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Columbus could receive second police motorcycle, page 13

Tryon Daily Bulletin

The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 86 / No. 171

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Friday, September 27, 2013

Only 50 cents

Who’s been sleeping in my bed? Three little bear s and a mama bear were spotted at a Hawthorne tree outside a home at Bright’s Creek Thursday, Sept. 26. Major Schutt, who took the photograph, said he was 15 feet from the bears as he snapped photos. Other bears have been spotted this week near The Sanctuary off Hwy. 108 and on Grady Ave. and Berry Street near downtown Tryon. Have you spotted a bear or other interesting wildlife this summer? Send your photos to news@tryondailybulletin. com. Tell us where the photo was taken and when, and your photo might end up in the paper. (photo by Major Schutt)

FENCE will host a free family concert featuring Tom Fisch this Sunday, Sept. 29 at 4 p.m. Refreshments will be served. The concert is made possible by the Kirby Endowment at the Polk County Community Foundation.

Hundreds of community members show support for Barrington by Samantha Hurst

her family. Barrington sustained severe brain injuries As almost 4,800 people show their support online for Tryon equestrian and mother, Amy a Sept. 4 during a riding accident. She is Barrington, hundreds others are putting their currently receiving medical attention and money, time, thoughts and prayers to work (barrington continued on page 6) as they support Barrington’s recovery and

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties


A2 2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

STAFF Betty Ramsey, Publisher betty.ramsey@tryondailybulletin.com

Samantha Hurst, Editor samantha.hurst@tryondailybulletin.com

Leah Justice, Reporter leah.justice@tryondailybulletin.com

Gwen Ring, Design gwen.ring@tryondailybulletin.com

Lenette Sprouse, Marketing Consultant lenette.sprouse@tryondailybulletin.com

Harry Forsha, Marketing Consultant harry.forsha@tryondailybulletin.com

Kevin Powell, Marketing Consultant kevin.powell@tryondailybulletin.com

Jessy Taylor, Administrative Assistant jessy.taylor@tryondailybulletin.com

Jeff Allison, Pressroom Manager jeff.allison@tryondailybulletin.com

Jonathan Burrell, Pressroom

Ethan Price, Pressroom

How To Reach Us Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

Friday, September 27, 2013

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Today

Essentially Silk, Artist Barbara McCombs Thomas’ show “Essentially Silk” at Millard & Co. in the Tryon Depot, will run through Monday, Sept. 30. Saluda Center, Friday events: chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; Trash Train, 10 a.m.; NA Meeting, 8 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Friday activities include movie matinee or drumming at 10 a.m. (every third Friday) and bingo or movie at 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Landrum High School varsity football will play at Liberty Sept. 27. Saluda Tailgate Market, every Friday, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Saluda Top of the Grade Concert featuring Spencer & the String Ticklers is a new funky folk band from Brevard with influences from jug band to rock and roll. Concert at McCreery Park, Saluda 6:30-8:30 p.m. American Legion Post 250 Bingo is hosted every Friday, 7 p.m. at 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Tryon Little Theater’s My Way – A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra will be performed on Sept. 26, 8 p.m. at Tryon Little Theater. Narcotics Anon., Saluda Senior Center, Friday, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Landrum Farmers Market sets up each Saturday from 7-11 a.m. along N. Trade Avenue in Landrum. Everything from to-

matoes to mushrooms to flowers. For information, contact Joe Cunningham at 864-457-6585. Columbus Tailgate Market, every Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon, until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Zumba Class at Green Creek Community Center Saturdays at 8 a.m. Polk County Democrats Men’s Club will meet Sept. 28 at Party HQ in Columbus at 8:30 a.m. Bring canned food to supply Thermal Belt Outreach Ministry. Adopt A Hwy Clean Up starts at 9:30 a.m., weather permitting. Info: 828-625-1689. Landrum High School cross country will have a meet at the Lakelands Invitational on Sept. 28, 9 a.m. at Connie Maxwell, Greenwood, S.C. Matchbook Cover Collage Art show Tryon Fine Arts Center’s Gallery I will host a display of Matchbook Cover Collage Art through Saturday, Sept. 28. The gallery is open 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. House of Flags Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum open Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Friendship Council financial planning seminar by Roland Stadelmann, hosted by Thermal Belt Friendship Council, Roseland Community Center, Peake Street in Tryon at 11:30 a.m. Car wash for Barrington, A car wash will be held this Saturday, Sept. 28 at noon at Ken Feagin’s Truck and Trailer in Landrum to

LOCAL WEATHER Today: Sunny, with no chance of rain. High 76, low 55.

Tomorrow: Sunny, with no chance of rain. High 73, low 51.

raise funds for Amy Barrington’s recovery. Bracelets will also be sold. Tryon Fine Arts Center, Oil painting class for teens with Margaret Curtis, Saturdays, noon - 3 p.m. Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg hosts 40th annual Juried Show, The opening reception and awards ceremony will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, 6–9 p.m., in the Spartanburg Art Museum. The public is welcome to attend. For further information, contact Robin Els, artistsguildofspartanburg@ gmail.com or call 864-764-9568. Tryon Little Theater My Way - A Tribute to Frank Sinatra will be held on Sept. 28, 8 p.m. at Tryon Little Theater.

Sunday

Mary Comerford Memorial Classical Quintet Mary Comerford Memorial Classical Quintet will be hosted on Sept. 29 at 3 p.m. at the Landrum Presbyterian Church. Tryon Little Theater My Way - A Tribute to Frank Sinatra will be held Sept. 29, 3 p.m. at Tryon Little Theater.

Monday

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Mondays, Harmon Field/Tryon, 7 a.m. - noon. Saluda Center, Mondays, chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; line dance, 12:30 p.m.; Saluda Duplicate Bridge, 1:30 p.m. 828-7499245. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center, sing-along, 10 a.m.; (calendar continued on page 39)

OBITUARIES Robert Richardson, p. 10 Lois Katherine Dorsey Youngblood, p. 12

Wednesday’s weather was: High 62, low 58, 1.03 inches of rain.

Tonight’s Moon Phase:

“Punkin” Howard, p. 12


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Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Eighth annual Ache Around the Lake winners

Ache Overall Female - Jennifer Fisher took the overall female award with a time of 34:17.26. Ache Overall Male - Josey Weaver took the overall male award with a time of 27:46.08. Top Dog - Alexandra Adams took the Top Dog award, being the first human/canine team to finish the Ache. The Top Dog award was donated by Bonnie Brae Veterinary. See full story on page 4. (photos submitted by Jennifer Wilson)

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A4 4 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Local runners lead pack in eighth Ache Around the Lake event This year, participation in the Ache Around the Lake or Ouch race supported the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Lab at St. Luke’s Hospital in Columbus. Activities of daily living are routine things you frequently do, such as feeding, bathing, dressing and grooming yourself. With the opening of the ADL Lab, St. Luke’s patients will have the ability to actually practice the tasks of daily living, as well as other ADL retraining activities related to the kitchen, home and community environments. The lab will serve to improve patient care and allow St. Luke’s to offer a wider array of support services to the community. Overall Ache winners Top Male - Josey Weaver of Weaverville, N.C. 27.46.08 Top Female/Eighth overall - Jennifer Fischer of Columbus (Top female) in 34:17.26 Other local runners placing in the top 25 of the overall Ache race were: 12 - Brad Fraedrich of Landrum in 35:40.73; and 19 – Lori Geddings of Tryon in 37:14.67. Laura Walker of Tryon won the Masters Female division in 41:55.13; Ansley Lynch of Mill Spring won the 1-14 female age division in 48:39.49. In the 35-39 age group all of the top three finishers were local – Valerie Davis of Tryon in first with 42:34.60; Julia Carroll of Tryon in second with 51:48.88 and Angela Jenne of Mill Spring in third with 52:55.18. In

the 40-44 female division Kathryn Gillie of Tryon came in second place with 54:35.89, followed by Michelle McMahan of Campobello in third with 59:08.58. In the 40-44 male group, Brian Jones came in second with 40:27.40. For females 45-49, Lorna Burrell from Campobello finished in 52:58.27 and for males 45-49 John Gillie of Tryon finished 39:48.44. In the 50-54 age groups, Paul Zimmerman of Campobello finished third among males in 40:51.59, while Yvonne Dessoffy and Sherry Page, both of Tryon, finished first and second with times of 45:29.24 and 45:40.88, respectively. In the 55-59 age group, Andy Millard of Tryon finished third in 52:27.37. Lou Gilbert of Mill Spring finished first for the 60-64 year-old females in 1:17:58.72. David Zacharias of Tryon and Hank Heintzberger of Campobello grabbed second and third places for males 60-64 in times of 44:47.33 and 48:58.04. Kathleen Wright of Tryon, in the 65-69 female division, finished in 1:02:51.74. Lee Cone of Landrum and Alan Leonard of Tryon finished first and third in the 65-69 males with times of 37:51.85 and 47:41.04. Locals also dominated the 70-74 female group with Mary Beth Trunk of Landrum placing first with 59.26.60 and Elaine Jenkins of Tryon finishing second with a time of 59.29.73. – article submitted by Jennifer Wilson


