Benefits Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. TNL18 .FINESTCFF.ORG / HOME

4/6 Hall of Fame Awards Assembly Benefits Will Rogers High School Community Foundation. WILLROGERSFOUNDATION.NET

4/14 Chapman Foundations Route 66 Gurney Tourney Benefits Hospitality House of Tulsa. HHTULSA .ORG

4/6 Hall of Fame Dinner and Presentation Benefits Will Rogers High School Community Foundation. WILLROGERSFOUNDATION.NET

4/14 Herb Day in Brookside Benefits Brookside Business Association. BROOKSIDETHEPLACETOBE.COM

4/6 Mirror Mirror Gala Benefits Youth At Heart. YOUTHATHEART.ORG / EVENTS 4/6 Promise Ball Benefits Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. JDRF.ORG 4/7 Aquarium Run Benefits Oklahoma Aquarium. OKAQUARIUM.ORG 4/7 The Color Run Benefits River Parks Authority. THECOLORRUN.COM

4/14 ONE Awards Benefits Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits. OKLAHOMACENTERFORNONPROFITS.ORG / CONNECT / ONE-AWARDS 4/14 Rock the House Benefits Tulsa Habitat for Humanity. TULSAHABITAT.ORG 4/14 Spokeasy Benefits Tulsa Hub. TULSAHUB.ORG / SPOKEASY 4/14 Tanzanite Nights Benefits Mainsprings. MAINSPRINGS.ORG

4/14 TBH Junior Women’s Association Derby Dash Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. SIGNMEUP.COM / SITE / ONLINE-EVENTREGISTRATION /121786

4/19 Appetite for Construction Benefits Home Builders Association Charitable Foundation. TULSAHBA .COM 4/19 Beyond the Curtain Benefits Tulsa Ballet. TULSABALLET.ORG

4/27-5/20 Designer Showcase Benefits Foundation for Tulsa Schools. FOUNDATIONFORTULSASCHOOLS.ORG 4/30 Golf Tournament Benefits Arts Alliance Tulsa. ARTSTULSA .ORG 4/30 Musical Mondays Concert Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG

MAY

4/19 Embers Benefits Palmer Continuum of Care Inc. PALMER -TULSA .ORG

5/3 Tulsa Tycoons: A Night of Monopoly Benefits Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. TULSATYCOONS.COM

4/19 Juliette Low Leadership Society Luncheon Benefits Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma. GSEOK .ORG

5/4 TARC Shot in the Dark Golf Tournament Benefits TARC. DDADVOCACY.NET

4/19 Step Up to the Plate, Fight ALS Benefits Muscular Dystrophy Association. MDAUSA .ORG

5/4 Scout Quest Benefits Indian Nations Council, Boy Scouts of America. SCOUTQUEST.ORG

4/20 CANdlelight Ball Benefits Child Abuse Network. FACEBOOK .COM / CANDLELIGHTBALL

5/5-7 Cinco de Mayo Benefits River Parks Authority. RIVERPARKS.ORG

4/21 Celebrate Cascia Benefits Cascia Hall Preparatory School. CASCIAHALL .COM

5/5 Blank Canvas Benefits Youth Services of Tulsa. YST.ORG

4/21 Heart Walk Benefits American Heart Association. TULSAHEARTWALK .ORG

5/5 Gem Gala Benefits Junior League of Tulsa. JLTULSA .ORG / FUNDRAISERS / GEM- GALA

4/21 Where Hands and Feet Meet Benefits TSHA. TSHA .CC

5/5 Power to End Stroke Luncheon Benefits American Heart Association. TULSAPTES.HEART.ORG

4/23 Annual Golf Classic Benefits Indian Nations Council, Boy Scouts of America. OKSCOUTS.ORG / SUPPORT- SCOUTING / GOLF- CLASSIC 4/24 Empty Bowls Benefits Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. OKFOODBANK .ORG 4/26 Links to Independence Golf Classic Benefits Ability Resources. ABILITYRESOURCES.ORG / WAYS-TO -HELP / EVENTS / GOLF

4/26 SPARK 2018: TRIVIA NIGHT Benefits Camp Fire Green Country. TULSACAMPFIRE.ORG / SPARK 2018 4/27 Philbrook Wine Experience Benefits Philbrook Museum of Art. PHILBROOK .ORG / WINE 4/27 Rhinestone Cowboy Benefits Volunteers of America Oklahoma. VOAOK .ORG / RHINESTONECOWBOY

A WEEKEND of

CULINARY WONDER

April 13 - 14 918-289-0330

botanicaltulsa.org

5/5 Ritas for Rescue Benefits Humane Society of Tulsa. TULSAPETS.COM 5/5 Run for the Roses Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG / TULSABOYS / RUNFORROSES. ASP 5/5 Tour de Tulsa Benefits Pathways to Health. TULSABICYCLECLUB.COM / TDT 5/7 Tom Boyd Memorial CF Classic Benefits Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. CFF.ORG 5/7 Town and Country Golf Tournament Benefits Town and Country School. TANDCSCHOOL .ORG 5/7 Tulsa Boys’ Home Frank Rhoades Golf Classic Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG / TULSABOYS / GOLF.ASP

HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS DENOTE ADVERTISERS.

SAVE THE DATE

#DifferenceMaker

02.23.2018 Details | Tickets | Sponsorships

streetpartytulsa.com 918.833.9800 TulsaPeople.com

41


5/8 Shooting Stars Tournament Benefits Indian Nations Council, Boy Scouts of America. OKSCOUTS.ORG / SUPPORT- SCOUTING / SHOOTING - STARS

䨀伀䤀一 䠀伀一伀刀䄀刀夀 䌀䠀䄀䤀刀匀 䨀䤀䰀䰀 ☀ 吀䔀刀刀夀 䐀伀一伀嘀䄀一

 ㌀⸀㄀ ⸀㈀ ㄀㠀

䠀䄀刀䐀 刀伀䌀䬀 䠀伀吀䔀䰀 ☀ 䌀䄀匀䤀一伀 吀唀䰀匀䄀 圀圀圀⸀䤀䠀䌀刀䌀㈀䴀伀伀一匀⸀伀刀䜀

42

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

TBA MOJOFest Benefits Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. FACEBOOK .COM / MOJOFESTTULSA

TBA Hike for Healing Benefits the Tristesse Grief Center. THEGRIEFCENTER .ORG

9/7 Day of Caring Benefits Tulsa Area United Way. TAUW.ORG / DAYOFCARING

5/12 CREATE Benefits Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa. CREATEGALA .ORG

6/2 St. John Street Party Benefits St. John Health System Foundation. STJOHNHEALTHSYSTEM.COM / FOUNDATION / STREET-PARTY

TBA Murder Mystery Benefits Arts amd Humanities Council of Tulsa. AHHATULSA .ORG

9/7 Kaleidoscope Ball Benefits Emergency Infant Services. EISKBALL .ORG

5/12 DIG: Day In the Garden Benefits Tulsa Botanic Garden. TULSABOTANIC.ORG

6/4 Links for Little Ones Benefits Little Light House. LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG

5/12 Electric Lime Gala Benefits Tulsa Children’s Museum Discovery Lab. TULSACHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG / ELG

6/7 Brookside Rumble and Roll Benefits Brookside Business Association. RUMBLEANDROLL .COM

8/2 Cigar-B-Que Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. CIGARBQUE.ORG

5/12 WP Eleven Benefits Family and Children’s Services. WHITEPARTYOK .COM 5/16 Tulsa International Mayfest Invitational Gallery Opening Party Benefits Tulsa International Mayfest. TULSAMAYFEST.ORG 5/18 Shoot for the Center, H-O-R-S-E tournament Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER .ORG

5/20 Heather Burns Memorial Scholarship Fundraiser Dinner Benefits Heather Burns Memorial Scholarship Fund. HBMSF.ORG 5/21 Musical Mondays Concert Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG 5/30-6/1 Reconciliation in America National Symposium Benefits John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation. JHFCENTER .ORG

JUNE

TBA Press Your Luck Benefits Tulsa Press Club. TULSAPRESSCLUB.ORG

www.fcsok.org

TBA Non-Event Benefits Community Health Connection. COMMUNITYHEALTHCONNECTION.ORG

6/2 RISE to Freedom Gala Benefits Restoring Identities after Sexual Exploitation. RISESHELTER .ORG

5/19 Play Your pART Brunch Benefits Arts Alliance Tulsa. ARTSTULSA .ORG

Counseling for Children, Adults & Families | Crisis Services | Mental Health Services for Children & Adults | Child Abuse & Trauma Services | Substance Abuse & Addiction Help | Women in Recovery | Parenting & Relationship Classes

AUGUST

5/11 Go Red For Women Luncheon Benefits American Heart Association. TULSAGORED.HEART.ORG

5/19 Great Strides Benefits Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. CFF.ORG

Won’t you help us keep Tulsa’s kids and families strong by making a gift today?

TBA Taste of Brookside Benefits Youth Services of Tulsa. TASTEOFBROOKSIDE.COM

TBA Support Our Troops Poker Run Benefits Broken Arrow Blue Star Mothers — Chapter 5. BABLUESTAR .ORG

6/9 Dirty Dog 5K and Fun Run Benefits the Bridges Foundation. THEBRIDGESFOUND.ORG 6/14 The Next Big Thing Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. NEXTBIGTHINGTULSA .ORG 6/14 Red Shoe Shindig Benefits Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tulsa. RMHCTULSA .ORG 6/15 Relay For Life of Tulsa Metro Benefits American Cancer Society. RELAYFORLIFE.ORG / TULSAOK 6/15 WALTZ on the Wild Side Benefits Tulsa Zoo. WALTZONTHEWILDSIDE.ORG 6/23 The Center Polo Classic Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER .ORG 6/25 Musical Mondays concert Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG

JULY

TBA Sertoma Pancake Breakfast Benefits Broken Arrow Blue Star Mothers - Chapter 5. BABLUESTAR .ORG 7/4 Folds of Honor FreedomFest Benefits River Parks Authority. RIVERPARKS.ORG 7/4 July Fourth Celebration Benefits Arts Alliance Tulsa. ARTSTULSA .ORG 7/23 Musical Mondays Concert Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG

HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS DENOTE ADVERTISERS.

8/4 Back-to-School Style Show and Brunch Benefits Baptist Children’s Home, Owasso. OBHC.ORG / BCH- OWASSO / BACK-TO - SCHOOL- STYLE- SHOW 8/10 Jeans and Jewels Gala Benefits Tulsa State Fair Junior Livestock Auction Corp. TULSASTATEFAIR .COM 8/12-18 National Health Center Week Benefits Morton Comprehensive Health Services. MORTONHEALTH.ORG 8/20 Musical Mondays Concert Benefits LIFE Senior Services. LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG 8/25 Tulsa Mini Maker Faire Benefits Fab Lab Tulsa. TULSA .MAKERFAIRE.COM 8/25 Wild Brew Benefits G.M. Sutton Avian Research Center. WILDBREW.ORG

SEPTEMBER

TBA Champions of Health Gala Benefits the Oklahoma Caring Foundation. CHAMPIONSOFHEALTH.ORG TBA Evening of Giving Benefits Home Builders Association Charitable Foundation. TULSAHBACF.COM TBA Gold Medal Gala Benefits Special Olympics Oklahoma. SOOK .ORG / SUPPORT / FUNDRAISING -EVENTS TBA Laps for Little Ones Benefits Little Light House. LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG TBA MCA Golf Classic Benefits Metro Christian Academy. METROCA .COM TBA MisFEST: Music Is She Festival Benefits River Parks Authority. MISFEST.COM

9/7-16 Restaurant Week Benefits Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. OKFOODBANK .ORG / EVENTS / RESTAURANT-WEEK 9/8 Charity Banquet Benefits MITA’s Foundation. MITASFOUNDATION.ORG / EVENTS 9/10 Golf Tournament Benefits Restore Hope Ministries. GOLF.RESTOREHOPE.ORG 9/11 Charity Golf Tournament Benefits Broken Arrow Blue Star Mothers — Chapter 5. BABLUESTAR .ORG 9/11 JA Classic Benefits Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. JAOK .ORG 9/11 Western Days Benefits Saint Simeon’s Foundation. WESTERNDAYSEVENT.COM 9/13 Flight Night Benefits Tulsa Charity Flight Night. TULSAFLIGHTNIGHT.ORG 9/15 ART 2.0 Benefits Oklahoma Performing Arts Inc. OPAN 2 ART.ORG 9/15 Philbrook MIX Benefits Philbrook Museum of Art. PHILBROOK .ORG / MIX 9/18 Power Breakfast for Dinner Benefits Collegiate Hall Charter School. COLLEGIATEHALL .ORG 9/20 Oklahoma Caring Awards Benefits Hospitality House of Tulsa. HHTULSA .ORG 9/21 Cattle Baron’s Ball Benefits American Cancer Society. TULSACATTLEBARONSBALL .ORG 9/28 The Tasting at Woodward Park Benefits Tulsa Garden Center. TULSAGARDENCENTER .COM 9/29 Green Leaf Gala Benefits Up With Trees. GREENLEAFGALA .ORG


9/29 Komen Tulsa Race for the Cure Benefits Susan G. Komen Tulsa. KOMENTULSA .ORG

OCTOBER

TBA 5K Rosary Run Benefits St. Michael Catholic Radio. TULSAROSARYRUN.COM TBA 60th annual Awards Dinner Benefits the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice. OCCJOK .ORG / EVENTS / AWARDS-DINNER .HTML TBA Birdies for Babies Benefits Emergency Infant Services. EISTULSA .ORG / EVENTS TBA Bunco-Rama Benefits Broken Arrow Blue Star Mothers — Chapter 5. BABLUESTAR .ORG TBA First Draft Benefits Tulsa Press Club. TULSAPRESSCLUB.ORG TBA Giving Spirits Benefits Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. OKFOODBANK .ORG / EVENTS / GIVINGSPIRITS

TBA Mini-Laps Benefits Little Light House. LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG TBA Pink Ribbon Event Benefits Oklahoma Project Woman. OKLAHOMAPROJECTWOMAN.ORG TBA Savor and Stroll Benefits Lindsey House. LINDSEYHOUSE.ORG / SPECIAL-EVENTS / SAVOUR - STROLL 10/1 Tulsa Hall of Fame Benefits Tulsa Historical Society and Museum. TULSAHISTORY.ORG 10/4 McDazzle Fun Ball Benefits Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tulsa. RMHCTULSA .ORG 10/4 Tulsa State Fair Junior Livestock Auction Benefits Tulsa State Fair Junior Livestock Auction Corp. TULSASTATEFAIR .COM 10/5 Cocktails for Crayons Benefits the Pencil Box. PENCILBOXTULSA .ORG

10/5 Stacked Deck Benefits Resonance Center for Women Inc. RESONANCETULSA .ORG 10/6 Center Experience Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER .ORG 10/6 ZooRun Benefits Tulsa Zoo. TULSAZOO.ORG / RUN 10/11 Cooking for a Cause Benefits Iron Gate. IRONGATETULSA .ORG 10/13 Noche de Gala Benefits Hispanic American Foundation. HAFTULSA .ORG 10/16 Bo Van Pelt Celebrity Golf Classic Benefits Tulsa Habitat for Humanity. TULSAHABITAT.ORG 10/17 Corporate Night — Gemutlichkeit Benefits Tulsa Oktoberfest Inc. TULSAOKTOBERFEST.ORG 10/19-22 Linde Oktoberfest Tulsa Benefits River Parks Authority. TULSAOKTOBERFEST.ORG 10/20 Divas and Devils Benefits Tulsa Opera Inc. TULSAOPERA .COM 10/26-11/4 Care Card Benefits Family and Children’s Services. FCSOK .ORG 10/27 BooHaHa in Brookside Benefi ts Brookside Business Association. BROOKSIDETHEPLACETOBE.COM / BOOHAHA-IN- BROOKSIDE 10/27-31 HallowZOOeen Benefits Tulsa Zoo. TULSAZOO.ORG / BOO 10/28 The Museum Gala Benefits Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. JEWISHMUSEUM.NET

NOVEMBER

TBA Visions: A Celebration of Nonprofit Leadership Benefits Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits. OKLAHOMACENTERFORNONPROFITS.ORG / CONNECT / VISIONS

11/8 Unite! Benefits Tulsa Area United Way. TAUW.ORG / UNITE 11/10 Paint the Town Red Benefits Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. DSTTULSALUMNAE.ORG

SAVE THE DATE

4.19.18 Juliette Low Leadership Society Luncheon

Join us May 5th for an event of Epic Portions

11/14 TBH Women’s Association Trivia Night and Dinner Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TBHINC.ORG

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

11/17 Holiday Mart Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER .ORG 11/21 Tulsa Farmers’ Market Harvest Dinner Benefits Tulsa Farmers’ Market. TULSAFARMERSMARKET.ORG 11/29 Tulsa Boys’ Home Gift of Hope Fundraising Luncheon Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG

May the best chef win! GUEST SPEAKER:

Bonnie St. John

BlankCanvasTulsa.com

SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB

1-800-707-9914 gseok.org/jlls

DECEMBER

TBA Darnaby Arts and Crafts Show Benefits Darnaby Elementary PTA. DARNABYARTSANDCRAFTSSHOW.COM TBA Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award Benefits Tulsa Library Trust. TULSALIBRARYTRUST.ORG TBA Theology at the Tower Benefits St. Michael Catholic Radio. STMICHAELRADIO.COM 12/6 Advocacy Awards and Volunteer Recognition Benefits TARC. DDADVOCACY.NET 12/7-9 Holiday Market Benefits Junior League of Tulsa. JLTULSA .ORG / FUNDRAISERS / HOLIDAY-MARKET TP

TBA JA Investor Challenge Benefits Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. JAOK .ORG

VISIT TULSAPEOPLE.COM FOR COMPLETE EVENT INFORMATION. HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS DENOTE ADVERTISERS.

TulsaPeople.com

43


2018 VENUE GUIDE

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

EVENT & WEDDING VENUE GUIDE When planning an event — large or small — there are so many details to coordinate. From finding a place with the right amount of space to choosing from catering options and amenities, the to-do list can be overwhelming. Use this guide to wedding, event and conference venues around Tulsa as a resource.

THE BLUE COTTAGE

THE CAMPBELL HOTEL & EVENT CENTERS

CARAVAN EVENT CENTER

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT TULSA DOWNTOWN

COX BUSINESS CENTER

EXPO SQUARE

THE GAST EVENT CENTER

GILCREASE MUSEUM

GLASS VERANDA AT FOREST RIDGE

GLENPOOL CONFERENCE CENTER

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA

THE MANSION AT WOODWARD PARK

2636 East 11th Street (918) 744-5500 thecampbellhotel.com Event rental contact: Diane Morrison Capacity: 225

409 East “A” Street, Jenks (918) 299-8204 bluecottagejenks.com Event rental contact: Kay Greer Capacity: 50-60 (upstairs, no elevator)

7901 East 41st Street (405) 615-2778 caravantulsa.com Event rental contact: Jack Brotton Capacity: Large Room: 1,200; Small Room: 200

415 South Boston Avenue (918) 508-7400 marriott.com/tultd Event rental contact: Robin Monnot Capacity: 35

4145 East 21st Street (918) 744-1113 ext-2090 exposquare.com Event rental contact: Sarah Thompson Capacity: Multiple facilities available

100 Civic Center (918) 894-4260 coxcentertulsa.com Event rental contact: Kathy Tinker Capacity: 100-1,300

1429 Terrace Drive (918) 744-6997 thegasthouse.com Event rental contact: Sara Gonzales Capacity: 200

1400 North Gilcrease Museum Road (918) 596-2771 gilcrease.org Event rental contact: Brittney Pitts Capacity: 60-250 in various locations

307 East Brady Street (918) 585-1234 livingarts.org Event rental contact: events@livingarts.org Capacity: 260 44

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

12205 South Yukon Avenue, Glenpool, OK 74033 Phone: (918) 209-4632 Fax: (918) 209-4626 glenpoolconferencecenter.com Event rental contact: Lea Ann Reed, lreed@cityofglenpool.com Capacity: flexible, up to 500

JESSICA LYNN TUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

7501 East Kenosha Street, Broken Arrow (918) 357-4413 forestridge.com Event rental contact: Amy Dodson Capacity: 125 seated, up to 200 standing

2435 South Peoria Avenue (918) 576-5153 tulsagardencenter.com Event rental contact: Cristen Burdell, Event Coordinator Capacity: 200-300


2018 VENUE GUIDE

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

MEADOWLAKE RANCH

3450 South 137th West Avenue, Sand Springs (918) 494-6000 meadowlakeranch.com Event rental contact: Ashley Smith, Manager Capacity: Up to 250. Choice of Indoor & Outdoor Venues.

MIKE FRETZ EVENT CENTER

11545 East 43rd Street (918) 663-5820 mikefretzeventcenter.com Event rental contact: Gabby Bridenbaugh & Marlena Chase Capacity: 256

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

POSTOAK LODGE & RETREAT

5323 West 31st Street North (918) 430-3299 postoaklodge.com Event rental contact: Kelly Jo Kickman Capacity: 50-500

8330 Riverside Pkwy (918) 299-8518 riverspirittulsa.com Event rental contact: sales@riverspirittulsa.com Capacity: 1,500

STUDIO 308

TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

308 South Lansing Avenue (918) 329-0224 studio308tulsa.com Event rental contact: Paddy Harwell; info@Studio308Tulsa Capacity: 100 seated, 200 reception

3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive (918) 289-0330 tulsabotanic.org Event rental contact: Maggie Regan Capacity: Call for information.

TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

2445 South Peoria Avenue (918) 576-5153 tulsahistory.org Event rental contact: Cristen Burdell, Event Coordinator Capacity: 100-150

TULSAPEOPLE.COM

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45


Congratulations!

