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CO NN ECTI ONS L I N K I N G D I S C O V E RY T O I N N O VAT I O N

TULANE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Celebrating our donors. You are our link to success.


C O N N E CT I O NS ...

Since 2006, the School of Science and Engineering has connected the physical sciences, the life sciences, the mathematical sciences, and the engineering disciplines under one trans-disciplinary academic unit, establishing Tulane University as a leader in shaping future generations of scientists and engineers. And we couldn’t have done it without your support. Because of you, the stories on the following pages can be told.


C O N N E CT I O NS ... AT THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW MILLENNIUM, TULANE HAD THE NOVEL IDEAL TO CROSS THE BOUNDARY OF RESEARCH, TO CONNECT DIFFERENT DISCIPLINES AND ENCOURAGE COLLABORATION IN THE HOPES OF CREATING NEW KNOWLEDGE, INSPIRING INNOVATION AND UNCOVERING BREAKTHROUGHS. TO DO THAT, THEY BUILT A BUILDING TO HOUSE MULTIDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION, THE MERRYL AND SAM ISRAEL JR. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE BUILDING (FEATURED ON THE COVER) . THE ISRAEL BUILDING WAS THE FIRST BUILDING BUILT ON TULANE’S CAMPUS DEDICATED TO CONNECTING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AT TULANE. THE ISRAEL BUILDING ALONG WITH THE BOGGS CENTER FOR ENERGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY AND DONNA AND PAUL FLOWER HALL OF RESEARCH AND INNOVATION (FEATURED ON THE BACK COVER AND ON THIS PAGE) HOUSE COLLABORATIONS THAT EMBODY THE MISSION OF THE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING — LINKING DISCOVERY TO INNOVATION.


Dear Alumni and Friends of Tulane School of Science and Engineering, Thank you. The School of Science and Engineering completed an extraordinary year and we have you to thank. I want to welcome you to the second annual School of Science and Engineering stewardship report. This report allows us to take a look back at the academic year and recognize the generosity that makes our accomplishments possible. In the following pages you will read stories that highlight our donors’ motivations for investing in the future of science and engineering at Tulane University. In the 2014-2015 fiscal year we raised $19,318,460 from 1,342 donors. These selfless gifts have supported forward-thinking research projects, engaged K-12 students in STEM fields, and helped advocate for our economy through technology and innovation. But your support has also enhanced the lives of our students by increasing their access to a Tulane education and by giving them remarkable opportunities to engage in research, design, community engagement and study abroad. Your investment helps propel the School of Science and Engineering toward success. This year’s freshman class is the largest and most accomplished incoming class we have ever seen. I am confident that we have many more stories of success to share. On behalf of the entire school, please accept our thanks for all that you do.

NICHOLAS J. ALTIERO

Dean, Tulane School of Science and Engineering


SSE BY THE NUMBERS YEAR

10

A

SS

ST U DENT S

Y

Psychology largest program

1,342

N U M BE R

77 16,000

+

DOC T ORA L ST U DEN T S

Chemistry largest program

NE W DE GR E E P R O GR AMS

(Engineering physics & Computer science)

2

(Increased from 418)

100

350

2

O F D O NO R S

MA ST ERS ST U DENT S

FACULTY

ME MBE R S H IR E D

R

U NDERGRA DU AT E

Neuroscience largest program

120

VERSA

1,800

NI

2014 - 2015

E

N

10 ✯

STUDENTS

NE W GR ADUAT E

DE GR E E P R O GR AMS

(Behavioral health masters and Bioinnovation PhD) PATE NTS F ILE D

13 patents issued, 11 local start-up companies

E L E M E NTARY & H IGH S CH O O L

S T U D E NT S & T E ACH E R S H AV E BE E N

I N S P I R E D TH R O UGH S T E M P R O GR AMS

ANNUAL FUND GIFTS

>

500 K 450 K

$446K

$471K

400 K 350 K

$323K

$313K

300 K

$359K

281K

250 K

$193K

200 K

$219K

150 K

$107K

100 K

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY 2015 TOTAL GIFTS

1300+

DONOR S C O N T R I B U T E D O V E R

$19M

AV E R AGE GIF T:

$11,146


S I N C E T H E 1 9 3 0 ’ S N E A R LY

1,900

SQUARE MILES

OF THE COAST HAS BEEN LOST IN LOUISIANA. WE WILL WORK TO REVERSE THIS TREND T H R O U G H R E S E A R C H , E D U C AT I O N , C O M M U N I T Y E N G A G E M E N T A N D T E C H N O L O G Y D E V E L O P M E N T.