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Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A6 6 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Barrington (continued from page 1)

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therapy at The Shepherd’s Center in Atlanta, Ga. Family friend Stephanie Johnson has helped organize a car wash for Saturday, Sept. 21. Johnson said she’s known Barrington for about seven years and said she is more than deserving of the outpouring of support. “She is one of the nicest people you will ever meet – she always has a smile on her face no matter the situation,” Johnson said. A reception and auction to benefit Barrington, held Saturday, Sept. 21 at FENCE, brought out more than 300 equestrians, family and horse trial participants. All proceeds from the event, hosted by the Tryon Riding & Hunt Club (TR&HC), went to the Equestrian Aid Foundation (EAF). Monies were also raised at the EAF/Amy Barrington silent auction on site. More than 200 items donated by both the local and national equestrian community kept participants busy and competitive at the auction. Volunteers, within a six-day time frame, worked tirelessly to pull off a fun and profitable event. The evening fundraiser was capped off with a taco supper catered by Paul Dale’s Foothills Mountain BBQ. EAF is a national 501(c) 3 dedicated to helping equestrians with catastrophic injuries. Sheryl Kursar, EAF managing director and board member, was present for the fundraiser. “Improving the lives of horsemen in need is our mission. The outpouring of support by the community and TR&HC for EAF is strong. Our organization will assist Amy and her family in the many months to come,” said Kursar. TR&HC President Nancy Wilson plans on this fundraiser becoming an annual benefit. “Combined with our recognized horse trails at FENCE, we know this event will be well supported by the local equestrian community and in turn, benefit those locally, most in need,” said Wilson. Thus far, $17,000 has been

Friday, September 27, 2013

raised from the Saturday night event, with more donations and payments in process. Ongoing fundraising efforts: Car wash - A car wash will be held this Saturday, Sept. 28 at noon at Ken Feagin’s Truck and Trailer in Landrum. Bracelets supporting Barrington’s recovery will also be sold. All monies will go to Barrington’s recovery. “I’m really hoping a lot of people will come out because Amy, Greg and Ben are always so considerate of others that we need to show that same kindness to them,” Johnson said. Wristbands - TR&HC and the Farmhouse are also selling “Ride For Amy” benefit wristbands. A suggested donation is $5 per bracelet, with 100 percent of proceeds benefitting Amy Barrington and her family. Anyone interested in purchasing a wristband or making a donation can send a check to: Amy Barrington at TR&HC office, FENCE, the Farm House, Little Mountain Farm Supply, The Tack Shop in Greenville and The Hay Rack on Hwy 14. More than $2,500 has been raised so far, from all over the nation. For more information on how to donate to Barrington, contact the TR&HC at office@trhcevents. org or 828-863-0480. Flower Fund – An Amy Barrington “Flower Fund” is set up at The Farm House in Landrum so that anyone who might want to send flowers, can consider contributing to a fund offsetting medical costs for the family. FRC - The Foothills Riding Club Dressage and Schooling Jumping Show to be held Oct. 12 at Harmon Field will be designated as a benefit show for Barrington. Proceeds will be donated to the EAF to help with long-term care. In recognition of the need for ongoing assistance, plans are underway for another benefit in the spring. To keep up with Barrington’s recovery and additional fundraising efforts, visit www.facebook. com/amybarringtonrecovery. – Kathryn Cunningham, with TR&HC, contributed to this article


A7 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A8 8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Polk district court results John T. Gandolfo Jr. was conIn Polk County District Court held Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013 victed of speeding 79 mph in a with Judge David K. Fox presid- 65 mph zone. Gandolfo was fined ing, 184 cases were heard. Some $200 and court costs. Mandyl Gabriel Grier was concases were continued, dismissed victed of possession of drug paraor sent to superior court. The following persons were phernalia. Grier was sentenced to one year unsupervised probation, convicted of a crime: Dennis Manuel Aguirre was a $75 fine and court costs. Jason Scott Grimes was conconvicted of speeding 79 mph in a 65 mph zone. Aguirre was fined victed of unauthorized use of motor vehicle. Grimes was sentenced $200 and court costs. to 21 days in jail Daniel Alan with credit for Blackman was Court results time served. convicted of Victor Jerry speeding 79 mph in a 65 mph zone. Blackman Johnson was convicted of speeding 79 mph in a 65 mph zone. was fined $50 and court costs. David T. Bradley was con- Johnson was fined $200 and court victed of possession of drug costs. Robert E. Jones Jr. was conparaphernalia and misdemeanor larceny. Bradley was sentenced victed of speeding 103 mph in a 65 to six days in jail with credit for mph zone. Jones was sentenced to one year unsupervised probation, time served. Kendra Leigh Campbell was a $103 fine and court costs. Michael Kuti Lundquist was convicted of failure to appear on misdemeanor. Campbell was sen- convicted of driving while license tenced to one year unsupervised revoked. Lundquist was sentenced probation, $186 in restitution and to one year unsupervised probation, a $100 fine and court costs. court costs. Mary Cecilia Naples was conChristopher C. Carroll was convicted of possession of open victed of speeding 79 mph in a 65 container/consumption of alcohol mph zone. Naples was fined $100 in passenger area. Carroll was and court costs. Andrew Todd Peter was confined $25 and court costs. Chelsey Jean Collins was con- victed of possession of drug paravicted of speeding 79 mph in a 65 phernalia. Peter was sentenced to mph zone. Collins was fined $100 one year unsupervised probation, a $75 fine and court costs. and court costs. Paul J. Politz was convicted Calvin Chester Davis was convicted of speeding 79 mph in a 65 of speeding 74 mph in a 65 mph mph zone. Davis was fined $100 (court results continued on page 10) and court costs.

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A9 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A10 10 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Polk sheriff weekly report During the week from Sept. 15 through Sept. 22, 2013, the Polk County Sheriff’s Office answered 153 calls for service. There were 10 arrests, 15 citations, 13 civil papers and seven criminal papers served. Officers assisted the pub-

Obituaries

Robert Richardson Robert Richardson of Columbus passed away Thursday afternoon, Sept. 26, 2013 in the Hospice House of the Carolina

• Court results kim@sheelahclarkson.com www.sheelahclarkson.com

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(continued from page 8)

zone. Politz was fined $50 and court costs. Javier Zambra Quintero was convicted of no operator’s license. Quintero was sentenced to one year unsupervised probation, a $100 fine and court costs. Juan Munez Rivero was convicted of speeding 74 mph in a 65 mph zone. Rivero was fined $30 and court costs. Ewarl Anglin Stephens was convicted of failure to appear on misdemeanor. Stephens was sentenced to one day in jail with credit for time served. Robert Martin Thrall was convicted of operating a vehicle with impaired equipment. Thrall was fined $40 and court costs.

lic four times, assisted other agencies four times, completed 330 house checks, 402 church checks, 703 business checks and patrolled 7,421 miles. - information submitted by chief deputy Mike Wheeler

Foothills, Landrum, S.C. Arrangements will be announced. An online guest register is available at www.mcfarlandfuneralchapel.com. McFarland Funeral Chapel Connie Burne Whiteside was convicted of level 1 driving while impaired. Whiteside was sentenced to two years supervised probation, 30 days in jail, a $500 fine and court costs. Travis Dean Williams was convicted of two counts of no operator’s license and failure to appear on misdemeanor. Williams was sentenced to one year unsupervised probation, a $50 fine and court costs. Rhett Jordan Williamson was convicted of speeding 74 mph in a 65 mph zone and failure to appear on misdemeanor. Williamson was sentenced to six days in jail with credit for time served. Christopher L. Wright was convicted of speeding 79 mph in a 65 mph zone. Wright was fined $200 and court costs.