CONGRATULATIONS NAIOP AWARD WINNERS!

Pam Bewley, President; Susan Atherton, In-House Title Attorney; Sally Wales, Executive Vice President; Lea Ann Hanseth, Closer.

Thank you for selecting us for…

Congratulations William Beichler and David Looney for receiving NAIOP Tulsa Chapter Land Sale of the Year... For the sale of the FedEx ground building in Broken Arrow sold to JDC Corporation.

• Commercial Escrow Transactions • Title Insurance • • Reverse 1031 Exchanges • 1031 Exchanges •

4739 E. 91st St., Suite 200 • 918-556-6336 • commercialtitleok.com

2017 NAIOP Tulsa Lifetime Achievement Award

CONGRATULATIONS, RON LOONEY! The annual award presented by NAIOP Tulsa is the highest honor for the chapter to bestow on a member. It recognizes an individual who has a distinguished and longstanding record of exemplary service and a positive impact in the industrial and office real estate industry. We join in congratulating Ron for this much deserved recognition. His career in the commercial development business began in the 1960’s. He has served NAIOP in many leadership capacities including Past President (two occasions), Past National Director, Past State Vice President, and was named the organization’s Member Of the Year in 2006 and Developer Member Of the Year in 1987. Ron has served in many leadership capacities in important organizations including the Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa, Tulsa Utility Authority, Tulsa County Board of Adjustments, Tulsa Chamber Educational Committee and Higher Education Task Force, BLR PROPERTIES I, LLC

5841 South Garnett Road • Tulsa

46

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

and the Greater Tulsa Association of Realtor’s Commercial Alliance. Ron Looney also deserves recognition and thanks for serving as a member of the Tulsa Community College Board of Regents since 1985 with his final term expiring in 2021. He is currently the longest serving regent within the state’s higher education system. Ron has served as Chairman of the TCC Board of Regents, among many other leadership capacities, and has been involved in the selection of three TCC presidents over the past 30+ years. Additionally, he has actively served his church in leadership positions at First Baptist Church in Jenks, including overseeing the construction of the church’s new facility on South Elm Street. We are immensely proud of Ron Looney for his many years of devotion and leadership to his industry, community, and church.

HOLLIDAY AMERICAN MORTGAGE 8023 East 63rd Place, #225 • Tulsa

TRI-ANGLE DEVELOPMENT II, LLC 5841 South Garnett Road • Tulsa

WOODRUM, TATE & ASSOCIATES, PLLC 321 South Boston Avenue • Tulsa


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

OFFICE SALE OF THE YEAR 5100 E. SKELLY DRIVE Buyer: Wiggins Investments Inc. Buyer Representative: Wiggins Properties Seller: KBS Meridian Tower Inc. Seller Representatives: Mary Martin, Terry Payne (CBRE) INDUSTRIAL SALE OF THE YEAR CROSSTOWN BUSINESS CENTER, 9797-10161 E. ADMIRAL PLACE Buyer: International Developers and Investments LLC and Tulsa Crosstown Partners Buyer Representative: Bob Pielsticker (CBRE) Sellers: Saul Holdings LTD Partnership Seller Representatives: Matt Reese, Adam Rumsey (CBRE) RETAIL SALE OF THE YEAR VILLAGE SOUTH SHOPPING CENTER, 10125 S. SHERIDAN ROAD Buyer: Village South Retail LLC Sellers: Irmas Rock Coc LLC, Gold Cod LLC Seller Representatives: George O’Connor, Kevin O’Connor, Victor Whitmore, Joel Thompson LAND SALE OF THE YEAR FEDEX GROUND, EAST 81ST STREET AND SOUTH LYNN LANE AVENUE, BROKEN ARROW Buyer: JDC Corp. Seller: Mason and Association Seller Representatives: Bill Beichler, David Looney (McGraw Commercial) INDUSTRIAL LEASE OF THE YEAR 11333 E. PINE ST. Tenant: American Airlines Tenant Representatives: Matt Klimisch, David Glasgow, Alex Powell (CBRE) Landlord Representatives: Dwayne Flynn, Bill Mizener, Ryan Shaffer OFFICE LEASE OF THE YEAR CITY PLEX TOWERS, 2488 E. 81ST ST. Tenant: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tenant Representative: Michael Predovic, Trinity Corporate Real Estate Advisors Landlord Representative: Derek Bateman, Trinity Corporate Real Estate Advisors RETAIL LEASE OF THE YEAR HILLSIDE CROSSING, 751 HILLSIDE DRIVE, BROKEN ARROW Tenant: Hobby Lobby Tenant Representative: Mark Inman (CBRE) Landlord Representatives: Ben Ganzjow, Julie Edwards, Caitlin Shores, Lindsey Warren (CBRE) MULTI-FAMILY SALE OF YEAR WOODLAND MANOR, 8641 E. 61ST ST. Buyer: Peak Capital Partners Seller: BSR Trust Representatives: Brandon Lamb, Tim McKay, David Burnett (ARA) MEMBER OF THE YEAR DANNY OVERTON, DLRE INC.

GREG BOLLINGER

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RONALD S. LOONEY, TRI-ANGLE DEVELOPMENT II LLC DEAL OF THE YEAR CITY PLEX TOWERS, 2488 E. 81ST ST. Tenant: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tenant Representative: Michael Predovic, Trinity Corporate Real Estate Advisors Landlord Representative: Derek Bateman, Trinity Corporate Real Estate Advisors

MOVING FORWARD FEELING THE WEIGHT OF THE OIL BUST, TULSA HAS ADJUSTED TO A NEW ECONOMIC REALITY AND IS PREPARED FOR THE FUTURE. BY ROBERT EVATT

F

or the past three years, the oil bust weighed down Tulsa. Thousands lost their jobs, survivors spent their money more carefully and corporations thought twice about opening new locations in the area. That weight was eased in 2017. Not because oil prices have recovered; at the time of this writing, most oil price forecasts predict an overabundance of supply and continued flat demand from China and other countries will keep oil prices low through 2018. Yet most companies have stopped cutting away their workforces or canceling expansion plans. Simply put, the oil bust has done all the damage it can. Residents and corporations alike already have tightened their belts and adjusted to this new economic reality, and everyone’s now ready to move forward, says Bob Ball, director of economic research at the Tulsa Regional Chamber. “We’re no longer losing jobs,” Ball says. “Even with oil prices being what they are, we’re starting to slowly add jobs.” As of October, Tulsa’s unemployment rate stood at 4.4 percent, around the same rate unemployment stood when oil prices started to plummet in 2014. October’s national rate was 4.1 percent, which includes the majority of the country that didn’t have to experience the full impact of the oil bust. Ball says Tulsa’s traditional ability to outperform the national unemployment average was upheld even during the worst of the localized downturn. Now that the pain and uncertainty has started to lift, Tulsa has the opportunity to stand out from other similarly sized metro areas once again. That said, he believes an oil recovery would absolutely benefit the area, even if it isn’t in the cards for now. “If oil can sustain a price of $57-$59 in 2018, steady growth should occur,” he says. “Tempered production by major oil producers has held prices higher. Worldwide demand for oil is beginning to grow again. Mid-year 2018 is when OPEC and Russia will reassess their production cuts.” TulsaPeople.com

47


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INDUSTRIAL AND OFFICE PROPERTIES The Oklahoma chapter embarks on its 51st year with a mission to provide the Oklahoma commercial real estate community with a visionary, beneficial and responsive association and to advance responsible commercial real estate development, investment and ownership. 2018 NAIOP EXECUTIVES President: Rick Guild, The Guild Co. Vice President: Bill Beichlier, McGraw Commercial Properties Secretary: Danny Overton, DRLE Inc. PAST PRESIDENTS Nick Probst, Corporate Realty Advisors, 2016 Jason Kennon, Case and Associates, 2014-2015 Jonathan Cowan, US Signs and Screenprinting, 2013 Scott Morgan, Coury Properties, 2012 Carl Vincent, Corporate Realty Advisors, 2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Derek Bateman, Trinity Corporate Real Estate Advisors Susan Buck, Flintco Chris Bumgarner, Bumgarner Asset Management Steve Ganzkow, American Residential Crystal Keller, Crystal Keller Consulting

Ball’s prediction is for overall Tulsa employment to grow by 1.3 percent annually for the next five years. The energy sector will grow at about 1.2 percent as the industry rebuilds with stable oil prices in the $57-$59 range. Manufacturing is the brightest spot for growth with an expected average annual growth of 2.8 percent for the next five years, with aerospace and fabricated metals being standouts. David Roberts, a commercial broker with Coldwell Banker Select, says oil isn’t the only obstacle that has been overcome in the past year. Presidential election years always cause some degree of uncertainty and hesitation from regular citizens and businesses alike, and this one was definitely no exception. “Our economy took a big turn after Nov. 8,” he says. “Before the election, nobody wanted to do anything because no one knew what was going to happen. After the election, the floodgates opened up.” Local politics can play a role in commercial development as well, and Roberts is bullish on the impact of Mayor G.T. Bynum. 48

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

“Tulsa’s been a better market because we’ve got new leadership with our new mayor, and I think we’re going to see the mayor and city council work together to bring new business to Tulsa,” Roberts says. Ball reports the Chamber is now fielding more inquiries from regional and national companies looking to expand and potentially establish regional headquarters in the metro area, which would help diversify the local economy. More jobs means more people could choose to make Tulsa their home. In fact, that might already be happening. According to the Greater Tulsa Association of Realtors, 12,281 homes changed hands during the first 10 months of the year, up nearly 1 percent from 2016. What’s more, long-term Tulsans are becoming less hesitant to put their homes on the market and find new ones. After years of shrinking inventory, the number of homes for sale finally started to increase in 2017. Combine that with higher sale prices — the average reached $199,694, up 17 percent from 2016 — and you’ve got a strong indication that

even committed residents are ready to spend more money in general, Ball says. He estimates Tulsa’s overall consumer spending has stayed strong, and it likely equals the national average spending rate. “We’ve continued to spend disproportionately better than the jobs outlook, which was consistent with the last recession,” he says. “People kept filling parking lots in restaurants.” Even with the downturn, Tulsa is becoming a more attractive place to live, with numerous development projects in play, including downtown. Then there’s the Gathering Place. The $400plus million, 100-acre park being developed by the George Kaiser Family Foundation will offer numerous activities for families when Phase 1 is finished in 2018. Ball says the visibility and attractiveness of these projects will help pull in workers and employers alike for the entire metro area, not just near downtown. “Anytime you offer any kind of amenity that’s attractive to a young workforce, it helps,” he says. “People want to be where there are things going on, and we’ve got plenty going on.” But the abundance of new amenities and redevelopment brings challenges, too. Roberts says tenant mobility back to downtown areas, as well as tenants taking advantage of new developments in the southern part of the metro area, means older properties could become overlooked. “Our concern is that the new shopping centers were dominating, and older shopping centers had to come up with incentives to make them attractive,” Roberts says. To make matters thornier for retail properties, a wave of national brands have suffered due to stiff competition from Amazon and other online retailers. Those closures have resulted in more empty spaces in Tulsa. “Though some individual centers will be affected, I don’t think these closures will affect the retail market as a whole,” he says. Even so, retail continues to grow around Tulsa. Projects including Shops at Warren Place and the Mother Road Market announced impending construction, and two long-struggling centers, Riverwalk Crossing and Midtown Village, are starting to improve. Ball says Tulsa’s fundamentals are improving; the long-term employment outlook will move beyond simple stabilization to strength, and corporations are looking to grow in Tulsa. Roberts also is optimistic, though he’s already bracing for the next cyclical challenges. “I think things will continue to trend up, at least until the next election,” he says. TP

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story first appeared in the Tulsa Commercial Properties publication of the Oklahoma National Association of Industrial and Office Properties Chapter. It was edited for length and some statistics updated.


MAKE YOUR HISTORY. LEAVE YOUR

JOIN THE MOVEMENT Define your legacy today. Check out the organizations that are making it a mission to plan for the future.

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About Legacy Tulsa

5

LEGACY PARTNERS

Junior League of Tulsa

34

Leadership Tulsa

35

Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma

36

A New Leaf

9

LIFE Senior Services

37

American Cancer Society

10

Mental Health Association Oklahoma

38

Arts Alliance Tulsa

11

Metro Christian Academy

39

Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa

12

New Life Ranch

40

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma

13

Oklahoma Aquarium

41

Bishop Kelley High School

14

Oklahoma Project Woman

42

Broken Arrow Seniors

15

Starlight Concerts

43

Camp Fire Green Country

16

Riverfield Country Day School

45

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

17

Street School

46

Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma

18

The Little Light House

47

Circle Cinema Foundation

19

The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice

48

Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma

20

The Tristesse Grief Center

49

Counseling & Recovery Services of Oklahoma

21

TSHA

50

Disaster Resilience Network

22

Tulsa Botanic Garden

51

Eagle Point Christian Academy

23

Tulsa Boys’ Home

52

Family Safety Center

24

Tulsa Children’s Chorus

53

Gatesway

25

Tulsa Dream Center

54

Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma

26

Tulsa Engineering Foundation

55

Goodwill Industries of Tulsa Inc.

27

Tulsa Habitat for Humanity

56

Happy Hands

28

Tulsa Town Hall

57

Holland Hall

29

Tulsa Symphony

58

Home of Hope

30

Tulsa Zoo Management Inc.

60

Hospitality House

31

Up With Trees

61

John 3:16 Mission

32

Youth at Heart

62

John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation

33

Youth Services of Tulsa

63 LEGACY TULSA 3


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M A K E YOUR HIS T ORY. L E AV E YOUR L EG ACY.

here is something different about the people living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It’s almost as though giving back, helping others and taking care of each other is part of our genetic makeup. Making a difference and contributing to something bigger than ourselves is part of our city’s culture, and we are stronger for it. Throughout the years, hundreds of people have taken it one step further and are working together to build a stronger future for Tulsa. More than 500 donors have chosen to support charities and organizations they are most passionate about through legacy giving — giving through wills and estate plans via various cash, stock, property, bequests and other assets through established charitable funds. It all began in 2008, when the Tulsa Community Foundation started a Planned Giving Partnership Program, which created a collaborative environment for local nonprofit agencies to work together to educate their supporters about planning. This program helped to create an opportunity for those living in our community to give to the future of the causes they care about most. The idea of organizations collectively partnering together to build their endowments was oneof-a-kind. In fact, this was the first program in the United States where nonprofits were working together to offer complimentary planned giving services to their donors. This collaboration enabled people from all walks of life to create a legacy that cared for their family’s financial needs and philanthropic desires. Each donor can focus their legacy gift on the causes that move them most: enriching education, safeguarding health, improving neighborhoods, cultivating arts, protecting the environment, strengthening families, etc. This unique program has touched more than 100 organizations and has raised millions to build a stronger foundation for generations to come. People from all income levels, backgrounds and beliefs have joined this program. When asked about the most significant contribution they had made in life, with very few exceptions, participants mentioned the impact they have had on another person, group, family member or community. Not only had these individuals contributed to something bigger than themselves today, but they were passionate about leaving a future legacy that would make their families, loved ones and philanthropic causes proud. Legacy Tulsa was created to inspire people from the Tulsa area to think beyond their lifespan and consider making a legacy gift. It is designed to inspire people like you to make a charitable gift that helps care for you, your family and the organizations you passionately support.

LEGACY TULSA 5


Paul and Julie Davis established an estate plan for their daughter, Mia, and were able to help community organizations at the same time.

PLANNING for the future There are a variety of reasons why individuals and couples alike have decided to meet with the Advancement Group, the planned giving office of Tulsa Community Foundations’ Planned Giving Partnership Program. It’s never too early or too late to start thinking about the importance of wills and estate planning. Wills and trusts can help loved ones ensure wishes are carried out concerning a person’s property, designation of guardians for any minor children, naming the executor of an estate, supporting a favorite charity or cause, and distribution of assets in a timely fashion. And these are just a few key reasons. By planning for the future, we can help make our lives more secure and create a more meaningful impact. Mother and son Dixie and Ken Busby wanted to participate together in the Legacy Tulsa program to map out a plan that would take care of them and also provide for charities that were close to their hearts. Ken saw the importance of legacy giving and what it could do to help those who were making 6 LEGACY TULSA

Ken Busby and his mother, Dixie Busby, participate in Legacy Tulsa together.

the gifts, as well as the charities who would be the ultimate beneficiaries. “For my mom, this has really given her peace of mind, knowing that she is taken care of no matter what happens,” Ken Busby says. “And for me, I have my estate plan done, which allows me to enjoy life knowing that at the appropriate time my legacy will continue through charitable giving — positively impacting cultural organizations for which I have a true passion.” Paul and Julie Davis are just one duo of many young parents who have taken advantage of Legacy Tulsa not only to create an estate plan, but to create a legacy for the future. Throughout the

planning process, they were able to make significant decisions that will impact their family, the Tulsa community and the organizations they hold near and dear. “Having a child changes everything,” Julie Davis says. “When Paul and I first learned that we were pregnant with our daughter, Mia, our lives were completely changed. We were no longer simply focused on our current lives and our individual needs. We realized that we needed a plan for that future — for the care of Mia in case anything were to ever happen to us. Legacy Tulsa allowed us to create a plan for Mia and care for the organizations that meant most to us.”


JOIN THE movement Representatives from member agencies in Legacy Tulsa's Planned Giving Partnership Program

Immeasurable IMPACT Tulsa Community Foundation and the agencies who are part of the Planned Giving Partnership Program are focused on the future of our communities, making them better places to live, work and play. When we all work together to connect philanthropy with innovative nonprofits focused on the future, the impact is immeasurable. Legacy Tulsa wants all Tulsans to take advantage of this free program that celebrates how we care for the futures of our families, neighbors, cities and the organizations making Tulsa and the surrounding areas a better place for all.

To become part of the Legacy Tulsa movement and participate in a program focused on caring for you, your family and the organizations you most passionately support, visit legacytulsa.org and consider reaching out to one of the Legacy Partners listed.

Tulsa Community Foundation is the recognized, community ownedorganization that initiates, teaches and encourages personal and corporate charitable giving today to ensure that the philanthropic needs of eastern Oklahomans can be met for all generations.

LEGACY TULSA 7


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/fi-doo-shi-er-ee/ noun

The audacious idea that a wealth manager should act in its clients’ best interests.

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8 LEGACY TULSA


PARTNER

A New Leaf

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Of the more than 961,000 individuals living in the Tulsa metropolitan area, approximately 3 percent of the population has a developmental disability. Of these individuals, roughly 85 percent are unemployed, homebound and isolated from society because they have not been taught the skills necessary to be independent. For 38 years, A New Leaf has provided opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities through vocational and residential services. A New Leaf serves 325 individuals with developmental disabilities through three comprehensive service lines to promote selfsufficiency. Through A New Leaf ’s Vocational Training Program, clients learn marketable job skills while earning a wage by working in the organization’s six greenhouses, two retail centers, wholesale route, 3-acre farm or various community job sites. To address the issue of unemployment, A New Leaf also serves students in area public middle and high schools to instill pre-vocational skills and ensure a successful transition to life after graduation. In addition, A New Leaf provides residential services and daily living supports to allow clients to live as independently as possible. With more than 29,000 individuals with developmental disabilities in the Tulsa area, the need for A New Leaf ’s services increase every day.

MISSION To provide individuals with developmental disabilities life skills, marketable job training through horticultural therapy, community-based vocational placement and residential services to increase their independence and individual choices.

L E A D ERSHIP Mary C. Ogle, Chief Executive Officer Maranda Figueroa, Director of Fund Development Kate Schlichter, Director of Human Resources Chuck Kelley (Chair), Senior Vice President of Corporate Planning and Development, ONEOK Dave Cleveland (Managing Partner), Corporate Performance Group Kristine Sexter (Chair, Human Resources Committee), CEO, Workwise Solutions E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 13 — Garden Party April 14 — Garden Fest

JOIN THE movement LEGACYTULSA.ORG

A N EW LEAF P.O . BOX 35903 TU LSA, OK 74153 918-451- 1491 AN EWLEAF.ORG LEGACY TULSA 9


PARTNER

American Cancer Society

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The American Cancer Society is the leading organization dedicated to all cancers and all phases of the cancer journey: cancer prevention, early detection, treatment and survivorship. In 2012 there were 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million cancer deaths worldwide. By 2030, the global burden is expected to grow to 21.6 million new cancer cases and 13 million cancer deaths simply due to the growth and aging of the population. The ACS provides cancer patients and their loved ones with 24/7 support and information through its cancer information helpline and website. Its helpline answered more than 1 million requests last year in English and Spanish, and its website, cancer.org, was visited 61 million times. The 24/7 helpline provides cancer information, helps patients find resources they need — like transportation and lodging while in treatment — matches patients to clinical trials, helps patients and caregivers understand health insurance and other financial considerations, and provides a compassionate ear when people need it most. Specially trained Road to Recovery volunteer drivers have given patients more than 7.6 million 10 LEGACY TULSA

free rides to and from cancer treatment and related appointments. The ACS’s 32 Hope Lodge communities provide cancer patients with a free, nurturing homeaway-from-home when they have to travel for treatment. Since 1984, that has amounted to 4 million nights of free lodging, saving 550,000 patients and caregivers $466 million. ACS patient navigators have helped more than 500,000 newly diagnosed patients get beyond barriers to treatment and care and navigate the health care system. The Reach to Recovery program has matched more than 1.5 million breast cancer patients with one-on-one support from women who’ve been there. Over the past 25 years, the Look Good Feel Better program has helped more than 1 million women with the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment. Led by licensed volunteer beauty professionals, the program offers free workshops on beauty, skin care, makeup and hair-loss solutions in a supportive environment. In partnership with Pantene, the ACS has provided more than 42,000 real-hair wigs to women coping with hair loss due to cancer.

