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contents Introduction

2

Thesis

4

Options Studios

28

Core Studios

66

Courses

148

Electives

156

Preservation

176

Study Abroad

184

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MICHAEL KELLER Faculty Advisor: Cordula Roser Gray

Synthetic Urbanism: a water[land]scape proposal for the industrial canal This thesis utilizes landscape as an operative medium for urban transformations that engender porosity across existing mono-functional edge conditions in the city. The placed-based Situationist strategies of détournement and dérive are understood in the context of landscape urbanism and re-interpreted through the strategies of spatial and programmatic hybridity and the indexing and amplification of site conditions and processes in the contemporary urban landscape. The proposal reconsiders how we occupy [post] industrial waterfronts through the spatial restructuring on the water’s edge. Sediment collection infrastructure is integrated with contextual banding to define a field that allows for a multiplicity of processes, events, exchange and play occur in the proximal relationships across an open-minded performative system, in pursuit of the city as a continuous plane of occupation.

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thesis // spring 09

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ANNIE PEyTON Faculty Advisor: Judith Kinnard

New Urban Infrastructure a network of transit centers for new orleans This project envisions a future with less focus on private, oil-fueled transportation and a greater emphasis on environmentally sound public transit. Proposed as a phasing scheme with the long-term goal of creating a network of urban transit centers, the plan envisions a holistic system of connections and nodes for a people-centric city. Existing gas stations provide the sites for future transit centers: generally, each is located on a major transit route and is highly visible, and will become void with the onset of this project. The full network will create a city bikeshare program and a series of zipcar stations while connecting to existing and future infrastructure: the streetcar, a light rail system and expanded bicycle lanes. Site-specific program within each center will differentiate the sites within the larger system. This new network of transit centers for New Orleans will help minimize excessive dependence on private transportation, creating a city for people rather than car.

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thesis // spring 11

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LIVINg ON THe edge: Mixed-use development on the water front critic

The initial studies of Pendulous Threads were composed of

In lieu of the traditional problem-solution method, yielding only

Ammar Eloueini

extensive cyclical analyses of the existing context, the New

a singular solution to a complex obstacle, a more flexible sys-

Orleans Mississippi Riverfront. We employed the use of such

tem is necessary. By creating enough variation to accommodate

studies to gain an understanding of the network of activity

multiple scenarios, one allows for a plethora of user-defined

characterized by a culturally diverse city such as New Orleans.

spaces. We present Pendulous Threads simply as a case study

Luis Quinones

The cyclical analysis investigated elements of surrounding

for the innumerable variations made possible by parametrically

Carlos Garcia

program types, ranging from hotel and residential, to music

linking variables and attributes, thereby engaging site and

venues and galleries. These nodes of influence contain at-

context simultaneously. This design methodology is an effec-

tributes of occupancy, proximity, and hours of activation based

tive proposal to accommodate multiple complex systems in a

on a twenty-four hour timetable.

21st century city.

students

Using parametric design techniques, we were able to transition to a complex system of three-dimensional organizational routes. Reapplying the attributes of the existing context to the introduced program facilitated the connection between the initial programmatic study and the emergent program distribution.

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dsgn 4100/5100 // fall 09

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grOW daT yOUTH FarM critics

The “Grow Dat Youth Farm” is an urban agriculture facility

Scott Bernhard

planned for implementation in New Orlean’s City Park. The

Architectural Design Studio

facility will combine agricultural and health training with

Abigail Feldman Landscape and Site Design Studio

FELDMAN STUDIO

BERNHARD STUDIO

Ellen Hailey

Mira Asher

Natalia Hidalgo

Hee Kyong Cho

Jade Jiambutr

Rachel Finkelstein

Fernando Polo     

Patrick Franke

Christopher Tellone        

Lindsey Keifer

This studio was structured as both a “research-based” studio

Ana Teran             

Samuel Levin

and a “design/build” studio. We explored three simultane-

William Trakas    

Jason Levy

ous themes—the larger landscape, the spatial relationships

Claire Tritschler 

Bradley Rohman

of buildings to each other and the farm, and the material

Michael Welsh

Jennifer Wickham

internships for high-school-age students to work and learn on a productive, urban farm. The facility will support the cultivation of 2 acres of urban farmland and will provide classrooms, outdoor market/event spaces and a range of service components.