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Obituaries

Lois Katherine Dorsey Youngblood Lois Katherine Dorsey Youngblood, 87, of East Flat Rock passed away Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 at Park Ridge Hospital. Lois was a native of Henderson County, born in Tuxedo on Feb. 7, 1926 to her parents, Fred Dorsey Sr. and Jessie Hensley Dorsey. She was the seventh child of the 10 children born to a family of eight daughters and two sons. She was preceded in death by her son, Stephen M. Guffey. She was an extremely talented entrepreneur, having owned and operated several businesses including The Flamingo Gift Shop in Hendersonville, where she made petticoats and lingerie for adoring customers like The Smokey Mountain Cloggers and Marie Beal Fletcher, Miss America 1962. She owned and operated a multi-faceted retail

“Punkin” Howard Harold “Punkin” Dean Howard of Inman died Sept. 23. Survivors include his daughters, Christy O’Sullivan of Campobello, S.C.; Amy, Ashley and Hara Howard, all of Inman, S.C.; brothers, Billy and

Friday, September 27, 2013

business in Sapphire Valley for many years that included a fine dining restaurant, hardware store, grocery and antique shop. From the kitchen of that restaurant she ran a very successful canning business - her jams, jellies and pickles were sought nationwide. Upon her retirement, Lois moved back to Henderson County where she had time to pursue her true passions; gardening, bird watching and admiring all things nature. She is survived by her brother, Fred Dorsey Jr. and his wife, Suzie; her son, Nowell C. Guffey and his wife, Dianne; daughter-in-law, Tippy R. Guffey; daughter, Elissa G. Waggoner and her husband, Steve; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. A private graveside service will be held at Shepherd Memorial Park. An online register book is available online for family and friends by visiting www.thosshepherd.com. Thos. Shepherd & Son Funeral Directors is in charge of arrangements. Monty Howard; sister, Barbara Pruitt; grandchildren, Chasden, Austin, Bentley, Tresealyn, Emily, Hydi, J.T. and Cameron; and his girlfriend, Paula Campbell of Landrum. Funeral services will be held Friday, Sept. 27 at 1 p.m. at the Lighthouse Christian Fellowship in Inman, S.C.


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Columbus could receive second police motorcycle by Leah Justice

The Columbus Police De- Columbus Police Chief partment received preliminary Chris Beddingfield told notification recently from the council the town has N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program that it is a recipient of spent less than $1,000 another new motorcycle, free of a year on the current charge. Columbus Town Council met motorcycle, which was Sept. 19 and approved a resolution also obtained at no cost to to move forward with receiving the town. The town pays another motorcycle. Columbus currently has a Ka- for general maintenance wasaki police motorcycle that it and insurance on the received about two years ago from motorcycle. the N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety program. Columbus Police Chief Chris town receives funding for equipBeddingfield told council the ment and training from the state town has spent less than $1,000 with no matching funds required. a year on the current motorcycle, Beddingfield said each motorcywhich was also obtained at no cost cle class the town participates in, to the town. The town pays for the town earns 300 points, which general maintenance and insur- equals $300 for equipment. Beddingfield said the town’s ance on the motorcycle. N.C. Governor’s Highway motorcycle has been tremendous The World’sThe smallesT daily NeWspaper page 3 Safety Program will administer for community relations. He said the grant from federal funding the community is interested in seein the amount of $41,756 for ing the bike as well as increasing the motorcycle, according to the bike safety through the classes. “The whole purpose for the resolution. Beddingfield said the police first (motorcycle) was safety traindepartment has two officers cur- ing,” Beddingfield said. “But the EvEry WEdnEsday 4-8 pm is remarkrently qualified to teach the Bike community• relations able. It’s been a tremendous tool Safe class and one officer has to Drink specials use their personal motorcycle. community relations-wise, not to Complimentary mentionD'oeuvres the training.” When the officers need training, Hors & Lady Beddingfield said heRed has antheEntertainment: town can only send one Kenny officer Parker because the town only has one other officer interested in receivFull Menu for – training and if so, ingDinner motorcycle bike, he said. Beddingfield said there have the town would have three officers been several community activi- for two motorcycles. The new motorcycle ties where the town has used the by will be motorcycle, including leading a BMW because Kawasaki disounty Fire parades and 5K runs as well as continued manufacturing police olph, conducting the Bike Safe classes, motorcycles. Beddingfield said new one will be the same of points for the Hours Winter Chief which generate a lotNew photo Columbus in the N.C. Governor’s color and setup as the current mon. - Wed.: 2 p.m. - 12 midnight motorcycle. Highway Safety Program. Thurs. & Fri.: 2 p.m. - 2 a.m. It is not yet known when the By gaining points and parnow 2 p.m. - 12 midnight sun.: Closed approved town •will be officially ticipating insat.: the N.C. Governor’s asheville Hwy, Top of the Bird mountain • 864-457-2250 or receive the new bike. Safety Program, r the Highway ning

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

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Tryon Daily Bulletinâ&#x20AC;&#x192; /â&#x20AC;&#x192; The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work â&#x20AC;Ś With Your Neighbors! HELP WANTED ;LMXI3EOSJ8V]SRLEW STIRMRKWJSV '2% W%PP7LMJXW48 6IPMIJ'SSO487IGYVMX] *VM 7EXTQEQ %TTP]EX3EO7X 8V]SR2')3)

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HOUSES FOR SALE

HOUSES FOR RENT

MOBILE HOME RENTALS

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Our best selling 3 bd / 2 ba singlewide with designer decor Please call 828-684-4874 Selling your home? Advertise here and sell it faster. Call Classifieds at 828.859.9151.

MOBILE HOME RENTALS

FARMS/ ACREAGE

FOR RENT IN GREEN &EVRJSVVIRXWXEPPFEVR CREEK: 2 BR, 2 BA, nice SR,YRXMRK'SYRXV]6SEH 7LSVXLEGOXS*)8% mobile home on 1/2 acre lot. Garbage, grass mow- XVEMPWJIRGIHXYVRSYXWVMH MRKEVIE[MXLVSYRHTIR ing & water included. TIVQSRXL $550/m. No pets. Call  828-899-4905

HORSES & EQUIPMENT

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ONE TIME SPECIAL OFFER!

LAND & ACREAGE

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GOOD THINGS TO EAT â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picnics are fun atâ&#x20AC;? Parker-Binns Vineyard 7382 Highway 108 E Mill Spring, NC (828) 894-0154 Like Us On Facebook

LAWN & GARDEN

MOTOR HOMES

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WANTED TO BUY Junk Autos Wanted

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4((%HQMVEP7) 1, you. Paying up to $1500 *SVH'LEWWMW1 in cash. No towing fee. %YXS0IZIPMRK4S[IV 828-289-9515 7IEX6IEV'EQIVE /;+IR Sell your home in the  classifieds call 828.859.9151

Looking for a home?

Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

WANTED TO BUY VEHICLES

42 local artists, teak furn, pottery, wtr features, bird WE BUY houses, Pawleys Island Cheap running cars and Hammocks, Thompson junk cars. Up to $1000.00. Garden Gallery Come to your location. 828-859-3135 FAST SERVICE.

SPORTING GOODS

CARS

(828) 289 - 4938

CARS

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

O’Neal laNdscapiNg Lawn Maintenance

Landscaping, retaining walls, tractor & bobcat work, rock work.

Insured Call 828-863-2143

Friday, September 27, 2013

“Merrittsville: Lost Village of the Dark Corner” Oct. 8 The Landrum Library presents a showing of the documentary film “Merrittsville: Lost Village of the Dark Corner” with Dr. Anne Blythe on Tuesday, Oct. 8 beginning at 6:30 p.m. Her documentary film is an outgrowth of both her Upcountry heritage and her belief in the importance of place in our lives. The Dark Corner of Greenville County holds many secrets. One of them, perhaps the least known and now with time, the most mysterious, is the once-thriving but now underwater lost village of Merrittsville. Balanced upon the mountain peak dividing North and South Carolina, Merrittsville once rested in the ancient crosspath of the Saluda Gap, that natural passage way first marked by the tracks of native animals, then those of Native Americans. It later became the best route over the rugged mountains. What is known as “the Old State Road,”- the Superhighway of the 18th century, connecting upcountry with low country. But progress always exacts its due and over time, the price we paid was the loss of this once-bustling mountain town. Merrittsville now exists only in memory and story.

Dr. Anne Montague Blythe is a seventh generation South Carolinian and a literary historian. She holds a doctorate in 20th century American Literature, with a specialty in Southern and South Carolina writers. Formerly the curator of the Upcountry History Museum in Greenville, she is currently a heritage tourism consultant with Greenville County recreation district. She also chairs the Heritage foothills committee, which directs mindful development, tourism and promotion of the Historic Highway 11 Corridor in Northern Greenville County. Dr. Blythe has taught and directed conferences all over the world and has produced television and radio programs for South Carolina Educational TV and radio. She has published widely on authors such as William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Marjorie Rawlings and William Gilmore Simms. She is a published poet and has recently published her first novel entitled Carolina Mountain Song. This event is free and open to the public. Call the library for more information 864457-2218. - article submitted by Lee G. Morgan