MISSIO N To save lives, celebrate lives and lead the fight for a world without cancer.

AMER ICAN CANCER SOCI ETY 4110 S. 110TH E. AVE., G R AN T B U ILDI NG, SUI TE 101 TU LSA, OK 74146 918-743- 6767 CAN CER.ORG


PARTNER

Arts Alliance Tulsa

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Arts Alliance Tulsa, Tulsa’s only United Arts Fund, is beginning its third year of consolidated cultural fundraising efforts by providing the mechanism to support 40 vetted arts organizations with a single gift. Public funding of the arts has been reduced at national and state levels, which directly corresponds to further reductions at the local level. To bridge this gap, Alliance Member Organizations receive unrestricted economic support through AAT’s annual granting process. Arts organizations that receive strong and consistent financial support can afford to create and sustain needed educational opportunities for our community. Beyond exposure to arts education, students who participate in arts activities are more likely to hold leadership positions, volunteer in the community and attend school consistently. These benefits of civic engagement through the arts provide a quality of life that attracts and retains talented citizens. With unrestricted granting, organizations are provided the resources to create or continue high-quality programming, which generates revenue for the organizations and the local economy. Tulsa’s nonprofit arts sector generates $228.8 million in economic activity and supports 7,876 fulltime equivalent jobs. * AAT is unique to our city as it is the only organization of its type with a mission of raising funds

MISSION Arts Alliance Tulsa is a United Arts Fund that strengthens and supports the arts for a greater Tulsa through fundraising, audience development and responsible investment and allocation of resources.

for multiple local arts and cultural organizations. Our goal is to make our city competitive nationally and to leverage a healthy arts and cultural community as a driver of tourism and economic prosperity. * Data provided in the Arts and Economic Prosperity 5 study published by Americans for the Arts in June 2017. LE A D ERSHIP Todd Cunningham, Executive Director Chad Oliverson, Marketing Director Suzie Bogle, Development Director Anna Inhofe, Development Associate Phil Lakin, Founding Board President Robert S. Purgason, 2017 Campaign Chair Melanie Tate, 2017 Brunch Chair E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 30 — Golf Tournament May 19 — Play Your pART Brunch July 4 — July Fourth Celebration

ARTS ALLI ANCE TULSA 203 N . MAIN ST., SUI TE 212 TU LSA, OK 74103 918-289- 0222 ARTST ULSA.ORG

The Jane Heard Clinton Society — Tulsa women united for the arts AAT HOME — A real estate fundraising program benefiting the arts LEGACY TULSA 11


PARTNER

Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa was founded in 1961 and was one of the first local arts councils in the nation. Many prominent Tulsans who shaped the city’s growth in the early years invested in arts organizations, facilities and collections, including the Tulsa Ballet, Gilcrease Museum and Philbrook Museum of Art. It was the vision of the AHCT founders to maintain and grow these institutions and to support the development of new organizations by acting as the connector and clearinghouse. Seeing the arts slowly leave the Tulsa Public Schools system, one of the first major endeavors of the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa was the Artists in the Schools program, founded in 1965. From that moment forward, the AHCT held a key leadership role in arts education in Tulsa. In 1984, the AHCT launched Harwelden Institute, patterned off the Lincoln Center Institute for Education. In 2012, the AHCT became the lead organization in the collective impact program, Any Given Child-Tulsa, in partnership with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, TPS and the City of Tulsa. In 2012, the AHCT took the next bold step in supporting and growing the arts in Tulsa, opening 12 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To cultivate a more creative Tulsa through advocacy, education and innovative partnerships, which contribute to the quality of life and economic vitality of the greater  community. AHCT’s purpose is to be the link between the arts community and the greater Tulsa community, and to connect all stakeholders interested in championing arts and culture in the city of Tulsa.

the Hardesty Arts Center in the Tulsa Arts District, which allowed the organization to reach the public directly through art galleries, artist studios and workshop spaces. Today, the AHCT continues the long tradition of supporting the arts and culture sector in Tulsa. It works every day toward its long-term vision of access to the arts for every Tulsan, in their classrooms, workplaces and neighborhoods. LE A D ERSHIP Holly Becker, Executive Director Brenda Moody, Financial and Operations Director

ARTS & HUM ANI TI ES CO U N CIL OF TULSA 101 E. ARCHER ST. TU LSA, OK 74103 918-584- 3333 AH H ATULSA.ORG

Hillary Parkhurst, Director of Development Holbrook Lawson, President, Board of Directors Kimberly Norman, Vice President, Resource Development Caroline Crain, Vice President, Programs E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 2 — Harwelden Awards May 12 — CREATE, creategala.org Every month — First Friday Art Crawl

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PARTNER

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For more than 100 years, Big Brothers Big Sisters has operated under the belief that inherent in every child is the ability to succeed and thrive in life. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma targets the children who need us most, including those living in single-parent homes, growing up in poverty and coping with parental incarceration. BBBSOK pairs children, ages 6-16, with role models in oneto-one relationships in communities across the state of Oklahoma, and serves children 6-18. In the School/Site-based Program, Bigs provide Littles individualized time and attention on a regular basis at the Little’s school or after-school program. The Big-Little relationship promotes a positive school experience for the child: good attendance, healthy peer and adult relationships, a good attitude and academic achievement. In the Community-based Program, Bigs offer Littles the same individualized attention on a consistent basis, typically three to four times per month for two to three hours each time out in the community, sharing activities they mutually enjoy. They develop a trusting, caring relationship that provides an outlet for the Little and a model of how to handle everyday challenges. A growing percentage (43 percent) of all children served through the BBBSOK School-based and Community-based Programs statewide are children of incarcerated parents as part of our Amachi: Mentoring Children of Promise initiative.

MISSION To provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

Without support like the one-to-one mentoring services BBBSOK provides, these children are seven times more likely to repeat the cycle of intergenerational incarceration. Through a match with their “Bigs” in either the school/site-based program or our community-based program, the “Littles” are exposed to new, unique experiences and start dreaming and setting goals for a more positive future. L E A D ERSHIP Darrell Weaver, Chief Executive Officer Jennifer Harrison, Vice President of Resource Development Matt Morton, Tulsa Area Director Scott McElroy, Tulsa Board Chair Ryan McDaniel, Past Chair E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES January — National Mentoring Month February-April — Bowl for Kids’ Sake Campaign June 14 — The Next Big Thing Gala B IG B R O TH ERS BI G SI STERS O F O KLAHOM A 1401 S. B O U LD ER AVE., SUI TE 300 TU LSA, OK 74119 918-744- 4400 B B B SOK.ORG LEGACY TULSA 13


PARTNER

Bishop Kelley High School

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Bishop Kelley High School is a co-educational Lasallian Catholic high school with 930 students, grades 9-12, located in the center of the Tulsa metropolitan area on a 47-acre campus. Founded in 1960, the school is owned by the Catholic Diocese of Tulsa and operates in the Lasallian tradition of the Brothers of the Christian Schools. For nearly 60 years, Bishop Kelley High School has provided exceptional education to a vibrant and diverse community of students. The school serves Catholic and non-Catholic families alike in Tulsa and the surrounding communities who seek a college-preparatory program within a Christian environment of concern, trust and growth. Bishop Kelley educators continually strive to prepare the school’s young men and women for college, for life and for heaven. Bishop Kelley students have long made positive contributions to the Tulsa community and state of Oklahoma through various Christian service initiatives and ultimately as productive members of society. 14 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To carry on the teaching ministry of Jesus Christ by providing a Catholic, Lasallian education that develops individuals whose hearts and minds are prepared for a purposeful life.

L E A D ERSHIP Fr. Gary Kastl, President Jim Franz, Principal Bishop David Konderla, Chair, Board of Directors Deb Thalken, Vice Chair, Board of Directors Doug Thomas, Director of Advancement Deb Butler, Director of Admissions E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Jan. 20 — Trivia Night April 7 — 38th annual Auction

B ISH O P K ELLEY HI GH SCHOOL 3905 S. HUDSON AVE. TU LSA, OK 74135 918-627- 3390 B ISH O PKELLEY.ORG


PARTNER

Broken Arrow Seniors

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Broken Arrow Senior Center has the unique role of providing a safe place and healthy activities for a diverse and growing aging population in the area. Activities and programming are designed to meet the needs of those 55 and older. These activities include yoga, tai chi, tap dancing, limited exercise, Zumba Gold and line dancing for those who seek to remain flexible or become more physically active. Seniors with limited mobility can take advantage of chair exercises and spend time with others while enjoying puzzles, card games, weekly movies and more. Members looking for intellectual pursuits are involved with Bible study, novel writing, computer classes, Dakim Brain Fitness and creative writing. Travel, domino and pool tournaments, crafting and guitar lessons offer further opportunities to remain active and engaged. A noon meal is provided daily as is transportation to and from the center. Broken Arrow Seniors is committed to providing a variety of programs and services designed for older adults to stay active and encourage independence, well-being and connection with the community.

MISSION To provide a safe place with programs and activities to help those 55 and older stay physically active and socially engaged.

L E A D ERSHIP June Ross, President/Chief Executive Officer John Palkowski, Chair Walter Still, Chair-Elect Carol Carter, Secretary/Chair Designate Melissa Cruts, Immediate Past Chair E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Jan. 26 — Community Bunco Bash April 27 — 28th annual Senior Resource and Health Fair, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Central Park Community Center in Broken Arrow May 4 and Aug. 3 — Community Bunco Bash

B R O K EN ARROW SENI ORS 1800 S. M AI N ST. B R O K EN ARROW, OK 74012 918-259- 8377 B ASENI ORS.ORG

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LEGACY TULSA 15


PARTNER

Camp Fire Green Country

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Camp Fire Green Country is a contemporary, inclusive, coeducational organization engaging young people and their families in highquality youth development programs. Across 30-plus sites in the Tulsa area, children pre-K through 12th grade are part of afterschool clubs led by safe, caring, well-trained adults who provide curriculum-based activities and projects in topics such as health, science and the environment. Middle- and high-school teens participate in the same small group clubs and focus on leadership, learn about their community, develop service-learning projects and mentor younger children. Throughout the year, students in Camp Fire clubs get the opportunity to experience the outdoors through field trips and events at one of Camp Fire’s outdoor properties. Each summer, Camp Fire Green Country hosts summer camp for hundreds of children ages 8-17. During the week-long camp, youth experience new challenges and learn about themselves while they make new friends, learn to kayak, hike in the woods, go rappelling and build a campfire. 16 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION The promise of Camp Fire Green Country is to provide young people the opportunity to find their spark, lift their voice and discover who they are. In Camp Fire, it begins now.

Camp Fire celebrates each person’s uniqueness, and trained mentors help each child explore and discover their “spark” or passion. A culture of inclusion helps children develop their own prosocial skills and create a community of social competence. Throughout all of its programs, Camp Fire utilizes a research-based approach that empowers children to build confidence, set goals, learn from failure and develop the skills to thrive and reach their full potential, now and in the future. LE A D ERSHIP Renee Meek, Executive Director Amy Hilligoss, Assistant Executive Director Liz Hunt, Program Director Penny Pricer, President Justin Lord, President-Elect Stuart Kasiske, Vice President of Administration E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 26 — Spark 2018: Trivia Night June/July 2018 — Summer Camp

CAMP FIR E GREEN COUNTRY 706 S. BOSTON AVE. TU LSA, OK 74119 918-592- 2267 TU LSACAM PFI RE.ORG


PARTNER

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Cascia Hall is a Catholic, Augustinian school for students of all faiths in grades 6-12. In the Augustinian tradition, students receive a liberal arts education that prepares them for college and for life. At Cascia Hall, children will benefit from challenging academics, enriching activities, an excellent faculty and community support. For more information about giving to Cascia Hall, contact Carol McMahon at cmcmahon@ casciahall.com or 918-746-2639.

MISSION To educate the whole person — body, mind and spirit. Students are prepared for college and for life in a supportive Christian community that focuses on the Augustinian core values of truth, unity and love.

L E A D ERSHIP Roger C. Carter, Headmaster Very Rev. Bernard C. Scianna, O.S.A., Ph.D., Prior Provincial Rev. Brian Barker, O.S.A., Director of Augustinian Mission John J. Hastings ’01, Chair, Board of Directors Mark C. Butterworth ’73, President, Cascia Hall Foundation Cynthia D. Outlaw, Development Chair, Board of Directors E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Jan. 19 — Trivia Night April 21 — Celebrate Cascia April 20 and 22 — Upper School Musical, Disney’s “The Little Mermaid”

CASCI A HALL PR EPAR AT ORY SCHOOL 2520 S. YORKTOW N AVE. TU LSA, OK 74114 918-746- 2600 CASCIAHALL.COM LEGACY TULSA 17


PARTNER

Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For a person living on the margins, just obtaining basic food and shelter are daily challenges. Catholic Charities believes in helping to fill hungry bodies, but it also strives to fill neighbors in need with hope. Case managers meet with each family to identify relevant resources through Catholic Charities’ 14 programs, which include an emergency food and clothing center, a dental clinic, counseling services, GED and ESL classes, and transitional living programs — one for homeless pregnant women and the other for homeless women and their children. Catholic Charities is uniquely equipped to help those it serves in a holistic way. Rather than a handout, it provides a hand-up so its clients can work toward independence. Catholic Charities offers encouragement and respects the dignity of all. Many are surprised to learn that 85 percent of those served by the nonprofit are not of the Catholic faith. 18 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To be Christ’s merciful love to those who suffer. This mission is carried out by more than 3,600 volunteers each year, all working together to reach out and serve neighbors in need.

L E A D ERSHIP Tim O’Sullivan, Vice Chair, Board of Governors Randall Snapp, Vice Chair-Elect, Board of Governors Hon. John Dowdell, Board of Governors Dr. James Miller, Board of Governors Jeff Stava III, Board of Governors Sharon Voskuhl, Board of Governors E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 10 — Cooking Up Compassion

CATH O LIC CHARI TI ES O F EASTERN OKLAHOM A P.O . B OX 580460 TU LSA, OK 74158 LAU R IE PER K INS: 918- 508- 7116 CCEOK.ORG


PARTNER

Circle Cinema Foundation

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Originally opened in 1928, Circle Cinema is Tulsa’s last remaining historic movie theater. It brings to Tulsa quality independent, documentary and foreign films from Oklahoma filmmakers and from filmmakers around the world, enhancing the film experience for its audiences with interactive film events featuring guest speakers, panel discussions, celebrities and noted experts. The theater also hosts special programming, including film festivals, classic film screenings and cult film favorites, and often exhibits local artists’ works in its art gallery. Additionally, Circle Cinema offers film programming for local public and private schools and universities that enhances education and awareness for students of all ages. It often partners with other nonprofit groups, clubs and organizations to present compelling films and community conversation on such topics as literature, history, health, environment, arts, religion, music, diversity, urban and social issues, and politics.

MISSION To use film to foster understanding and appreciation of the diversity of the human experience and create community among viewers in the restored Circle Cinema.  

Circle Cinema is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and its neighborhood is designated a Certified Cultural District by the Oklahoma Arts Council. Honoring the theater’s history, an original 1928 theater pipe organ accompanies the Circle’s silent films and entertains audiences with holiday tunes and intermission music. L E A D ERSHIP Stephanie LaFevers, Executive Director

CIR CLE CIN EM A FOUNDATI ON 10 S. LEW I S AVE. TU LSA, OK 74104 918-585- 3456 CIR CLECI NEM A.COM

Chuck Foxen, Film Programmer Greg Younger, Theater Manager Clark Wiens, President and Co-Founder Beth Bovaird, Vice President William J. Doyle, Esq., Secretary Jay Eshelman, Treasurer

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E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES July — Circle Cinema’s 90th Birthday Celebration LEGACY TULSA 19


PARTNER

Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Hunger is a daily reality for one in six Oklahomans and one in four Oklahoma children. Oklahoma consistently ranks among the top states in the nation in the number of people who struggle with hunger. Located in Tulsa, with a branch in McAlester, the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma is the largest hunger-relief organization in eastern Oklahoma. It distributes food to 465 Partner Programs, including food pantries, emergency shelters, soup kitchens, senior citizen centers and after-school programs. Partner Programs in Tulsa include Catholic Charities, Iron Gate, Emergency Infant Services, Tulsa CARES, Restore Hope, Youth Services of Tulsa and many more. Additionally, the Food Bank has several direct service programs: Senior Servings, veterans’ distributions and Food for Kids, which includes the Backpack Program, School Pantries, Free Family Farmers’ Markets and ME, the mobile eatery food trucks. In Fiscal Year 2017, the Food Bank distributed more than 24.7 million pounds of food, of which 32 percent was fresh produce. This is the equivalent of 396,000 meals each week. 20 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma feeds the hungry of eastern Oklahoma through a network of partner programs and engages communities in ending hunger. The food bank provides food security, with dignity.

L E A D ERSHIP Eileen Ryan Bradshaw, Executive Director Rochelle W. Dowdell, Director of Philanthropy and Communication Mike McAndrews, Board President Tom Hutchison, Board Vice President Jason Smith, Treasurer E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 24 — Empty Bowls Fall 2018 — Giving Spirits Second Wednesday of every month — Food for Thought Lunches with the Executive Director

CO MMU N IT Y FOOD BANK O F EASTERN OKLAHOM A 1304 N . KENOSHA AVE. TU LSA, OK 74106 918-585- 2800 O K FO O DBANK.ORG


PARTNER

MISSION Helping build better lives through behavioral health and substance abuse services.Â

LAURA GOLDEN SHANNON

Counseling & Recovery Services of Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Counseling & Recovery Services provides mental health and substance abuse treatment, physical health care coordination and wellness services for over 5,000 children and adults annually, regardless of ability to pay. Services include counseling and case management for adults and children, substance abuse treatment and medication management, as well as our CALM Center, which is the only crisis-stabilization facility in eastern Oklahoma. As a Medicaid Health Home, Counseling & Recovery Services staff members help coordinate mental health, physical health and wellness services for children and adults. A nurse works with a team of staff to help clients track essential treatment basics such as lab work and follow-up visits. Counseling & Recovery Services is Oklahoma’s only community mental health center certified in the Sanctuary Model of Care. Using this model, the agency provides trauma-informed care, creating an environment of safety through helping identify and manage emotions, process loss and aiding clients in creating a future of growth and change.

L E A D ERSHIP Bryan K. Blankenship, Executive Director Martha Hauser, Operations Director Jeffrey D. Hill, Controller Rebecca Dozier, Chairwoman, Board of Directors Jon Lanning, Vice Chairman Arianna Moore, Past President E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Blizzard Bags for Transitional Housing Residents Fill a bag with household items and non-perishable foods to help in case of emergency or inclement weather. CALM Center Emergency Backpacks Provided to kids who come to the CALM Center with little or no personal items. Pack them full of everyday essentials like toothpaste, toothbrush, deoderant and an item of clothing or pajamas. For more details, contact Lindsay DeWeese at 918-392-5809.

CO U N SELING & RECOVERY SERVICES OF OKLAHOM A 7010 S. YALE AVE., SUI TE 215 TU LSA, OK 74136 918-492- 2554 CR SOK.ORG

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LEGACY TULSA 21


PARTNER

Disaster Resilience Network

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Disaster Resilience Network has three core programs, each led by volunteer multi-sector councils. The Disaster Resilient Business Council focuses on small business and nonprofit continuity of operations.This includes providing symposia, workshops and presentations using volunteer subjectmatter experts, including the signature “A Day Without Business Symposium.” The Disaster Resilient Cross-Cultural Council focuses on stakeholder-led preparedness outreach by diverse language and cultural groups, including the “Emergency Preparedness — Real Stories” video series with the Tulsa Community College Center for Creativity. The Disaster Resilient Housing Council focuses on low-impact development, green infrastructure and sustainable, disaster-resistant construction, including collaboration with the IBHS FORTIFIED HomeTM program. This last council 22 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To form partnerships between the public and private sectors that will facilitate the development of resilient communities. This mission will be achieved through education, mentorship and advocating for the most effective ways to strengthen homes, schools, businesses and communities against disruptions and disasters, both natural and manmade.

provides a “resilience for all” approach, making sure that everyone, regardless of resources, has access to resilient housing strategies. Other projects and initiatives related to the mission also are done outside of these programs, always in collaboration with other community stakeholders. L E A D E RSHIP Tim Lovell, Executive Director Sara Kelly Combs, President Jennifer Leber, Vice President Beth Wild, Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 2018 — A Day Without Business Symposium Spring 2018 — Small Business Seminars: “Emergency Preparedness — Real Stories” community meetings; FORTIFIED HomeTM Lunch and Learns

D ISASTER R ESI LI ENCE NETW ORK P.O . BOX 2192 TU LSA, OK 74101 918-632- 0044 DISASTERRESILIENCENETWORK.ORG


PARTNER

Eagle Point Christian Academy

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Eagle Point Christian Academy’s strong academic Association of Christian Schools- and state-accredited program includes a phonics-based reading approach using the A Beka curriculum and an emphasis on mathematical concepts, problem solving and critical thinking using the Glenco and Saxon Math curricula. Regular classroom instruction also includes language, penmanship, spelling, science and health, history, geography and art. In addition to daily devotional times and Bible lessons, scriptural principles and Christian character training are incorporated in all subjects. Band, physical education, computers, a library, forensic science and a variety of resources are offered to promote a well-rounded education. The school’s growing athletics program offers football, basketball, volleyball, cheer, golf and bowling. Students are encouraged to express the gifts God has given them in chapel, concerts, musicals, dramas and competitions during the school year.

MISSION To partner with families to teach students to know God through developing Academic excellence, establishing a biblical worldview and shaping Christ-like character. Eagle Point Christian Academy is committed to educating the whole child — body, mind and spirit — to the glory of God.