FUTURE SITE OF THE TULANE RIVERFRONT CAMPUS FOR APPLIED COASTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING.

8,000

SQUARE FEET FOR LAB, OFFICE AND

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES WITH ANOTHER

400,000

TO

FULLY REALIZE ITS ACADEMIC AND ECONOMIC POTENTIAL.


CONNECTIONS...

What about type

overlaying these pics that says something provocative a Tulane

C O N N ECT I ON S ...

Your support connects the past with the present. By honoring past wisdom, you create a promising future for science and engineering.


RICHARD ROSIER – Environmental Biology – Class of 2016, Reinhard A. Steinmayer Endowed Scholarship holder for 2014-2015

M E N T O R S

As I was finishing high school, I began receiving offers from colleges around the nation. Despite the reputations of these schools, I knew that I wanted to stay in state for my collegiate education. When my mother and I arrived to tour Tulane, the beautiful buildings, feel of campus life and the smaller class sizes I was ecstatic when truly impressed me. I opened it and saw My biggest concern, however, was the cost. When the envelope came from Tulane, “accepted,” and even more I had butterflies in my stomach. What if I thrilled when I saw the got accepted but had to turn it down befinancial aid package that cause of tuition costs? I was ecstatic when I opened it and saw “accepted,” and even I had been offered. more thrilled when I saw the financial aid RICHARD ROSIER package that I had been offered. It had all worked out: I was going to Tulane! The students here at Tulane are all accomplished, and this contributes to a very intellectual, stimulating environment. There are intelligent students from all over the world. If I want to have a conversation about neurological pathways, or gerrymandering, or the effects of gender on power dynamics, there is someone that I can talk to that will be open to discussion. They will have their own perspectives to add, which are often very different from mine. It is this assemblage of differing intellectuals that truly makes Tulane great, by exposing young people like me to new ideas and viewpoints. I’m very thankful that I could come here. When I go home, my family always tells me how proud they are that I am at Tulane. They know its reputation for excellence, and that it is preparing me for a successful life. I’m enjoying the experience, and very appreciative of the scholarships and donors that have allowed me to succeed here.

H O N O R I N G

TULANE IS HIS FIRST CHOICE


GIVING THANKS FOR GUIDANCE Gene Miller (A&S ’54, G ’59) counts his experience at Tulane University as one of the most important in his life, one that transformed a boy from a small town in the Midwest into a successful chemist and company chief. He was eager to return the favor to Tulane, endowing a professorship in honor of his mentor, Joseph Boyer. He left behind a town of only 150 to attend Tulane. “When I graduated from high school, my graduation present was the Korean War,” he joked. He noted that the conflict abroad provided strong incentive to keep his grades up as an undergraduate. Although he completed his bachelor’s of science degree in chemistry in the spring of 1954, he elected to stay at the university in order to pursue his passion for organic chemistry as a graduate student. That same spring, Lois Cullen, a native New Yorker, was busy completing her bachelor’s of science degree in chemistry and mathematics at Bucknell University. After graduation, she relocated to New Orleans to begin Tulane’s graduate program in organic chemistry. At Tulane, another type of chemistry took hold between the two graduate students, and Gene and Lois married 1957. Together they raised six children and were blessed with ten grandchildren. Sixty years after his graduation, Miller established a professorship in honor of Professor Joseph Boyer. It was Boyer who first introduced him to the mysteries of organic science, providing him with the expertise to do great things in chemical sciences. Tulane provided him with the fellowship that allowed him to complete his doctorate.

When I graduated from high school, my graduation present was the Korean War. GENE MILLER

2 0 1 5 PA U L TULANE SOCIETY INDUCTEE GENE M I L L E R , L E F T, RECEIVES A HUG FROM TULANE PRESIDENT MIKE FITTS.