A project of the Tulane City Center

conditions related to retrofitting shipping containers. Work-

William Trakas

ing in collaboration, we designed a comprehensive landscape

Claire Tritschler

plan for the Youth Farm. We also identified the elements of

Michael Welsh

“phase 1 construction” and along with detailed plans and

Jennifer Wickham

implementation strategies for the buildings in that phase. The creative reuse of shipping containers as building components of the Youth Farm facility formed a principal focus of our design efforts. Finally, we used an actual shipping container to vet design ideas.

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students


dsgn 4200 feldman // spring 11

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KeLLer SqUare - a pLaCe FOr reCreaTION aNd UrbaN eNrICHMeNT critics

The site is situated between the Central Business District to

point with a significant amount of commercial or recreational

Cordula Roser Gray

the east, the Historic Garden District to the south and the Up-

potential, specifically for children and young adults.

town neighborhood to the west with access to the city’s major

student Andrew Graham Gavin Newman

public transportation routes. A diverse neighborhood and home to many immigrant and working class families, Central City in the 1940’s was a thriving business district with Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard (formerly Dryades) as its commercial corridor. After the ‘white flight’ of the 1960’s prompted a steep decline of the area, there is now opportunity for revitalization with the intent to offer essential programs, amenities and services to the neighborhood’s residents. Located within Central City amongst several housing development clusters, Keller Square is the site of a former New Orleans Recreation Department (NORD) building and the old 6th District Police Station. Since Katrina, the NORD building which was up until then occupied by the ASHE Cultural Arts Center sits abandoned with many of the surrounding properties blighted or empty slabs. Complimented by a run-down corner store within a historic market building the site currently constitutes a void in the neighborhood in lieu of what could be a focal

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A major current challenge for ASHE has been balancing and coordinating the spatial demands for rehearsing, meeting, performing and gathering, specifically for dance performances and community theatre. Through the New Orleans Neighborhood Development Corporation (NONDC), ASHE and other stakeholders are interested in developing a new facility that would offer the much needed cultural support to the neighborhood. The studio focused on developing a sustainable design strategy for the mostly abandoned site to create a safe destination and focal point within the neighborhood and the city. The strategy derives through close collaboration with the client and stakeholders as well as the community and presented to the City as a means of allocating funds and implementing a design solution. After an initial design charrette, students worked individually and in teams to each develop a master plan for the site. Students produced design documentation that will be used for a marketing publication.


dsgn 4200 // spring 11

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dsgn 3100 // fall 09

Jade JIambUTr PARIS DANCE SChOOL Critic: Irene Keil

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dsgn 110


dsgn 3100 // fall 09

mIra aSHer PARIS DANCE SChOOL Critic: Errol Barron

architecture.tulane.edu

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dsgn 3200 gRad // spRIng 11

aLLISON POWeLL hEADQuARTERS FOR PROSPECT NEW ORLEANS Critic: Jonathan Tate

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dsgn 3200 gRad // spRIng 11 The Graduate Comprehensive Studio program was a midscale office building in the Central Business District of New Orleans to house the administrative headquarters of Prospect New Orleans—the international biennial exhibition for contemporary art. In addition, the building includes commercial lease space intended for associated creative agencies, a 200-seat auditorium and a small open gallery. In order to address the goals of the comprehensive semester, the studio prioritized specific aspects of the architectural design and development process to allow for greater degrees of resolution than previously attained in other design studios. 

eLIzabeTH daVIS hEADQuARTERS FOR PROSPECT NEW ORLEANS Critic: Doug harmon

architecture.tulane.edu

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dsgn 2100 gRad // fall 09

SCOTT HeaTH FIRE HOuSE Critic: Judith Kinnard

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dsgn dsgn2100 210 gRad // fall 10