L E A D ERSHIP Jim Pryor, School Administrator Rhonda White, Director, Curriculum and Instruction Garry Judy, President Don Lovy, Past President Robert Pennybaker, Past President E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 3 — 36th annual Founders Dinner and Auction April 9-13 — Get Your Paws on Books book fair

EAGLE POINT C H R ISTIAN

AC A D E M Y

EAGLE POINT CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 602 S. MOUNDS ST. SAPULPA, OK 74066 918-227-2441 EPCA.NET

LEGACY TULSA 23


PARTNER

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Awarded one of 15 grants from the Department of Justice President’s Initiative on Family Justice Centers, Tulsa’s Family Safety Center opened in 2006 with eight on-site partners. Today, the original partners have been joined by five additional agencies who embed their professional staff at the FSC. These providers give necessary traumainformed wraparound services and access to justice for Tulsa County’s most vulnerable citizens: victims of family and intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, vulnerable adult and elder abuse, and human trafficking. The FSC’s Navigators can help individuals access the many services available and provide referrals to off-site agencies. Legal advocates from DVIS will assist by providing danger assessments, safety planning and assistance with filing emergency protective orders. Legal Aid Services and DVIS attorneys can help with divorce, custody, paternity, protective order hearings and other civil and family issues. Forensic documentation of injuries by Tulsa Police Department forensic nurses, SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) exams and general health assessments can be obtained onsite.  The Parent Child Center provides a child and family therapist to help children during these times of trauma, and on-site childcare is provided. (Childcare provided by DVIS Master Teacher.) Police reports can be filed, and individuals can meet with a detective about a case. A chaplain from Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry is on call to address spiritual needs. If you or someone you know are in a violent relationship, the Family Safety Center can help in a secure and confidential environment. Visit or call for assistance.  LEA DER SH I P Suzann M. Stewart, Executive Director Jan Figart, Associate Director Sharon King Davis, Chairwoman of the Board Ann Herndon Cox, Vice Chairwoman Brandon Brown, Treasurer

FAMILY SAFETY CENTER POLICE COURTS BUILDING, 600 CIVIC CENTER, SUITE 103 TULSA, OK 74103 918-742-7480 FSCTULSA.ORG 24 LEGACY TULSA

Family Safety Center MISSION The Family Safety Center is the backbone organization for 13 on-site, and as many as 23 off-site, partner organizations that provide co-located multidisciplinary services to victims and families suffering intimate partner and family violence, sexual assault, stalking, harassment, elder abuse and human trafficking in Tulsa County.


PARTNER

Gatesway

MIS SION To encourage independence and provide opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities that will enable them to live and work in the community and improve their quality of life.

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Gatesway Foundation is an Oklahoma agency established to encourage independence and provide opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Gatesway’s goal is to ensure its clients acquire the living, vocational and social skills necessary to become a vital part of their community. Gatesway provides a variety of programs and services for its clients, including residential housing, intermediate care housing, job coaching, life skills training, job placement, supported employment and advocacy intervention. Many of these services are offered on Gatesway’s campus in Broken Arrow, and others are provided within the Tulsa community and surrounding areas. Gatesway’s employment options for its clients range from Fortune 500 companies to small local businesses. Industries include food services, hospitality, janitorial, manufacturing and medical. Since its inception in 1963, Gatesway has employed thousands of individuals and is committed to providing training and employment opportunities to assist clients in reaching their fullest personal and vocational potential.

L E A D ERSHIP Gloria Morton, Interim President Matt Coughlin III, President Greg Arend, Vice President Larry Langford, Secretary G AT ESWAY 1217 E. COLLEGE ST. B R O K EN ARROW, OK 74012 918-258- 3900 G ATESWAY.ORG

JOIN THE movement LEGACYTULSA.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 25


PARTNER

Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The first Girl Scout troop in Tulsa was organized in 1917, followed by the first council in 1923. Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma serves nearly 13,000 girls and adult volunteers in 30 eastern Oklahoma counties. Headquartered in Tulsa, GSEOK maintains service centers in Bartlesville, McAlester, Muskogee, Stillwater, Ponca City and Ada. GSEOK has three camps: Tallchief, Swannie and Wah-Shah-She. The Council has both traditional girl programs as well as programs specifically for underserved girls. The Girl Scout Leadership Experience includes the nationally recognized Girl Scouts Beyond Bars program, the Girl Scout Gold Award, Powered Up Bullying Prevention, day/resident camps, outdoor adventure, scholarships, travel, financial literacy and STEM. 26 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place.

L E A D E RSHIP Roberta Preston, President and Chief Executive Officer Susan Kenny, Chief Development Officer Sheila Harbert, Chief Community Outreach Officer Gary Provine, Board Chair Cindy Bottomley, First Vice Chair Lari Gulley, Board Member E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 9 — Cookies and Cocktails April 19 — Juliette Low Leadership Society Luncheon

GIRL SCOUTS OF EASTERN OKLAHOMA 4810 S. 129TH E. AVE. TULSA, OK 74134 918-749-2551 GSEOK.ORG


PARTNER

Goodwill Industries of Tulsa Inc.

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Goodwill began serving the Tulsa area in 1927. Goodwill offers a wide variety of training programs for people with disabilities or disadvantages. Services for people with disabilities include classroom-style employment training for high school students, intensive center-based and community-based skills training, long-term work opportunities and placement, and follow-up services provided under State of Oklahoma contracts. Goodwill’s TulsaWORKS Career Academy provides training for industry-recognized credentials that lead to in-demand careers. These include forklift operation, hospitality, unarmed private security and the computer support/information technology fields. The Career Academy supports participants and their families with a career navigator, who works with participants to resolve issues that might prevent success in the workplace. In partnership with the Tulsa Area United Way, Goodwill Tulsa offers free income tax preparation on Saturdays during the tax season for low- and moderate-income taxpayers who qualify. In collaboration with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Goodwill has a financial coach who is available to anyone in the community, without regard to employment status or income.

MISSION Goodwill Industries of Tulsa Inc. provides work opportunities, job training and support services for people with disabilities or other employment barriers.

L E A D ERSHIP David E. Oliver, President Karla Davis, Director of Finance and Information Technology Terry Blain, Board Chair Steve Berlin, Vice Chair Ron Mucci, Secretary/Treasurer E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES May 9 — Goodwill Awards Luncheon

G O ODW I LL 2800 SO U T HW EST BLVD. TU LSA, OK 74017 K AR LA D AVIS: 918- 581- 1234 G O O D WIL LTULSA.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 27


PARTNER

Happy Hands

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Happy Hands Education Center is the only fulltime organization in Oklahoma specifically dedicated to meeting the needs of children who are deaf, hard of hearing or have other communication disorders from birth to 6 years old. Happy Hands is committed to expanding language ability in these children so they can enter elementary school with the skills necessary to be successful in school and in life. There are estimated to be 1,400 children in need of its services in the Tulsa area. The center provides full-day services to over 80 children each year, support to their 250 family members and seminars/training classes to approximately 200 other members of the public. Happy Hands is accredited as a Christian school, licensed as a childcare center, annually audited and is an award-winning program. Happy Hands never denies enrollment to a child for lack of family finances. 28 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION Happy Hands empowers children who are deaf, hard of hearing or have other communication disorders and their families to flourish in northeast Oklahoma by educating children, nurturing families and building hope.

Through generous donations to the Hope NOW! Scholarship fund, these special children will succeed. “And the child grew and became strong in spirit, filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was upon him.” — Luke 2:40 LE A D E RSHIP Janine Pride, Executive Director Jennifer Freese, Director of Education Darla Otto, Development Director Mishelle Embry, Executive Board Member Chad Roberson, Executive Board Member E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 1 — Be The Story luncheon Twice a month — See The Story: Tour the program and meet its children.

HAPPY HANDS 8801 S. GARNETT ROAD BROKEN ARROW, OK 74012 918-893-4800 HAPPYHANDS.ORG


PARTNER

Holland Hall

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Holland Hall is Tulsa’s pre-K through grade 12 independent Episcopal school. Holland Hall offers an ambitious curriculum, an extensive array of exciting electives, dozens of individual and team sports, transformative arts programming and an apprenticeship in self-reliance. The school’s student/teacher ratio of 9-to-1 means each child’s teachers truly know who they are and where their strengths and passions lie. Located on a beautiful 162-acre campus, Holland Hall provides a lively and uncommonly kind community that honors the individual integrity of each child while providing the bedrock education every student needs to succeed in college, work and the world beyond.

MISSION Holland Hall provides a challenging, comprehensive educational experience grounded in a rigorous liberal arts, college preparatory curriculum that promotes critical thinking and lifelong learning. A pre-K-12 Episcopal school, Holland Hall seeks to foster in each student a strong moral foundation and a deep sense of social responsibility.

L E A D E RSHIP JP Culley, Head of School Richard Hart, Associate Head of School for Academic Affairs Leslie Kelly, Associate Head of School for Finance and Operations J.W. Craft, Chair, Board of Trustees E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 24 — 58th annual Holland Hall Book Fair Feb. 14, 28 and March 28 — Welcome Wednesday Admission Tours HOLLAND HALL 5666 E. 81ST ST. TULSA, OK 74137 918-481-1111 HOLLANDHALL.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 29


PARTNER

Home of Hope

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Every day courageous individuals struggle with impairment in functions most of us take for granted. Although some are blessed with extraordinary support around them, and others find their way with a powerful resilience and determination of their own, too many still find themselves separated from involvement in a world that doesn’t know how to respond to their needs. These individuals struggle to participate as equal members of society without some amount of support, guidance and advocacy on their behalf. For more than 250 men and women with intellectual and developmental disabilities in northeast Oklahoma, Home of Hope provides a place to call home. There, these individuals find friendship, support and encouragement. They gain a job and a sense of achievement and pride in earning a paycheck of their own. They are given activities to brighten their days and provide opportunities for engagement with the world around them. 30 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION Because people with intellectual disabilities often struggle to exercise their rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as easily and independently as other citizens, Home of Hope operates as a community-based organization supporting people with developmental and other disabilities by promoting choices, independence and a meaningful way of life.

Home of Hope is a place where the needs of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities come first, where their decisions are their own and where your support can make a difference. LE A D E RSHIP Ralph Richardson, Chief Executive Officer Dena Pitts, Chief Operating Officer Tony Wedding, Board President E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 8 — Chocolate Affair June 9 — 50th anniversary Banquet

HOME OF HOPE P.O. BOX 903 960 W. HOPE ROAD VINITA, OK 74301 918-256-7825, EXT. 152 HOMEOFHOPE.COM


PARTNER

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Hospitality House provides home-like lodging, meals, prayer support, transportation assistance and other support services to families who must travel 30 or more miles to receive medical care in Tulsa. Thirteen family suites are available at 1135 S. Victor Ave., and the nonprofit also utilizes a 10room Hotel Extension program at the DoubleTree Hotel at Warren Place. Hospitality House serves all 14 Tulsa-area hospitals. Services are provided to families of patients of any age and any diagnosis, including outpatients traveling for cancer treatment. Guests may make a suggested donation of $1-$20 per night; however, no family is turned away due to inability to pay. Each year, Hospitality House serves over 1,000 families who, instead of sleeping in a waiting room chair or their vehicle, are welcomed into a warm, safe and supportive environment.

Hospitality House MISSION Hospitality House offers a “home away from home” for families caring for loved ones in medical crisis.

LEA DER SH I P Toni Moore, President and Chief Executive Officer Sean Kouplen, Board Chair Preston Smith, Board Treasurer Kelisha Flipps, Board Secretary Wes Pebsworth, Board Member EV ENTS AN D OPPORT U N IT IE S April 14 — Chapman Foundation’s Route 66 Gurney Tourney Sept. 20 — Oklahoma Caring Awards

HOSPITALITY HOUSE OF TULSA 1135 S. VICTOR AVE. TULSA, OK 74104 918-794-0088 HHTULSA.ORG LEGACY TULSA 31


PARTNER

John 3:16 Mission

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For 65 years, John 3:16 Mission has played a unique role in meeting the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of hungry, homeless and atrisk people in Tulsa. In the ensuing decades, millions of meals have been served, and the men, women and children living on life’s margins have found a safe and welcoming refuge from the streets. Each day, the Mission serves approximately 650 meals and provides shelter for as many as 150 people. Last year, nearly 240,000 meals were served, and over 28,000 nights of shelter were provided. Anyone who is hungry is welcome to come to the Mission for a meal. In addition to providing meals, shelter, clothing and other emergency assistance, John 3:16 Mission also offers life-transforming programs for homeless men and women who are ready to turn their lives around. These long-term recovery programs are rooted deeply in the tenets of Christian faith and especially in the belief that with God’s help, no one is beyond redemption and restoration. At any given time, there are dozens of homeless men and women who are experiencing what 32 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION In the name and through the loving grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, John 3:16 Mission reclaims lives and restores hope to homeless and at-risk men, women and children as it ministers to their physical, mental, emotional and spiritual needs.

it means to go from life on the streets to a life of renewed hope and purpose at John 3:16 Mission. On top of all this, the Mission operates a Family and Youth Center in north Tulsa that is helping to spearhead community redevelopment by supporting lower-income families with various programs ranging from food and clothing assistance to mentoring, tutoring, literacy, arts and recreation. L E A D E RSHIP Rev. Steve P. Whitaker, Chief Executive Officer

JOHN 3:16 MISSION 575 N. 39TH W. AVE. TULSA, OK 74127 918-587-1186 JOHN316MISSION.ORG

Steven M. Whitaker, Chief Operating Officer Lee Bartel, Director of Development Bob Jack, Chair Scott McDaniel, Vice Chair David Rader, Secretary E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 3 — Gala June-August — Summer Kids Camp reading enrichment program May 7 — Women’s Day of Beauty

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PARTNER

John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Since its inception in 2007, the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation Inc., based in Tulsa, has pursued an active agenda of programs and activities aimed at transforming racial, ethnic and social divisions into social harmony through the serious work of reconciliation. The center’s ultimate goal is to create positive community change that is inclusive of all people. Its tools and programs are designed and positioned to help foster this type of change given the right amount of resources. This approach has yielded encouraging results toward restorative reconciliation across multiple cultures. John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation programs include: • Reconciliation in America National Symposium • John Hope Franklin Summer University • Inter-generational Community Dialogue Series • The Dan Harrison Docents and Volunteer Program • John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park • Annual Dinner of Reconciliation

MISSION In the spirit of Dr. John Hope Franklin, the center promotes reconciliation and trust among individuals of diverse communities through scholarly work that combines theory and practice to generate constructive community engagement in Tulsa and beyond.

L E A D E RSHIP Reuben Gant, Interim Executive Director Jean M. Neal, Program, Development and Event Manager Julius Pegues, Board Chair Sam Combs III, Development Chair Reuben Gant, Executive Board Member E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES May 30-June 1 — 2018 Reconciliation in America National Symposium featuring keynote speaker Michelle Norris Author of “The Race Card” JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN CENTER 322 N. GREENWOOD AVE. TULSA, OK 74120 918-295-5009 JHFCENTER.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 33


PARTNER

Junior League of Tulsa

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Junior League of Tulsa works to end the cycle of poverty in Tulsa through hands-on education and community-based training. Since 1923, JLT has provided trained and effective volunteers for more than 100 community projects, including Leadership Tulsa, the Ronald McDonald House, Mayfest, Oxley Nature Center and the Child Abuse Network. Last year alone, JLT members served more than 44,000 hours, benefiting the women and children in Tulsa who need the most help. After receiving hands-on training as an active member in JLT for an average of 8-10 years, JLT members become sustaining members, or alumni, and use the skills and knowledge gained during their time with JLT to continue to make a difference in the community through effective action and leadership in other community organizations. JLT has approximately 700 members and welcomes all women who value its mission. JLT is committed to inclusive environments of diverse individuals, organizations and communities.

MISSION The Junior League of Tulsa Inc. is an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable.

L E A D E RSHIP Molly Aspan, President Mary Beth Nesser, President-Elect Lauren Landwerlin, Treasurer Ashley Pettingell, Treasurer-Elect Courtney Wayland, Recording Secretary Andrea Kulsrud, Communications Vice President Lauren Avery, Community Vice President Maria McCue, Community Programs Vice President Kendall Mordhorst, Financial Vice President Jessica Engelbrecht, Leadership Development Vice President Micah Tjeerdsma, Membership Vice President Jennifer Wyckoff, Membership Programs Vice President Camille Torres, Strategic Planning Tara Proctor, Nominating Liz Brolick, Sustaining Advisor Rhonda Shiflet, Business Manager

34 LEGACY TULSA

EVENTS AND OPPORTUNI TI ES Jan. 25 — Mentorship Luncheon May 5 — 95th anniversary Gem Gala

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TULSA 3633 S. YALE AVE. TULSA, OK 74135 918-663-6100 JLTULSA.ORG


PARTNER

Leadership Tulsa

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For more than 40 years, Leadership Tulsa has been providing great community leadership development programs. It is known best for its traditional Leadership Tulsa class offered twice a year that focuses on a geographic exploration of Tulsa and engages new leaders in board service on more than 100 area boards. However, Leadership Tulsa’s expanded programs annually involve more than 200 adults representing a diverse cross-section of the community who learn about the infrastructure, needs and resources of Tulsa and how to get involved to effect positive change. Individuals have the opportunity to develop their leadership skills and their connections in the community. Classes are chosen through a competitive selection process, and participants enjoy ongoing educational experiences focused on building leadership skills and understanding the community as members even past their initial class experience. Leadership Tulsa has gained national recognition through the Association of Leadership Programs and will host the national ALP conference in Tulsa in 2019.

MISSION Leadership Tulsa identifies, develops and connects diverse leaders who impact the community through service.

L E A D E RSHIP Wendy Thomas, Executive Director Tina Parkhill, President Sean Weins, President-Elect E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 1 — Good News Summit at OU-Tulsa April 30 — Application Deadline for LT Class 60

JOIN THE movement LEGACYTULSA.ORG

LEADERSHIP TULSA 1717 S. BOULDER AVE., SUITE 104 TULSA, OK 74119 918-477-7079 LEADERSHIPTULSA.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 35


PARTNER

Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma provides free civil legal assistance to eligible low-income individuals and their families, the elderly, victims of domestic violence, veterans and survivors of natural disasters. This service is provided through LASO’s 18 law offices, strategically located throughout the state to serve clients in all 77 Oklahoma counties. In 2016, LASO advocates closed 10,133 cases, assisting 22,724 low-income Oklahomans. The biggest demand for LASO services is in the area of family law, including cases involving domestic violence. Children are the biggest benefactors of LASO’s work, as LASO strives to stabilize their families through the issues of custody, child support and divorce. LASO also represents the elderly seeking Social Security or other public benefits, or in helping the elderly resolve the issues of guardianship. LASO helps individuals faced with losing their housing through evictions or mortgage foreclo36 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To be a partner in the community, making equal justice for all a reality.

sures, and with cases involving Medicare, Medicaid and health care problems. LASO maintains a service unit devoted to assisting survivors of Oklahoma natural disasters, and has two Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Veteran Legal Fellow Attorneys who assist low-income and homeless veterans. LASO also conducts community education events throughout the state to inform Oklahomans about the legal issues that might impact them and their families. L E A D E RSHIP Michael G. Figgins, Executive Director Molly A. Aspan, Esq., Board Chair Dwight L. Smith, Esq., Immediate Past Board Chair E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES May 1 — 2018 annual Campaign begins

LEGAL AID SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA 2915 N. CLASSEN BLVD., SUITE 500 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73106 405-488-6818 LEGALAIDOK.ORG


PARTNER

LIFE Senior Services

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For more than four decades, LIFE Senior Services has strategically grown to meet the emerging needs of an ever-increasing and diverse aging population. Today, LIFE provides solutions that empower older adults to stay active, to enjoy the highest quality of life and to remain independent for as long as possible. LIFE offers a variety of quality programs and services that makes life better for thousands of families in northeast Oklahoma each year. LIFE Senior Services programs include: • Adult Day Health • Caregiver Support Services • Care Management and Behavioral Health • Community and Professional Education • LIFE PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) • Medicare Assistance Program • SeniorLine Information and Resource Counseling

• • • • •

MISSION To promote and preserve independence for seniors. In keeping with that mission, LIFE specializes in home- and community-based services that promote active aging and aging-in-place for seniors, as well as services and support for family caregivers.