M E N T O R S

Shelton Hendricks (A&S ’63, G ’66, G ’67) was a senior at Tulane University, and he didn’t know where his future was headed. Then he enrolled in Arnold “Arnie” Gerall’s physiological psychology course, and the rousing lecturer made the science of behavioral biology come alive. “I had no intention of going into research until I took Arnie’s course my senior year,” says Hendricks. “I just loved his course and it changed the shape of my career.” Hendricks never forgot that charismatic man who had such an influence on his life and career. Gerall passed away in 2013, and Hendricks is honoring him by giving back to Tulane University School of Science and Engineering. His gift will complete the funding for an established award for student researchers, a cause that was close to Gerall’s heart. Following undergraduate graduation in 1963, Hendricks completed a masters and doctoral degree under Gerall’s tutelage at Tulane. Now retired, Hendricks served 43 years on the faculty of the University of Nebraska-Omaha in the Department of Psychology. “I met Arnie as an undergraduate student but did my graduate work under his direction. He was such a great role model as a scientist and teacher,” says Hendricks. “We remained colleagues and friends throughout his life.‘‘ Gerall was a noted behavorial neuroendocrinologist and a longtime faculty member in the Tulane Department of Psychology. Known as a dynamic teacher and inventive researcher, during the course of his career he mentored more than 30 doctoral students. Most of those students followed Gerall’s example with a career in research and academia. Gerall’s friends, colleagues and former students provided the initial funding for the Arnold A. Gerall Award for Distinction, which is awarded to an undergraduate or graduate student who has demonstrated excellence in neuroscience and psychology. Hendricks’ generosity has given the award an endowed status and it will now provide the awardee with funding for conference travel and a research stipend. “This award was what Arnie wanted,” says Hendricks. “He was such a big supporter of student research, and it’s a small encouragement for a student beginning their research career. I’m really happy to be able to do this.”

H O N O R I N G

HONORING A MENTOR


C O N N ECT I ON S ...

Your generosity helps us cross the boundaries of science and engineering. You help us focus on collaborations that move our society forward.


L E A D E R S H I P

What if you could build any structure that you could imagine? Tulane University students will soon be able to create anything their imagination can create thanks to the vision of alumni and faculty. Located in a former mechanical services workshop, the Maker Space is a center for design, invention, innovation and fabrication. A 1000 square foot ideation gallery rises above 3000 square feet of shop floor installed with high-volume modern prototyping tools alongside traditional hand and power tools. “You can turn original creative ideas into a reality that you can hold in your hand,” says biomedical engineering professor Cedric Walker. “A student can come up with the idea, create it with a 3-D printer or laser cutter, and have that physical reality in his hands in just a few hours.” Walker’s enthusiasm and vision for the Maker Space made him an ideal candidate for the position of Maker-in-Chief. In that role he will help students from across the university have a safe place to experiment with their ideas. Tulane biomedical engineering graduate Leilani Stritter (E ’87) believed in Walker’s vision and wanted to support the future of the Maker Space. THE PROPOSED “One of my favorite professors was Dr. Cedric M A K E R S PA C E Walker,” says Stritter. “When I heard he was one of the R E N O V AT I O N early visionaries of the Maker Space and that he would SET IN THE be leading the charge, it seemed to make sense to give CURRENT SITE OF THE back to Tulane and pay it forward to future students by M A C H I N E S H O P. supporting his role as Maker-in-Chief.”

A L U M N I

ALUMNA SUPPORTS FORMER PROFESSORS VISION


ALUMNI STEP FORWARD TO AID K-12 STEM For the past two years, the K-12 STEM education program at Tulane has offered high school girls a chance to learn about orthopaedic surgery and engineering. When funding for the Perry Initiative was threatened, Tulane alumni raised the resources needed to continue the program. “A classmate and fellow science and engineering board of advisor, Dr. Warren Bourgeois (A&S ‘78, M ‘82), and I got to thinking that this could be a place where our support could make a difference,” says orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Stephan McCollam (A&S ’78, M ’82). “Through the generosity of Dr. Bryan Hawkins (E ’79, M ’83), Warren and myself, we were able to underwrite the program for 2015.” The Perry Initiative inspires young women to become leaders in orthopaedic surgery and engineering, two fields where women are historically underrepresented. At Perry Initiative events, girls watch hands-on demonstrations, participate in creative problem-solving, learn orthopedic implant design process, and view mock surgical scenarios. “After over 25 years in practice and serving at the state and national level in leadership roles in my profession, I have seen very few female orthopedists enter the field,” says McCollam. “This is a wonderful program that inspires and prepares girls to look at bio-engineering and orthopaedics.” YOUNG The Perry Initiative has been a great success WOMEN FROM in its first two years at Tulane. Each year, the program has THROUGHOUT grown, demonstrating its impact in the New Orleans comLOUISIANA munity. Thanks to alumni support, it was able to continue TRAVELLED TO to make a difference in young girls’ lives. TULANE TO PA R T I C I PAT E IN THE PERRY I N I T I AT I V E .