B5 Friday, September 27, 2013

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

With treatment and recovery of addiction, one size doesn’t fit all Editor’s Note: As a continuing observance of National Recovery Month, and this year’s theme, Join the Voices for Recovery: Together on Pathways to Wellness,” Pavillon Treatment Center explores the styles and pathways of recovery that differ with each individual. While it is true that styles and pathways of recovery differ with each individual in recovery, it is also true for the care plans of formal addiction treatment services. This is known as the individualization of care. While we acknowledge individual differences, is there anything that is the same within what we know about addiction? Addiction disease has a widely accepted set of diagnostic criteria (the American Psychiatric Association), a descriptive definition covering physical, emotional, behavioral, spiritual and relational aspects of the illness (the American Society of Addiction Medicine) and a large body of research clarifying these aspects of the illness. This body of research grows each year. As the available research evaluating addiction illness grows, our understanding of addiction disease grows. This has led to a clearer picture of the commonality of addictive illness, regardless of the substance (e.g. alcohol, cocaine or prescription opiates) used or the behavior one is engaged in (gambling, etc.). The disease of addiction has never been better understood or better defined for all. Although the disease is well defined and our understanding of it is uniform, best care is individualized. Why is that? Not all people enter the disease with the same life or lifestyle. Not all people manifest all possible aspects of the illness. Not all people are equal in their length, complexity and severity of addiction illness. The common definition of addiction that describes and defines the problem is not a replacement

for understanding the person as an individual. What does the person using formal treatment to enter recovery specifically need? A formal intervention is needed for some and not others. Medically managed withdrawal is needed for some and not others. For many a residential start to formal treatment is needed. Some will do best in a longer term of residential care that includes stepping down through extended care and/or a sober residence. Some will benefit from medications aimed at withdrawal, post-acute withdrawal or psychiatric conditions. Some people will benefit in early recovery through medication support aimed at reduction of cravings. Everyone comes to treatment with their own key relationships and family connections. Thus, every plan for care varies in

terms of education, referral and vital support necessary for the relationships in each individual’s life. The goal is always promoting change and recovery at the level of key relationships and the family system, but again specific plans will vary. Are some of the family members or key relations in recovery? Do they need or want education regarding their own health and healing within the context of the personal recovery of the one in treatment? Will they do best with a counselor of their own? All of these questions illustrate that a one-size-fits-all approach will not work best with key relationships and the family system in view. Many are familiar with substance use problems through personal experience of one kind or another. Many are also familiar with the requirements of early recovery and of sustaining

Everyone comes to treatment with their own key relationships and family connections. recovery. Because our experience or familiarity with addiction or recovery, it can become easy to overlook the variables found within each person or to broadbrush the idea of a recovery plan. In short, we need look no farther than the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous to see clearly the centrality of the disease and of recovery, as well as the ways within which each person’s individual challenges and journey into and through recovery differ. Quality care and vibrant recovery appreciate and draw from both. - By Brian Coon, director of clinical services

macon wealth management Farrell Beam

Welcomes

Capital Investment Group Representative

640 North Main Street Hendersonville, NC 28792 Office:(828)692-3000 ext. 3607 fbeam@capital-invest.com

We have a new financial representative to serve you in the Hendersonville and Brevard, NC area. Stop by and see Farrell Beam and let him help you with your financial needs. Macon Wealth Management provides, through Capital Investment Group, Inc., a wide variety of products and services, including Retirement Planning and Rollover Options, College Savings Plans, Insurance, Annuities, Stocks, Mutual Funds, and Estate Planning. NOTICE: About Our Relationship with Capital Investment Group, Inc. Capital Investment Group, Inc and Macon Bank dba Macon Wealth Management have entered into an agreement for Capital Investment Group, Inc. to provide services at select Macon Bank locations. Mr. Beam, other Independent Contractors and employees of Capital Investment Group, Inc are not employees of Macon Bank, nor do they sell bank products. Non-deposit investment and insurance products and services that are offered by Capital Investment Group, Inc and/or related agencies are (1) NOT INSURED BY THE FDIC, (2) NOT DEPOSITS IN OR OBLIGATIONS OF MACON BANK or MACON WEALTH MANAGEMENT AND ARE NOT GUARANTEED BY MACON BANK AND (3) ARE SUBJECT TO RISK, INCLUDING THE POSSIBLE LOSS OF INVESTMENT PRINCIPAL

Securities offered through Capital Investment Group, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC 17 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27603 (919)831-2370


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Stubbed toes give reason to prop feet up and pause “Smoke hangs like haze over harvested fields, The gold of stubble, the brown of turned earth And you walk under the red light of fall The scent of fallen apples, the dust of threshed grain The sharp, gentle chill of fall. Here as we move into the shadows of autumn The night that brings the morning of spring Come to us, Lord of Harvest Teach us to be thankful for the gifts you bring us ...” – Autumn Equinox Ritual Summer disappeared overnight and fall is on our doorstep; leaves starting to change here and there, Joe Pye weed swaying a soft dance along Saluda back roads. Fall comes with a whisper amid blue clear skies, whispers of ever-turning seasons, life itself. Hummingbirds linger, the

little rascals fighting over feeders; to have to prop feet up, to take butterflies flit through afternoon time to read a new book, to watch the clouds overhead. Just a little sunshine. River dog lazes on the back reminder to come back to earth, deck, snoozing happily, soaking watch the changing leaves, and up warmth, as dogs love to do. just be in that moment. And will Barefoot, no glasses on, I man- I learn my lesson? Probably not: there’s nothing age to trip over better than bare him and smash Saluda feet on a sunny toes on the News & afternoon. downswing, the Commuresulting lanNotations nity: guage coloring by Bonnie Bardos Saluda Tailears of anyone gate Market within a mile. continues at River snoozes on, blissfully unaware of the crisis West Main Street public parking as I hunt up an emergency bag lot on Fridays, 4:30-6:30 p.m., of frozen peas for fast-swelling many Saluda businesses are open black and blue toes, mentally later on Friday, so browse the markicking myself amid the mind- ket’s fall produce, enjoy a meal, boggling pain for not wearing shopping and music. The next Top of the Grade glasses or footwear. However, over the past weeks as the toes Concert with Spencer & The healed slowly, very slowly, I String Ticklers is Sept. 27, 6:30found myself hobbled enough 8:30 p.m., McCreery Park. Bring

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chairs; food available. Saluda Welcome Table is every Tuesday; dinner from 5:30-7 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Saluda United Methodist Church. All welcome; donations accepted. Make plans to support the Oct. 12 Saluda 5k9 race for dogs and their people. Proceeds benefit Saluda Community Land Trust; visit saludaclt.org or call 828749-1560. There’ll be a community potluck and bingo at Saluda Center, Sept. 30, 6 p.m. Bring your favorite dish to share. Remember if you’re homebound and can’t prepare meals or are recovering from surgery, are 60 years and over, call Saluda Center to join the Meals on Wheels Program. Also, medical equipment is available to loan. Ask for Donna for information at 828-749-9245. (SALUDA NEWS continued on page 19)


B7 Friday, September 27, 2013

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Dr. James Booker receives certification Dr. James Richard Booker, Ph.D. business administrator, was recently licensed by the Secretary of the State of North Carolina as a notary public. Booker is a graduate of Stratford Career Institute, Washington, D.C. with a diploma in accounting, and is licensed by the state of North Carolina Department of Revenue as an accountant. He is a certified nurse aide that graduated from the Certified Nurse Aide Continuing Education Program at Isothermal Community College in October 2010, passed the N.C. Division of Facility Services – Adult Care Licensure Section, Medication Aide exam in February 2010;

• Saluda News (continued from page 18)

Yes, it’s true: there’ll be opera in Saluda. On Oct. 10 the University of South Carolina’s Music Department and Historic Thompson’s Store will bring a magical evening opera/dinner to the Back Alley Deck and Boarding House Venue. Contact Judy Ward at Thompson’s Store 828-749-2321 for information and reservations. Help Saluda School by donating box tops at the library, post office or school office. Happy “46” Anniversary to Rich and Rita Igoe! Happy September Birthday to Dale McEntire, Joni Rauschenbach, Sonya Monts, Linda Kaye Hayes, Carol Kenfield, Debbie Fisher, Leslie Jespersen, Linda Mintz, Sheila Billeter, Cary Pace, Ross Arrington, Hop Foster, Chuck Hearon, Alexia Timberlake and Clark Thompson. Thank you, dear readers for reading this column. It’s my goal to make you feel as if you were enjoying a visit on the porch swing on a golden late-September afternoon. Please feel free to contact me at bbardos@gmail.com; or 828-749-1153. You may also visit my website at bonniebardos.com for more writing and art, or find me on facebook.

and passed the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services exam to meet the educational requirements for the position of administrator for licensed adult care homes in North Carolina. He also recently earned credits through the State Board of Community Colleges and the University of North Carolina Board of Governors Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. - article submitted by James Booker

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Land O’Sky Doll Club to hold show and sale Come and enjoy the fun on Sept. 28 at the 25th annual Land O’Sky Doll Club Show and Sale from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the WNC Ag Center across from the Asheville Airport. The Log Cabin (enter at gate 5) will be bursting at the seams as dealers from six states, as far away as Florida and Louisiana, will be selling a beautiful variety of antique, vintage, modern, Barbie and artist dolls, teddy bears, parts and supplies. Bring your treasured doll for identification and appraisal. The Land O’Sky Doll Club has members from all over western North Carolina including Tryon and Columbus. A portion of the proceeds will go to charity. If you are a collector, are interested in becoming a collector or would like an interesting day out, you will not want to miss this event. Pictured at the 2012 Land O’Sky Doll Club Show and Sale from left to right: Linda Campbell, Jeannette Schmeichel and Myrna Viehman. (photo submitted by Jeannette Schmeichel)