Senior Activity Centers Tax Assistance Program Vintage Housing Vintage Publications Volunteer Resources Program

L E A D E RSHIP Laura Kenny, President and Chief Executive Officer Tamra Moore, Chief Operating Officer Kathy Palmer, Chief Financial Officer Lindsay Hurley Fick, Board Chair Jeanne Sturges, Secretary Angela Larson, Treasurer Rod Nordstrom, Past Chair E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 22 — Puttin’ on the Dog July 24 — Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair with LIFE Senior Services and the Tulsa Police Department

LIFE SENIOR SERVICES 5950 E. 31ST ST. TULSA, OK 74135 918-664-9000 LIFESENIORSERVICES.ORG LEGACY TULSA 37


PARTNER

Mental Health Association Oklahoma

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Mental Health Association Oklahoma has been advocating for Oklahomans impacted by mental illness and homelessness since 1955. The association is dedicated to promoting mental health and the equity of access to mental health care through advocacy, education, research, service and housing. The association currently owns and manages 1,469 units of affordable housing in Tulsa and 112 units in Oklahoma City. Programs include housing, mental health education, support groups, pro bono counseling, mental health screening and referral, suicide prevention, peer-to-peer recovery services, employment readiness, community health and wellness initiatives, and criminal justice advocacy. The association’s housing program utilizes a Housing First model that provides immediate access to safe, decent and affordable housing for individuals impacted by mental illness, homelessness, substance abuse and criminal histories. While fragmented systems of care struggle to meet the complex needs of these individuals, the association’s mission is designed to greatly reduce barriers to accessing affordable housing and men38 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION Mental Health Association Oklahoma is dedicated to promoting mental health, preventing mental disorders and achieving victory over mental illness through advocacy, education, research, service and housing.

tal health care in one collective effort. The association’s housing program and wrap-around services position it to begin meeting the mental health care needs of the most vulnerable members of the community. L E A D E RSHIP Michael W. Brose, Chief Empowerment Officer Gregory A. Shinn, Associate Director and Chief Housing Officer Wendi M. Fralick, Chief Administrative Officer Mark A. Davis, Chief Programs Officer Stephanie Dees, President Scott Hamilton, President-Elect Michael Madsen, Treasurer Madison Baird, Secretary E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 24 — Carnivale: Stars and Stripes Sept. 27-28 — Zarrow Mental Health Symposium

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OKLAHOMA 1870 S. BOULDER AVE. TULSA, OK 74119 918-585-1213 OR 405-943-3700 MHAOK.ORG


PARTNER

Metro Christian Academy

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Established in 1983, Metro Christian Academy is a state accredited, college preparatory school serving students P3-12th grade. From their first morning in the halls to the day they don cap and gown, Metro Christian Academy students learn and live out the school’s four pillars. Academics, spiritual life, activities and community each make up a vital part of the student experience. Academics are taken seriously at every level. Metro’s educational standards are clearly articulated and aligned to ensure every student receives a consistent education. MCA maintains small class sizes for students. They stay challenged and remain on track because teachers are in tune with them and can offer differentiated instruction. Biblical principles and truths are woven throughout every part of the school. Students study the Bible, strengthen their faith, and serve the community through outreach and mission opportunities. Students are encouraged to discover and display their talents in activities ranging from ath-

MISSION To provide, in partnership with involved parents, an accredited college preparatory education that is founded on biblical principles, cultivates Christian character and equips students to excel academically, spiritually, physically and socially.

letics to fine arts to leadership. Participation in activities builds character, strengthens skills and fosters relationships. Metro cultivates innovators, artists, leaders and lifelong learners so they are prepared for the path ahead of them. For more information visit metroca.com. L E A D E RSHIP Roger Gerstenberger, Headmaster Gerald Burrow, Secondary School Principal Matt Buffington, Elementary School Principal Jarrod Frie, School Board Chair Ryan Griesemer, Foundation President Clay Greene, Alumni Association President E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Jan. 9, Feb. 13, March 13, April 10 — Second Tuesday Tours for Prospective Families April 5 — Annual MCA Dinner and Auction

METRO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 6363 S. TRENTON AVE. TULSA, OK 74136 918-745-9868 METROCA.COM

LEGACY TULSA 39


PARTNER

New Life Ranch

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Founded in 1958, New Life Ranch is a nondenominational Christian camp and retreat center located on Flint Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma. It is situated on 1,000 acres of rolling woods and pasture in a valley set apart for the glory of God. Boasting a wide range of activities, New Life Ranch runs annual programming that includes summer camp, retreats, day camp, high school leadership development, educational programming, family camps, team building and community ministries. More recently, the ranch has acquired 4 acres in the neighboring community of Colcord for the expressed purpose of building a community center that will provide mentoring, counseling and tutoring services for the underserved and at-risk in the community. Serving adults, youth and children from various organizations and churches through all of these ministries, New Life Ranch currently touches the lives of over 20,000 people each year. 40 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ and equip believers for ministry.

L E A D E RSHIP Tom Graney, Executive Director Tim Hale, Director of Development John Blair, Director of Guest Services Jon Petersen, Board President Eric Freeman, Board Vice President Gordy Guest, Board Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 3 — A Night for New Life (New Life Ranch) April 12 — A Night for New Life (Five Oaks Lodge, Tulsa) June 3-Aug. 4 — Summer Camp (third-12th grade) June 3-Aug. 11 — High School Leadership Development (10th-12th grade) Aug. 5-8 — Family Camp

NEW LIFE RANCH 160 NEW LIFE RANCH DRIVE COLCORD, OK 74338 918-422-5506 NEWLIFERANCH.COM


PARTNER

Oklahoma Aquarium

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Even in landlocked Oklahoma, water ties the state to its neighbors and the entire world, as streams and rivers flow from border to border and ultimately the ocean. Water covers more than 70 percent of Earth’s surface, so to protect the planet, knowledge and appreciation of freshwater and marine life is critical. The Oklahoma Aquarium offers visitors the chance to safely stare in awe at massive sharks and to laugh at the antics of splashing sea turtles, playful clownfish and hundreds of other species. Through these unique experiences, the aquarium fulfills its mission to provide a vital science education resource and foster conservation of aquatic environments. People are all connected by water. The Oklahoma Aquarium brings that connection to life for guests of every generation, to help protect the aquatic world for many generations to come.

MISSION To educate and inspire conservation of the aquatic world through interactive discovery. The mission of the Oklahoma Aquarium Foundation is to provide support and resources to the Oklahoma Aquarium and its mission, while advocating for the aquarium as a premier cultural institution in the state of Oklahoma.

L E A D E RSHIP Diana Beaulieu, Oklahoma Aquarium Foundation President Matt Griffin, Oklahoma Aquarium Foundation Vice President Dave Shirley, Oklahoma Aquarium Foundation Secretary Kevin Gore, Oklahoma Aquarium Foundation Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 3 — Splash April 7 — Aquarium Run

OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM 300 AQUARIUM DRIVE JENKS, OK 74037 918-296-3474 OKAQUARIUM.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 41


PARTNER

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Oklahoma Project Woman is a statewide nonprofit agency that provides access to free mammograms, biopsies and surgeries for women and men with no health insurance and limited financial resources. OPW serves people of all ages with a primary focus on women 40 years and older, who possess income levels that are no more than 185 percent of the poverty level. These women do not have private health insurance, Medicare or Medicaid. OPW is able to provide a complete range of care because of multiple contracts with health care facilities throughout the state. OPW has agreements with 95 clinics and 50 hospitals as well as the corresponding radiology, surgical, anesthesia and pathology groups for each hospital. Medical partners are reimbursed a contracted rate for each procedure. The medical partner agrees to write off the remainder of the procedure cost so the patient is billed nothing. Since 1998, OPW has provided access to care for more than 47,700 uninsured Oklahomans; 706 of those patients have been diagnosed with breast cancer. LEA DER SH I P Anne Bogie, Executive Director Scarlet Henley, Development Director Denise Senger, Clinical Program Director Jeff Husen, Chair Heather VanHooser, Chair-Elect Lauren LaBass-Oonk, Treasurer EV ENTS AN D OPPORT U N IT IE S October — Pink Ribbon Event

OKLAHOMA PROJECT WOMAN P.O. BOX 14026 TULSA, OK 74159 918-834-7200 OKLAHOMAPROJECTWOMAN.ORG 42 LEGACY TULSA

Oklahoma Project Woman MISSION Oklahoma Project Woman is dedicated to providing access to breast health care that will facilitate the early diagnosis of breast cancer and decrease the mortality rate for uninsured women with limited income.


PARTNER

Starlight Concerts

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Starlight’s summer concerts are a Tulsa tradition. For over 70 years, the Starlight Band has presented high-quality, live music to Oklahoma audiences. Many Tulsans have fond memories of attending Starlight summer concerts with their parents and grandparents and now do so with their children. Starlight Band is Oklahoma’s only professional concert band. The band has over 50 professional musicians who delight audiences each summer with music for every generation. The Starlight Jazz Orchestra thrills its audiences in at least two concerts each season. Currently, concerts are held at Guthrie Green in the heart of the vibrant Tulsa Arts District. Crowds of music lovers from all walks of life attend each of the organization’s free, family-friendly concerts.

MISSION To provide quality live music to the largest possible audience.

L E A D E RSHIP Catherine deCamp, Executive Director L. Dale Barnett, Artistic Director Rich Fisher, Jazz Orchestra Director Mike McClendon, Chair of the Board E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Dates TBA — Summer 2018 Concerts STARLIGHT CONCERTS P.O. BOX 35158 TULSA, OK 74153 918-798-7827 STARLIGHTBANDS.NET

LEGACY TULSA 43


2017 3A SPEECH & DEBATE STATE CHAMPIONS

2017 MIDDLE SCHOOL OJABA ACADEMIC BOWL REGIONAL AND STATE CHAMPIONS IN THREE OF FOUR GRADE DIVISIONS

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645

NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAM

students , I nfants

– 12 th

grade

TRAINING SITE FOR PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS FROM ECU, NSU, ORU, OSU, AND OU

120-ACRE CAMPUS WITH WOODS, TRAILS, PONDS, CREEKS, AND BARNYARD

2017 GREAT RAFT RACE STEM GRANT WINNER AND STEM CHALLENGE BEST ENGINEERING WINNER

2017 VARSITY BOYS AND GIRLS BASKETBALL CHEROKEE CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS (5TH YEAR RUNNING FOR BOYS)

riverfield.org


PARTNER

Riverfield Country Day School

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Riverfield nurtures students 8 weeks-12th grade to reach their potential through innovative education, small class sizes and a culture of community. Since its founding in 1984, Riverfield has remained steadfast in its commitment to providing a student-centered approach to education with an innovative program of authentic, experiential learning. The 120-acre campus inspires and engages 645 students as they explore the woods, visit the barnyard animals, create art in the meadow and conduct experiments involving local flora and fauna. Seen as facilitators of learning, Riverfield’s teachers provoke thought and action by challenging students to think critically as they interact with faculty, peers, students from other divisions of the school, and members of the greater Tulsa community. This collaborative experience contributes to a feeling of ownership and sense of belonging to something bigger than one’s self. The school’s philosophy and teachers are not bound by a single educational theory. Riverfield is inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to education, which is a student-centered, constructivist approach. Teachers continually use many of today’s best practices in education, including active learning, personalized instruction and design thinking

MISSION To provide an excellent education in a family-oriented atmosphere. Students are motivated and encouraged to learn, develop and mature in a respectful, secure and diverse environment. A caring, creative faculty and a challenging, integrated and personalized curriculum promote the development of the whole student as a confident and responsible learner prepared for success today and tomorrow.

with various applied STEAM and humanities initiatives at all ages. Through participation in the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association, the school finds success in athletics, academics and arts. Recent successes include winning the Varsity Boys Basketball Cherokee Conference title for five consecutive years, being named the 2017 Speech and Debate 3A State Champions, and Riverfield Rocks headlining the 2017 Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) Arts Festival and performing at Tulsa’s historic Cain’s Ballroom. Riverfield is accredited by the ISAS, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the Oklahoma Private School Accreditation Commission.

RIVERFIELD COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 2433 W. 61ST ST. TULSA, OK 74132 918-446-3553 RIVERFIELD.ORG

L E A D E RSHIP Jerry Bates, Head of School Patti Grice, Director of Giving Tracy Lee Emmons, Director of Major Gifts Brenda Dinan, Board of Trustees Chair Virginia Eddleman, Riverfield Family Association President

JOIN THE movement LEGACYTULSA.ORG

Laura and Dan Smolen, INSPIRED Capital Campaign Chairs LEGACY TULSA 45


PARTNER

Street School

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Street School combines alternative education and therapeutic counseling and is Oklahoma’s longestrunning and most successful dropout prevention and intervention program. Annually, Street School serves an average of 135 students ages 14-19 who reside in the Tulsa Public Schools district. Street School’s focus is teens who have dropped out or are on the verge of dropping out due to academics, abuse, neglect, bullying, drugs or pregnancy/teenage parenting. Each year over 4,000 students drop out in the Tulsa area between ninth grade and graduation, which has a tremendous social and economic impact on the community. Street School’s goal is to reduce the high school dropout rate by providing at-risk students the academic and emotional skills needed to prepare them for college/technical school and/or the workforce. Over the past 10 years, 90 percent of Street School seniors, on average, have graduated, and its dropout rate has averaged 5 percent or less. This 46 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To provide a supportive community for students who have chosen to continue their education in a non-traditional setting. Its comprehensive and individualized services enable students to reach their potential and become responsible and productive adults.

past school year Street School served 136 students, and 34 seniors graduated. The average GPA increased to 3.0 from 1.0, and the number of courses completed was 100 percent versus 57 percent. Attendance improved by 70 percent, and 86 percent of students successfully completed their treatment plans. L E A D E RSHIP Lori McGinnis-Madland, President and Chief Executive Officer Jana Emerson, Chief Operating Officer Sandra Thornton, Development Director Todd Martin, Chair Jim Cornwell, Vice Chair Amy Stutzman-Fortna, Chair-Elect E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 23 — Street Party Gala

STREET SCHOOL 1135 S. YALE AVE. TULSA, OK 74112 918-833-9800 STREETSCHOOL.ORG


PARTNER

The Little Light House

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Since 1972, the Little Light House Christian developmental center has provided tuition-free therapy and education for children with special needs age birth to 6 years old, regardless of religious beliefs, race, gender or socioeconomic status. The center uses what is called a transdisciplinary team approach to services. This team is comprised of physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, a low-vision therapist, an assistive technology professional, a registered nurse, certified special education teachers and trained associates. These professionals work closely with each child’s parents to devise a highly individualized plan to help their child reach their maximum potential. In keeping with its mission, the Little Light House also serves as a model training center for families, college students, professionals and interns both locally and worldwide. The goal is to provide hands-on training for those who work with individuals with special needs, giving them

MISSION To glorify God by improving the quality of life for children with special needs, their families and their communities.

confidence and skills to assist these individuals. It also strives to shift the focus from the person’s disability to their capability. L E A D E RSHIP Jean Winfrey, Executive Director Rachel Mouton, Director of Development Jessica Mardis, Director of Operations Kimberly Burnett, Board Chair Eric Wendelbo, Vice Chair Brian Tims, Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 7 — Garden Party June 4 — Links for Little Ones

THE LITTLE LIGHT HOUSE 5120 E. 36TH ST. TULSA, OK 74135 918-664-6746 LITTLELIGHTHOUSE.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 47


PARTNER

The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice is a statewide organization celebrating its 60th year with programs for people at nearly any stage of life. School-based programming begins in the second grade with Different and the Same, a child-focused initiative to help students identify, talk about, and prevent prejudice. Other programs include Middletown, an anti-bullying program, and Anytown Leadership Institute, a week-long experience for high school students focusing on citizenship, self-awareness, communication skills, cultural awareness, racial understanding, gender and interreligious respect. OCCJ also offers signature interfaith events for teens and adults, as well as diversity and inclusion training for a wide range of private and nonprofit partners. Community partnerships and collaborations include the Say No to Hate Coalition, Anti-Bullying Collaboration and Tulsa Unites. 48 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice is dedicated to achieving respect and understanding for all people through education, advocacy and dialogue. OCCJ’s vision is to eliminate bias, bigotry and racism in our state, in our generation.

L E A D E RSHIP Moises Echeverria, President and Chief Executive Officer Mandy Winton, Director of Development Sarah Rana, Director of Programs Adrienne Watt Nesser, Chair Shane Fernandez, Immediate Past-Chair Kayla Hale, Vice Chair for Fund Development E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 4, 11 and 18 — 35th annual Trialogue Series October 2018 — 60th annual Awards Dinner

THE OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR COMMUNITY AND JUSTICE 100 W. FIFTH ST., SUITE 701 TULSA, OK 74103 918-583-1361 OCCJOK.ORG


PARTNER

The Tristesse Grief Center

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Tristesse Grief Center provides northeastern Oklahoma families and individuals with professional services specifically designed to heal grieving hearts. Tristesse offers comprehensive grief support, advocacy and education. Its counseling services, support groups and special programs are available to all — regardless of the ability to pay. Grief Center programs include individual counseling, group counseling, monthly workshops, crisis response and special programming designed just for kids and teens, including Oklahoma’s first overnight bereavement camp. Every service is facilitated by professional grief counselors, each with a master’s degree or higher. They provide a safe place to grieve and celebrate the lives of loved ones. The Grief Center understands that each person’s grief is unique and that seeking help is a sign of strength, not weakness. Through listening, sharing and remembering, the Grief Center is where adults, teens and children can come find hope and learn how to be whole again.

MISSION To create a caring community where grieving families know they are not alone; to provide a safe place to grieve the deaths and celebrate the lives of loved ones; to provide professionally facilitated support groups, individual counseling and special programs for grieving children, teens and adults; and to be the primary community resource for providing comprehensive grief support, advocacy and education.

L E A D E RSHIP Lauri Lenora, Executive Director Sarah Reinhardt, Program Director Carolyn Yoder, Community Relations Director John B. Stagg, President Amanda Shank, Vice President Judy Berry, Secretary E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 6 — ARTSCAPE Gala June 1-3 — Camp Erin Tulsa bereavement camp

THE TRISTESSE GRIEF CENTER 2502 E. 71ST ST. TULSA, OK 74136 918-587-1200 THEGRIEFCENTER.ORG OCCJOK.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 49


PARTNER

TSHA

MIS S IO N TSHA is bridging gaps to improve the quality of life of those affected by hearing loss. TSHA provides unbiased information to increase acceptance while removing barriers in families, agencies, businesses and communities related to hearing loss.

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D TSHA is the only organization of its kind in Oklahoma. It was founded out of frustration in 1953, when parents came together in support of their deaf children because there were no services available. Today, the organization has three main departments that serve the community: • The Interpreter Referral Program provides certified sign language interpreters throughout the state, allowing for full communication. • Deaf Services works with the deaf community through one-on-one sessions, community workshops, advocacy, its Deaf Teen Club and more. • The Community Resources department focuses on family services, including services for children with hearing loss, elderly services and outreach to the hearing community through sign language classes, free presentations and more. TSHA also coordinates several hearing-aid assistance programs. 50 LEGACY TULSA

L E A D E RSHIP R. Rene’ Ryan, Executive Director Diana Higgins, Community Relations Manager Brandon Croley, Board President Roger Smith, Past-President Tony L. Kirby, President-Elect E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March 9 — Vintage ’53 April 21 — “Where Hands and Feet Meet” 5K Run

TSHA 8740 E. 11TH ST. TULSA, OK 74112 918-832-8742 TSHA.CC


PARTNER

Tulsa Botanic Garden

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Tulsa Botanic Garden is a place for connecting people with plants and each other. Generations of families visit to celebrate and make memories. Beautiful gardens, such as the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces, not only offer opportunities for escape, contemplation and inspiration, but also serve as a living collection of plant life for research and conservation. The garden’s living collection acts as an outdoor classroom for exploring plant adaptations, life cycles and inter-relationships in nature. Groups from pre-K to college utilize the garden for hands-on investigation and experiential learning. Dynamic educational programming sparks curiosity in the natural world for visitors of all ages. The Children’s Discovery Garden is a 2-acre wonderland designed for all ages to have interactive fun. Visitors can engage with plants to explore textures, scents, sights and even the sounds of nature. Original masterpieces are painted daily on the Art Wall, and butterfly wings let children’s imaginations take flight.

MISSION To promote the beauty and importance of plants and nature to create a more sustainable and harmonious world.

L E A D E RSHIP Todd Lasseigne, President and Chief Executive Officer Jane Dunbar, Senior Director of Development Barbara Sturdivant, Board Chair Janet McGehee, First Vice Chair Raj Basu, Second Vice Chair E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES March-April — Tulsa Botanic Blooms, featuring over 100,000 spring bulbs April 13-14 — Botanical! A Weekend in the Garden May 12 — DIG: Day in the Garden

TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN 3900 BOTANIC DRIVE TULSA, OK 74127 918-289-0330 TULSABOTANIC.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 51


PARTNER

Tulsa Boys’ Home

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Established in 1918, Tulsa Boys’ Home believes in heroes and the virtues of honesty, integrity, faith, hope, love, honor, courage,  commitment and  responsibility.  TBH provides a treatment program that reinforces these concepts and helps the boys develop a code of conduct with a set of principles that  will help guide their life decisions. During the past century, TBH has cared for nearly 13,000 young boys and has been responsive to the needs of the community.  TBH serves 64 boys, ages 11-18, with serious emotional, behavioral and drug problems requiring long-term temporary placement out of the home in a structured, therapeutic environment. When developing a treatment plan, TBH takes into account each boy’s unique needs and challenges. A significant component of this treatment is the Equine Therapy Program, where young boys work closely with horses in  both individual and group sessions each week.  During their stay  at Tulsa Boys’ Home, residents also receive life skills training, character education and attend the stateof-the-art on-campus school.   52 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To provide the highest-quality residential care for young boys needing placement outside their homes, for the purpose of developing well-adjusted, responsible adults and strengthening the family.