L E A D E R S H I P

Walking to a classmate’s uptown house to have a home-cooked meal, spending long hours with a slide rule and leaving funny messages for the engineering dean. Those are all memories that the Class of 1963 will never forget. Now their legacy will live on for future generations of chemical engineering students through a new class scholarship. “The Class of 1963 is a very tight-knit group,” says Anne Robinson, chair of the Department of Chemical and BioIn 1894, Tulane molecular Engineering. “They always make a big University was push to try to get the entire class to come back for the first school every reunion.” It was during his 50th reunion that Clay Lewis in the South and (E ’63) first started discussing creating a chemical the third in the engineering scholarship in honor of the class. United States to “Chemical Engineering is a special major,” says establish a fourRobinson. “You really get to know your classmates year curriculum because you work so closely together.” denoted as It was their long hours spent analyzing calcuChemical lations and completing projects that cemented a Engineering. bond that has lasted a lifetime. These experiences inspired Lewis to establish the scholarship, which will give future generations the opportunity to have the same special experience that he did. And just like Lewis pushed for his classmates to come back to campus for their 50th reunion, he also encourages them to support the Class of 1963 scholarship fund. “Our students go out and do wonderful things in the world,” says Robinson. “Scholarships like this one keeps that momentum going. It enables students to attend Tulane when they otherwise wouldn’t be able to.” Lewis and his classmates hope to encourage other classes to come together and remember Tulane in this special way.

A L U M N I

CLASS OF 1963 SCHOLARSHIP CELEBRATES CLOSE BOND


C O N N E CT I O NS...

Your investment advances science to drive engineering innovation. You are part of the future of academia and industry.


...The big challenge is to develop new technologies so we can sustainably produce that energy. DA N I E L S H A N T Z

S O L U T I O N S

As technology advances so does our dependence on the latest products, but as a result our global energy consumption is growing at rapid rates. Daniel Shantz, inaugural Entergy Chair in Clean Energy Engineering at Tulane University, is working to find a way for you to continue to enjoy the latest technology while reducing our carbon footprint. “We all like to have energy whenever we want it,” says Shantz. “But the big challenge is to develop new technologies so we can sustainably produce that energy.” Shantz’s newly constructed lab plans to tackle that challenge on two fronts. He hopes to develop technology that will transform carbon dioxide emissions from air into usable products like plastics and fuel. Shantz also has creative ideas on how to effectively capture alternative fuels, such as cornbased ethanol, without excess waste and energy. “Many current alternative energy routes, such as biomass to fuels, have the challenge of large energy inputs to isolate the desired product,” says Shantz. “You often end up with a huge water management problem.” In his previous lab at SABIC, Shantz found that he could selectively capture certain molecules of value, from a mixture with many different molecules, in an energy efficient way. He hopes to expand on those findings at Tulane. “There are a lot of challenges that the planet faces and meeting these needs are not trivial,” says Shantz. “But we can all agree that it is an important challenge.”

I N D U S T R Y

RESEARCHER HAS BIG PLANS FOR REDUCING OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

DANIEL SHANTZ, CENTER, C E L E B R AT E S WITH HIS PA R E N T S , RICHARD AND D J S H A N T Z AT THE INVESTITURE OF THE ENTERGY CHAIR IN CLEAN ENERGY ENGINEERING.


