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Tryon Painters and Sculptors mark 45th anniversary, page 10

Tryon Daily Bulletin

The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 86 / No. 136

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Friday, August 9, 2013

Only 50 cents

July sees four times average monthly rainfall by Samantha Hurst

You are not hearing a big fish tale when people claim to have gotten15-20 inches of rain at their homes last month. Records collected by the Tryon water plant show the area accumulated 20.05 inches of rain in the month of July, almost four times the average monthly rainfall of 5.27 inches. This average was taken from rainfall totals documented from 1981-2010. The average yearly total is 61.68 inches. In 2012 the total amount of rainfall for the year was 54.80 inches. With four months left to go in 2013, Tryon has already reached 68.23 inches of rain. Polk County Cooperative Extension Director John Vining said the inundation of rainfall has hit farmers hard this sum(Continued on page 3)

Green River Cove Road, between Silver Creek Road and Saluda, experienced a washout and eroded asphalt the week of July 4. Stones were put into place to reinforce the embankment and warning signs alerted motorists to the issues. The area received 1.67 inches and 2.87 inches of rain back to back on July 4 and July 5. Read the full story on page 3. (photo by Mark Schmerling)

Wo m e n U n d e r the Hood. On Aug. 12, 19 and 26, from 6 - 9 p.m., the Tryon Seventh-day Adventist Church will host a car maintenance seminar for women. Instructor is Pastor

Bill Strong. There is a small registration fee. To find out more, call 828-859-6407.

Commissioners spar over waterline tap fees by Leah Justice

Polk County Commissioners disagreed during a meeting Monday, Aug. 5 over what the county should charge for water tap fees. Commissioner Ray Gasperson said although he voted to allow all residents to tap onto the county’s waterlines for $700 until the end of the year, he may have voted differently if given more time to think about it. The meeting agenda packet included

minutes from September 2008 where commissioners then approved setting a temporary water extension policy charging residents 40 percent of the cost of the waterline extension, with a maximum of $5,000 and a tap fee of $1,200 before the project and $1,600 after the project. The motion to approve the temporary water extension policy was made

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties

(Continued on page 6)


A2 2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

STAFF Betty Ramsey, Publisher betty.ramsey@tryondailybulletin.com

Samantha Hurst, Editor samantha.hurst@tryondailybulletin.com

Leah Justice, Reporter leah.justice@tryondailybulletin.com

Gwen Ring, Design gwen.ring@tryondailybulletin.com

Lenette Sprouse, Marketing Consultant lenette.sprouse@tryondailybulletin.com

Harry Forsha, Marketing Consultant harry.forsha@tryondailybulletin.com

Kevin Powell, Marketing Consultant kevin.powell@tryondailybulletin.com

Jessy Taylor, Administrative Assistant jessy.taylor@tryondailybulletin.com

Jeff Allison, Pressroom Manager jeff.allison@tryondailybulletin.com

Jonathan Burrell, Pressroom

Ethan Price, Pressroom

How To Reach Us Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

Friday, August 9, 2013

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Today

Saluda Center, Friday events: chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; Trash Train, 10 a.m.; NA Meeting, 8 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Friday activities include movie matinee or drumming at 10 a.m. (every third Friday) and bingo or movie at 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Saluda Tailgate Market, every Friday, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. American Legion Post 250, weekly bingo games, Fridays, 7 p.m., 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Cruisin’ for Telemedicine Old Car Show to benefit Saluda Medical Center at The Party Place & Event Center, Aug. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Music, raffle, hotdogs and old cars. The Party Place & Event Center is located on Friendship Road in Saluda. The Saluda Top of the Grade Concert will be held on Aug. 9 from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. at the Old Skate Park, Saluda. American Legion Post 250 Bingo is held every Friday, 7 p.m. at 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Summer Tracks – Nikki Talley, Letters To Abigail will be on Aug. 9, 7 p.m. at Roger’s Park, Tryon. Narcotics Anon., Saluda Senior Center, Friday, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Columbus Tailgate Market, every Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon, until November. All items are