Essentially, Tulsa Boys’ Home is about healing broken hearts and broken homes, giving young boys a sense of hope for a positive future that they perhaps never thought possible — changing lives for a lifetime, one boy at a time. LE A D E RSHIP Gregory T. Conway, Executive Director Ken Callen, Program Director (DHS Program) Tanisha Penn Moore, Program Director (TBH Substance Abuse Treatment Program) Andrew Levinson, Board Chair Carley Williams, Board Vice Chair, Board Treasurer Todd Lang, Board Secretary E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 24 — TBH Junior Women’s Association Buttercup Bash May 5 — Run for the Roses

TULSA BOYS’ HOME P.O. BOX 1101 TULSA, OK 74101 918-245-0231 TULSABOYSHOME.ORG


PARTNER

Tulsa Children’s Chorus

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Founded in 1991, the Tulsa Children’s Chorus remains one of the best-recognized choral organizations in Oklahoma. In 2016, the choir celebrated its 25th anniversary season with several special events, including a performance in October 2015 with Metropolitan Opera star Leona Mitchell, production of a CD with performances from the past 25 years, a special 25th anniversary concert with founding Artistic Director Ginny LeDoux, a 25th anniversary gala at the Jazz Hall of Fame in April 2016 and a trip to Kansas City. This season, the chorus welcomes a new artistic director, award-winning music educator Michael D. Shimp. Tulsa Children’s Chorus includes children from 8-18 years old who sing in one of two choruses: the Tulsa Children’s Chorus or the Tulsa Youth Chorale. Within the chorus are students from several public, private and home schools throughout Tulsa and surrounding communities.   The Tulsa Children’s Chorus believes that by providing an excellent choral music experience, it

MISSION To provide children and youth from all backgrounds the opportunity to learn and perform choral music in a professional setting, and to inspire a life-long love of all music — both as a performer and as a listener.

can help children grow in their own vocal skills and love of music. Choir members learn how various composers expressed a wide range of ideas and emotions through their music. The program instills discipline by emphasizing teamwork and achieving excellence. Singers work together toward a common goal of excellence in performance, which gives each of them a sense of pride in their success. L E A D E RSHIP Michael D. Shimp, Artistic Director Jason McIntosh, President William Doolittle, Vice President Anna Neal, Secretary Debbra J. Gottschalk, Treasurer

TULSA CHILDREN’S CHORUS 2210 S. MAIN ST. TULSA, OK 74114 918-295-7787 FACEBOOK.COM/ TULSACHILDRENSCHORUS

Ginny LeDoux, Board Member Hon. April Sellers White, Governance Chair Catherine Hickman, Board Member LEGACY TULSA 53


PARTNER

Tulsa Dream Center

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D The Tulsa Dream Center is a faith-based community center in the heart of north Tulsa that empowers the community to rise above poverty. The Dream Center provides programs and services that are strategically designed to not only meet individuals’ physical needs but also give them the skills and resources to transform their lives. Weekly services include clothing distribution, grocery assistance, hot meals and recreational activities and sports teams. Last year alone the center clothed 7,507, fed a hot meal to 9,774 and provided groceries for 9,119 individuals. Beyond these services, the two primary areas of focus are education and medical. The L.I.F.E. (Literacy Is For Everyone) Program, is an after-school reading program for kindergarten-12th grade and a biweekly adult GED tutoring program. In the past eight years, the center has brought literacy to over 1,500 north Tulsa children. Its medical clinic 54 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION The Tulsa Dream Center exists to empower the community of north Tulsa to know God and experience transformation.

is a primary care provider to uninsured north Tulsa community members. Last year alone, there were over 1,800 patient visits. L E A D E RSHIP Aaron Johnson, Executive Director Tim Newton, Program Director Caroline Coussens, Medical Clinic Director Paul Daugherty, Tulsa Dream Center Board President Doyle Bishop, Tulsa Dream Center Board Treasurer Jill Easley, Tulsa Dream Center Advisory Council Member E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 22 — Night of Dreams Gala March 31 — Spring Carnival

TULSA DREAM CENTER 200 W. 46TH ST. N. TULSA, OK 74126 918-430-9984 INFO@TULSADREAMCENTER.ORG TULSADREAMCENTER.ORG


PARTNER

Tulsa Engineering Foundation

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D No profession unleashes the spirit of innovation like engineering. From research to real-world applications, engineers constantly discover how to improve lives by creating bold new solutions that connect science to life in unexpected, forward-thinking ways. Few professions turn so many ideas into so many realities. Few have such a direct and positive effect on people’s lives. We are counting on engineers and their imagination to help us meet the needs of the 21st century. TEF hosts activities to encourage youth and professionals to pursue engineering. The Engineers Week Luncheon highlights achievements in engineering. The Engineers Week Student Breakfast for high school youth highlights the multiple opportunities with the engineering fields. The Tulsa Engineering Challenge attracts more than 1,000 youth from northeast Oklahoma. It is a hands-on opportunity for youth to explore prob-

MISSION To provide and promote STEM activities in the community with an emphasis on engineering and assist in coordinating professional activities among engineering societies and universities/ colleges.

lem solving, designing and construction of devices that accomplish tasks. TEF also offers scholarships for college students, project grants for activities that promote STEM activities and support through communication among the engineering communities. L E A D E RSHIP Jeff Beasley, President Gaylon Pinc, Vice President Karen VanSchoyck, Secretary Barbara Wollmershauser, Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 18-24 — Engineers Week March 2 — Tulsa Engineering Challenge

TULSA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION P.O. BOX 703065 TULSA, OK 74170 918-906-7929 TULSAENGINEER.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 55


PARTNER

Tulsa Habitat for Humanity

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Tulsa Habitat for Humanity families have the same life goals as other families. They are simply looking for a way to achieve the dream of homeownership, build wealth, climb the socioeconomic ladder and set their children on a path toward success. Tulsa Habitat has a proven model for providing an avenue to homeownership for individuals and families who might not qualify for home financing through conventional means. THFH equips its clients with homeowner and financial education, incorporates “sweat equity” down payments and closes on low-interest mortgage loans to keep house payments affordable. Reliance on volunteer labor and in-kind and monetary donations from individuals and corporate citizens helps Habitat provide safe, quality and affordable housing. Its vision is a world where everyone has a place to call home. 56 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION Seeking to put God’s love in action, Tulsa Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope. Tulsa Habitat partners with qualified families to build an affordable, quality home they can purchase with a low-interest Habitat loan.

L E A D E RSHIP Cameron Walker, Chief Executive Officer Todd Klabenes, Chief Operating Officer Terry DeCoster, Chief Financial Officer Miles McFadden, Chair Mark W. Smith, Chair-Elect Julie Aggus, Treasurer E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 14 — Rock the House Oct. 16 — Tulsa Habitat for Humanity Golf Classic

TULSA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY 6235 E. 13TH ST. TULSA, OK 74112 CHERYL KANE, DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING: 918-556-4603 TULSAHABITAT.ORG


PARTNER

Tulsa Town Hall

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For 83 years, Tulsa Town Hall has enriched the city’s cultural environment with provocative and stimulating speakers. David McCullough, Gentry Lee, Ken Burns, Bob Schieffer, Amy Tan, Neil deGrasse Tyson, James Lovell, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Fareed Zakaria are just a few of the notable individuals who have come to Tulsa to share their knowledge, wisdom and experience. TTH presents five speakers each year on select Friday mornings for a season subscription price of $100. Through the help of generous sponsors, area high school and college students attend lectures and participate in a Student Forum Q&A with each speaker. The majority of its 2,300-plus subscribers come from the Tulsa metropolitan area, but about 30 percent are from surrounding communities such as Bartlesville, Muskogee, Stillwater and Okmulgee. TTH engages the community and adds to the economic energy of our downtown area. New this year is a one-night Tulsa Town Hall special event that is separate from the season subscription.

MISSION To open minds, stir curiosities and inspire imaginations. Since 1935, TTH has hosted speakers who are diverse and provocative, as well as experts in their fields.

L E A D E RSHIP Kathy Collins, Executive Director Betty O’Connor, Community Relations Manager Jill Thomas, President Barbara Bird, President-Elect Lynda Brownson, Endowment Chair E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 12 — Tulsa Town Hall After Dark, featuring Piper Kerman, social justice advocate and author of “Orange Is the New Black” Be a part of Tulsa Town Hall’s 84th season. Speakers will be announced in March. Subscriptions are available March 20. TULSA TOWN HALL P.O. BOX 52266 TULSA, OK 74152 918-749-5965 TULSATOWNHALL.COM LEGACY TULSA 57


TULSA SYMPHONY

2017-2018 S E A S O N T W E LV E

Classics Series

MENDELSSOHN’S SYMPHONY NO. 3

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2018 | 7:30 PM T ULSA PE R FO R MI N G A RT S C E N T E R Concertmaster Rossitza Jekova-Goza is the featured soloist, performing Korngold’s dramatic Violin Concerto. The program will open with Medea’s Dance of Vengeance by Samuel Barber. The Tulsa Symphony will perform Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3 “Scottish” to close the evening.

BARBER: Medea’s Dance of Vengeance, op.23a KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto in D major, op.35 MENDELSSOHN: Symphony No. 3, op.56 (Scottish) Daniel Hege, Principal Guest Conductor Rossitza Jekova-Goza, Violin *Pre-Concert Conversation | 6:30 PM *Pre-Concert Student Recognition Concert | 6:45 PM *Post-Concert Reception – All Welcome *Childcare Available

For Tickets, Call 918.596.7111 or www.tulsasymphony.org


PARTNER

Tulsa Symphony

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D In addition to delighting music lovers of all ages through outstanding live performances of classics, pops and chamber music repertoire, Tulsa Symphony has a strong commitment to serving the region through education and community outreach. A robust educational resource for students and educators, TSO is proud to impact more than 17,000 area elementary students each year through the Link Up program in partnership with Carnegie Hall. Link Up provides professional development for teachers as well as expertly designed instrumental music curriculum for third-, fourthand fifth-graders, which culminates in special concerts where students sing, dance and play recorders alongside the professional musicians of Tulsa Symphony. The Heart Strings initiative broadens cultural access through coordinating live performances for underserved populations at venues such as hospitals, shelters and soup kitchens. Other community outreach offerings include the free Symphony in the Park concert on Guthrie Green each September, ticket programs for veterans and a variety of performances at philanthropic events.

MISSION To collaborate and resonate throughout the community as the professional orchestra that educates, entertains, inspires and distinguishes the community through musical excellence, innovation and service.

Tulsa Symphony provides services through a unique model. Most of its administrative staff is made up of symphony musicians, and musicians are involved at every level of the orchestra’s decision-making — a concept TSO is proud to be pioneering right here in Oklahoma. Tulsa Symphony’s commitments to excellent artistry, music education and service to the community combine to create a beautiful harmony for Tulsa. LE A D E RSHIP Ron Predl, Executive Director Tim McFadden, Orchestra Manager, Principal Trumpet Angela Carter, Development Director, Clarinet/Bass Clarinet Deborah Shallcross, Board President E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Jan. 13 — An Evening with Eric Whitacre Feb. 4 — Mendelssohn Symphony No. 3 March 4 — Family Concert: Link Up: The Orchestra Sings

TULSA SYMPHONY 117 N. BOSTON AVE. TULSA, OK 74103 918-584-3645 TULSASYMPHONY.ORG

LEGACY TULSA 59


PARTNER

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D As the region’s largest daily attraction, the Tulsa Zoo welcomes more than 700,000 visitors each year, which gives it a unique opportunity to inspire future generations to appreciate and protect species and the planet. Tulsa Zoo Management Inc. operates the Tulsa Zoo on behalf of zoo owner the City of Tulsa, and is responsible for fundraising for the 20-year master plan. In its 90th year in 2018, the Tulsa Zoo is being transformed into the world-class zoo the Tulsa community deserves. TZMI is committed to becoming the state’s leading wildlife education and conservation resource. More than 60,000 school children experience the zoo through class field trips that are free for Tulsa schools and half price for schools outside the city limits. The zoo generates more than $540,000 in sales tax revenue for the city of Tulsa each year and has a more than $25 million annual economic impact. As TZMI builds a bigger, better zoo, its annual economic impact is expected to reach $90 million. The Tulsa Zoo is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. LEA DER SH I P Terrie Correll, President and Chief Executive Officer Mike Miers, Board Chair Doug May, Vice Chair EV ENTS AN D OPPORT U N IT IE S June 15 — WALTZ on the Wild Side Oct. 6 — St. John ZooRun

TULSA ZOO MANAGEMENT INC. 6421 E. 36TH ST. N. TULSA, OK 74115 918-669-6600 TULSAZOO.ORG 60 LEGACY TULSA

Tulsa Zoo Management Inc. MISSION To inspire passion for wildlife in every guest, every day.


PARTNER

Up With Trees

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D In the past four decades, Up With Trees has planted more than 30,000 trees at more than 700 sites throughout Tulsa County. The organization also maintains more than 10,000 of those trees throughout greater Tulsa. This includes replacing them when damaged, pruning, watering and other general maintenance. Up With Trees provides trees the maximum opportunity for success in our community so that Tulsans may reap the benefits of cleaner air, improved water quality, safer neighborhoods, increased property values and more for decades to come. Education is a significant part of the Up With Trees mission. Time is dedicated to educating people of all ages on the importance of keeping Tulsa green. The Citizen Forester program trains dozens of individuals each year about the role trees play as an asset to our community. These Citizen Foresters then help us spread the Up With Trees message to the greater public and aid in the care

MISSION To beautify greater Tulsa by planting trees and to create urban forestry awareness through education. Founded in 1976, Up With Trees is dedicated to planting, preserving and promoting Tulsa’s urban forest.

and maintenance of Tulsa’s trees. Through the youth education program, Tree School, Up With Trees is able to reach younger generations and instill the value of trees at an early age. Up With Trees utilizes these programs and others to invest our community in a unified goal of a healthy, thriving and beautiful Tulsa. L E A D E RSHIP Steve Grantham, Executive Director Bob Jack, Board President Jeff Case, Board Vice President Tom Wallace, Board Second Vice President

UP WITH TREES 1102 S. BOSTON AVE. TULSA, OK 74119 918-610-8733 UPWITHTREES.ORG

E V E N TS AND OPPORTUNITIES Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24 — Citizen Forester Training March 30 — Arbor Day Sept. 29 — Green Leaf Gala LEGACY TULSA 61


PARTNER

Youth At Heart

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D For more than 40 years, Youth At Heart has provided children ages 6-18 in Tulsa’s socioeconomically challenged neighborhoods and schools with a variety of after-school and summer programs. In addition to helping with daily homework assignments, YAH works hard to facilitate positive youth development through life skills and recreational sports programs. Because YAH offers youth the opportunity to work one-on-one outside of the school day in a more relaxed and fun environment, students are more successful in completing homework assignments, reinforcing lessons learned during the school day while having new and interesting experiences. This type of educational best practice is why Youth At Heart’s programs are so effective. Youth At Heart received a multi-year grant to develop a “21st Century Community Learning Center” in 2015; this program officially launched in fall 2015 at Walt Whitman Elementary School and continues to impact nearly 100 students. In conjunction with the U.S. Tennis Association 62 LEGACY TULSA

MISSION To provide opportunities that develop character, instill values and equip youth for success.

Foundation, Youth At Heart offers a National Junior Tennis and Learning Chapter to expose students to the life-long sport of tennis. Tennis is one of the many recreational activities that Youth At Heart provides to students to promote sportsmanship, health and wellness.  L E A D ERSHIP Jocelyn McCarver, President and CEO Marquetta Finley, Director of Development Kelvin Bonner, Director of Programs Bob Sullivan, Chair Jearl Meeks, Finance Chair Lee White, Development Chair E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES April 6 — Mirror Mirror Gala April 26 — Volunteer and Partner Appreciation

YO U TH AT HEART 6026 S. SHERI DAN ROAD TU LSA, OK 74145 918-493- 7311 YO U TH ATHEART.ORG


PARTNER

Youth Services of Tulsa

KEY SE RVI CE S PROVI D E D Youth Services of Tulsa has been meeting the increasingly complex needs of young people, ages 12-24, and their families since 1969. YST focuses solely on adolescents and young adults living in Tulsa and the surrounding communities — the only agency to do so. More than just a Safe Place, YST offers an array of proven, innovative and complementary programs in four areas: Runaway and Homeless Services, Counseling, Delinquency Prevention and Youth Development. Every year, YST intercedes in the lives of thousands of young people, often at some of the most difficult times of their lives. Committed to providing quality services, YST is accredited by the Council on Accreditation. Focused on outcomes, YST uses data to drive decisions that produce positive results to the youth and families it serves. YST is a proud Tulsa Area United Way partner agency.

MISSION To value and accept all youth, supporting and challenging them to embrace their potential.

L E A D ERSHIP David C. Grewe, Executive Director Tania Pryce, Assistant Director Monica Kik-Turner, Finance Director Suzy Sharp, Development Director Karissa Cottom, President Chris Miner, Secretary Meg Nelson, Vice President of Programs E V E NTS AND OPPORTUNITIES May 5 — Blank Canvas June 2018 — Taste of Brookside Fall 2018 — 50th anniversary Kickoff Nov. 19-Dec. 10 — Gifts of Hope

YO U TH SERVI CES OF TULSA 311 S. M ADI SON AVE. TU LSA, OK 74120 918-582- 0061 YST.ORG

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T R AV E L + H O M E + T R E N D S

Pictured clockwise from top left: day planner notepad, $30, to-do notepad, $14, and month-at-a-glance notepad with clipboard, $22, all from The Inviting Place; 2018 agenda planners, $34 each, from Modern Cottage; 2018 calendar set with easel stand, $71 ($36, reďŹ lls), from Embellishments Interiors; pencils, $12 for a set of 12, and gold scissors, $22, both from The Inviting Place; and hanging wall calendar, $26, from Modern Cottage. TP

SAVE THE DATE BY KENDALL BARROW

Tools that are as stylish as they are functional will make keeping track of time and to-do lists a breeze in 2018. TulsaPeople.com

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STOREFRONT Long necklaces A sparkly accessory to complete any outfit. $12-$25.

MTS T-shirt dresses Flowy, soft and easily paired with leggings in the winter and worn as a stand-alone dress in the warmer months. $35-$45.

Chunky knit scarf Sure to keep you warm and on trend for a January outing. $22.

Liz Whitehead

PASSION FOR FASHION AMARANTH COLLECTION STRIVES TO BUILD WARDROBES AND RELATIONSHIPS. BY JAMIE RICHERT JONES

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ulsa native Liz Whitehead found she had a passion for style consulting at a young age while competing in pageants. After college, she opened a small business in an empty space in her dad’s office building. However, Whitehead’s clientele quickly grew beyond the pageant community. “There is nothing better than seeing a woman’s whole demeanor change when she finds an outfit that she really loves,” Whitehead says. Through word of mouth, she outgrew the office space and opened a boutique in February 2014 called Amaranth Collection at 8007 S. Sheridan Road.

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“We specialize in selling practical, trendy clothing for women who want to feel confident and stylish while they’re going about day-to-day activities,” Whitehead says. “I think what’s really special about our store is women can come in here with a blank slate and leave with a head-to-toe wardrobe.” Amaranth Collection strives for affordability, as most of the inventory is under $50. However, Whitehead feels it’s the personal relationships she has built with her customers that set the store apart. “I think the thing you can truly find here that you can’t find other places is the connection and the service,” she says. “I’ve worked really hard to make sure we’ve built a team of people who actually care.” She often gets asked how she chose the name of her store. It began with her love of flowers, but a need to find something unique. “When I read that amaranth meant ‘a never fading flower’ and ‘loyalty,’ it just really clicked with me,” Whitehead says. “Amaranth Collection is really just a fruition of the brand. “We’re loyal to our customers. We provide a service standard that builds true, meaningful relationships. We try to provide quality products, but really this is more than just providing fashionable pieces. We provide a place for women to connect, build their confidence and find pieces they feel great wearing.” TP

Journal and notecards Designed by local Kristi Holland Designs. $15-$16.

Judy Blue Cello distressed denim Amaranth carries several brands that provide a denim look with stretch for extra comfort. Some styles are more distressed than others. $45-$55.

Stacatto lightweight sweater and Everly knit cardigan A basic, solid lightweight sweater is an essential, and the cardigan is great for Oklahoma’s varying daily temperatures. $35-$47.

Amaranth Collection 8007 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | 918-392-7858 AMARANTHCOLLECTION.COM 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Friday; 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday.


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SPECIAL SAVINGS GOING ON NOW

CASTLEBERRY’S AN AUTHORIZED ETHAN ALLEN RETAILER TULSA 6006 SOUTH SHERIDAN 918.496.3073 Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. Sale going on for a limited time. ©2017 Ethan Allen Global, Inc.

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BEYOND CITY LIMITS

CLAREMORE’S CALLING STORY AND PHOTO BY RHYS MARTIN

HISTORIC OPPORTUNITIES AWAIT IN ROGERS COUNTY.

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laremore is a town that has seen much change over the years I’ve known it. Hobo’s Discount Foods, the grocery store my father managed when I lived there, is now a Locke Supply. The city has gained several thousand residents and attracted many new businesses along OK-66. Even with all the growth the city has seen over the past few decades, there are plenty of attractions that tie into the city’s history and cultural heritage. Nestled between two alignments of Historic Route 66, the J.M. Davis Arms and Historical Museum, 330 N. J.M. Davis Blvd., boasts the larg-

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est privately held firearms collection in the world. Additionally, the museum showcases a variety of related artifacts such as vintage saddles and World War I posters. There’s also a huge tank in the parking lot that’s great for photo opportunities. You can’t miss it. Visit the Will Rogers Memorial, 1720 W. Will Rogers Blvd., and learn about the state’s most famous son. Exhibits tell the story of Rogers’ life from birth to death, plus a theater plays his films. Once you’ve had your fill of history, stop at the nearby Hammett House, 1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd., and fill your stomach. This classic diner has

Claremore's Belvidere Mansion

been in service since 1969 and has been rated a Top 10 Comfort Food Restaurant in America by AAA. They have a rotation of special dishes throughout the month and excellent pie. Just east of Route 66 is Main Street, also known as Will Rogers Blvd., which is host to boutiques and antique stores. You can spend hours wandering the businesses and chatting with their owners. Keep your eyes open for the bronze statue of Will Rogers reading the local paper on the east end the street. The Belvidere Mansion, 121 N. Chickasaw Ave., is not far from downtown and provides another great photo opportunity. The “belle” of Rogers County was built in 1907 by the Belvideres, a family steeped in the development of Claremore. The mansion was saved from the brink of destruction in the early 1990s. Self-guided tours of the three-story Victorian home are free. For a few local vittles to take home, the Swan Bros. Dairy, 938 E. Fifth St., is a great option. The dairy and farming operation began in 1923 with a single cow; today, the place is run by the fourth generation of the Swan family. Fresh milk, cheese and other goods are available to purchase. If you can make it all the way back to Tulsa without eating through a bag of hot pepper cheese curds, you’ve got better self-control than I do. TP


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Alluring and seductive, a smoky color palette is always in style. Blending amber-hued warmth with sleek fixtures, this smoky bathroom captures the best elements of minimalist design. Let’s make your dream a reality. Visit our showroom where our skilled consultants can help you recreate this look… or design one of your own.