B9 Friday, September 27, 2013

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Landrum Library fall fest Leon Gawlick and Barbara K u j awa e n j o y i n g t h e last Fall Fest concer t, performed by The Wilhelm Brothers, Sept. 19 at the Landr um Librar y. The library hosted five outdoor p e r fo r m a n c e s d u r i n g their first annual Fall Fest concert series. (photos by Anne Regan)

Meet Jim Holleman, General Surgeon, and… Like all good men, Jim Holleman is more than just his job. On a daily basis, he is removing gallbladders, repairing hernias, and saving lives through emergency surgery at St. Luke’s Hospital. That’s his day job, and sometimes his night job too! But when he’s not in the OR, you might find him on the yoga mat in lotus position… picking his guitar with a little rock ‘n’ roll… or just… contemplating. He understands there is more to health and wellness than curing disease. With respect for each patient, he often combines his skill in traditional medicine with his training in integrative medicine. If you ever need surgery, you need Dr. Holleman. You’ll get a great surgeon and a really great guy. St. Luke’s Surgical Associates (828) 894-3300 44 Hospital Drive, Suite 1A, Columbus,NC

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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even their occupation. You can also do an advanced Google search at google.com/advancedsearch, which helps you specify your search for better results. Some other free people search websites to try are pipl.com, wink. com and zabasearch.com. Or for a few dollars, you can search a little deeper at sites like intelius.com and peoplefinders.com. In addition to these search engines, try social networking and affinity sites where your friend may have registered like facebook.com, twitter. com, linkedIn.com and classmates. com. Another option is to check out high school alumni websites. Not every school has its own site, but some do, and you can look for it by going to any search engine and typing in the name of the school with the city and state it’s located in. You can also search at alumniclass.com, a huge hosting site for thousands of high schools across the U.S. If you’re looking for old college friends, your university alumni association may be able to help. While they probably won’t give you the contact information of the person you’re looking for, they may be able to forward a message for you. If you’re looking for someone you served with in the military, military.com offers a free “Buddy Finder” service that has a database

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B11 Friday, September 27, 2013

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

23

• Savvy Senior (continued from page 22)

of more than 20 million records. And if the person you’re looking for is politically active, the Federal Election Commission’s Web site (fec.gov) lists the addresses, ZIP codes and occasionally even the occupations of those who have given $250 or more to a national campaign. Deceased friends If you can’t find any current information about the person you’re searching for, it could be that he or she is dead. To find out if that’s the case, several sites including familysearch.org and tributes.com offer free access to the Social Security Death Index, a listing of around 90 million deaths in the United States. Legacy.com also adds a database of published obituaries from hundreds of American newspapers. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

New century scholars presents at Rotary

A program about Isothermal Community College was presented by Polk County Campus ICC Foundation Board members Sherril Wingo and Thad Harrill at a recent meeting of the Rotary Club of Tryon. Two of Polk’s 18 New Century Scholars (NCS) also spoke briefly about the six-year program, which prepares students for college and rewards successful completion with two years of fully paid tuition to ICC. Pictured are NCS 12th grade students Desiree Villecco (left) and Hannah Tafoya (right) with Rotary president Glenn LeFeber. (photo submitted by Barbara Clegg)


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Key nutrients enrich healthy bodies I’m often asked just what vi- muscles contract properly. Caltamins and minerals are, and why cium may also help prevent many major diseases according to a we need them. Vitamins are organic nutrients study conducted by Tufts-New (that our bodies can’t produce England Medical Center. Our or synthesize) that come from body’s concentration of calcium plants or animals. Minerals are declines with age, and must be naturally occurring, inorganic replenished by supplementation substances, which our bodies also or our diets. Two common forms of calcan’t produce. Our bodies need at least 30 vitamins, minerals and cium supplements are calcium carbonate (take other dietary with food) and compounds for Diet & Exercise citrate good health. by David Crocker calcium (take on an Today, I’m empty stomgoing to share ach). Be sure to check with your with you five. doctor before taking calcium 1. Vitamin E. This vitamin is a powerful supplements, because these can antioxidant that protects our sometimes interfere with absorpcells and actually helps them tion of some medications. Good communicate with each other. food sources include yogurt and It’s great to help protect skin, other dairy products, sardines and if you’re not getting enough with bones and leafy greens. 3. Potassium. vitamin E, you’re probably not This is another electrolyte absorbing other nutrients as well as you should. Vitamin E also that helps keep muscles and the plays a role in inhibition of blood nervous system healthy. Potasplatelet aggregation or premature sium helps keep blood pressure at blood clotting. Good food sources normal levels. Not getting enough include wheat germ, wheat germ potassium may leave you feeling oil, sunflower seeds, white beans, weak and fatigued. Many folks vegetable oils and red bell pepper. ingest too much sodium, but not enough potassium, but these two 2. Calcium. Every cell in our body con- should be in proper balance for tains, and uses some calcium. good health. The ratio of potasShortages of calcium can cause sium to sodium should be 2:1. In fact, one study suggests low bone density (osteoporosis). Calcium is also one of several minerals (electrolytes) that help (diet & exercise continued on page 24)


B13 Friday, September 27, 2013

• Diet & Exercise (continued from page 24)

consuming twice as much potassium as sodium can cut your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease in half. Potassium can lower risk of stroke too. Good food sources include bananas, citrus juices, avocados, cantaloupe, tomatoes, lima beans and fish. 4. Vitamin A. This vitamin helps keep skin, gums, and teeth healthy. It also helps us see better at night. To see in dim light, the rods in your eye’s retina use the chemical rhodopsin (also known as” visual purple”) to absorb photons and actually perceive light. Without enough vitamin A, rhodopsin can’t be produced. Vitamin A helps boost your immune system too. Vitamin A is fat soluble, which means your body stores it, so you can obtain too much. There are two types of vitamin A. Pre-formed vitamin A, from sources like liver, fish liver oils and eggs, and Pro-vitamin A (beta-carotene), that’s converted by our bodies as we need it, from sources like carrots, butternut squash, dark leafy greens, paprika, red peppers and sweet potatoes. 5. Magnesium. This is the fourth most abundant mineral stored in our bodies and necessary for more than 300 biochemical reactions. Magnesium helps our bodies store energy, keeps nerves healthy, and muscles toned, helps genes function properly, keeps bones strong, and heart rhythm steady. Magnesium helps decrease triglycerides (fat in the blood) and increases HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It can decrease hypertension (high blood pressure) and decrease risk for type 2 diabetes. Magnesium can also reduce risk of “Metabolic syndrome,” whose symptoms include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and obesity occurring at the same time, increasing one’s risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. One study showed those who consumed adequate amounts of magnesium cut their risk of metabolic syndrome by 33 percent or more.

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Diet or exercise question? Email me at dwcrocker77@ gmail.com or visit fitness4yourlife.org. David Crocker of Landrum has been a nutritionist and master personal trainer for 27 years. He served as strength director for the Spartanburg Y.M.C.A., head strength coach for the USC-Spartanburg baseball team, S.C. state champion girl’s gymnastic team and the Converse collage equestrian team. David was also a regular guest of the Pam Stone radio show.

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

A whole new world Special Cases writer, Leonard Rizzo with special case, Snickers (left) and friend. Read more about Snickers on page 27. (photo submitted)

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B15 Friday, September 27, 2013

• Snickers

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Though we do not have a home thus far for Snickers, the (continued from page 26) Boxer-Pit from last week’s tale, All too often we look at things I made it my business to make only through our own eyes, how the time to pay him another visit. we perceive things, how they Besides the urge to witness his make us feel. progress, I relished the chance to I often try to see things visit my dear friends, Jackie and through the eyes of the animals I Richard, and their fabulous group deal with instead. of rescues. I never tire of entering Our veta home where a Humane Society erinarians and group of dogs Special Cases specialists do a that enjoy my pretty good job presence greet Leonard Rizzo healing injuries me at the door. and illnesses, Down on one but it is up to us to heal the psy- knee as each inspects me and chological wounds animals often won’t leave till they get one on suffer through human hands. one attention and acknowledgeMany times these animals believe ment. Snickers joined the team that a life of abuse and neglect is as if he was always part of the simply the way it’s supposed to family, thanks to the wonderful be. You’ve seen their faces on TV job Richard and Jackie always ads and even at our own shelter, do with my kids. that blank stare of hopelessness Outside I watched as he and confusion. When I worked romped and played with other at the shelter it was one of my dogs and whatever toy was availgreatest joys to witness that tiny able. Every few minutes he light of hope begin to shine in would come over to visit me or their eyes. Jackie to give us some kisses and

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“Though we do not have a home thus far for Snickers, the Boxer-Pit from last week’s tale, I made it my business to make the time to pay him another visit.” -- Lennie Rizzo

to make sure we were watching how much fun he was having. The whole scenario filled me with emotions as I fought hard to hold back tears. Those of you who have been on this emotional roller coaster with me for years, and those new on board, I want you to imagine this: watching one of my kids, my precious babies, come out of a life of despair and enter a whole new world. I merely tell their stories, it is you, all of you, which make it possible and believe me, it doesn’t get better than this. Bless you, thank you and thanks for listening.

