Issuu on Google+

Polk and Spartanburg counties see decreased unemployment rates, page 10

Tryon Daily Bulletin

The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 86 / No. 152

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Monday, September 2, 2013

Only 50 cents

Battling the green beast

SCLT board member Nora Parks Anderson shown removing kudzu at a site in Saluda, near a sign that describes the project. See full story on page 4. (photo by Mark Schmerling)

Tryon Fine Arts Center arts in education committee members are looking for items to sell in the FENCE Community Yard Sale to be held Saturday, Sept. 7. Committee members ask you to bring your household or yard items to TFAC’s Studio A by 5 p.m. Sept. 5 to donate. All proceeds made by the sale of your items benefit B.I.G. grants for education.

Landrum tightens belt on 2013-2014 budget by Samantha Hurst

Landrum City Council members scrutinized every line item in the town’s proposed 2013-2014 budget during a work session held Tuesday, Aug. 26, tightening projected revenues and expenditures and preparing for insurance increases. Town manager Caitlin Martin in July brought concerns to council that insurance costs might go up as much as 13

percent. Such an increase would have forced the town to slash up to almost $13,000 from its budget, for insurance alone, Martin said. At a recent Public Employees Benefits Administration conference an increase of 6.8 percent was announced. (LANDRUM BUDGET continued on page 6)

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties

Want Your ad Here?

Call 828-859-9151 Reserve Your Space Today!


2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

STAFF Betty Ramsey, Publisher betty.ramsey@tryondailybulletin.com

Samantha Hurst, Editor samantha.hurst@tryondailybulletin.com

Leah Justice, Reporter leah.justice@tryondailybulletin.com

Gwen Ring, Design gwen.ring@tryondailybulletin.com

Lenette Sprouse, Marketing Consultant lenette.sprouse@tryondailybulletin.com

Harry Forsha, Marketing Consultant harry.forsha@tryondailybulletin.com

Kevin Powell, Marketing Consultant kevin.powell@tryondailybulletin.com

Jessy Taylor, Administrative Assistant jessy.taylor@tryondailybulletin.com

Jeff Allison, Pressroom Manager jeff.allison@tryondailybulletin.com

Jonathan Burrell, Pressroom

Ethan Price, Pressroom

How To Reach Us Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Today

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Mondays, Harmon Field/Tryon, 7 a.m. - noon. Saluda Center, Mondays, chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; line dance, 12:30 p.m.; Saluda Duplicate Bridge, 1:30 p.m. 828-7499245. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Family Member Support Group meets in Columbus on the first Monday of the month, 10 a.m. - noon. For info and/or location, contact Lisa at 828-894-0104 or Annie at 864457-7278. The Meeting Place Senior Center, sing-along, 10 a.m.; senior fitness, 11 a.m.; bingo or bead class 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Christian Fellowship Luncheon, TJ’s Cafe, Tryon, Mondays except holidays, noon - 1 p.m.; food, fellowship and discussion of relevant issues; interdenominational. The present study is The Christian Atheist: Believing in God but Living as if He Doesn’t Exist by Craig Groeschel. 859-5051. Chess Club, Mondays, 12:30 p.m., recreation room, LaurelHurst Apartments, Columbus. Open to anyone in community. 894-3336. Alcoholics Anonymous, Mondays, 5:30 p.m., Tryon United Methodist Church, New Market Road in Tryon. Male Domestic Abuse Intervention, Mondays, 6 - 7:30 p.m., Steps to HOPE. 894-2340. Landrum Library, yoga class 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Limited to

first 30 people for small fee. Thermal Belt Stamp Club will meet the first Monday of every month at Isothermal Community College in Columbus at 7 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous, Mondays, 8 p.m., Columbus Presbyterian Church.

Tuesday

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Tuesdays, Ozone Drive and Hwy. 176, Saluda. The Meeting Place Senior Center, beginner/intermediate pilates, 8:30 a.m.; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; devotions, 10 a.m.; bingo, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. House of Flags Museum, open Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum, open Tuesdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Storytime: Library card signup month will be held on September 3, 10:30 a.m. at the Polk County Public Library, Columbus. We’ll read books about libraries, make bookmarks, and you can sign up for a library card. LIFECare of Polk County/ Adult Day Health Care provides services Monday - Friday. Pet therapy every Tuesday is an opportunity for participants to interact with a trained pet therapy dog in a safe and meaningful environment. Call 828-894-2007 for more info. Cracker Barrel, 1 p.m. Tuesdays, conference room, Congregational Church. Free lunch at Mt. Valley, Free lunch available every Tuesday from 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.at Mt. Valley Pentecostal Holiness Church on Hwy. 176.

LOCAL WEATHER Today: Scattered t-storms, with 50 percent chance of rain. High 86, low 67. Thursday’s weather was: High 91, low 71, 0.02 inches of rain.

Tomorrow: Partly cloudy, with 10 percent chance of rain. High 84, low 61. Tonight’s Moon Phase:

PCHA: African American Faces of the Civil War The Polk County Historical Association programs will start up again on Tuesday, Sept. 3 at 2:30 p.m. in the museum in Columbus. Ron Coddington will discuss his new book “African American Faces of the Civil War.” All are welcome. Polk County Public Library, quilting club meets on the first Tuesday of each month, 4-6 p.m. Landrum High School cross country will have a meet with Woodruff on Sept. 3, 5 p.m. at Woodruff High School, Woodruff, SC. Saluda Welcome Table, every Tuesday, dinner will be served from 5:30 - 7 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Saluda United Methodist Church. All are welcomed. Donations accepted. Harmon Field Board of Supervisors meeting Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m. Public welcome. Harmon Field Cabin. Info: 828-859-6655. Landrum High School varsity volleyball will be playing Carolina on September 3, 5:30 p.m. at home. Steps to HOPE’s Women To Women Support Group on the first and third Tuesday of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. The meetings will be held at Ashley Meadows Community Room, 113 Ashley Meadows Circle, Columbus. Call 894-2340 for further information. Saluda Business Association, first Tuesday of each month, 5:30 p.m., top floor, public library. 828749-3444. Women to Women Support Group, first and third Tuesdays of (Calendar continued on page 15)

OBITUARIES Joseph A. Brown Jr., p. 9 “Bill” Belvin Coleman Ruff, p. 9

tryondailybulletin.com


Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

O.P. Earle Elementary students busy bees Students at O.P. Earle Elementary enjoyed their first day back to school Monday, Aug. 19. This week the school will hold student council elections and a summer reading celebration on Friday, Sept. 6. (photo submitted by Dawn Mason)