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Celebrating 56 Years Of Service In Northeastern OK


HOME

Practical must-haves and a modern touch gave this bathroom renovation a timeless look.

ECLECTIC STYLES, TIMELESS TRENDS From color schemes to light fixtures, design trends can date an era, but designers and their clients are in search of timeless features. In today’s HGTVinspired world of concepts and crazes that come and go, smart renovations mix functionality with personal elements that never go out of style. BY GAIL BANZET-ELLIS

MASTER SUITE IN SOUTH TULSA In the Jack Arnold-designed home where Kelly Ferrell and her family have lived for the past 10 years, she and husband Cannen have incorporated renovations one project at a time. In October, they embarked on a master suite remodel with help from Dana Day of Day Build and Design. The Ferrells envisioned a more modern look for the 709-square-foot space and also wanted to eliminate minor mold issues in the bathroom. Kelly’s must-haves were practical, including replacing the Jacuzzi tub with a more efficient self-standing model and adding cabinets, functional counter space and a makeup vanity. Starting from scratch can be intimidating, says Kelly, who knew her style would be difficult to articulate. “I have a unique taste and like things that are different that you don’t see everywhere else,” she says. Day’s expertise made the design process easier for Kelly, who wanted a warm and inviting space reflective of the family’s Colorado vacations. She browsed photos online for inspiration and often made decisions based on options presented by Day. With the Ferrells’ permission, Day kept many of the finishes a surprise until the reveal.

“The bathroom is extremely elegant, classy and rich with marble and high-end finishes,” Day says. “The bedroom is more rustic with an outdoor feel that is Colorado classy.” Day’s picks included a custom-built headboard made from Colorado pine beetle wood along with updated stained glass and granite around the fireplace. “I wanted something that was welcoming and comforting, not stark,” Kelly says. The master closet features a chandelier, island, corner turnabout to maximize space and a sliding barn door to Kelly’s bathroom, which is nothing short of glam. Floor-to-ceiling marble tiles wrap around five walls of the space, which has black cabinets, chrome hardware and fixtures, quartz countertops, and tan and white porcelain tile floors. “We spent more money on the marble walls as a focal point and less on the floor tile,” Kelly says. A crystal chandelier hangs over the tub, and a seamless glass shower with double heads provides another bathing option. A hidden door of beveled mirrors and wood trim smartly disguises the toilet. The renovation was completed by Christmas, and Kelly says she is pleased with the stunning results. “I would never have been able to do it myself. It’s exciting.” TulsaPeople.com

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KITCHEN AND MASTER BATH IN MIDTOWN

This kitchen renovation was a marriage of practicality and style for the midtown ranch-style home.

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Mary and John Stutsman purchased their ranch-style home in the Warrenton addition of midtown in 2007, but Mary says the kitchen never met her cooking needs. The Stutsmans enlisted the help of Lynn Knight Jessee from Kitchen Concepts to remodel their kitchen, dining and master bath areas. For Mary, who loves to cook and host family, the project’s must-haves were practical. “We didn’t have space, and the appliances were old,” she says. “Storage was my main thing.” Structural changes included knocking down the wall between the kitchen and dining room and removing a wet bar area the Stutsmans never used. “She has a cooking area, a prep area and a cleaning area so family can be doing different things and not be all over each other,” Jessee says. Large black-and-white floor tiles were replaced with hickory wood planks. Custom cabinets were installed in a light gray color to complement yellow and gray floral wallpaper. A large island, painted a soft yellow, showcases quartz countertops of brown, gray and black tones. The quartz ties in with Mary’s dark ceramic tile backsplash in the color “leather.” She chose stainless-steel appliances, including a double oven and microwave drawer built into the island. “I wanted to set the stage to make everything as neutral as possible so it doesn’t lock her into something she doesn’t want later in life,” Jessee says. A large white farm sink and sliding antique barn door to the pantry are classic touches that appeal to the homeowners. Jessee improved the ergonomic design by adding as many drawers as possible for kitchen basics such as spices, pots and pans. Can lights, large pendant lights above the island, and brushed nickel hardware and fixtures reflect style choices the two made together. “She knows what she’s doing, and she’s so easy to work with,” Mary says, reflecting on Jessee’s 40 years of experience in home design. “I told her what I wanted, and I got what I wanted.” The dining room’s shared space with Mary’s functional kitchen left room for a small nook and chair, adding an extra level of comfort to the room. The color scheme continues in the Stutsmans’ entryway with an accent wall of gray and yellow stripes. In the master bath, Mary chose a similar pattern of gray and yellow wallpaper and Carrera marble floors. Jessee added a wall between the tub and walk-in shower, also made of marble. Gray quartz countertops and brushed nickel fixtures are featured in a double vanity, and skylights were kept from the original design for natural lighting. One of Mary’s favorite bathroom features is the full-size washer and dryer added to the master closet. Other fun elements include a sliding barn door with frosted glass to close off the space from the bedroom. The renovation not only created a new look for the Stutsman home but also complements the homeowners; Jessee says the choice of yellow and the spacious kitchen show off Mary’s happy and friendly personality. “Her style is eclectic. It’s the essence of her and her family.”


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KITCHEN AND MASTER BATH IN BIXBY

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Along with a kitchen and master bath renovation, a family room was added to this Bixby home to maximize entertainment space while capitalizing on the property’s panoramic views.

The designers used brown tones combined with modern finishes to complement the home’s setting.

LSD PHOTOGRAPHY/COURTESY GHD INTERIORS

As designers for GHD Interiors, Gina Miller and Brenda Rice believe in the philosophy that matching space and amenities with daily use is key to an effective renovation project. “It has to fit a majority of all the ways you live a majority of the time, not every once in a while,” Miller says. “It’s what makes you happy.” When the owners of a one-story ranch home on 5 acres in rural Bixby reached out to the design duo, they requested a rustic contemporary renovation conducive to entertainment and heavy cooking. The property was purchased almost exclusively for its ridge-top location and brought to life by a remodel that showcases the home’s breathtaking panoramic view. Miller and Rice added a family room with 11-foot floor-to-ceiling windows, spanning 30 feet across the home’s eastern view. The open concept space is tied to a roomy kitchen with a large farmhouse-style table and massive granite island. Brown tones combined with modern finishes complement the home’s nod to nature and the rural location. “What’s interesting is that the somewhat eclectic combination really lends itself to timelessness,” Rice says. “Five to ten years from now, this space will still feel relevant because of the attention we paid to these little elements.” Installed vertically in a linear pattern to the ceiling, the backsplash mosaic tile is a honed cream and taupe travertine that offers a contemporary look. Perimeter cabinets, made of clear alder and stained to a soft, medium chestnut, are paired with honed black granite countertops and 24-inch square, honed travertine floors for what Miller calls a masculine, stoic backdrop to stainless-steel KitchenAid appliances. In contrast to the black granite, pendant lights set off the island’s 126-inch-long seamless slab of cream-colored granite with black and smoky topaz veins. Miller and Rice mixed the kitchen’s hearty character with statement features that give the space character and honor the client’s family history. “The décor for the space was built around vintage black-and-white items of a diner owned by the family in the 1940s and 50s,” Miller says. Nostalgic, custom-framed diner photos are incorporated among open shelving and upper cabinets with reeded glass doors for privacy. Other elements include a wet bar with a built-in wine cooler, a stainless-steel warming shelf and mid-century swinging doors that open into the adjoining butler’s pantry. The home’s nine-month renovation also involved the master bathroom inspired by classic finishes with an edge. The space was reconfigured to replace a nonfunctional, oversized tub with one that is minimal and freestanding. Marble is the star of the shower and countertops as well as the flooring that features a herringbone pattern. The vanity’s rift-cut oak is stained a dark walnut and matched with geometric mirrors. Bamboo-inspired 1950s and 1960s light fixtures above the tub are combined with more traditional lighting above the vanity and contemporary LED can lights. Polished chrome hardware, original art pieces and a calming neutral paint color round out the design. “It’s going to fit the way they live on a daily basis, not just special occasions,” Miller says. “The space was built on finishes and styling that must stand the test of time.” TP


HEALTH

RHYS NORTHERN

PAST THE NEW YEAR’S SLUMP

Lacey Thompson Caywood

HEALTH AND WELLNESS RESOLUTIONS DON’T HAVE TO FALL SHORT. BY ASHLEY RIGGS

TWO THINGS PICK UP WHEN THE HOLIDAYS END: department store sales and gym memberships. Every year, millions of well-meaning Americans begin January with a list of health improvement goals. But 80 percent fail to accomplish their resolutions, according to U.S. News and World Report. So what can the average person do? The key is to not expect change overnight, says Lacey Thompson Caywood, YWCA director of health and wellness. In fact, research suggests that it can take three weeks to form a habit.

“Many people end up unsuccessful because they take an all-or-nothing approach,” Thompson Caywood says. “Find something that is enjoyable to you. If you hate running on the treadmill, don’t do it. Try a different activity, such as lifting weights, Zumba or swimming.” The next step is to make your goals S.M.A.R.T. S: SPECIFIC Define healthy for you. For example, are you looking to increase your exercise or your vegetable consumption? Plan accordingly for your diet and fitness. M: MEASURABLE Make your goals concrete. This will make your fitness goals easier for you to reach. For instance, “being in shape” is not measurable, but walking 30 minutes three times per week is. A: ATTAINABLE Evaluate whether your fitness goals fit into your lifestyle. Aiming too high can be discouraging if you don’t measure up. Start small and go from there. R: REALISTIC Be practical. If you have a sweet tooth, a “no-sugar” diet is unrealistic. Instead, make yourself a deal to eat a piece of fruit in place of a sweet at least once a day. T: TIME-BASED Give yourself a deadline. Without a sense of urgency, procrastination can take over and keep you from reaching your goals. Lastly, seek out free or low-cost fitness programs. Explore your options. “Most fitness facilities have free or one-time guest passes to try before committing to anything longterm,” Thompson Caywood says. “Reaching fitness goals doesn’t have to cost a lot, and you don’t need tons of equipment. Showing up and putting forth the effort are the most important steps to success.” Much like a sugar rush, it’s easy to aim high with your resolutions and crash at the first sign of trouble. However, you don’t have to succumb to the narrative. “How you handle your shortcomings will determine your success,” Thompson Caywood says. TP

JAN. 8-13 — YWCA GET FIT FOR FREE WEEK

Try out classes and facilities for free. At 5:30 p.m. on Jan. 12, a Zumba party will be at the East location while Glow Yoga will take place at the Patti Johnson Wilson Center. Also, the YWCA is waiving joining fees for the month of January. Visit ywcatulsa.org or facebook.com/ywcatulsa for more information.

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IT’S A GREAT TIME FOR A GREAT NEW BEGINNING. HAPPY NEW YEAR! TulsaPeople.com

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MUSINGS

RESOLUTIONS OR REGRETS? BY CONNIE CRONLEY

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Kate Barnard

chapter seven — is stored in boxes. It’s a project that ought to be completed. Kate Barnard was an Oklahoma social reformer at the turn of the century. She was the first woman official elected in the state, Oklahoma’s first Commissioner of Charities and Corrections, and she was a national celebrity. Her career was heroic, but her life was tragic. She championed child labor laws, compulsory education, prison reform, a juvenile court system and aid to the poor. “Her compassion shone like a candle,” Debo said. Barnard was charismatic, eloquent, fearless and idealistic. She spoke to audiences of 4,000 or more, her voice ringing out clear-

ly in that era before amplifications. National press canonized her as the “Good Angel” of Oklahoma. She was a tiny Irish woman who overworked herself into physical collapse. Despite her fame, she was modest and plain. “How can I wear diamonds when babies cry for bread?” she asked. And then, at the height of her power, she began investigating fraud among the guardians of the oil-rich Indian orphans of the state. She had gone too far. “She stopped preaching and started meddling,” one politician said. Grafters and corrupt politicians closed ranks against her. They ruined her state department and her career. She died a recluse in 1930 at age 54. A couple of books have been written about Kate Barnard. My book will be better. I am beginning this new year, not with regrets and remorse, but with a new resolve. I will resurrect my manuscript and keep my promise. I’ll look at the North Star and say, “Dr. Debo, it ain’t over till it’s over.” I won’t beat myself up about this delayed — not broken! — promise. Instead, I’ll remember the wise women and wise cats I’ve known in my life and all I have learned from them. Cats, especially, have taught me a lot about how to live a contented life. A Cat’s Philosophy of Life Take every day as it comes. Get some sunshine. Take a nap and moderate exercise. Play a little. Be a keen observer of your environment. Once in a while, chase something. When you eat fish, lick your plate clean. And don’t ever go to bed wondering if you could have done this day better. This is the secret of being a happy cat, this new year and every year. TP

COURTESY CONNIE CRONLEY

I

t’s January of a new year, and I am torn between welcoming some new resolutions or mourning some old regrets. The resolutions would be new blue-sky aims and projects. These are appealing because they’re shiny and fresh. The regrets would be projects I didn’t complete and promises I didn’t keep. These are old remorses, dusty with age and weary with being hauled out for yet another inspection. They’re tired of my apologies and promises. “Yeah, sure,” they say to me. “Whatever.” What is the statute of limitations on personal failures? When do we absolve and forgive ourselves and move on? When do we tell ourselves, “You are never going to do that! Let it go. You’re smoking your own dope.” And yet. How long do we hold ourselves accountable to ourselves? How many times can we say, “Come on, let’s have one more go at it! This time you’ll do it! Don’t give up on yourself. It’s not over till it’s over.” Lots of exclamation marks in these personal pep talks. I have only 700 words for this column — not nearly enough space to list all my regrets, but the greatest is a promise I made and have not kept. Several years before she died, Oklahoma’s great historian Angie Debo asked me to write the biography of Kate Barnard, who had been her role model. Dr. Debo was my role model, and I not only leapt to agree, I jumped into the project with vigor. I did research everywhere from Oklahoma City’s Department of Libraries to the Washington, D.C. National Archives. I even got a little research grant from the University of Tulsa. I researched, I read, I wrote on this manuscript for about five years. And then … And then I took a job that consumed my life. And then another job just like it. And the unfinished manuscript — up through


QA &

From Tulsa Professionals

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INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

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PET STORE

Will the Medicare Part D “doughnut hole” change in 2018?

I want my dog to eat a healthier food. What ingredients should I avoid?

Yes. The doughnut hole amount will continue to shrink each year until 2020. In 2017, Part D participants’ out-of-pocket cost for drugs in the coverage gap was 40 percent for brand names and 51 percent for generics. In 2018, participants will pay 35 percent of the cost of brandname drugs in the coverage gap, and 44 percent of the generic drugs costs. By 2020, a participant will only pay 25 percent of the cost of all drugs in the coverage gap.

You don’t want to see an ambiguous protein source like “poultry” or “meat” meal and especially no meat by-products. The first ingredient should be a whole protein source or a named meat meal, such as “chicken” meal. Artificial colors and flavors should be avoided. Your dog’s food should have enough quality protein and fat to be flavorful; your dog definitely does not care about the color of food. Poor quality dog foods often contain sweeteners as well. Dogs have a taste for sweets, just like humans, and sweets can increase the appeal of a food but has health risks—such as diabetes—which is an increasing epidemic among pets.

J. Harvie Roe, CFP, President

Emily Bollinger

AmeriTrust Investment Advisors, Inc. 4506 S. Harvard Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 918-610-8080 • hroe@amerad.com

Dog Dish 1778 Utica Square • Tulsa, OK 74114 918-624-2600 • www.dogdish.com

VETERINARIAN Can the rock salt I use for melting ice on my driveway be harmful to my pets? With the cold weather upon us, make sure to either avoid using rock salt around pets or make sure it is appropriately cleaned off. If left on the coat or skin it can cause irritation and even gastrointestinal upset. There is pet-safe salt that may be used instead. This is also the time that many people change their antifreeze so be careful of any spills as this will lead to kidney failure. Make sure any spilled antifreeze is washed away well to prevent any problems.

WILL AND TRUSTS How can I ensure my children will “play nice” when I’m gone? Naming one of your children to act as Trustee upon your death seems practical. But naming a third party, like a trust department, is often the more thoughtful solution. This is particularly true if your children are to receive different portions at various times due to age or skills. Involving a third party prevents the resentment from building between your children, and allows them to continue having Christmas dinner together for years to follow.

Dr. Erin Reed

Karen L. Carmichael

15th Street Veterinary Group 6231 E. 15th St. • Tulsa, OK 74112 918-835-2336 • www.15thstreetvet.com

The Law Office of Karen L. Carmichael 2727 E. 21st St., Ste. 402 • Tulsa, OK 74114 918-493-4939 • www.tulsawillsandtrusts.com TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

1554 S Yorktown Place

8320 S. 69th E. Avenue

Enjoy the character and charm found in this historically significant, 1930 Gillette District home! Stunning details and numerous original features. Impeccable condition! Library, formals, gameroom, exercise room with sauna, two laundry areas and rentable garage apartment. Remodeled kitchen with subzero fridge. Expansive bedrooms. Gorgeous landscaping with backyard large enough for pool. Travel the tree-lined boulevard on your way to Cherry Street! $649,000

New Listing! Custom built by the current owners in The Crescent. The house features a very flexible floorplan with lots of living space for both public and family entertaining. Formal dining room with hardwood floors. Office with privacy French doors. Master suite on the first floor plus a second bedroom down. Upstairs features three additional bedrooms, each having private baths and walk-in closets. Game room. Safe room. $357,000

Gated Guierwoods

Guirewoods offers so many different options for residents to enjoy an easy lifestyle. 7204 S. G ar y Ave.- $410,000 One-story unit with 3,176 sq. ft. of living space has lots of updates. Master with his and her baths. Generac-whole home generator, and safe room. Newer roof and driveway. Beautiful covered patio. 7242 S. G ar y Ave. - $499,000 Need something a little bigger? 3,402 sq. ft. of beautiful living space. Completely redone by the current owners with custom kitchen and baths. Master suite on first floor. 2 bedrooms up each have private baths. Spacious laundry. Several outdoor living areas. 7203 S. G ar y Ave. - $415,000 Not ready to give up your “Big� pieces yet try this 3,996 sq. ft. Spacious formals. Large eat-in kitchen opens to patio. Master suite with updated bath. A second bedroom is down with a private bath. 2 additional bedrooms are on the 2nd floor. 126

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tIm Hayes

918-231-5637 thayes@mcgrawok.com

sHerrI sanders

GOrdOn sHeLtOn

918-724-5008 918-697-2742 ssanders@mcgrawok.com gshelton@mcgrawok.com

dIana PattersOn

918-629-3717 dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

Grand Lake Monkey Island A Real Jewel - Original Charles Davis Home on point in The Chateaus. Seven Bedrooms, six full Bathrooms plus two Powder Baths. Gourmet Granite Island Kitchen with full Wet Bar, two Dishwashers, two Ice Makers and Wine Chiller. Vaulted, beamed ceilings, hardwood floors and fireplace. Huge Patio Lakeside and oversized Swim Dock. Breathtaking, panoramic views of Grand Lake like no other! $2,500,000

avaLOn PLaCe

Call any of the Luxury Property Group Realtors about one of these homes, or any property that you have an interest in. They will provide you with superior personal service with the highest integrity.

GreenHILL 4410 S. Lewis Place- Newer Transitional gated Midtown home. Upscale finishes & extensive hardwoods throughout. Luxurious Master suite and additional suite down. First floor Media, exercise room and study. Upstairs has 2 bedroom suites & gameroom. $1,375,000

WOOdmere

12205 S. 68th E. Ave., Bixby Stunning home located on a greenbelt. Open floor plan with living, dining, kitchen flowing together. Master suite on 1st level w/guest bedroom used as office. 3 more bedrooms + gameroom up. Covered patio overlooks pool & spa. 3 car garage. $925,000

Oak COuntry estates III

3020 S. Trenton Ave. - One owner custom built smart house. Architect Rachel Zebrowski calls it “Desert Mediterranean�. Large Master suite downstairs and guest apartment with living area and kitchenette. Pool overlooks greenbelt & Crow Creek. $899,000

5230 Oak Leaf Drive - Enjoy this beautiful home in Oak Country Estates. Sits on over 1 acre with pool, cabana & outdoor kitchen. Granite kitchen opens to family room. Large master suite, theater room and game room. $849,000

sIGnaL HILL

Park PLaza

5127 E 84th Place - Gorgeous full Stone/brick home on .70 acre. Stunning hardscaping park-like yard. Formal living & dining. Study. Granite/SS Kitchen. Master suite with spa bath. Media room up with 3 beds. Extensive hardwoods throughout. 4 Fireplaces. Outdoor living, Pool with spa & greenhouse. Gated. $775,000

5841 S. Hudson Place An exquisitly remodeled home featuring newer kitchen, bathrooms, fresh paint, and more! A new deck and guest cottage in the back yard. 2 Two-car garage with newer driveway. $199,900

Enjoy the Luxury Lifestyle you desire TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

Luxury Property Group at McGraw Realtors


McGraw Realtors

F A R M S BrookWood Farms III features 1.0 - 1.5 acre premium home sites located in Wagoner County, just southeast of Tulsa and Broken Arrow. This small, privatized, upscale neighborhood consists of 27 home sites. It is situated among mature trees, open spaces and nature. Purchasers are welcome to choose their own builder. 14100 S. 296th E. Ave. Lot prices start at $85,000.