CORPORATION PROMOTES STUDENT RESEARCH When Ben Rosenthal, a senior engineering physics major, got the opportunity to work in Professor Doug Chrisey’s lab, he was excited about the incredible opportunity. Now his research contributions have earned him the title of Schlumberger Scholar. Schlumberger, the world’s leading supplier of technology, integrated project management and information solutions to customers working in the oil and gas industry worldwide, donated $25,000 to support undergraduate and graduate students at the School of Science and Engineering. In addition to Rosenthal, graduate students Michael Hopkins, Alex Breaux and “George” Ezeh as well as undergraduate student Laurent BEN ROSENTHAL DelaFontaine were named Schlumberger Scholars. WAS CHOSEN Rosenthal’s project involves alternative energy production, AS ONE OF FIVE SCHLUMBERGER specifically the use of a hydrogen pump that draws power SCHOLARS FOR from a difference in temperature on different sides of the THE 2014-2015 device. Rosenthal grows nanoparticles for the pump and proACADEMIC YEAR. cesses them through the use of high-technology equipment including a scanning electron microscope and a specialized printer that uses nanoparticle ink. “I enjoy what I do in part because of the amazing equipment I get to work with, and the science is so interesting,” says Rosenthal. “I’m very excited to be a Schlumberger Scholar. They are involved in every area of energy production, and that really fits in line with what I want to do.”

Schlumberger also recently donated $8 million worth of in-kind software to be used by faculty members. This software is widely used in the industry, and will allow students to be familiar with the product as they enter the workplace.


S O L U T I O N S

In 2011, the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a comprehensive joint study to gauge the behavioral and health impacts of new government tobacco regulations. Little is known about the long-term effects of new tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes and second-hand vapor exposure. Due to tobacco’s well-documented health risks, or the stigma associated with accepting funds from tobacco companies, few scientists are entering the field. Altria Group is sponsoring research efforts at universities across the country in an attempt to bring in early career investigators. It granted $100,000 to the Tulane University School of Science and Engineering to support a 12-month doctoral stipend and research supplies for two Tulane students, including Cell & Molecular Biology scholar William (Chase) Anderson. Anderson will have the opportunity to compare the effects of cigarette smoke versus e-cigarette vapor on vascular endothelial cell tissues. Corporations and government agencies provide a majority of the research funds at universities in the United States, including Tulane. Tulane applies the same strict ethical standards and integrity protocols to all industry-sponsored research, regardless of the company. Dean Nicholas Altiero says he understands that accepting resources from tobacco companies is controversial. “This decision was not made lightly,” says Altiero. “We spent two years discussing the pros and cons at the highest levels of Tulane leadership. Ultimately, this is about getting our best scientists in the relevant fields to do this important research.”

I N D U S T R Y

RESEARCH AT THE INTERSECTION OF ACADEMIA, GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY


DONOR HONOR ROLL Thank you to all who give their generous support to the Tulane University School of Science and Engineering. Your gifts create a culture of collaboration that is working to solve the world’s most pressing problems. THE FOLLOWING LIST RECOGNIZES ALUMNI AND FRIENDS WHO GAVE LEADERSHIP GIFTS OF $1,500 AND ABOVE BETWEEN JULY 2014 AND JUNE 2015.

Scot (E ‘78) and Alexandra Ackerman

Earl Calkins

Nick and Amy Altiero

Joseph Capezio and Jennifer (NC ‘79) Jericho-Capezio

Samuel Alward Elsa (NC ‘66) Angrist Richard (G ‘82) and Cynthia Ashman Leon (G ‘52) August Steve (A&S ‘92) and Leslie Bennett Ellen (NC ‘78) Berkowitz James (E ‘84) and Sharon Blackwell Robert (E ‘48, E ‘49) Bland Warren (E ‘78, M ‘82, R ‘87) Bourgeois and Usha Ramadhyani John and Jacque Boyer Charles Bracht and Cheryl (NC ‘70, SW ‘75) Verlander

Sue (G ‘65, G ‘68) Carlisle William (G ‘75) and Mary Carroll Amir (E ‘80, E ‘81) Shahkarami Juan (E ‘87) and Judith Cendan Philip (E ‘44) and Madeline Closmann William (E ‘96) Dean Steven (E ‘78) and Shirley (NC ‘77, B ‘78) Dehmlow Waitus (UC ‘93) and Lori (E ‘84, E ‘12) Denham Nancy Derickson Jim (E ‘85, E ‘87) and Sharon Dillard