3


4 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

Saluda Community Land Trust shows kudzu can be controlled by Mark Schmerling

Although kudzu has earned the nickname “The vine that ate the South,” members of Saluda Community Land Trust (SCLT) have worked to control the growth of this aggressive, imported invasive plant in several locations around Saluda over the past five years. Support from the Polk County Community Foundation has helped pay for tools, signs and for some additional labor (SCLT members are all volunteers). SCLT’s kudzu removal project locations include the hillside behind the public parking area (where tailgate markets are held on Fridays); the so-called “Graham Triangle,” behind the Blue Gypsy, Manna Cabana and Green River Outfitters, off Main Street; near the Saluda Inn; the intersection of Ozone Drive and Thompson Road; the nature park; and behind Saluda School. The Ozone/Thompson location

shows the absence of invasive plants – proof it can be done. SCLT’s interest in kudzu removal dates to one of the group’s meetings, where members read an article on kudzu, and learned of the Spartanburg Kudzu Coalition that took on the entrenched and conducted its “Kudzu Kollege” to help others fight the plant. The coalition uses non-chemical methods to control kudzu. At the “Kollege,” SCLT members learned how to identify kudzu and how to control it. They learned that de-crowning each plant (separating the crown at the base of the plant, from the roots) is key. “It’s the most effective way of getting rid of it (kudzu),” said SCLT board member Nora Parks Anderson. SCLT members learned more when the Coalition’s Newt Hardie spoke at one of their meetings. They first engaged

(kudzu continued on page 4)

SCLT board member Don Clapp shows how a kudzu vine anchors itself to the ground and other plants. Below: Another volunteer works atop a hillside covered in kudzu. (photo by Mark Schmerling)

their opponent at the Ozone/ Thompson location, aided by “Kudzilla,” a small tractor modified to help roll up the long tendrils. “Kudzilla” was a brainchild of the Spartanburg Kudzu Coalition. It took more than one treatment, SCLT President Nancy Barnett. “You have to keep going back,” Barnett said. After the first treatment, coalition members returned to that location. “It was bad,” remembered Barnett. “We had to de-crown it. It’s an ongoing project.” In selecting other locations, “We saw places that were very visible,” said Barnett, to show others that control could be achieved. Though SCLT members have hired goats to munch unwanted kudzu, these efficient critters have not yet been available. “There are many uses for kudzu,” Anderson said, “and we encourage them (people) to use it.” Kudzu is also edible for humans. Young leaves can be used in salads, or juiced, while the roots provide edible starch. Young shoots are also edible;

seeds and pods are not. Some landowners bail kudzu for hay to feed livestock. Kudzu is also a source for soaps, lotions, rope and twine, baskets, paper, fuel and compost. SCLT members will show homeowners how to control kudzu on their property, but because the members are all volunteers, it’s up to individual homeowners to perform the actual control. SCLT’s efforts are within the 28773 zip code area. To reach SCLT, call 828749-1560.


5

Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Tr yon Supermarket 370 Trade Street, 828-859-9245

10% SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNT Wednesday Only With Coupon

STORE HOURS:

MUST BE 55 OR OLDER

Visit Us Online!

10% DISCOUNT

MONDAY THRU SUNDAY Excludes Advertised Specials Excludes Dealers Or Vendors (8AM-9PM)

www.tryon.iga.com

To All Churches

Hometown Owned • Hometown Operated • Hometown Proud PRICES EFFECTIVE : Meat Specials! MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 THRU SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities And Correct Typographical Errors. No Sales To Dealers. We Welcome Vouchers And Federal Food Stamps.

Boneless

Ribeye Steaks

Butt Portions $1.28-Lb.

Carolina Pride Shank Portions

6.98 1.18 Lb.

12-Oz., Assorted

Gwaltney Bacon

3.28

Ea.

Lb.

2-Liter, Assorted

Coke & Coke Products

.98

Sold in a 10-Lb. Bag

Chicken Leg Quarters

Limit 3, Please!

.68

Lb. 10-Ct.

16-Oz.

Tilapia Filets

Totino’s Pizzas

12-Roll

24-Oz.

2.98

Fresh

Chicken Breast Tenders

2.98 2.98 Ea.

10-Lb Roll, 73% Lean

Ground Beef

9.8 To 10.9-Oz.

Pet Ice Cream Sandwiches

2.28 5.98

Lb.

Lb.

Fresh Produce!

16-Oz.

27.8 To 33.9-Oz. Assorted

1.98

6.98

Smucker’s Grape Jelly

Hungry Jack Syrup

Jif Peanut Butter

Seedless White Grapes

.98

Lb.

Local

4-Pack

S.C. Grown Peaches

.98

Lb.

Fresh Red Bell Peppers 10-Lb.

2.98

All Purpose Russet Potatoes

3.98

3-Lb. Bag

Gala Apples

2.98

Jumbo

Seedless Cucumbers

45 /$

32-Oz.

Hungry Jack Pancake Mix

Folgers Coffee

2/$4

27.6-Oz.

1.98

24-Pack

IGA Water

2/$5

2.98

Fresh Deli Pizzas Available! Boar’s Head

Boar’s Head 12-Oz.

Fresh Express Garden Salad Mix

.78

8-Roll

Bounty Paper Towels

2.98 7.98

.78

18-Oz. Grape Jam, Apple Or Fresh

32-Oz.

Duke’s Mayonnaise

IGA Ketchup

6.98

.98

2.98

Lb.

Sukarne Ribeyes

IGA Crinkle Cut Fries

Tropicana Orange Juice

.98

Charmin Bath Tissue

2-Lb.

59-Oz.

Roast Beef

7.98

Lb.

Potato Salad

1.98

Lb.

Provolone Cheese

6.98

Lb.