27

St. Luke CME Meet and Greet Sept. 28 The Evangelism Board of St. Luke CME Church will sponsor a Meet and Greet where community members can come and learn about Jesus and St. Luke CME Church, on Saturday, Sept. 28 beginning at 10 a.m. The event will be held at the Tryon Mall, located at the turnoff for Lake Lanier. Members of the board will give away free hotdogs and tracts, offering various items for sale and answering any questions you may have about St. Luke and Jesus. All are welcome to this event. Proceeds will benefit the Evangelism Board in their efforts to spread the Good News to others. – article submitted by Kimberly Porter


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

Spencer and the String Ticklers to entertain at Top of the Grade Concerts Playing a genre of rag-time, folk, and rock and roll, this up and coming local band will get your feet moving and put a smile on your face. Spencer and the String Ticklers will perform on center stage at the Top of the Grade Concerts in McCreery Park, Saluda, on Sept. 27 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Shops will be open until 8 p.m. Visit the band’s facebook page at Facebook/ StringTicklers to learn more about the band and listen to their music. Bring your chairs or blankets. Food, soft drinks, and coolers are allowed. Events are rain or shine, and concerts will move to the Pavilion if it is raining. The events are free to the public, and donations to the Top of the Grade Concerts are always welcomed. Food will be available on site. The Top of the Grade concerts are organized by the NC Small Town Main Street promotions team to produce events that bring the community together on a Main Street venue. For music scheduling, please contact Judy Ward at judyward@charter.net or 828-6745958. For sponsorships, please contact Cathy Jackson at 828-817-2876 or cathy@cathyjacksonrealty.com. – article submitted by Cathy Jackson

Spencer and the String Ticklers


A13 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Commissioners learn more about DSS through joint meeting In mid-September Polk County commissioners met with Department of Social Services (DSS) staff to better understand the mission of DSS. “I was very pleased with the level of professionalism, that their staff displayed during their presentations to us,” said commissioner chair Michael Gage. “As one commissioner, I would say this is just the beginning of a better working relationship between us all.” Involved in the meetings were Gage, Commissioner Ted Owens, Commissioner Ray Gasperson, Economic Services Supervisor Pallas Edwards, DSS Board Chair Pat Adcock, DSS Director Lou Parton, Social Work Supervisor Kim Wilson, Social Work Supervisor Jackie Johnson and Administrative Officer Julie Horne. – article submitted by Michael Gage

DSS staff and commissioners recently held joint meetings. Shown are front row, Pallas Edwards, Pat Adcock, Lou Parton, Kim Wilson and Michael Gage; back row, Ted Owens and Jackie Johnson.

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A14

Sports

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Friday, September 27, 2013

page 30 Friday, September 27, 2013

Tryon Daily Bulletin / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Green Creek Archery brings home state championship The Green Creek Archery club traveled to Conyers, Ga. the weekend of Sept. 21-22 for the Georgia State Archery Championship competition and came home with five medals, including one state championship. There were some high caliber archers in the competition, including Elzbieta Tworek, a member of the Polish Olympic archery team in 1980 and 1984; Lee Ford, a 2012 Para-Olympic archery team member; and Jake Veit, who set a record for high score in the Male Compound Fingers Master 70 division. Seven archers from the club, Rachel Roberson, Josh Streacker, Matthew Loman, Phil Burney and Rick Burney, as well as coaches Jim Vennera and Steve Burney participated in the tournament. Rick Burney won the state championship in the 12-14-yearold male compound bow division, with a score that was the sixth highest in the entire competition, across all divisions. Matthew Loman took the bronze medal in the same division. Phil Burney won the bronze medal in the 12-14-yearold male recurve bow division. Vennera and Steve Burney each won silver medals in their respective divisions. Rachel Roberson and Josh Streacker both came in fifth in their divisions (under 12 recurve bow, female and male, respectively). This was the first tournament for Loman and Roberson. The coaches agreed that it was a very good weekend and the club did a good job of getting noticed in Georgia.

Green Creek Archery Club medalists, from left, Steve Burney (silver), Matthew Loman (bronze), Phil Burney (bronze), Rick Burney (gold) and Jim Vennera (silver). (photo submitted)

Half of the archers at the tournament shooting under cloudy skies. At the far right is Green Creek Archery team member Josh Streacker. (photo submitted)

“It’s unusual for one club to win so many medals at a tournament, and we’re especially proud to bring home a state championship,” said Vennera. “The kids have all been working hard, and this weekend they were shooting against kids who have been shooting for many years longer than they have. They all did a great job.”

The Green Creek Archery Club initiated in October 2012 at the Green Creek Community Center. The JOAD (Junior Olympic Archery Development) program was started a short time later, in February 2013. Since then the JOAD club has grown to include 11 kids and has traveled to participate in four tournaments

in Georgia and hosted a tournament in conjunction with the Green Creek Heritage Festival. The club is open to children over 8 years old and adults. For more information, contact Steve Burney at Medicap Pharmacy in Columbus or call 828-894-6112. – article submitted by Steve Burney


A15 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Wolverines begin conference play versus Madison at home by Mark Schmerling

The Polk County Wolverines look to begin their quest for a Western Highlands Conference football title at 7:30 p.m. this evening when they host Madison, their first conference rival of the season. The Wolverines (2-3) have won their last two games. After a 55-27 loss to Erwin last week, Madison is 3-1 overall, and playing its first conference game of the season as well. The Wolverines are fresh off a 47-17 thumping of East Henderson. Wolverine coach Bruce Ollis labeled the Patriots “a very formidable opponent.” The team, which won 13 games last year and made it to the regional semi-finals, has many returning players. Last year, Polk lost the match up, 28-21, at Madison. Tonight, with a home crowd behind them, and a healthy squad, Polk looks to give Madison a long bus ride back. As witnesses to recent games

have seen, “We’ve played well on defense. We’ve made some dynamic plays on offense,” said Ollis. Polk’s tackling, a bit sketchy early, has become much more authoritative. As always, ball control will be key for Polk. Not coincidentally, the Wolverines made no turnovers in their two wins. Two Patriot players the Wolverines will try to stop in particular, are Madison’s talented tailback, Tyler Hoffman, and Cole Cuthberson, whom Ollis described as “probably the best punt returner and kick-off returner in western North Carolina.” He added that the Patriots have a tall and talented pass receiver (John Tikhonov). “They’re not as formidable up front as last year (after losing some players). (But) They’ve got a lot of confidence in having a great team,” Ollis said. “It’s good to be at home… This is a game we need to win.’”

The Wolverines’ Jordan Smith (2) and Debois Miller (54) bringing down an East Henderson ball carrier in Polk’s second win of the season. (photo by Mark Schmerling)


A16 32 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Sports

Friday, September 27, 2013

Landrum Cardinals head to Liberty

by Samantha Hurst

While Landrum found homecoming victory, the Cardinals hope to prevent Liberty from enjoying the same celebration as they head to play the Red Devils Friday, Sept. 27. “I’m excited about playing the game just like I am every Friday night,” said LHS head coach Russell Mahaffey. “If our players play at the level I know they can play I think we’ll do well, but we take no one lightly.” Landrum (1-3) hopes to keep momentum alive after grabbing their first season win over Carolina 21-6 at home. The Cardinals put up 336 yards last week and hope to put up that or more over Liberty, who’s 0-4 on the season. Mahaffey said the Red Devils are primarily a running team and his guys will have to be prepared for that type of offense. “We are going to have to play a good game against the run, which we’ve done and hopefully will continue to do,” he said. Liberty put up a strong effort against Powdersville last weekend, eventually shrinking the Patriot’s 18-point lead to a win of just 7 points. Landrum’s defense will look to create opportunities and limit Liberty’s offense. One way the Cardinals can do that is by forcing turnovers – LHS benefited from four turnovers by Carolina last week and two interceptions by their own Jacob Corn. Big plays like this could allow the Cardinals to continue their forward motion into another win.