Roy (A&S ‘67) and Laura Brady

Timothy and Julia (G ‘91) Doolin

Marion and Edgar Bright

Steven (E ‘03, G ‘06) Duck and Ulana (NC ‘03, M ‘07, PHTM ‘07) Pogribna

Michael (E ‘85) and Suzanne Browne Edison (E ‘77) Buchanan and Sally Corning

Bob (E ‘91) and Emily Feiner Ann (NC ‘69) Flowerree

Bob (E ‘78) and Susan Buesinger

Elaine (NC ‘44) Flowerree

Allan (E ‘58, E ‘60) Bundy

Jane (L ‘77) and David (A&S ‘74, L ‘77) Flowerree

Thomas (A&S ‘74, M ‘78) and Catherine Burke

Kenneth (G ‘87) and Nancy Ford


Samir (E ‘97, G ‘00) Ghadiali and Stephanie (E ‘95, E ‘96) Kute

John (A&S ‘66, M ‘70) and Ann (NC ‘67, G ‘69, G ‘70) Kenney Judith (E ‘77) Kron

George (A&S ‘68) and Kathryn Gokel

Julian (E ‘70) Landau

Charles (G ‘67, E ‘71) and Patricia Goodman

Jay (L ‘77, B ‘78) and Sally (NC ‘78) Lapeyre

Michael (E ‘68) and Gillian Goodrich

Michael (E ‘86, G ‘88, L ‘94) and Valerie Lee

John (E ‘71, E ‘73) and Joan Gray Albert and Kathryn Greenberg Lawrence (E ‘80) and Jannith Gros Bob (A&S ‘69) Grossman and Elisabeth Cohen Lyle (E ‘86) and Ashlyn (E ‘86) Hall Jerry (E ‘52) and Agatha Haydel Scott (A&S ‘72) and Mary Alice Heape Shelton (A&S ‘63, G ‘66, G ‘67) Hendricks Luke (G ‘05) and Simrin (NC ‘03) Hooper

Edward (A&S ‘78) and Jami Levy Jean-Marc (E ‘83) Levy and Karen Beck Levy Clay (E ‘63) and Nancy Lewis Michael (E ‘87) Lockhart Robert (E ‘49) and Gayle (NC ‘49) Longmire Robert (E ‘86) and Kathleen Manger Alan and Susan Mansfield Teri (NC ‘85) Marconi Bill (E ‘81, E ‘83) and Marta Marko

Kenneth and Lisa (E ‘83) Jackson

Richard (E ‘79) and Susan Mayer

Vincent and Sabrina (E ‘88) Johnson

Dorothee (UC ‘56) McClain

Hans (A&S ‘63) and Pierce (UC ‘63) Jonassen

Stephen (A&S ‘78, M ‘82) and Kimberly McCollam

R O L L

John (E ‘86) and Carol Gallagher

H O N O R

L I S A P. J A C K S O N ( E ’ 8 3 )

Vice President of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, Apple, Inc.; Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

D O N O R

Giving to SSE is a great way to feel part of the wonderful changes happening on campus. And I know my support is going where it’s needed most.


Wayne (E ‘60) and Ann McDonald John (E ‘70) and Anne McGaha Kathy (NC ‘53) McLean Kevin (A&S ‘77) and Catherine (NC ‘80) McMichael James (E ‘81) and Dina Mead Tommy (E ‘83) and Mary Meehan Eugene (A&S ‘54, G ‘59) Miller and Dorothy Lamb Robert (E ‘65) and Mary Ellen Mittelstaedt Wiley (E ‘43) Mossy Jake (E ‘00) Mumm Herb (A&S ‘75) Nelson and Drusilla (NC ‘75) Burns

Charles Pickering Rusty (E ‘91) and Kimberly Pickering

Libby (SE ‘14) Nelson

Robert (E ‘46) and Mary Pierpont

James (E ‘78) Nix

George (E ‘86) Prueger

John (E ‘80) and Susan (E ‘80) Noel

Harry (E ‘74) and Karen Quarls

Doris O’Connor

Tom (B ‘85) Ranna

James (E ‘73) and Kay Orth

Andrea and Andrew Resnick

Terrance (E ‘99) Osby

Bryan (E ‘85, G ‘92) and Donna (E ‘85) Reuter

Kenneth (A&S ‘68) and Barbara (NC ‘72) Pailet Curtis (A&S ‘77) and Maria Pellerin Shep (E ‘83) and Yvonne Perrin