6 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

• Landrum budget (continued from page 1)

“It’s good that overall it was less than I had anticipated … that dropped our budget numbers a lot,” Martin said. “The good thing is this means we won’t have to cut our budget as much as we feared.” Martin said she estimated 13 percent based on how much insurance costs were going up in other states and what other municipalities were estimating. Retirement costs are also going up about half a percent for police officers (last year’s rate was 12.45 percent and this year will be 13.01 percent), while the percentage for all other employees will increase to 10.75 percent. These two budget items amount to an additional $6,325 for insurance costs and $5,603 for retirement costs. During the Aug. 26 budget workshop and one previously held in July, council members proposed cutting about $43,000. “I went through the revenues to start off with and tried to get them

closer to what we were actually bringing in,” Martin said. For example, the city had received $511,000 in taxes as of July but had budgeted to receive up to $550,000. Martin said it is unlikely the town would reach that amount. In the 2011-2012 fiscal year, the City of Landrum brought in $580,000 in property taxes. With the fear of a 13 percent increase in insurance costs and losses in tax revenue, council members briefly discussed a tax increase during workshops. Mayor Robert Briggs said he believed talk of a mileage increase was premature. “When it comes to taxes, I think we all feel the same way – nobody likes to pay more taxes. Our responsibility is to make sure we are doing our due diligence as city leadership to make the budget work,” Briggs said. Council members cut Risk Insurance from $45,000-$30,000 and dropped a line item for capital improvement projects all together.

The elimination of capital improvement resulted in a savings of $13,500. Martin said in the last five budget years, the city has never used those funds, which typically only come into play if a major project must be completed that was unexpected. The city did also lower its line item for street improvements – work on sidewalks, etc. – from $25,000 to $15,000. These three decreases amounted to a savings of $43,500. If the city must cut elsewhere, council members suggested not purchasing a police vehicle this year. “Most citizens complain about how many police officers we’ve got and how may police cars we have, but they want to be safe,” said council member Johnny Carruth said. “There is a point, though, where you can have too much and it can cost you.” According to Martin, the city will add one police officer to its force through an agreement with District One Schools. The school system has offered to pay all costs

for employing one officer at Landrum High School. Martin said she is also prepping the city for a loss of $50,000 in the 2014-2015 budget when money stops coming in from the city’s contract with Spartanburg Water. “Luckily Landrum has been in a position over the years to put back money and have something in savings to fall back on if needed. It’s not the ideal situation but at least the city prepared itself in years past,” she said. The total budget for 20132014 is projected at $1,634,884, a decrease of $17,356 from the 2012-2013 budget. “When we estimate revenues we are extremely conservative,” said Mayor Briggs. “The revenues look like they are down a lot, but I think it is just a truer picture of what we’re going to be working with this coming year.” The city has about four weeks left to set public hearings and approve a balanced budget prior to it taking effect on Oct. 1.

You might be surprised to find the retirement lifestyle you’ve been looking for is already in your community, at Tryon Estates. Nestled in the foothills in Columbus, we’re a community that keeps you close to everything you love about this area. We’re an ACTS Retirement-Life Community, built on proven financial stability and a faith-based mission to provide security and peace of mind ™. Call us ® through ACTS Life Care at 828.414.1524 An Affiliate of ACTS Retirement-Life Communities to discover how Tryon Estates can elevate your retirement experience.

Magnolia Trace

C

Tryon Estates

P

An ACTS Retirement-Life Community

ACTStryon.org

Lanier Village

617 Laurel Lake Drive • Columbus, NC • 828.414.1524

Elevate your retirement

without changing your area code.

E S T A T E S An ACTS Retirement-Life Community ®

ACTS Retirement-Life Communities is celebrating more than 40 years of strength as the leader in service to seniors.

Park PointeVillage An Affiliate of ACTS Retirement-Life Communities®

Fo


7

Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Now At

Fuel Rewards Shop & Save on Gas!

*

$1 in Groceries* = 1 Point

Redeem Your Fuel Rewards at any Ingles North Carolina Gas Express Locations:

Store #4 1141 Tunnel Rd. Asheville, NC 28805

Store #27 756 S. Church St. - Ste. 132 Forest City, NC 28043

Store #43 2901 Hendersonville Rd. Fletcher, NC 28732

Store #120 120 Carbon City Rd. Morganton, NC 28655

Store # 146 715 W. Trade St. Dallas, NC 28034

Store #7 29 Tunnel Rd. Asheville, NC 28805

Store #28 5580 Hwy. 25/70 Marshall, NC 28753

Store #55 630 Champion Dr. Canton, NC 28716

Store #121 2630 Connelly Springs Rd. Granite Falls, NC 28630

Store #147 2111 Shelby Rd. Kings Mountain, NC 28086

Store #8 550 Hwy. 9 Black Mountain, NC 28711

Store #30 1865 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803

Store #62 575 New Leicester Hwy. Asheville, NC 28806

Store #127 276 NC Highway 9 Lake Lure, NC 2876

Store #177 220 N. Highland Lake Rd. Flat Rock, NC 28731

Store #12 1818 W. Dixon Blvd. Shelby, NC 28150

Store #33 125 Greenwood Rd. Spruce Pine, NC 28777

Store #67 684 N. Broad St. Brevard, NC 28712

Store #130 301 Long Shoals Rd. Arden, NC 28746

Store #179 3643 Howard Gap Rd. (@Hwy 64) Hendersonville, NC 2879

Store #22 - Woodland Hills 499 Weaverville Rd. Asheville, NC 28804

Store #34 2299 US Highway 70 Swannanoa, NC 28778

Store #80 225 Carl Eller Rd. Mars Hill, NC 28754

Store #133 3338 Boylston Hwy. Mills River, NC 28759

Store #180 140 Weaver Blvd. Weaverville, NC 28787

Ingles ROP 7.625x9.935 (Runs Week 9-1 through 9-7-13) 4/C - NC Tryon Daily Bulletin


8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work ‌ With Your Neighbors! PHOTOGRAPHY

HEALTH & WELLNESS

PhotoBlankets andMore.com Turn favorite photos into a woven collage blanket. Great gift! (828) 817-4790

4634L]WMGEP8LIVET] ,IEPXL *MXRIWW 1EOI463]SYV *-678',3-')

  [[[46348GSQ

Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151

EDUCATION Lake Lure Classical Busing from Columbus Green Creek, Mill Spring Free public school option Now enrolling K-10 Info at 828.625.9292

PET CARE Pet boarding, grooming and daycare. Large suites, playgrounds, vet on call, friendly staff. Hideaway Hills 828-685-9500

ARTS & CRAFTS &IEH/RMXXMRK'PEWW /RMXMGEPMX]MR7EPYHE 7IEXMRKMWPMQMXIH 6IWIVZI]SYVWRS[ 'EPP

APPLIANCES 18&,SYWI SJ&EVKEMRW ,[] 'EQTSFIPPS 'SQFMRIHFSXLWXSVIW ,SX[EXIVLIEXIVW WXSZIWVIJVMKIVEXSVW [EWLIVWHV]IVWERH QYGLQSVI 1*7EX  &IWXTVMGIWMR SVSYXSJXS[R