grown or made in Polk County. Green Creek Community Center, Zumba class, Saturdays, 9 a.m. Mokume Gane Jewelry Workshop with Katie Poterala will be held on Aug. 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Tryon Arts & Crafts You will learn how to pattern a copper and nickel silver billet to create your own mokume stock and fabricate jewelry pieces from your own personal pattern. House of Flags Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Chimney Rock Naturalist at PAC On Aug. 10 at 10:30 a.m., join PAC members at the Anne Elizabeth Suratt Nature Center at Walnut Creek Preserve to hear Chimney Rock State Park’s Naturalist Emily Walker for her presentation, “Wildlife in Western North Carolina,” an interactive program on wildlife found in the area. There will be live animals. Info: 828-859-5060, www. pacolet.org or email: landprotection@pacolet.org. PCHS boys soccer will play in a jamboree on Saturday, Aug. 10 at East Lincoln. Time to be determined. Landrum High School Varsity Football will play Thomas Jefferson August 10 at the Chesnee Jamboree. Tryon Fine Arts Center, Oil painting class for teens with Margaret Curtis, Saturdays, noon - 3 p.m. Star Ornament in a Box Class will be hosted on Aug. 10, 1 - 5 p.m. at the Mill Spring Ag Center.

LOCAL WEATHER Today: Scattered t-storms, with 50 percent chance of rain. High 85, low 70. Tuesday’s weather was: High 76, low 70, 0.62 inches of rain.

Tomorrow: Scattered t-storms, with 40 percent chance of rain. High 85, low 69. Tonight’s Moon Phase:

Second Saturday Gallery Trot, Tryon’s Second Saturday Gallery Trots invite art enthusiasts to peruse through the town’s various art galleries and shops where local, regional and national artists will be featured from 5-8 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. The evenings will also be filled with live entertainment and refreshments. Find Tryon Gallery Trot on facebook or email skyukafineart.com for more information. Moment in Time Opening will be hosted on Aug. 10, 5 - 7 p.m. at Tryon Painter & Sculptors, 26 Maple St., Tryon. Tryon Garden Club’s 85th Anniversary celebration will be hosted on August 10, 6 to 9 p.m. at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. Astronomy Program will be hosted on Aug. 10, 8:30 - 10:30 p.m. at FENCE on Hawk’s Ridge. Ring Nebula and Venus near the moon. For information: Jessie Willard 864-457-2615.

Sunday

Mokume Gane Jewelry Workshop with Katie Poterala will be hosted on Aug. 11, noon – 5 p.m. at Tryon Arts & Crafts. Learn how to pattern a copper and nickel silver billet to create your own mokume stock and fabricate jewelry pieces from your personal pattern. Pace Family Reunion Aug. 11 Family and friends of Harrison and Hattie Pace are invited to the Pace Reunion at Fork Creek Baptist Church Fellowship Hall in Saluda at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 11. Bring a covered dish. (Continued on page 31)

OBITUARIES Susan McCarter Black, p. 8

tryondailybulletin.com


A3 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Rain totals (continued from page 1)

mer. “Our vegetable guys have had a real struggle. The first four Saturdays the tailgate market (in Columbus) was open, it was pouring rain. Even those that had produce had no one to sell too,” Vining said. “And in the animal world, it’s been near impossible to cut hay because farmers can’t get it cured when they’ll cut it one day and it rains the next.” Vining said several things have occurred because of the rain. Disease plagued farmers early on as things like Downy Mildew became more prominent causing cucumber and squash plants to collapse, Vining said. Tomato growers also had to struggle with blight – the same disorder, Vining said, that caused the Irish famine with the destruction of potatoes. The second issue was that anyone who could get tomatoes to grow likely couldn’t sell the produce at market because the fruit would split from absorbing too

much water. Vining said many consumers won’t purchase split fruit even though it’s fine to eat. While the excessive rains have proven detrimental to many businesses it has boosted work for others. “I’m getting calls like crazy, but people don’t want you in their yard when it’s wet to do the work,” said Brooks Skipper with Skipper’s Tree Service. “We’re seeing a lot of broken limbs hanging over homes and a lot of people are calling in about trees that are dead.” Skipper said homeowners should consider taking precautions with trees close to their home. He said to look for leaves falling off limbs, bark peeling off the tree or large infestations of black ants. He said all of these are warning signs of disease. He also said it doesn’t hurt to have a professional look at any tree you might be concerned about. “If the ground is wet, like it is now, any tree can fall,” Skipper (Continued on page 4)

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A4 4 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

• Rain totals (continued from page 3)

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Tryon precipitation totals

Greenville/ Spartanburg precipitation totals

July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 9 July 10 July 11 July 12 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 16 July 17 July 18 July 19

0.02 0.36 0.27 1.67 2.87 0.90 1.46 0.04 0.09 0.58 0.06 0.01 2.60 0.60 0.98 0.00 T 0.25 0.00

July 20 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 24 July 25 July 26 July 27 July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31