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Landrum’s Aaron Bryant works to break free from a Carolina tackle on the Cardinal’s way to a homecoming win. (photo by Lorin Browning)


A17 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

33

Everything’s rosey with Daffy Jills

Jim Wilson, grower, exhibitor and president of the Asheville Blue Ridge Rose Society, gave a slide presentation on the 2013 RHS Chelsea Flower Show in London, England at the September meeting of the Daffy Jills Garden Club at the Polk County Library. Shown are Wilson and Daffy Jills President Priscilla Yeager. (photo submitted by Kathleen Warmack)


A18 34 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

A musical comedy created right before your eyes

Straight from NYC, The completely improvised musical comedy, Broadway’s Next Hit Musical will appear at Tryon Fine Arts Center on Saturday, Oct. 5 at 8 p.m. Tickets are available online or through the box office. A cast member will hold a musical theater improvisational workshop at 4 p.m. before the performance. See full story on page 35. (photo submitted)


A19 35

Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Hit Musical (continued from page 34)

Saturday, Oct. 5 at 8 p.m. at Tryon Fine Arts Center, join some of the most experienced musical improvisers in the United States as they create an entire musical comedy on the spot. Broadway’s Next Hit Musical, sponsored by Millard and Company, is the opening show of Tryon Fine Arts Center’s 201314 Main Stage Season. To celebrate this occasion and to provide material for the show itself, TFAC will offer hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar starting at 7 p.m. During this pre-show party, audience members can submit original song titles, some of which will be chosen at random for the actors to improvise in front of a live audience and one of which will be expanded into a “full” musical comedy in the second half of the show. With audience input used to generate every aspect of the show, Broadway’s Next Hit Musical promises a comedy inspired not

only by the audience, but by Tryon itself. The seasoned performers, four actors, an emcee and a pianist, collectively have 20,000 performances under their belt. Company member Robert Z Grant will offer a 90-minute class in improvisational theater for actors high school aged and up. The number of participants in this class is limited and those interested are asked to register in advance. Tryon Fine Arts Center is a nonprofit organization that operates and programs a 300-seat performance venue and 150-seat amphitheater for music, theatre, dance and lectures for a wide variety of audiences. Tickets for the season opener, Broadway’s Next Hit Musical are available online or at the Box Office. Tryon Fine Arts Center is open TuesdayFriday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. For information, call 828-859-8322 or visit www. tryonarts.org. – article submitted by Marianne Carruth

Carolina Keglers bowling shakes off rust for new season The Carolina Keglers began a new bowling season Wednesday, Sept. 25. This is a mixed league of women and men over 50 who want a little recreation with an emphasis on fun rather than competition. No experience required. Bowlers’ averages range from 70 to 170. Their format is nontraditional in that they change teams every week. This means there is no need to find a sub if you can’t bowl one week. Just keep the league secretary informed of your schedule and team adjustments are made while you enjoy that cruise to the islands. The Keglers welcome new bowlers any time during the six-month season. They bowl Wednesday mornings at Autumn Lanes in Forest City at

10 a.m. There is no league fee, you only pay for your bowling and shoe rental. The gang was a bit rusty after a long summer off, but had a good time as always. Familiar faces told stories of summer and new folks were met with friendly smiles and greetings. Some notable high games: Ellen Harvey - 147 Joan Hancock - 155 Jack Knirk - 188 Mike Davidson - 192 Gary Poague - 196 Anyone wishing to join the Carolina Keglers should contact Mike Davidson at 828894-5823 or email kwk1970@ windstream.net. Members are asked to please tell Mike when they cannot bowl. - article submitted by Mike Davidson

Fundraiser

Thursday, October 3 4:00 - 7:30 PM

To be held at Foothills Community Chapel 2720 Landrum Rd. Columbus, NC

.

No reservations required. Carryout available. For more information, call 828-817-4202.

Menu:

Fish, Hush Puppies, French Fries, Cole Slaw, Beans, Dessert, & Tea

EVERYONE WELCOME

LavenderBistro_NewStore_Quarter_091313_TDB_59394_[B]_190_V2c 3.75” x 5” 09 Sept 2013_Sri


A20 36 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, September 27, 2013

There’s no cut-off age for another grand adventure So I am dreaming about a While I have lifted my voice to join the chorus of, “Will this place to retire to that isn’t too far rain ever end?” uttered non-stop away from a boarding stable (besince the beginning of July, I cause giving up riding is a nonstarter), but may be anywhere have a guilty secret to share: that appeals. It should be said I have been loving it. Unless there has been a steady that Paul is a dreadful enabler downpour, I’ve managed to keep regarding these romantic visions the horses worked, not in my and for that, I’m very grateful. So arena which, frankly, began to far, we have it narrowed down to resemble an infinity swimming three places: Central, coastal, Italy, bepool the first week of rain, but rather, along the fence line in the cause of the wine, climate and charming, anbig field. “I’m Just cient, hill towns, Wa l k i n g west country hills is terrific Saying…” the of England, becross-training cause of the fish for horses and by Pam Stone and chips, pubs the steady aplenty, and the rhythm of this four-beat gait beneath you sends fishing villages that tumble down you into the land of Zen where from wild flower sprinkled cliffs all the problems of the world to the harbor, or the Cognac recan be solved after 30 minutes gion (‘nuff said) of France. Naturally, our friends think in the saddle. But even better, when the we’re nuts. “What about health care?” frequent storms prevented any “But you wouldn’t know outdoor activity, I had completely guilt-free afternoons with anyone there!” And the obligatory: endless cups of tea to pursue my “You don’t think you guys other passion: would be a bit long in the tooth Looking at real estate. Trust me: I’m not looking for such an upheaval?” Pffffft. for a second home. Nor could I There’s millions of people purchase one if wanted. No, my Internet trawling is something in Europe and the last time I akin to the daydreaming of hold- checked, they have exceedingly ing the winning lottery ticket… good physicians and hospitals. a whole afternoon of ‘what if?’ And secondly, I didn’t know a Truth be told, there will come soul when I naively moved to a day when the farm becomes too Los Angeles at the age of 25 and much upkeep for two people. I I had a wonderful time for the 15 am staggered that Paul can go years I called it home. But that last comment, about out, after a run or simply working at his desk, in the early humid being a bit old for such foolish afternoon, and cut all the grass schemes, frankly, took me somearound the house and barn with what aback. My plans coincide when the our archaic, non-propelled, push mower. For the endless driveway number 6 is attributed to my age. and fields (which takes six hours) Perhaps before, who knows? The the tractor is used. It’s all rather point is, since when was there easy to maintain in the other a cut-off age for another grand three seasons, but during a wet adventure? Exactly which birthday comes summer, when you swivel round in the tractor seat and actually with the whispered set of instrucsee the grass rising up again (I’m just saying continued on page 37) behind you, it’s a bit unnerving.


A21 Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

37

A fun way to buy local this holiday season You hear it over and over, Charles Taylor CPA, Cinn-Ful but what does it really mean Nuts, Condar, Fireplace Accesto our community? Simply put sories, Creative Cedar Homes when you buy local your dollars (certain items), Essential Bodywear (women’s intimates), stay local. If money spent at our local Fun Specs Eyewear, Henson’s business supports our local Building Materials, L. Blake economy and keeps our com- Smyth CPA, Landrum Antique munities thriving and supports Mall, LaBouteille Beer & Wine our city’s tax base, then we Boutique, Little Mountain Potneed to shop local. Consider tery, Melrose Inn, Swedish Sothis, studies have shown that for lutions Day Spa, The Red Horse Inn, Topnotch every $100 dollars you Publisher’s H a r d S u r f a c e Tryon spend at a loNotebook Cleaning, Daily Bulletin, cally-owned Tr y o n M o u n business, $45 by Betty Ramsey tain Hardware, dollars stays Tryon Riding & in the local economy, creating jobs and Hunt Club Steeplechase, Vines expanding the city’s tax base. & Stuff, WNC Edutech (comFor every $100 you spend at puter installation, repair and a national chain or franchise training). Chamber Bucks are honored store, only $14 remains in the at full cash value at participating community. While doing your gift shop- members. If you are a Foothills ping this year, you might want to Chamber of Commerce member consider The Foothills Chamber and are interested in signing up of Commerce “Chamber Bucks” for the Chamber Bucks proas a way to keep your dollars gram, contact Janet Sciacca, local. These gift certificates can chamber director, at 828-859be purchased at the Foothills 6236. More information can be Chamber of Commerce and then found at www.carolinafoothillsspent locally at participating chamber.com. Make a commitment to shop merchants, keeping your dollars local on a regular basis. It’s in the community. As of today (more are be- good for you, your neighbor ing added) participating Foot- and your community. If your hills Chamber merchants are: neighbor sells it buy it.

• I’m Just Saying (continued from page 36)

tions, “Now, dear, let’s be a little realistic and tuck away such silly dreams. Because, after all, they are just dreams, aren’t they?” Yes, unless you act upon them, dreams remain simply dreams. I don’t see myself as the sort of person who intends to jump out of an airplane at age 80 or even plunge, screaming, through a gorge on a zip-line, tomorrow.

But I do see Paul and I toasting a summer sunset from a bougainvillea-drenched terrace with a rustic Italian table wine, or going for an autumn hack on my horse through the open countryside of Cornwall and hearing the boom of the surf against the cliffs, or sampling the hand crafted cheeses in the village fromagerie. Whatever the reality becomes, I intend to give it my best shot, because I can’t imagine having nothing to look forward to. No matter what your age.