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HELP WANTED

8SQQ] W 430-')3**-')6 ,SQI-QTVSZIQIRX 8LI'MX]SJ0ERHVYQ 6SSJWVIRSZEXMSRWWMHMRK MWRS[EGGITXMRK GEVTIRXV]HIGOW[MR ETTPMGEXMSRWJSVE4SPMGI HS[WWGVIIRMRK%PP,SQI 3JJMGIV5YEPMJMIHETTPMG 6ITEMVW*6)))WX ERXWQYWXFI]IEVWSPH ,SQI   EVIWMHIRXSJ7'LEZIE 2EXYVEP*SSHW 'IPP   ZEPMH7'HVMZIVoWPMGIRWI 5YEPMX]:MXEQMRW ,IVFW ERHFIEFPIXSTEWWE 1EWWEKI8LIVET] =SYV*PSSVMRK VMKMHFEGOKVSYRH 2EXYVI W7XSVILSYWI 7TIGMEPMWXW MRZIWXMKEXMSR'IVXMJMIH  1MQSWE'EVTIX-RG SJJMGIVW[MPPFIKMZIR 7SYXL8VEHI7X TVIJIVIRGI%TTPMGEXMSRW 8V]SR2' [MPPFIEGGITXIHEX'MX] OUSE ,EPP27LEQVSGO %ZIYRXMPTQ LEANING 7ITXIQFIV ABINETS ,SYWI'PIERIV ,EVH[SVOMRK (ITIRHEFPI ELP ANTED 7MKREXYVI'EFMRIXW 0SSOMRKJSVRI[GPMIRXW 'YWXSQ'EFMRIXW ESTAURANT 6IJIVIRGIWEZEMPEFPI 1ERXIPW)RXIVXEMRQIRX 'EPP'EVSP 'IRXIVW*VII)WXMQEXIW 2S[,MVMRK   'SSOWERH;EMXWXEJJJSV RI[P]STIRIH,EVZIWX ,SYWI6IWXEYVERX'EPP AINTING FIX[IIREQTQ ERVICES ;IH7EX WILLIAMSON'S PAINT 463*)77-32%0 for all your painting needs 46)7796);%7, 140 N Trade Ave RADES RAFTS ;I[EWLLSQIWHIGOW Landrum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r)\GIPPIRX,SQI8MQI ERVICES r2SXSYGLJVIMKLX %YXYQR'EVISJ7EPYHE r6ITIXMXMZIHIPMZIV] COMPLETE LEWERSTIRMRKJSVE VSYXIW 04262JYPPXMQI;ISJ PAINTING SERVICES r(VST ,SSO*VIMKLX JIVJPI\MFPIWGLIHYPIW Yoder Painting is fully r*EQMP]%XQSWTLIVI KVIEXFIRIJMXTEGOEKIW insured, including worker's %TTP]SRPMRI$ comp. No job too large. [[[WLMTXVYGOWIVZMGIGSQ GSQTIXMXMZI[EKIWPSRK XIVQGEVII\TIVMIRGITVI Call 828-894-5094. SVGEPP

JIVVIH4PIEWIGSRXEGX .SMRSYVXIEQSJ 8MWLE(EZMW 4VSJIWWMSREP(VMZIVW  REE ERVICE 869'/7)6:-')-2' *SVIWX'MX]2' &E]EHE,SQI,IEPXLGEVI TOTAL TREECARE, Need to find the -QQIHMEXIRIIHJSV62 W BOBCAT SERVICE, ERH042 W-R7SYXL'EVS STUMP GRINDING right employee? PMRE4SPO'SYRX],IRHIV WSR'SYRX]ERHWYVVSYRH JB TREES LLC MRKEVIEW'YVVIRXP]LMVMRK 864 497-8511 FSXL48ERH*8JSVTIHM EXVMGERHEHYPXTSWMXMSRW OME 'SRXEGX2MGSPI0YKS 

H C

C

H R

P

S

T

D

P

T

W

D

S

S

H IMPROVEMENT

WE CAN HELP.

SOLATUBE Daylighting System Innovations in Lighting (828) 894-8148 Columbus, NC Like Us On Facebook

Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

7IIOMRKUYEPMJMIH 2YVWI4VEGXMXMSRIV JSV[IPPIWXEFPMWLIH TVEGXMGI 2SGEPP2S[IIOIRHW GPSWIHQENSVLSPMHE]W 'SQTIXMXMZIWEPEV]

FIRIJMXW)QEMP':XS MRJSVQEXMSR$ GQELIEPXLGEVIGSQ

REAL ESTATE 1YPXM9WI6IRXEP4VST IVX]*PI\MFPI7TEGI%'

+EW4LEWI4S[IV EZEMPWUJX WQEPPSJJMGIW WXSVEKI WTEGI4EVOMRK0IEWI RIKSXMEFPI[MPPGSRWMHIV TEVXMEPPIEWI SV  KZKEEP$KQEMPGSQ

,C &S

/ /OTR

H M

HELP WANTED MEDICAL/DENTAL

W /D

CABINS

DB Let T d Ads siď&#x192;&#x17E;e you! s a l C for work

HOUSES FOR RENT

&PYI,SVWI0ERI 3JJMGI7TEGI%ZEMPEFPI ,SVWI*EVQ MR,MWXSVMG&YMPHMRK FHVQFEJSVQEP XSWUJXWTEGIW HMRMRKVSSQIEXMROMX XSTIVQSRXL GLIR  WXEPPFEVR  1MPP7TVMRK%KVMGYPXYVEP JIRGIHTEWXYVIWEFIEYXM 'IRXIV *EVQ7XSVI JYPIWXEXIJMVWXPEWX WI 3TIR1SR7EX GYVMX]SJTIVQSRXL JIEXYVMRK0SGEP*SSH'EPP VIUYMVIH6IJIVIRGIWRS SV WQSOIVWGSRXEGX [[[TSPOGSYRX]JEVQWSVK 4EX1EVXMR  ;MRRIVW'MVGPI FHVQFE RSWQSOIVWVIJIVIRGIW JMVWXPEWXERHWIGYVMX] HITSWMXSJ *MVWX6IEP)WXEXI 