0.00 2.50 1.00 0.04 0.00 0.00 0.08 0.75 2.87 0.00 0.00 0.05

July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 9 July 10 July 11 July 12 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 16 July 17 July 18 July 19 July 20 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 24 July 25 July 26 July 27 July 28 July 29 July 30 July 31

1.62 0.46 1.15 2.61 0.69 0.66 0.02 0.45 2.44 0.08 0.01 0.76 T 0.30 0.02 0.00 0.64 0.00 0.00 0.37 1.29 T 0.00 0.00 0.24 T 0.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.05

TOTAL

20.05

TOTAL

14.45

said. And the ground has surely been wet with emergency responders taking call after call for downed trees, crumpled culverts, sinkholes and flooded roads. Second to the month of July in total rainfall, so far this, year was May, which saw 11.30 inches of rain. Last year the Tryon area recorded only 7.90 inches of rain in July and only 9.50 inches in May, the wettest month for the area in 2012. Rainfall for the month of July

was 14.45 inches at the Greenville Spartanburg airport. This is a new monthly rainfall record for that area in July breaking the old record of 13.57 inches, set in 1984. This included 14 days of heavy rain during the month. “I guess there is a bright side of it – we’ve probably needed a year like this to recharge our ground water. Its been tough on farmers but some of the streams I haven’t seen them at normal levels since the drought problems we’ve had in year’s past,” Vining said.


A5 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A6 6 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Tap fees (continued from page 1)

by then commissioner Harry Denton and seconded by then and current commissioner Tom Pack. Gasperson said the $1,200 tap fee goes back to 2008 but remained in place when the permanent policy was adopted in 2009. “And now we have in effect several people upset,” said Gasperson. “They could have saved money. I’m convinced that the only thing that can be done is to take corrective action. Maybe we should rescind the action so we can go back and look at the issues that were created when we changed that tap fee from $1,200 to $700.” Gasperson was referring to the board’s June 17 action of discounting the tap fee to $700. On June 17 the county also approved a $1,353,492 bid to extend its waterline from Peniel Road in Green Creek to the Hwy. 9 crossroads in Mill Spring. The tap fee discount is in place (for a ¾ inch tap) from July 1 through the end of the year and also includes no participation fees. The action was taken in order to grow the number of county water customers. So far, seven new customers have been obtained through the discount. Commissioner Pack said people keep going back to the 2008 minutes, but the action then was to set a temporary tap fee and at the time that was the cost to the county for a tap fee. Pack asked Gasperson why he wants to overcharge citizens now that the tap fee costs are only $700. Pack said he can go buy a car and two weeks later he could have gotten it for $1,000 less. “You think I’m going to go and get a rebate because I didn’t wait,” Pack asked. Residents who have expressed concern over the new tap fees live in Meadowbrook Farms, where the county charged a $1,200 tap fee with the last day to tap at that rate on being in May 2013. Commissioner Keith Holbert said Gasperson is holding the new majority to a different standard than Gasperson was held to when the county ran a waterline to the Green Creek Community Center. Holbert read minutes from April 26, 2010, where then commissioner Warren

Friday, August 9, 2013

Watson argued against the county fully funding a water line extension to the Green Creek Community Center, saying it is against the county’s water policy. Holbert asked Gasperson if he was willing in 2010 to pay everyone back their 40 percent they paid for waterline extensions as he is now asking the county to pay back people who paid a $1,200 tap fee. Watson’s argument in 2010 included that the county is a tenant at the community center and shouldn’t be responsible for providing adequate utilities. Watson also argued that the then board’s decision was hasty and there was no need for an emergency because the community center had recently spent $5,000 to repair its well, money which would have paid the majority of funds needed to pay the 40 percent required match for a water line extension. “Thirdly, is it fair and equitable to the other taxpaying citizens who have come before this board, filled out the forms, committed their personal monies, and worked hard in their communities to garner support from their neighbors to get a costly waterline extension, for this board to selectively manipulate the system by using a loophole in our newly adopted policy to allow such an exception?” Watson said in 2010. “Fourthly, when making these types of decisions, it is imperative for our board to have time to properly deliberate the costs and the consequences of such actions. Unfortunately, the last minute addition to the agenda, the false sense of urgency and the large price tag do not meet the standards of open government professed by this board.” Resident Clay Ayers told commissioners the public detests commissioners hashing at each other. Ayers asked commissioner Pack if he remembers when the county was going to put a landfill in his backyard. “That’s the reason you’re a commissioner,” Ayers said to Pack. Ayers said he wants to be treated fair, that he paid $1,200 for his tap fee and he thinks everyone else should pay $1,200 and if the county wants to make the fee $700 they should give his money back. Ayers also said commissioners trash mouthing each other is sickening. “You’re childish. Grow up and stop hackling,” Ayers said. “The county is sick of it.”