Steven Rossi and Mary Lynn (UC ‘66) Hyde Rhonda (E ‘99) Rowland Bobby (A&S ‘79, G ‘88) and Michele Ryan Rich (E ‘66, E ‘67) and Claudette Schmidt Soumitra (G ‘92) Sengupta and Terri Malouff Jim and Leah Sohr

SCOTT G. HEAPE (’72)

AND ROBERT H. MARSHALL (’72) CREATED THE MARSHALL-HEAPE

CHAIR IN GEOLOGY TO SUPPORT A DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR IN THE FIELD OF GEOLOGY.

Laura (E ‘80) Starks Wayne (A&S ‘87, B ‘90) Teetsel and Lauren Patel-Teetsel Edward and Leilani (E ‘87) Stritter Scott (E ‘87) Sullivan and Michele Cooper


WITH ALMOST $500,000 COMMITTED IN JUST 7 MONTHS, THE INNOVATIVE MAKER

John (G ‘63, G ‘65) and Katherine (NC ‘60, G ‘64) Trebellas Anantharaman (E ‘87, G ‘92) Vaidyanathan and Usha (L ‘94) Ravi

Additional supporters include Samuel and

Rae (NC ‘63) Victor

Ruth Alward, John (E ’86) and Carol Gallagher, Wayne (A&S ‘87, B ’90) and Lauren Teetsel, Jacob Mumm (E ’00), Curtis (A&S ’77) and Maria Pellerin, Juan (E ’87) and Judith Cendan, Brock Tice (E ’04, G ’10), Luke Hooper (G ’05), and the Burton Morgan Foundation

Franz (E ‘66, E ‘71) and Marilee Vogt Bob (E ‘72, B ‘77) and Germaine Vorhoff William Watson William (E ‘64, E ‘67) and Beatty Watts

H O N O R

MOMENTUM BEHIND IT.

SPACE PROJECT HAS A GREAT DEAL OF

D O N O R

Mark (A&S ‘78) and Diana Tipton

Steven Weishoff and Marla Schaefer William Wilson and Miriam (E ‘72) John

Kathy Thomerson

Russell (E ‘79) Wong

Sam (A&S ‘43, M ‘45, F ‘50) Threefoot

Will (TC ‘06) and Alison Wyatt

T H A N K Y O U T O O U R C O R P O R AT E A N D F O U N D AT I O N D O N O R S Altria Group, Inc.

Entergy Corporation

American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund

Freeport-McMoRan Foundation

American Heart Association, Greater Southeast Affiliate Research Programs

Google Education and University Relations Fund of the Tides Foundation

American Ornithologists Union

Highland Technology, Inc.

BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Bruce J. Heim Foundation Burk-Kleinpeter, Inc. Chevron Corporation Conservation Endowment Fund of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums Conservation Research and Education Opportunities Conservation, Food & Health Foundation Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund

INEOS Olefins and Polymers USA James S. McDonnell Foundation 21st Century Science Initiative in Studying Complex Systems

Grant of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation Ornithological Council Schlumberger Shell Exploration & Production Company Sigma-Aldrich Corporation

JRS Biodiversity Foundation

Simons Foundation

Laitram

Sun Drilling Products Corp.

Louisiana Board of Regents

United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) Jerusalem, Israel

Macular Degeneration Research fund of the BrightFocus Foundation Morris Animal Foundation

Valentine Chemicals, L.L.C.

Nalco Chemical Company

VentureWell

NARSAD Young Investigator

Willbros Engineers, LLC

R O L L

George (E ‘69, G ‘71, G ‘74) and Jamie Swan


THANK YOU TO ALL WHO GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED THE TULANE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING IN 2014-2015. WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR ALL THAT YOU DO.

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING S U IT E 2 0 1 , B O G G S CE NT E R F OR E NE RGY AND B IOT E CH N O L O G Y | N E W O R L E A N S, L A 70118 5 0 4 .8 6 5 .5 7 6 4 | W W W.GIVING . TU L A N E / SSE

Tulane School of Science & Engineering FY15 Annual Report  

Connections: Linking Discovery to Innovation

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