MOBILE HOME RENTALS FOR RENT IN GREEN CREEK: 2 BR, 2 BA, nice mobile home on 1/2 acre lot. Garbage, grass mowing & water included. $550/m. No pets. Call 828-899-4905

APARTMENTS

*SV6IRX:MRI]EVH 6H8V]SR;EPOSYXFEWI ,ERH]QER7TIGMEP QIRXETEVXQIRX&6 2'1SYRXEMR FEXLJYPPOMXGLIR GSXXEKISRPIZIPEGVIW [EWLIVHV]IVLSSOYTRI[ 3RP].YWX JPSSVMRKTIVQSRXL QMRYXIWXSXS[RERHPEOI TPYWHITSWMX'EPP 2IIHW[SVO'EPP  JSVHIXEMPW *366)2846)1-91 SRIFIHVSSQETEVXQIRX OUSES FOR JYPP]JYVRMWLIHEPPYXMPMXMIW MRGPYHIH0SGEXIHMR ALE ,EVQSR*MIPHEVIESJ , ZMPPI'SRZIRMIRX[ 8V]SR)RNS]XLIWTIGXEG ZMI[ YPEVZMI[WERHWIVIRIWIX *SVIWX[H'SYVX2MGIIRH XMRKQS-RUYMVIEX YRMX[MXL[SSHIHZMI[  &6&%[WYRVSSQ 

H

S

ONE TIME SPECIAL OFFER! Our best selling 3 bd / 2 ba singlewide with designer decor Please call 828-684-4874

HOUSES FOR RENT

%ZEMPEFPI23; &66IJVMK7XSZI MRGPYHIH2I['IRXVEP LIEXEMV0EVKIFEGO]EVH '2%*364)(-%86-'7 ;MXLMR[EPOMRKHMWXERGISJ 'YVVIRXP]WIIOMRKE'2% HS[RXS[R8V]SR'PSWIXS JSVSRISRSRIGEVIMRXLI 8V]SR)PIQIRXEV]WGLSSP 'SPYQFYW8V]SREVIE TIVQSRXL7IGYVMX] 4PIEWIGEPP HITSWMXVIUYMVIH'EPP JSVHIXEMPW

 

OFFICE SPACE

WANTED TO RENT

;ERXIH'PIER7XYHMS SVWQEPPETEVXQIRX 6IXMVIHTIVWSR[MXL I\GIPPIRXVIJIVIRGIW 

LAND & ACREAGE *36)'03796) 2'1827 TVMQIEGVIW[MXL WXYRRMRKQXRZMI[W PKLEVH[SSHWPIZIP IPIZEXIHFPHKWMXIERH TEZIHEGGIWWSRP] JMRERGMRKEZEMP FVOV

FURNITURE

*YVRMXYVIJSV7EPI 2I[ :MRXEKI0ERHVYQ %RXMUYIW *YVRMXYVI'S )6YXLIVJSVH7X 0ERHVYQ Sell your home in the classifieds call 828.859.9151

GOOD THINGS TO EAT â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picnics are fun atâ&#x20AC;? Parker-Binns Vineyard 7382 Highway 108 E Mill Spring, NC (828) 894-0154 Like Us On Facebook

LAWN & GARDEN 42 local artists, teak furn, pottery, wtr features, bird houses, Pawleys Island Hammocks, Thompson Garden Gallery 828-859-3135

Looking for a home? Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

WANTED TO BUY VEHICLES WE BUY Cheap running cars and junk cars. Up to $1000.00. Come to your location. FAST SERVICE.

(828) 289 - 4938

CARS .IXXE)\GIPPIRX GSRHMXMSR [LMXIXERPSEHIH2I[ 4MVIPPMXMVIW  WYRVSSJ EYXSQEXMGSVMKMREPS[RIV EP[E]WQEMRXEMRIHEXHIEP IVWLMTGSQTPIXIWIVZMGI VIGSVHKEVEKIHEWOMRK 


9

Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletinâ&#x20AC;&#x192; /â&#x20AC;&#x192;The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work â&#x20AC;Ś With Your Neighbors! LEGALS

LEGALS

0)+%0238-')

LEZMRKGPEMQWEKEMRWXXLI HIGIHIRX XS I\LMFMX XLI WEQIXSXLIYRHIVWMKRIH 4IVWSREP 6ITVIWIRXEXMZI SRSVFIJSVIXLIXLHE] SJ(IGIQFIVSVXLMW RSXMGI [MPP FI TPIEHIH MR FEV SJ XLIMV VIGSZIV] %PP TIVWSRWJMVQWERHGSVTSV EXMSRWMRHIFXIHXSXLIIW XEXI[MPPTPIEWIQEOIMQ QIHMEXITE]QIRX 8LMWMWXLIXLHE]SJ%Y KYWX

238-') 83'6)(-8367 ,EZMRK UYEPMJMIH SR XLI XLHE]SJ%YKYWX EW4)6732%06)46)7 )28%8-:) SJ XLI )WXEXI SJ 1%6-%22) &63;2 HIGIEWIH PEXI SJ 4SPO 'SYRX] 2SVXL 'EVSPMRE XLMWMWXSRSXMJ]EPPTIVWSRW JMVQW ERH GSVTSVEXMSRW

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

0)+%0238-') %YHVI]6/PEXXI 3EO7XVIIX%TX 238-') 8V]SR2' 83'6)(-8367 4IVWSREPVITVIWIRXEXMZISJ XLI)WXEXISJ1EVMERRI ,EZMRK UYEPMJMIH SR XLI &VS[R XLHE]SJ.YP]EW )<)'9836SJXLI)WXEXI 8V]SR(EMP]&YPPIXMR SJ1%6.36-)&:-2-2+ %YK7ITXERH HIGIEWIH PEXI SJ 4SPO  'SYRX] 2SVXL 'EVSPMRE XLMWMWXSRSXMJ]EPPTIVWSRW )78&63;21 JMVQW ERH GSVTSVEXMSRW LEZMRKGPEMQWEKEMRWXXLI

HIGIHIRX XS I\LMFMX XLI WEQIXSXLIYRHIVWMKRIH )\IGYXSVSRSVFIJSVIXLI XL HE] SJ (IGIQFIV SVXLMWRSXMGI[MPPFI TPIEHIHMRFEVSJXLIMVVI GSZIV]%PPTIVWSRWJMVQW ERHGSVTSVEXMSRWMRHIFXIH XS XLI IWXEXI [MPP TPIEWI QEOIMQQIHMEXITE]QIRX 8LMWMWXLIXLHE]SJ%Y KYWX .SLR:MRMRK

DB Let T d Ads siď&#x192;&#x17E;e you! s a l C for k r o w

LEGALS 43&S\ 8V]SR2' )\IGYXSVSJXLI)WXEXISJ 1EVNSVMI&:MRMRK 8V]SR(EMP]&YPPIXMR %YK7ITXERH  )78:-2-2+1 Sell your home in the classifieds call 828.859.9151

LEGALS Need to find the right employee?