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A8 8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Obituaries

Susan McCarter Black

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Susan Robin McCarter Black, 57, a beloved daughter, sister, wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend to all, passed on to God Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013 at her home. Born August 7, 1955 in Polk County, she was the daughter of the late Vernon and Sara Jo Mayes McCarter. Mrs. Black was preceded in death by a sister, Ronda McCarter Brewington; a brother, Barry McCarter; and a grandchild, Mason Cole Martin. Surviving to mourn her death and celebrate in her life is her husband of 33 unforgettable years, James Black; a loving daughter, Tracy Jo Martin (Den-

Friday, August 9, 2013

nis); two adopted daughters, Danielle and Brittney Hutchins; eight grandchildren, Jessica and Jamie Lewis, Cain and Cade Martin, Shayna, Hunter, Luke Ferguson, and Paizley on the way; also one great-grandchild Auydreigh-May. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013 at 2 p.m. in the McFarland Funeral Chapel with Dr. Dennis Jones officiating. Burial will be private. Memorials may be made to Tryon Second Baptist Church, 76 McDonald Street, Tryon, NC 28782. An online guest registry is available at www.mcfarlandfuneralchapel.com

Polk to put Park St. property up for sealed bids by Leah Justice

Polk County is trying to sell approximately 2 acres it owns on Park Street in Columbus and decided this week to sell it by sealed bid. County commissioners met Monday, Aug. 5 and approved advertising for sealed bids on the property. If sold, the county plans to give the money to the county’s economic and tourism development commission in order to plan for an industrial park in the county. County attorney Jana Berg gave commissioners options of disposing public property, which include a public auction, sealed or unsealed bids, private negotiations with another government or an exchange. Commissioner Ted Owens asked if the county went with sealed bids, could the county have the right to refuse all bids. Berg recommended that if the county sold the property through a sealed bid process it include a minimum amount. She said the

If sold, the county plans to give the money to the county’s economic and tourism development commission in order to plan for an industrial park in the county. county would have to say ahead of time what amount is acceptable. Commissioners decided to sell the property through sealed bids with the minimum amount accepted set at the property’s tax value, or $81,480. The county purchased the property in 2009 for $95,000 to construct the new department of social services building. The county later decided county-owned property off Wolverine Trail in Mill Spring was better suited for the building.


A9 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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A10 10 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Tryon Painters and Sculptors mark 45th anniversary Tryon Painters and Sculptors (TPS) is celebrating 45 years and continuing the tradition of being a haven for local artists. “Artists wanted camaraderie, a place to paint and a place to display their work,” said TPS President Aviva Kahn. “Our members are very loyal – it’s like a family here; it is a family.” TPS will begin its celebration with the Tryon Gallery Trot this Saturday, Aug. 10 with a new show, “Moment in Time.” In August 1968 the charter members of TPS met, elected officers and started the group’s dedication to the needs of local artists. Although all 20 original members were enthusiastic, Lou Ingwerson was truly the driving force of the organization. The impetus for the group’s formation was to be recognized as a viable organization and to be given space in the planned Tryon Fine Arts (TFA) building. Soon after this meeting, makeshift space was planned for housing the new group in the balcony of the TFA Center. In 1970 the group took over a storage room next to the Mural Room and the fine arts office and turned it into Gallery One for monthly art shows. When the Mural Room needed painting, members painted a Trade St. scene. In 1972 TPS became a tax-free North Carolina Corporation with a charter, by-laws and regularly designated meeting times. The third Monday of each month remains TPS’s meeting time, and its 501(c)3 non-profit status has been maintained. Presently TPS has 132 active members and 12 volunteers who serve on the board of directors and run the organization. The composition of the board reflects the membership, which is approximately three quarters trained or professional artists and one quarter beginning, amateur artists. “We wanted to be a group for