A Retreat From the Ordinary

Visit our website at www.BrookWoodFarms-Land.com or call/text Brian at 918-231-7519 or Sherri Sanders McGraw Realtors 918-724-5008.

Private Gated Estate on 26 Acres

www.brookwoodfarms-land.com 918-231-7519 Brian@BrookWoodFarms-Land.com 5412 E Princeton Street, Broken Arrow - $5,000,000

Impeccably maintained private gated Estate on 26+ acres. Breathtaking golf courselike grounds with manicured gardens. Grand curved staircase, palatial rooms with soaring ceilings throughout. Two master suites on first floor. Two additional bedrooms up. Kitchen opens to great room & over looks Infinity pool and spa. Sprawling pond with water feature. 9 bay outbuilding has heat & air, tack room, 5 horse stalls, wash bay & office. Additional outbuilding & greenhouse. Fully fenced property with secured gated entrances with paved winding drive. Truly a one of a kind property with easy access to major highways & shopping. Offered at $5,000,000. 128

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S

SherriSanders 918.724.5008 Sherri@SherriSanders.net sherrisanders.net


McGraw Realtors

918.260.7885

13911 S K I N G S T O N A V E N U E

4354 S V I C T O R Y A V E N U E

2480 E 27 T H P L A C E

Gated Estate home. Newer construction with marble floors and walls! Enormous fireplaces. Open floor plan with tall ceilings. Master suite with sitting area and fireplace. Outdoor living. Guest House to be finished out. $2,700,000

Spectacular newer custom stone home. Master or guest suite down, second master up. Utility up and down. Large game room with kitchen. Outdoor kitchen / living. Pool with waterfalls. Playhouse! Gated driveway. $2,495,000

Gated Estate home. Newer construction with marble floors and walls! Enormous fireplaces. Open floor plan with tall ceilings. Master suite with sitting area and fireplace. Outdoor living. Guest House to be finished out. $2,150,000

!

D OL

S

19122 E K N I G H T S B R I D G E A V E N U E Unbelievable views! House sits high above pond. Gorgeous formal area with loads of crown molding. Beams throughout. Comfortable log cabin room. Full home theater. Most of the house was built in 2005. House sits on 2 lots. $1,999,000

2411 E 27 T H P L A C E Fabulous stone home in Woody Crest. Kitchen opens to family living. Large beautiful formals. Wine room off of formal dining. Huge his and hers closets. Outdoor living with pool, hot tub, fireplace and built in heaters. $1,499,000

6709 E 109 T H P L A C E

2722 E 26 T H P L A C E

Spectacular Estate Villa. First floor master plus guest suite down. Guest apartment up. Stunning 2 story library. Outdoor cabana with kitchen and fireplace. Gorgeous pool with fountain and spa. Motor court with 5 car garage. $1,999,000

Open rooms and tall ceilings. Kitchen has Wolfe and Thermador appliances. All cabinets in home are custom. Exercise room off of master. Workshop in garage. Custom limestone mantel pieces. $1,795,000

1315 E 27 T H P L A C E

9450 E J A M E S T O W N A V E N U E

Stunning contemporary home near Philbrook. Bright, open floor plan w/tall ceilings & large rooms. Chef level kitchen appliances including dbl dishwashers & Travisen refrigerator. Study with fireplace. Attached guest house w/full kitchen. $1,250,000

Exquisite custom built home on a private cul-de-sac. Exceptional amenities inside and out. Custom carved wood floors. whole house sound system, chef grade appliances. Outdoor living and kitchen area complete the spa like area of this home. $799,000

2916 E 68 T H S T R E E T

4018 S X A N T H U S A V E N U E

Fabulous remodel in Southern Hills. Marble tile floors. Large open spaces. Custom master bath with steam shower. Commercial grade kitchen with Viking appliances. House feels brand new. Seller says bring all offers! $697,000

Pristine home sits behind a gate and backs to neighborhood common space. Stainless appliances in center island kitchen. Large first floor study could be 4th bedroom. Screened in indoor/ outdoor room off master. Gorgeous deck. Very private! $695,000

3803 S T R E N T O N A V E N U E Great Brookside location on a corner lot. Newer appliances. Granite kitchen counters. Three living areas. Wood burning fireplace in formal. Slate and wood floors. Lots of storage. Very cute! $359,000 TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

Laura Bryant 918-693-2961 - lbryant@mcgrawok.com 3739 S. Atlanta Place

Exquisite Jack Arnold custom home built in 1999. This luxurious, 5062 sq. ft. home features quality construction and fantastic, high-end finishes throughout. Four en suite bedrooms with master and additional bed down. Four full and one half bath. Flexible floor plan with formal living and dining rooms, office, game room and sunroom overlooking the outdoor living with fireplace and gorgeous in-ground pool. This desirable half-acre lot has a large landscaped yard plus hard-to-find three car garage in Midtown! Huge private drive and more parking inside of gated area. $999,000 130

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018


Allison jacobs

McGraw Realtors

Mobile:

918.850.2207

ajacobs@mcgrawok.com 4105 S. Rockford ave. tulsa, ok 74105

mcgrawrealtors.com

4407 S. Gary Avenue

Top-of-the-line home located in the heart of Midtown!. Granite island kitchen with breakfast area. Two bedrooms down including large master suite with private bath and walk-in closet. Downstairs office, living room with fireplace, formal dining room and exercise room. Three beds up all with private ensuite baths and HUGE closets. Theater room plus Large Gameroom! Outdoor living. $979,000

1411 S. St. Louis #A - Walk to Cherry Street. Open Living to kitchen & dining. Beautiful hardwoods, granite & stainless Steel appliances. Downtown views. Huge closets, highest quality finishes. Each bedroom has private bath! Low maintenance & stucco exterior. Must see! $340,000

Scott coffman 918-640-1073 - scoffman@mcgrawok.com

2404 E 27TH PLACE

$795,000 - 5 BED - 4 FULL, 2 HALF BATH Stunning fully remodeled Midtown Estate Home with top-of-the-line touches and amenities throughout. Enormous kitchen opens to casual living and breakfast nook. Original moldings and trim. Charming study, multiple living rooms, two indoor fireplaces, wine/cigar room, and basement with granite counters, 3 car garage, beautiful yard and landscaping. TulsaPeople.com

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DINING + FOOD + DRINKS

SIGNATURE S SAMMIE 9107 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | 918-496-2242 | HAMLETHAMS.COM

ince 1986, the Hamlet has been known for its honey-kissed hams. So, when venturing to its recently reopened dine-in location for lunch, why not try its signature sandwich? The Original Grilled Ham ($9) is warm Hamlet Honey-kissed Ham with Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato and honey mustard. Sandwiches are served with house-made chips, but in this cold weather season, warm up with a bowl of red pepper bisque ($7), a soup-of-the-day special. The dine-in café, whose menu includes sandwiches, wraps and salads, came back to its previous space this past fall. If it’s a nice day, opt for a table on the patio. A roaring, wood fireplace provides ambiance and warmth on winter’s cooler days. TP

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CHEERS!

A LA CARTE Food resolutions usually involve eating cleaner, leaner and lighter. Salads are often part of that equation. We love a good salad bar, and lucky for us, Tulsa is getting more delicious salad options. — NATALIE MIKLES (PRICES: $: LESS THAN $10 $$: $10-$15 $$$: $16-$25 $$$$: OVER $25)

Salata

WARM

Take 2: A Resonance Cafe

We are loving Salata, a customizable salad restaurant with toppings ranging from jicama to pumpkin seeds and bean sprouts to feta. Salata offers 10 house-made dressings. Teas, including cinnamon plum and tropical green, also are delicious.

Most people at Take 2 are there for the prime rib sandwiches, chili or chocolate almond cream pie. But the salad bar shouldn’t be overlooked. Most everything on the bar is homemade, including the pasta salad and dressings.

1617 E. 15TH ST., 918-794-7277 | 6030 S. YALE AVE., 918-392-0890 $

309 S. MAIN ST., 918-861-4555 $

AND

BUZZ-Y WITH HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES BEHIND US, it’s time to take a more functional approach to cocktailing. Eschewing the frills and offsetting the chills, coffee cocktails are uniquely qualified to pack this one-two punch. The star-tenders over at Hodges Bend, 823 E. Third St., possess the duality of barista and bartender, mixing Tulsa-based Topeca coffee with a variety of spirits, from vermouth to mescal. But their traditional Irish Coffee — with only espresso, whiskey, sugar and cream — is a true testament that quality ingredients and a little know-how go a long way. If the weather keeps you from visiting Hodges in person, below is a simple recipe for the perfect tipple to warm the cockles on a wintry day. Fill a small coffee mug or wine glass with 4 ounces of coffee (fresh ground, medium-roast bean with a French press works beautifully). Mix in ½ ounce simple syrup made from a lightly refined sugar, like Turbinado or Demerara (brown sugar can work in a pinch). Add 1 ½ ounce of Jameson Irish Whiskey. Lightly whip chilled heavy cream only until a foam forms, but not stiff peaks. Pour the foam over the back of a warm spoon to keep the foam suspended on top. — ANGELA EVANS

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Crushed Red

Jason’s Deli

Craft your own chopped salad at Crushed Red. Start with your lettuce mix, and then choose from toppings like roasted Yukon potatoes, artichoke hearts, barbecue chicken breast, ahi tuna, candied walnuts and granola. The roasted pepper vinaigrette is a tasty finish. Crushed Red’s soups and pizzas also are good.

Order a salad, like the Nutty Mixed-Up with chicken, organic field greens, grapes, feta, nuts, cranberries, raisins, pumpkin seeds and apples, from the menu. Or, make your own favorite mix of greens and toppings from the big salad bar. Don’t forget to pick up a few mini gingerbread muffins.

1525 E. 15TH ST., 918-960-2015 $

1330 E. 15TH ST., 918-599-7777 | 8321 E. 61ST ST., 918-252-9999 $

Lambrusco’z 1344 E. 41st St., 918-496-1246 114-A S. Detroit Ave., 918-496-1246 | lambruscoz.com

Stonehorse Market 1758 Utica Square | 918-712-9350 | stonehorsecafe.com

Lone Wolf 3136 E. 11th St., 918-861-4232 | 203 E. Archer St., 918-728-7778 lonewolftulsa.com

Pei Wei 3535 S. Peoria Ave., 918-749-6083 | 5954 S. Yale Ave., 918-497-1015 | 4609 W. Kenosha St., Broken Arrow; 918-250-8557 10005 S. Memorial Drive, 918-254-2151 | peiwei.com

Charleston’s 6839 S. Yale Ave., 918-495-3511 3726 S. Peoria Ave., 918-749-3287 | charlestons.com

Gourmet Takeout With January’s holiday hangover and cold temperatures in full effect, settle in for the night with takeout from some Tulsa favorites — winners of TulsaPeople’s annual A-List Readers’ Choice Awards.


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TulsaPeople.com

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DINING OUT

Attention to detail OREN IS ONE TULSAN’S TAKE ON BIG-CITY DINING. BY NATALIE MIKLES

Ricotta gnudi — a cross between gnocchi and ravioli — is made with ricotta rather than potato, like gnocchi.

Arancini — Oren’s take on risotto balls — are served with tomato sauce. 136

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M

atthew and Yara Amberg have given Tulsa a gift with their new restaurant, Oren. Oren could very easily fit into the New York City restaurant scene. You can imagine discovering a place like it in Brooklyn or on a list of the hottest new restaurants in NYC. Instead, Matthew Amberg opened a progressive American cuisine restaurant just blocks from the Brookside neighborhood where he grew up in Tulsa. Amberg’s New York style comes naturally, as he worked in mostly Michelin-starred restaurants in New York City for almost seven years. It was at these restaurants, including Oceana and Aureole, that Amberg learned under some of the best and developed and refined his own style. But Amberg’s plans included more than an influential culinary career. He and Yara wanted to buy a house in which to raise their son, have more children and open their own restaurant. Making that happen in New York would be a challenge. So, three years ago they came to Tulsa. They’ve bought the house, had another child and, now, they have their restaurant. Amberg tweaks the menu each day at Oren, making every visit new. His focus on what’s fresh and procuring the best food available translates to beautifully presented small plates of interesting, thoughtful food. We visited for a weekend lunch and found the service to be friendly and attentive but not overbearing. Our server was helpful in offering recommendations. We took her advice and ordered a few small plates and one larger entrée, sharing them all.


Matthew and Yara Amberg opened Oren in 2017 after moving back from New York City. The restaurant, which resides in Brookside’s Center 1 shopping center, focuses on progressive American cuisine.

Sweet potato croquettes ($8) were small square, crisp-coated cubes filled with a sweet potato puree. The croquettes sat on a coconut sauce dusted with granola, cilantro and lime zest, playing with the ideas of texture, color and temperature. When the last bite was gone, we were wishing for one more. Arancini ($7) is Oren’s take on risotto balls, but creamier and more flavorful than typical. The arrancini and accompanying tomato sauce are a crowd pleaser. While it doesn’t have the adventurous qualities of the sweet potato croquettes or others, including a jicama salad with Aleppo pepper, it’s a dish diners will find familiar and delicious. We were head over heels for the ricotta gnudi ($16), a cross between gnocchi and ravioli. Gnudi is made with ricotta rather than potato, like gnocchi. The light texture was brightened with Meyer lemon zest, Parmesan and parsley. The striped bass ($32) was nicely cooked and was served with an interesting side: rye spaetzli, a small, soft egg noodle. The accompanying arugula and whole-grain mustard rounded out the dish. The German spaetzle was unexpected but brought a nice texture to pair with the bass. Amberg says that unlike many restaurants that make the protein the focal point, it was important to him to focus on the vegetables. “We’re definitely fruit and vegetable focused, but not a vegetarian or vegan restaurant,” he says. “We feel like vegetables in Tulsa are kind of underutilized and, in general, kind of an afterthought.” So instead of starting with a steak and building

Beet salad

around it, Amberg starts with, for instance, pomegranate, and then determines which protein would pair. That’s how the pork tenderloin with pomegranate, celery and farro came to fruition. Oren doesn’t rely on standard garnishes and sauces. “We’ll probably never have a cream sauce here,” Amberg says. “We like things to be a little lighter.” Instead, he plays with olive oils and vinegars, pickling, and candied fruits, vegetables and nuts to add layers and interest to each dish.

The degree to which Amberg goes to find the best ingredients and treat them well is impressive. For his risotto, rather than use Arborio rice, the typical short-grain rice used for risotto, Amberg uses Carnaroli, an Italian rice aged for at least a year. “It makes a really superior risotto as opposed to Arborio,” he said. “We would never use cream in our risotto, which has become commonplace. You get the creaminess from the starch in the rice.” For risotto, Amberg starts with shallots and garlic, then lightly toasts the Carnaroli before adding white wine and chicken stock. He finishes with a bit of butter and pecorino cheese. The risotto has many iterations, depending on what’s seasonal. One winter iteration included roasted butternut squash and an aromatic pumpkin seed oil with dried Aleppo pepper. That risotto is a perfect example of the time and thought Amberg puts into each dish, from tracking down an imported rice to creating a pumpkin seed oil and adding the sweet-heat of a dried pepper with origins in Syria. It’s an approach Amberg is betting Tulsans will fall for. TP

Oren

3509 S. PEORIA AVE. | 918-764-9699 ORENRESTAURANT.COM

11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday; 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-11 p.m., Friday-Saturday. TulsaPeople.com

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W H AT’S COOK ING? The buzz on Tulsa’s tastiest products, restaurants and events BY NATALIE MIKLES

S

now days are made for soup. Make a pot in the morning and you can keep yourself warm all day. Warm soup, hot tea, a roaring fire and cookies hot out of the oven — this is the elixir for bone-chilling winter weather. For winter soups, we love tomato bisque, chicken noodle and turkeymushroom. If you like a heartier soup with more heft than broth, try a pasta fagioli soup, beef stew or a black bean chili. Potato soup might be the best of both worlds. It has chunks of veggies but a smooth base that’s good enough to mop up with crusty French bread. Consider this potato-leek soup the official soup of snow days.

POTATO LEEK SOUP Serves 4 to 6

½ pound leeks, cleaned, trimmed and sliced ¼-inch thick (white part only) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1 pound potatoes (peeled and cut into ½ -inch pieces) 3 cups water

Potato leek soup

In a sauté pan, cook the leeks in the olive oil over medium heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the soy sauce to the leeks after they have begun to caramelize. Continue cooking for a few more minutes to make sure the leeks are a uniform caramel color. In a large soup pot or Dutch oven, place the leeks, their pan drippings, the potatoes, water, chicken broth, salt, pepper, the bay leaf and thyme. Cook over medium heat until the potatoes are soft. Remove from the heat and discard the bay leaf. Process the soup in a blender (or use an immersion blender) to a coarse puree. Return the soup to the pot. Whisk in the half-and-half. Bring the soup to a gentle boil, then remove from heat. Serve hot with a garnish of green onion or parsley. TP

EL RANCHO GRANDE CANTINA Looking for a new place to eat? El Rancho Grande certainly isn’t new. The restaurant has been around since 1953. But walk upstairs, and you’ll find a recent addition: a cantina with its own menu, bar and party room. The cantina specializes in Mexican street food, with street tacos and enchiladas, Mexican shrimp cocktail, chicharrones (deep-fried pork skins) and a special weekly torta. The bar has margaritas, of course, and specialty drinks, including the Jalapeño Loco. El Rancho Grande is located at 1629 E. 11th St. 138

TulsaPeople JANUARY 2018

1 ¼ cups chicken broth 2 teaspoons salt Freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 bay leaf ¾ teaspoon dried thyme 2 cups half-and-half Green onion or flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

RAINDROP TURKISH HOUSE The people at the Raindrop Turkish House understand that food is one way to bridge cultures and to cultivate friendships between diverse groups of people. That’s why their cooking classes are such a key part of their outreach. Cooking classes are hands-on, with demonstrations of Turkish dishes, along with other international foods. After the meal is prepared, participants and the cook eat together, and everyone leaves with the recipes. Classes are $15 each. Sessions are from 3-5 p.m. on Saturdays at 4444 W. Houston St. in Broken Arrow. RSVP early to save your spot by emailing tulsa@turkishhouse. org or calling 918-806-6022. Upcoming class cuisines include Turkish on Jan. 20, Feb. 17 and April 14; Italian on Feb. 3; and French on March 3.


How do you describe a commercial cleaning company that has been in business for 32 years in 1 word?

Blessed. Here’s to the next 32 years!

BRIDGETTE and MIKE SKOW are the owners of Dinner’s at 6, a service that makes and freezes dinners for delivery or pickup. It’s a big help for those of us who’ve made resolutions to gather at the table, making more time for family dinners. Dinner’s at 6 is located at 4652 W. Houston St., Broken Arrow. For more info, visit dinnersat6.com. We talked to Bridgette to find out more. HOW DOES DINNER’S AT 6 WORK? We prepare meals fresh here in our kitchen and then freeze them. Customers place an order online and then pick it up in our store. When they get home, they just have to thaw and pop it in the oven. WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO OPEN YOUR BUSINESS? My husband and I had a new baby at home and both worked full time. We were really struggling with meal times and needed some help. We searched for a service that could help and couldn’t find anything in the area, so we decided to do it ourselves. WHAT’S THE MOST POPULAR ENTRÉE YOU SELL? Probably any of our meatloaves. They fly off the shelves. WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM MEAL SERVICES LIKE BLUE APRON OR HELLO FRESH? With those services, you still have to have time to prep and cook and then clean. We do all the prep for you ... not to mention there are virtually no dishes. Ours are prepared in disposable aluminum pans. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE COMFORT FOOD? Mashed potatoes. IF YOU COULD COOK DINNER FOR ANYONE, WHO WOULD IT BE? This is a tough one — probably Ree Drummond. She definitely cooks my kind of food, and she’d be so fun to hang out and chat with. DO YOU PLAY MUSIC IN THE KITCHEN WHILE COOKING? WHAT DO YOU LISTEN TO? Definitely. We usually have on the current pop station. That’s what my two kiddos love, and dinner prep time usually turns into a dance party. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TULSA RESTAURANT? Right now we are loving Bricktown Brewery, and we always love the Tavern.

918.663.1919 final touch cleaning.com Sc h o o l s • Me di c a l F a c i l i t i e s • I n d ust r i al & Offi ce

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WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE KITCHEN TOOL? At my store, it’s our commercial mixer; at home it has to be my KitchenAid. TP TulsaPeople.com

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TAKE ME BACK

Utica Bowl in the 1950s or ’60s, before the alley was destroyed by a fire

SPARE TIME U

tica Square, Tulsa’s fi rst suburban shopping center at East 21st Street and South Utica Avenue, was once home to the Southwest’s largest bowling alley. Utica Bowl, one of the Square’s original tenants, was situated on the former site of Miss Jackson’s and Petty’s Fine Foods, both demolished in 2016. A highly popular bowling alley, Utica Bowl contained the fi rst automatic pinsetter in town. But in 1963 it was destroyed when varnish used to refinish the lanes ignited, says Ian Swart, Tulsa Historical Society and Museum archivist.

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That same year, Utica Square developers and owners Dale Carter and Don Nix sold the Square to investor Bill Kistler. After the fi re, Kistler rebuilt the building to attract highend merchants. Following Kistler’s death in 1964, Helmerich and Payne Inc. purchased the Square. So what of the still-empty Miss Jackson’s/ Petty’s site? “The plans for the (space) are continuous, but there is nothing to announce at this time,” says Cassandra Montray, Utica Square property manager. TP

HOPKINS PHOTOGRAPHY/TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM

BY JUDY LANGDON


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TulsaPeople January 2018  
TulsaPeople January 2018