NICk SaCkOS NEW ORLEANS FILM ARCHIvE Critic: Kentaro Tsubaki “Building performance� is an action, an ingenious response to various internal and external forces as they seek equilibrium through time. It is not simply a technical predictability of its structural and environmental behavior nor an aesthetic legibility of the design ideas. A good musical performance has an element of surprise, as it is an intuitive, improvised response to the audience and to the context; so is the performance of a building. DSGN 2100 aimed to examine this nature through focused iteration, cultivating student awareness to the phenomenal quality of a physical construct as they develop technical proficiency in the design process. The studio, designed to be a beginning design sequence in the M. Arch I. program, started with a series of form generating and skill forming exercises accompanied by a discourse on architectural diagrams as a generative tool. The exercises culminated in the construction of a cast plaster Light Receiving Device. The observational record of its phenomenal performance was documented and appreciated as Light Drawings. A series of analytical diagrams accompanied the drawings, establishing the conceptual foundation for the main project, the New Orleans Film Archive. Located in the Warehouse District, NOFA aims to advance the rich historical and cultural heritage for future generations through preservation, education, promotion and research of audio and visual media chronicling New Orleans. The program consists of a theater, a preservation archive/library, offices and three residential units for artistsin-residence. The nature of the building was interrogated and examined thorough the interplay of light and shadow, crucial components to the perception of space, structure, form and function.

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dsgn 1200 // spRIng 11

PHaSe 3: FrereT STreeT FeTe Spring 2011

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dsgn 1200 // SPRING 11

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A | Ian Rosenfield, Critic: Judi Shade Monk B | Daniel Omuro, Critic: Andrew Liles C | Sanaa Shaikh, Critic: Tiffany Lin D | Caitlin Parker, Critic: Allison Stouse E | Zoe Grosshandler, Critic: Michael Keller

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rBsT 3400 // fall 10

Interpretive Urban Design

LOW-CARBON NEW TOWN – LONgPAO, JIANgSU PROVINCE, CHINA critic Grover Mouton

student Rebecca Bradley A project of the Tulane Regional Urban Design Center

The seminar targets the development of urban planning and

Based on the design considerations posed by the existing urban

design recommendations for Longpao, a small town located

fabric, students interpret the program established by Long-

across the Yangtze River from Nanjing, a city of 5 million

pao’s municipal government in an effort to create a model for

people. Longpao is slated for development due to a new

sustainable development in the region. Ecological remediation,

cross-river bridge, connecting the town with the Nanjing

as well as issues of livability and community development, play

metropolis. Students investigate urban development possibili-

a prominent role in the creation of a plan for the New Town.

ties while maintaining the agricultural lifestyle of its residents and environmental health through the promotion of low-carbon development.

issues at the scale of the city. Students create recommendations with the intent to influence the real-time, ongoing project

urban design agenda, working with officials of the American

design. Exposure to this process aids in student understanding

Planning Association and the Tulane Regional Urban Design

of political, monetary, and environmental factors that often

Center, who are collaborating on the project design. Full consid-

affect projects of this size and scope.

development, and other contextual design issues are required.

/ ELECTIVES /

to phasing guidelines, with the goal of understanding design

Students focus on design and policy development within this

eration of environmental impacts, existing villages and site

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Students develop urban design plans for the site in addition


rBsT 3400 // spring 10

Interpretive Urban Design

TRAILHEAd TOWN CENTER – mANdELVILLE, LA critic Grover Mouton

students Kate O’Connor Devin Oatman Alicia Zimmerman

This seminar focused on methods of development for urban

Review of relevant urban planning initiatives and those of the

design recommendations in the public realm. Using a variety

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center were used to demon-

of project and site scales and a real, engaged client base, stu-

strate interactive community planning principles. Visiting

dents learned the fundamentals of planning and urban design,

lecturers included former TSA students who explained various

interpretive design, and cultural planning, then applied these

means of becoming a successful planner and urban designer.

lessons to mini-design projects. The City of Mandeville, LA is a small community 30 miles north of New Orleans. Students examined Mandeville’s historic lake-

A project of the

front, the 1895 Dew Drop Jazz Hall, the Trailhead (a popular

Tulane Regional

public park and event center), and the Kierr Camellia Garden,

Urban Design Center

which will be implemented in 2011. Student analysis and design for each of these sites has helped city officials shape their future interaction with hired design consultants. The process affords students the opportunity to strengthen their graphic and verbal presentations for a public audience, and can include a service-learning component.