Tryon Painters and Sculptors hosted plein air artist Dwight Rose of Spartanburg at its Nov. 27 Art, Wine & Cheese event. TPS plans to hold five Art, Wine and Cheese events in total this year. (photo by Samantha Hurst)

people who were just interested in art. They may have never taken a class or maybe they just worked on their own,” Kahn said of members. “There’s nothing scarier than showing your work for the first time and TPS affords an opportunity for a comfortable and nurturing environment to do so.” Since the 1970s a close relationship exists between Tryon Little Theater (TLT), the Tryon Fine Arts Center (TFAC), Tryon Arts and Crafts (TAC) and the equestrian community. Sculpture, along with oil and watercolor painting, sketching and drawing and children’s art have been important parts of the organization. In 1980, TFAC acquired, through the generosity of Arthur Farwell and other donors, Binks House, which was an historic home next to the center. TFAC allowed TPS to use that house for their sculptor’s activities in exchange for renovating the building. This Farwell Annex, aka Studio Two, served wonderfully for

A painting by former TPS member Bill Ryan who passed away this year. Ryan taught a regular Thursday morning painting class. (photo submitted)

sculpting classes and shows for many years. TPS and TAC shared space downstairs and in the back of TFAC for their painting and drawing activities from the late 1980s through the early 2000s. TAC was the first to leave TFAC after purchasing a building at Harmon Field.

TFAC needed the rooms then occupied by only TPS and offered them, once again, the use of Farwell House. The board of TAC then voted to move to a more commercial downtown location to increase (Continued on page 11)


A11 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• TPS 45th (continued from page 10)

foot traffic. In 2010 TPS rented and moved into their present home at 26 Maple St., where they have increased attendance each year. The 2013 schedule includes nine Themed Art and Juried Art shows, five Art Wine and Cheese seminars featuring local artists and six classes or one-day workshops and weekly figure drawing classes with a live model. Business in TPS’s Gift Gallery is brisk and features all forms of artwork, note cards, handmade scarves and jewelry. Artist Barbara McComb Thomas joined TPS two years ago but began painting when she was 8-years-old. “It’s an opportunity to show your work and get support from other people,” Thomas said. “That’s not easy to do as an artist on your own, so TPS really is serving the community by fostering this companionship

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“Artists wanted camaraderie, a place to paint and a place to display their work ... Our members are very loyal – it’s like a family here; it is a family.” -- Aviva Kahn

and connecting artists with the community.” Tryon Painters and Sculptors invites everyone to visit its gallery and Gift Gallery located at 26 Maple St. just a few steps off Trade Street on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information about the group, visit www. TryonPaintersandSculptures. com or call 828-859-8322 during gallery. – article submitted by Gretchen Verbonic (Samantha Hurst contributed to this article)

Tryon Painters and Sculptors’ Gift Gallery offers a variety of items for purchase crafted by local artists. (photo submitted)


A12 12 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Polk district court results

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In Polk County District Court drug paraphernalia. Greening was held Wednesday, July 24, 2013 sentenced to one year unsupervised with Judge T. Mack Brittain pre- probation, a $100 fine and court siding, 57 cases were heard. Some costs. Marquis Decha Harrison was cases were continued, dismissed or convicted of possession of drug sent to superior court. The following persons were paraphernalia and driving while license revoked. Harrison was senconvicted of a crime: Rosie Nodine was convicted of tenced to 60 days in jail. Jazzmine Michel Hopper was misdemeanor conversion. Nodine was sentenced to 12 months unsu- convicted of operating a vehicle pervised probation and court costs. with impaired equipment. Hopper Linda Star Sain was convicted was fined $40 and court costs. Taylor Briof failure to wear Court results anne Howard seat belt-driver. was convicted Sain was fined of license/permit $161. time limit violation. Howard was July 29, 2013 session: In Polk County District Court fined $25 and court costs. Jonathan Carl Hudson was conheld July 29, 2013 with Judge Emily Cowan presiding, 158 cases were victed of speeding 92 mph in a 65 heard. Some cases were continued, mph zone. Hudson was fined $92 dismissed or sent to superior court. and court costs. Alexander Ian Lecroy was conThe following persons were victed of speeding 94 mph in a 65 convicted of a crime: Geary William Blackwell was mph zone. Lecroy was fined $94 convicted of speeding 90 mph in a and court costs. Tyson W. McCauley was con65 mph zone. Blackwell was fined victed of speeding 74 mph in a 65 $90 and court costs. Karen Phillips Byrd was con- mph zone. McCauley was fined $50 victed of possession of marijuana and court costs. Ricky Jerome McKenny was up to ½ ounce. Byrd was sentenced to one year unsupervised probation, convicted of speeding 70 mph in a 65 mph zone. McKenny was to pay a $75 fine and court costs. Cesar Cabrero was convicted court costs. Philip Parcase was convicted of of speeding 94 mph in a 65 mph zone. Cabrero was fined $94 and operating a vehicle with impaired equipment. Parcase was fined $40 court costs. Matthew Elliot Collie was con- and court costs. Mayra Esparanza Perez was victed of level 5 driving while impaired and unsafe movement. convicted of consumption of alcoCollie was sentenced to one year hol by under 19 year old. Perez was unsupervised probation, 24 hours sentenced to one year unsupervised of community service, a $200 five probation, a $25 fine and court and court costs for driving while costs. Brandon Alan Taylor was conimpaired and a $10 fine and court victed of possession of drug paracosts for unsafe movement. William Alfred Davidson was phernalia. Taylor was sentenced to convicted of possession of marijua- one year unsupervised probation, a na up to ½ ounce and possession of $75 fine and court costs. Pierra S. Washington was condrug paraphernalia. Davidson was sentenced to one year supervised victed of possession of marijuana probation, 24 hours of community up to ½ ounce and possession of drug paraphernalia. Washington service and court costs. Lydia Faye Fulton was convict- was sentenced to one year unsued of speeding 70 mph in a 65 mph pervised probation, a $100 fine and zone. Fulton was to pay court costs. court costs. Jeffery Brian Wells was conRichard Jose Greening was convicted of possession of marijuana (Continued on page 13) up to ½ ounce and possession of