WE CAN HELP. Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

TLT opens 2013-2014 season with Sinatra Tribute Sept. 26-29 Rehearsals are well underway at the Tryon Little Theater for its 2013-2014 season opener, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Way â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra,â&#x20AC;? to play the workshop Sept. 26-29 and Oct. 3-6. If someone refers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Blue Eyes,â&#x20AC;? you know who they mean. Same with â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chairman of the Board,â&#x20AC;? or for our older population, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voice.â&#x20AC;? All instantly bring to mind one Francis Albert Sinatra of Hoboken, New Jersey: the skinny Jimmy Dorsey crooner, gutsy Capital Records swinger, Academy Award winner, Gene Kelly dance partner, Rat Packer, family man . . . the lion in winter who did things his way. Directed by Ben Chumley, a

professional musician and actor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Wayâ&#x20AC;? takes the audience through many of Sinatraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best songs. He recorded over 1,300, and while they considered singing every one of them, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Wayâ&#x20AC;? company realized it would take them exactly eight days if they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take any intermissions or breaks. So instead patrons will be treated to many favorites via medleys: Broadway, cities, young love, summer, losers, big flirt, moon, survivors and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lady is a Tramp,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Got You Under My Skin,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Make Me Feel So Young,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It Was a Very Good Year,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;One for My Baby,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York, New York,â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Funny Valentine,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Best is Yet to Come,â&#x20AC;? on and on. It has been said that probably half the US population more than 50 was conceived while their parents were listening to the music of Frank Sinatra. Johnny Carson once asked Sinatra what music he put on when he wanted to get a woman in the mood. Sinatra laughed so hard, he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t answer. The stage set for TLTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Wayâ&#x20AC;? will be a cabaret, complete with working cash bar onstage open to patrons before the show starts and during intermission. Director Chumley at the piano will be joined onstage by singer/actors Debbie Craig-Archer, Katie Cil-

Obituaries

Army. In addition to his wife, he is survived by a sister, Pauline Brown Bradey. He was predeceased by brothers, Arthur Brown, Eddie Lee Brown, Claude Brown, J.M. Brown and Clarence Brown; and sisters, Rosetta Flynn and Lorena Peeler. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2013 at Saluda United Methodist Church. Funeral services will follow at 2 p.m. at the church conducted by Rev. Rob Parsons. Burial will be in Saluda City Cemetery. Condolences may be left at www.pettyfuneralhome.com.

Obituaries

Joseph A. Brown Jr. Joseph Ashby Brown Jr., 84, of Lake Hosea, Saluda passed away Aug. 29, 2013 at Pardee Hospital. He was the son of the late Joseph Brown Sr. and Florence Cudd Brown and husband of Betty Anna Thompson Brown. He was a member of First United Methodist Church in Saluda and a graduate of Robinson Business College. He retired from BigelowSanford and served in the U.S.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billâ&#x20AC;? Belvin Coleman Ruff â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billâ&#x20AC;? Belvin Coleman Ruff, died Aug. 29, 2013. He is survived by wife Sybil Huffstickler Ruff; daughters Robin Rene Ruff Street (Bob) of Forest City, Mitzie Renn Ruff

luffo, Terry Neal and Josh Moffitt. The TLT box office at the Workshop, 516 South Trade Street, will open Sept. 16, and be open Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 p.m., plus Tuesdays and Thursdays 4-7 p.m. Group discounts are available at 15 percent off for groups of 10-20, and 20 percent off for 21 tickets and above. All discounted group tickets must be for the same performance (not available opening night), and paid for by a single check or credit card. For reservations, call 828859-2466. Further information is available at www.TLTinfo.org. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; article submitted by Connie Clark

Dominguez (Rich), Resa Lynn Ruff Thompson (Marty) both of Rutherfordton; sisters Kaye Gold, Faye Bridges (Robert), and Linda Fleming (Carl) all of Rutherfordton; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. A celebration of life was held Saturday, Aug. 31 at the Family Life Center of Second Baptist Church-Rutherfordton.

Read more online at www.tryondailybulletin.com


Market Place

10 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

10

Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Monday, September 2, 2013

Chamber event at Foothills Humane Society

Top left: Business owners and Chamber Members brought donations of dog food, cat food and little to the Foothills Humane Society Aug. 27. Bottom: FHS Director Selena Coffet speaks to guests during the Chamber Business After Hour s event. The event was co-sponsored by Purrrfect Bark and Larkins. (photo submitted)

Polk and Spartanburg counties see decreased unemployment rates by Samantha Hurst

Polk and Spartanburg Counties both saw drops in their unemployment rates again this month. Polk County’s unemployment rate for the month of July dropped to 6.5 percent from its

6.6 percent rate in June. Polk County’s drop reflects that 611 individuals from the estimated 9,430-member work force are without a job. Neighboring Henderson County has a 6.4 percent unemployment rate, while Rutherford sits at 12.3

percent unemployment. Scotland County, N.C. had the highest rate in July at 16 percent. The lowest rate statewide was Currituck County at 5.3 percent unemployment. North Carolina’s statewide rate was 9.1 percent.

Spartanburg County also dropped from 8.7 percent in June to 8.4 percent in July, a 0.3 percent decrease. Spartanburg County’s rate was 9.9 percent in July 2012. South Carolina’s overall rate for July 2013 was 8.1 percent.


Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Where We Work Person Featured: Melissa Johnson Title: Customer Service and Sales Manager Business: Food Lion Address: 210 West Mills St., Columbus, N.C. Phone Number: 828-894-8286

11

An in-depth look at an area business

One thing you wish people knew about your business: There are many large retailers that lose sight of what customers want and need. In our store, we have a highly dedicated team whose key focus is providing the highest level of service to our customers, every day. Something to offer that a customer won’t find somewhere else: We provide our customers with low prices, a clean store and fast and friendly checkouts.