Think Globally... Shop locally!

—Support your— local merchantS

! First Rehearsal ! Community Chorus In preparation for

2013 Christmas Concert New Singers Invited !!!! October 7, 2013

Registration: 6:30 pm Tryon Presbyterian Church, Harmon Field Rd Rehearsals, Monday nights 7- 9 pm

Christmas Concert Date December 15, 2013 3:00 pm Polk County High School Director: Mr. Lesley Bush Accompanist: Ms. Pam McNeil


A22 38 Tryon Daily Bulletinâ&#x20AC;&#x192; /â&#x20AC;&#x192;The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Strauss & Associates, PA Estate Planning and Administration Attorneys 212 S. Grove Street Hendersonville, NC Dedicated to Preserving and Protecting Your Assets

Lee C. Mulligan, Esq.

Federal Estate Taxes Q. My estate is almost totally family land. Is there any way to arrange installment payments of federal estate taxes? Yes. If a substantial part of the estate is in a farm or a closely held business, your estate may not have enough funds to pay the taxes. The IRS allows an exception to the 9-month rule for such estates. If the decedent is a U.S. citizens and the value of the farm or business is more than 35% of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adjusted gross estate and the estate tax return makes such an election, your estate may defer payment of the estate tax for       your estate will have to pay only the interest on the deferred taxes. However, only the part of your taxes attributable to the farm or business can be paid in installments. The rest is due 9 months from the date of death. Call (828) 696 1811 for info on this or other planning techniques.

SASS-033252

Friday, September 27, 2013

Remembering Hunter, Wil and Ute Hearing of the passing of Hunter Waldrop was a real shock, as I had just visited with him a few days before, and he seemed fine. He showed me that he kept a grabber close at hand and used it for everything except the air conditioner, for which someone had given him a long stick to reach the knobs from his bed . . . Hunter had so much going all the time, even at White Oak, that he could hardly make time to visit. I am pleased that one of his honor bricks at the Veterans Plaza in Columbus is near mine . . . helps me find mine. Years ago I always saw Hunter at the Memorial Day and Veterans Day services. Later I took Lions medical equipment to their house for his late wife Edna. Hunter told me Edna always asked her caregiver to read to her, first from the Bible and then from my first book, A Boy in the Amen Corner. Hunter would always give me â&#x20AC;&#x153;tommy-toesâ&#x20AC;? (big smile) from his garden in season and tell me about his growing-up years. On my last visit at White Oak, he told me to get a peach from the refrigerator, since someone had brought him more than he could eat. He was always sharing from his bounty, either stuff or knowledge. A great friend to have! I saw Rev. Wil Potter many times over the years here, but

Remember When by Garland Goodwin

seldom had more than an exchange of pleasantries with him. I think that is what Wil was about . . . sharing and making life better for the folks he met, ministered to and built houses for. Not a bad record to leave behind when he went to re-join the One who sent him. Surely he was Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s man among His people. I enjoyed visits with Ute Seyffert at her White Oak apartment as Columbus Lions brought her our Christmas goodies each year as one of our VIPs (Visually Impaired Persons). She always welcomed us and we visited at some length with her â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and her bird, a large talkative parrot of some sort. When we talked of her reading machine, I asked whether she had a â&#x20AC;&#x153;mouse camera.â&#x20AC;? She had never heard of one. I sent her information about them and I believe one of her sons obtained one for her. The special â&#x20AC;&#x153;mouseâ&#x20AC;? (think computer) is much simpler to use than sliding stuff around under the TV-like screen. The mouse sends to the screen a greatly enlarged picture of whatever it is placed on. Ute could thus look at photos

in an album or labels on cans etc. as well as printed matter like newspapers and magazines. I was surprised to see her name by a closed room door (not her apartment) at White Oak last week . . . my visiting time was up so I told the young nurse to tell her that I would come back to see her another day. I am sorry that I will not have that opportunity because I had come to like her and enjoyed conversations with her. A delightful lady indeed. These are three more people of my acquaintance among too many departed souls this month. I write these little tributes in memory of folks who were a part of the tapestry that is my life to add some color to the bare facts covered in their obituaries. Sure, they had awards and accomplishments perhaps unknown to me, but we also shared experiences unknown to you. When I apologized to Jeff Byrd, former publisher of the Bulletin, for writing so many of these, he told me to continue because the staff of the paper often did not know the persons who had passed. So I have continued, at the expense of the stories and descriptions of people and events of the 30s and 40s that are supposed to be the substance of these columns. But many of these folks were a part of those years here, so I can rationalize that I am on track. Good!

T R Y O N P R E S B Y T E R IA N CHURCH

1x7 12/24 SASS-033252

3/7

A Church with Traditional Worship  Meeting Contemporary Needs Church School: 9:45 am Worship: 8:30 & 11:00 am Dr. Dent C. Davis, III - Pastor 430 Harmon Field Road 828-859-6683

tpreschurch@windstream.net STRAUSSASS - page 77

www.tryonpres.com

A Stephen Ministry Congregation


A23 39

Friday, September 27, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Calendar (continued from page 2)

senior fitness, 11 a.m.; bingo or bead class 12:30 p.m. 828894-0001. Democratic Women’s Club will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, Sept. 30 at 11 a.m. at the Democratic Headquarters in Columbus. This will be a working meeting and lunch will be served. Everyone is welcome. Info: 828-894-3219 Please submit Curb Reporter items in writing at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number of a contact person. Items will be printed in order by date of event, as space allows. Artist Keith Spencer

In plain sight at the Upstairs Artspace Spencer unveils the process With the possible exception of en plein air painters, it’s not often the public is granted the opportunity to voyeuristically watch an artist at work, particularly in the privacy of the studio. But this Saturday, Sept. 28, on the closing day of the highly successful 100 x 100 fundraiser at Upstairs Artspace, artist Keith Spencer will generously provide a glimpse into the creative process when he converts a corner of the downstairs gallery into his personal studio. The normally solitary artist will be painting on-site, from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., to create a work from start to finish. The finished painting will then be available for bidding during the silent auction closing event beginning at 6 p.m. that evening. While many local patrons are familiar with Spencer’s artwork, most will have never seen him at work. He has been a very private and solitary artist, work-

ing out of various local studios for the past 23 years. From first painting in an attic room in his Gowensville farmhouse, to his custom designed studio in Tryon, he has consistently been true to his process and commitments to the galleries that represent him throughout the southeast. His has been a long and successful road from managing a horse farm in Kentucky, to employment as a graphic artist, while enrolled in figurative art studies at the Greenville Museum of Art, to his long-term involvement with the local arts community. Spencer has been a regular contributor to the Upstairs Artspace having shown in numerous exhibitions, generously donated dozens of paintings for fundraisers and volunteered his time and experience consistently. He has served on its board of directors twice and chaired several committees. He has worked as a full-time artist since 2000 and his artwork is included in numerous collections throughout the U.S. and abroad.

During the time that Spencer is painting at the Upstairs Artspace this Saturday, viewers are asked not to interrupt his work. As a highly intuitive artist, a great deal of focus and attention is required to complete his work, and music is an integral part of that process. He will be happy to address the audience only during breaks and once the painting is completed. Silent bidding on the completed painting will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 28, and the bidding will close on his work and two collaborative works in the upstairs gallery at 7:30 p.m., at which time collectors of 100x 100 fundraiser artwork can take their purchases and discover the identity of the artists who completed them. The closing reception will last from 6-9 p.m. Upstairs Artspace is located at 49 S. Trade Street in downtown Tryon. For more information, visit the website at www. upstairsartspace.org or phone 828-859-2828. – article submitted by Tom Madison


A24

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Shown here is last years 2012-2013 winner Keeran Harmon, sixth grade student from Polk County Middle School. VFW Post 10349 Quartermaster and youth chairman, and Ladies Auxiliary chairman Gerry Taylor, present Harmon with a check and certificate. (photo submitted)

Friday, September 27, 2013

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paid trip to Washington, D.C. for the winner and a parent or guardian. This years 2013-2014 theme is: “What Patriotism Means To Me.” For a form and more information, call Johnny or Gerry Taylor at 828-894-8673, or see teacher Brain Taylor at Polk County Middle School. - article submitted by Johnny Taylor

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or parochial schools in the U.S., its territories or its possessions to participate. Home schooled students also are eligible. Foreign exchange students and former winners that place in the National finals are excluded from the contest. Winners are at the post, district, state and national levels are recognized. The first place award is currently $5,000, plus an all-expense

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Conducted nationwide, Patriot’s Pen, a VFW sponsored youth essay competition gives students an opportunity to write essays expressing their views on democracy. VFW Post 10349 invites community youth to join the more than 125,000 students who participated last year in this contest. Patriot’s Pen is open to sixth, seventh and eighth-grade students enrolled in public, private

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VFW post invites students to participate in Patriot’s Pen

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