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prst 6460 // spring 10

FIELd STUdIES IN HISTORIC pRESERVATION - mOROCCO critics Eugene Cizek, Ph.D. Mark Thomas

course description The MPS program has a longstanding tradition of conducting

construction and the difficulty in its preservation. Students

field studies in historic preservation to numerous destinations

also experienced a range of preservation technologies, both ap-

of international historic significance, expanding the learning

propriate and not, in order to learn about correct practice in ma-

experience far beyond that which may be learned through

terials conservation. On a community scale, students saw first

classroom lectures alone. Students are exposed to a wide

hand the results of variety of both successful and disastrous

range of preservation issues, from site interpretation to build-

attempts at historic district designation and enforcement. The

ing preservation. Local experts are invited to lecture the group

program provided a great opportunity to gain exposure to non-

on cultural and technical topics relevant to the destination.

western architectural traditions, as well as cultural landscapes

Particular attention is given to UNESCO World Heritage Sites,

such as olive orchards, citrus groves. The five major periods

especially on the effects of such designation on the site itself

in formal Islamic architecture in Morocco were studied, along

and the community surrounding the site. This program focused

with a diverse set of vernacular structures, ranging from vast

on Morocco and its treasure trove of globally important historic

mud cities to simple nomadic Berber tents made of camel hair.

sites and preservation efforts.

Students were assigned specific research topics for a paper

Among the numerous cities and sites included in this program were Casablanca, Rabat, Meknes, Volubilis, Moulay Idriss, Erfoud, Merzouga, Ouarzazate, Ait Ben Haddou, Marrakech, and Essaouira. The group learned about traditional adobe

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and photographic inventory.


prst 6520 // spring 10

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CITIES OF THE dEAd / CREOLE ARCHITECTURE ANd TRAdITIONAL BUILdINg critics Eugene Cizek, Ph.D.

course description The Studio in Building Preservation is a major component of

Students learn by doing, beginning with the HABS field docu-

the MPS program, in which students focus on preservation

mentation process and subsequent preparation of measured

issues and practices on a scale relating to individual structures,

drawings in accordance with HABS standards. These skills are

historic fabric and context, traditional building materials and

widely transferable to a variety of architectural and preserva-

techniques, site planning and interpretation, restoration vs.

tion professions. Students learn about traditional and contem-

renovation, among others. The class is conducted both in the

porary practices and conservation issues relating to masonry,

Charles Berg, AIA

field and in the classroom, with Monday night lectures, Tuesday

wood construction, iron/ metalwork, roofing systems, founda-

Cristina Kennedy

night studio workshop sessions, all-day Friday studio and field

tion systems, decorative arts, as well as natural, cultural, and

Christopher Howard

sessions, as well as two weekend field trips. The first part of

historic landscapes, producing a series of high quality essays

the semester focuses on the documentation of historic tombs

and illustrations, including mapping, site planning, architectural

and other structures in St. Roch Cemetery No. 1, while the

elevations, sections, floor plans, and details. Students produce

remainder of the semester focuses on numerous structures,

a professional quality publication summarizing the series of

historic settings, and cultural landscapes of the Mississippi

field exercises and each student’s findings.

Heather Knight Mark Thomas

students A | Campo Santo:

B | Tomb of Anton Bichelmayer: Danielle Del Sol C | Gordon McLeod

River Corridor / Creole Louisiana Region.

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A

ROME: Urban Structures and Forms critics

WK 1-3: Collective Palimpsests [spatial data, social/temporal

human relationship to the land and public space. In the same

Marcella Del Signore

practices]

way that the ancient Rome and the contemporary city super-

Tiffany Lin

The experience of living in Rome reveals the city as a contem-

poses layers of information and matter in successive and varied

students A | Andrew Graham B | Laura Robins C | Sophie Dardant D | Chris Tellone E | Natalia Hidalgo

porary urban metropolis existing within a preserved historic

entropic combination.

fabric. The first 2-week exercise focused on understanding Ro-

WK 9-15: Urban Collector [Cohabiting Dynamics ]

man strata as a series of formal/spatial layers and social/temporal layers. As an initial record of architectural observations, students distilled the spatial data of an urban piazza in terms of specific formal categories to produce a series of analytical 2D drawings and 3D models.

building types are a practical and sustainable means of optimizing land use, serving the varying needs of city’s inhabitants, and creating dynamic new urban communities. Mixed-use developments have the ability to become catalysts to generate

LANDscraper is a term coined by the architect Antoine Predock

activity and a vibrant 24-hr lifestyle for otherwise neglected

constructed on it. They seek the ability of to establish a new

/ STUdy AbROAd /

and housing development is in increasing demand. Mixed-use

WK 4-7: Lands of Superimposition [programming simultaneity] to denotate buildings that unfold the land, rather then being

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In contemporary cities, the available land for commercial, retail

areas of the city.


dsgn 4100 // fall 10

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the reVIEW 2009-2011