Melissa Johnson Operating Hours: Sunday – Saturday, Advice to young leaders: Don’t fail to learn all 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. you can from those who went before you. Don’t be afraid to challenge the rules. But most of all, remember to stay humble. Store Manager: Donna Ducker

Your role model: My mom is definitely my role model. She taught me that no task is too big, no day is too tiring and no challenge is too difficult. She also taught me that when life knocks you down, it’s not what knocked you down that defines you – it’s how How’s Business? Business is great. Food Lion you get yourself back up. continues to provide us with the resources we need to focus on what our customers want most. We can’t argue with the results either. We are Key to a successful business: Always look for ways to improve your business and make it stand out from the competition. Recognize that you don’t know everything, truly fortunate to be located in a town full of so and be open to new ideas and new approaches. many friendly and wonderful people.

Number of Employees: 35-plus

WANT YOUR BUSINESS FEATURED HERE? Email kevin.powell@tryondailybulletin.com, lenette.sprouse@tryondailybulletin.com or harry.forsha@tryondailybulletin.com


12 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

Verbesina walteri. (photo by Betsy George)

Polk’s Most Wanted Plant Walter’s Crownbeard This month’s species in our and South Carolina. Additional ongoing series of “Polk’s Most areas for this species are also to Wanted” is a wildflower known be found west of our region in as Walter’s Crownbeard (Verbe- the Ouachita Mountains. This is a rare species in most sina walteri). regions where Wa l t e r ’s it occurs. CurCrownbeard is Polk County’s rently, Walter’s a member of Most Wanted Crownbeard is the Aster FamPlants known from ily of flowerthree sites in ing plants that Polk County. include wellknown species such as Sun- Flowering begins in late August flower and Chrysanthemum. to mid-September. Therefore, However, unlike most members the time to search for this unof the Aster Family, Walter’s usual species is now. If you locate a population of Crownbeard lacks ray flowers (‘petals’) and thus has the some- Walter’s Crownbeard, please what odd appearance of being contact the Pacolet Area Cona globular flower- in reality, servancy at 828-859-5060, or many small individual flowers e-mail comments, questions known as disk flowers that are or photos to landprotection@ grouped together (compound) pacolet.org. The purpose of this project and thus look like a small ball. Walter’s Crownbeard prefers is to gain a better understandrich and moist habitats that may ing of the flora and fauna in include bottomland forests or Polk County and document the rich mountain coves. The distri- species present in the county. PAC is a 501(c)(3) non-profit bution of Walter’s Crownbeard is also unusual, as it is found in conservation organization (land coastal South Carolina, as well (walter’s crownbeard as a handful of piedmont and continued on page 13) mountain localities in North


Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

13

Let’s talk business by Bill Kerns

The Polk County branch of SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) is actively assisting existing businesses as well as individuals who are looking to start their own business in our community. SCORE is a non-profit organization, which provides free, confidential mentoring to help individuals start and operate a successful small business. Working and retired executives and small business owners offer advice and one-on-one mentoring sessions on topics such as developing a business plan, securing financing, day-to-day management, advertising and marketing to name a few. We also offer low-cost workshops to provide aspiring entrepreneurs with additional training on specific business topics. SCORE is a resource partner and operates in cooperation with the SBA (Small Business Administration). Our local branch is fortunate to have a group of dedicated mentors with a wide variety of business experiences. Each of us has had the good fortune of having had excellent mentors in our careers. Mentoring is an interesting process. Mentors should be motivated by nothing more than the desire to help. A mentor’s role is not

• Walter’s Crownbeard (continued from page 12)

trust) founded in 1989 to protect and conserve the area’s natural resources (PAC’s mission). PAC works with area landowners to ensure the long-term protection of their property through voluntary conservation easements (agreements), which enable landowners to maintain ownership of their property, preserving precious natural resources (open lands, forests, wildlife habitat, scenic vistas, farmland,

to advise, but rather to provide a different way of thinking. Mentoring is not intended to tell you what to do, simply offering another perspective based on experience. In today’s business world, business owners must wear many hats. You not only need to be an expert in your product or service, you also need knowledge in accounting, budgeting, personnel matters, marketing, advertising, sales and legal issues relating to your business. The local SCORE branch has successfully served a wide variety of clients of Polk County. If you own a business or are thinking of starting a business you have multiple local resources to assist you, including the Polk County Economic and Tourism Development Commission, Carolina Foothills Chamber of Commerce and local SCORE representatives. SCORE in cooperation with the Tryon Daily Bulletin will provide monthly articles on various business topics. We encourage you to send in requests for future topics by emailing SCORE at scorepolkcounty@gmail.com. If you would like to set up a mentoring session with a representative you may also send the request to this email address. SCORE can also be reached at 828-859-5456.

stream banks, etc.), and potentially obtain significant federal, state and local tax benefits. PAC’s vision is a community living and growing in harmony with our natural resources and or goal is to provide a legacy that will endure and be valued by generations to come. PAC works diligently to provide leadership to encourage conservation and provide education programs emphasizing native species appreciation and responsible land use practices to help – save the places you love. – article submitted by David Campbell

Tuxedo Treasures


14 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

Free computer classes at Landrum Library

Kiwanis learns about Broad River Water Authority

Tryon Kiwanian Ernie Giannini with Kiwanis’ Aug. 14 speaker Maria Hunnicutt. Hunnicutt is the manager of the Broad River Water Authority. (photo submitted by Boyd Correll)

The Landrum Library is offering beginning computer classes starting Tuesday, Sept. 17. The classes are taught by an instructor with the Adult Learning Center and are free and open to the public. There will be a series of four classes on Tuesday and Friday mornings from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and a series of five offered on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5:30 – 7:45 p.m. Attendance to all classes in one series is requested. These classes are a way to improve job skills or just learn the basic of using a computer.The topics to be covered in the sessions are: basic computer operations, keyboard and mouse use, PC environment, functions of the pieces of the computer (hardware), basics of Windows, basic file management, customizing the desktop, Internet and email and basic word processing. Call 864-457-2218 or drop by the Landrum Library to register; spaces are limited. When you register you will be given a complete schedule of the classes. – article submitted by Lee G. Morgan

Your Arts Calendar Landrum Drug

Landrum Drug

Let us become your Never Forget. Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg unveils a patriotic exhibit of paintings Personal Pharmacy!

Let us become your Personal Pharmacy!

by Lauren Hill: Never Forget. The new exhibit opens Tuesday Sept. 3. Free.

Sundays Unplugged. Experience the Sunday Art Market, a bazaar of locally handmade art from an array of mediums. Hear guitarist Mark Miller perform this Sunday as part of the free Singer-Songwriter concert series, 2-4 p.m. Free.

• Knowledgeable, helpful staff

• All drug plans gladly accepted

40th Annual Juried Show. Spartanburg Art Museum hosts Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg’s 40th Annual Juried Show, opening Tuesday, Sept. 3 and featuring works from a plethora of mediums. Free. While you’re there, also check out...

• Good prices Siblings. Photographer Ben Nixon, owner of the recent Plates to Pixels exhibit, brings creative siblings, brother John Nixon (collage artist) and stepsister Page Davis (acrylic painter), to Spartanburg Art Museum for another fantastic exhibit. Siblings will open Saturday, Sept. 7. Free.

• Drive-up window

• Home healthcare supplies

Gala for Hope. Children’s Security Blanket hosts a night of entertainment, music, great food, and fundraising on Friday, Sept. 6. The $50/person tickets go directly to aid local families of children with cancer.

Give us a try...you'll be glad you did!

864-457-2401

200 Saint John Street, • (864) 542-ARTS 104East W. RutheRfoRd Rd.Spartanburg • LandRum • 800-368-7552 ChapmanCulturalCenter.org mon - fRi 9-6 • Sat 8:30-1

2x5 8/13, M tfn

• Free delivery to Landrum area • Knowledgeable, helpful staff • All drug plans gladly accepted • Good prices • Drive-up window • Home healthcare supplies

Give us a try...you'll be glad you did!

864-457-2401

104 W. RutheRfoRd Rd. • LandRum • 800-368-7552 mon - fRi 9-6 • Sat 8:30-1

2x5 Change for 1/5, M tfn

LDRU-023815

Swofford Career Center. The Student Galleries now feature art by Spartanburg School District One’s Swofford Career Center. See digital paintings, metalwork, architectural models, etc. Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday 1-5 p.m.


15

Monday, September 2, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Calendar (continued from page 2)

On behalf of the Polk County Democratic Women’s Club and the Men’s Club, Wilma and Jack Jolley give Polk County Schools Curriculum Director Aaron Greene checks totaling $1,750 to pay for classroom supplies in support of Polk County teachers. (photo submitted)

Polk Democrats raise $1,750 for classroom supplies Polk County Democratic Women made it easy to help Polk County’s teachers this year. On a recent Saturday morning, the group held one of their big country breakfasts and donated all the proceeds (every cent, not just profits) to Polk County’s teachers for badly needed classroom supplies. According to Aaron Greene, curriculum director for Polk County Schools, the North Carolina state legislature in Raleigh cut the budget for instructional supplies by 51 percent in this last legislative session. Te a c h e r s h a v e a l w a y s chipped in their own money to supplement classroom supplies, but the legislature’s cuts this year meant that they’d need to donate even more of their own dollars to give students the classroom experiences that are so crucial to their education. Teachers may still need to chip in, even though this year’s legislative cuts have dropped North

Carolina teachers’ pay to 49th in the country. Polk County Democrats’ Women’s and Men’s Clubs came to the rescue, along with the many other generous citizens who donated to the cause. The women’s club raised $1,500 with their breakfast. And the men’s club added $250 from their fundraising efforts, making a total of $1,750. Greene accepted the Democratic Women’s and Men’s Club checks on behalf of the teachers and their students. He said these donations would greatly help give Polk County students the kind of education they need and deserve. When accepting the checks, Greene explained the recent legislative session in Raleigh gravely hurt the schools. The legislature cut 20 percent from the budget for teaching assistants this year, and promised to cut another 20 percent during next year’s session. The legisla-

“Democrats are serious about public education in North Carolina and about their support for Polk County’s teachers, students and schools. These donations show how serious we are.” -- Margaret Parker, chair of the Polk County Women’s Club

ture also cut the state textbook budget by 75 percent. Greene said these cuts are “big ones that really impact.” Margaret Parker, chair of the Polk County Women’s Club, said, “Democrats are serious about public education in North Carolina and about their support for Polk County’s teachers, students and schools. These donations show how serious we are.” – article submitted by Renee McDermott

each month, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. at Steps to HOPE, 60 Ward Street, Columbus. 828-894-2340. Tryon Weight Watchers Group, Weight Watchers weekly Tryon meeting every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Tryon Untied Methodist Church. Al-Anon Family Group, meets Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., Saluda Senior Center, 64 Greenville Street, Saluda, one half block off Main Street (U.S. Hwy. 176 S.), 828-749-2251 (Saluda) or 1-800-286-1326. American Legion, Polk County Memorial Post 250, first Tuesday of each month, 7 p.m., 43 Depot Street, Tryon. Foothills Knitting Guild, first Tuesday of each month, North Woods Farm Fiber and Yarn, 221 North Main St., Campobello, 7 p.m.

Wednesday

Polk Couty Mobile Recycling Unit, Wednesdays, Fire Department in Green Creek, 7 a.m. - noon. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Wednesday activities include Tai Chi, 9 a.m.; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; Wacky Wednesday and senior fitness, 10 a.m.; bingo and bridge, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Green Creek Community Center, quilters’ group, Wednesdays, 10 - 11:30 a.m. Saluda Center, Wednesday activities, Trash Train, 10 a.m.; gentle Yin Yoga 12:30 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www. saluda.com. Tryon Kiwanis Club, meets Wednesdays, noon, Congregational Church, 210 Melrose Ave., Tryon. Please submit Curb Reporter items in writing at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number of a contact person. Items will be printed in order by date of event, as space allows.


16 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Monday, September 2, 2013

Cover up…

this ad with a mailing label. Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin.

PCHS students attend FCA leadership camp

Low-stress money management for cautious investors.

22 Depot St., Tryon ● 828-859-7001 www.low-stress-investing.com

Cover up…

A steady partner in an uncertain world….

this ad with a mailing label. Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin.

A group of Polk County High School students attended FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) leadership camp this summer at the Epworth by the Sea Retreat Center in St. Simon’s Island July 1-5. The students were encouraged and inspired by various speakers and sessions and were led in worship by the band Hello August. All students were involved in athletic competition and a few students ran the annual 5K race on Thursday of that week. The following students attended: Brett Phipps, Anthony Carson, Eli Hall, JC Suddeth, Rudy Macias, Jessica Bentley, Graci Moser and Sam Firby. (photo submitted by William Pack)


20130902