B1 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Court results (continued from page 12)

victed of speeding 97 mph in a 65 mph zone. Wells was fined $97 and court costs. July 31, 2013 session: In Polk County District Court held July 31, 2013 with Judge Peter Knight presiding, 131 cases were heard. Some cases were continued, dismissed or sent to superior court. The following persons were convicted of a crime: Steven John Abbatiello was convicted of speeding 29 mph in a 20 mph zone. Abbatiello was fined $30 and court costs. Donna Lynn Binzer was convicted of speeding 25 mph in a 20 mph zone. Binzer was fined $20 and court costs. Markcus Dewayne Davis was convicted of operating a vehicle with impaired equipment. Davis was fined $40 and court costs. Alec Newell Eman was convicted of level 5 driving while impaired and reckless driving to endanger. Eman was sentenced to 12 months

unsupervised probation, 24 hours of community service, a $100 fine and court costs. Jonathan Lamont Gibbs was convicted of no operator’s license. Gibbs was sentenced to 12 months unsupervised probation, a $50 fine and court costs. Janet S. Hall was convicted of level 5 driving while impaired. Hall was sentenced to 12 months unsupervised probation, 24 hours of community service, a $100 fine and court costs. Jasmine Penarodriguez was convicted of operating a vehicle with impaired equipment. Penarodriguez was fined $40 and court costs. Geoffrey D. Pote was convicted of speeding 74 mph in a 65 mph zone. Pote was fined $30 and court costs. Bobby Joe Pruitt was convicted of operating a vehicle with impaired equipment. Pruitt was fined $40 and court costs. Starla Nicole Raines was convicted of failure to secure passenger under age 16. Raines was to pay court costs.

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Local gospel singers to perform The annual Anniversary Singing, featuring the Sound of Singing Men, a 30-voice southern gospel singing group that includes members from Polk, Rutherford, Henderson and other western North Carolina counties, the Refuge Ladies Quartet and the Singing Laymen will be held on Friday, Aug. 30 at the Refuge Baptist Church in Dana, N.C. at 7 p.m. The church is located at the

junction of Upwards, Ridge, Dana and Oleta Roads. For 40 years, the Gospel Music Festival was held on Labor Day weekend in Hendersonville. Since this date is in the hearts and minds of the community, the Anniversary Singing honors the tradition of the past with a concert on Friday evening. - article submitted by Frankie Harder

Polk County sheriff’s weekly report During the week from July 28 through Aug. 4, 2013, the Polk County Sheriff’s Office answered 269 calls for service. There were five arrests, eight citations, 23 civil papers served and three criminal papers served. Officers completed 330 house

checks, 441 church checks, 711 business checks, assisted other agencies 12 times, assisted the public 20 times and patrolled 7,311 miles. - information submitted by chief deputy Mike Wheeler


B2 14 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work ‌ With Your Neighbors! GIVE AWAYS

GARAGE SALES

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PHOTOGRAPHY PhotoBlankets andMore.com Turn favorite photos into a woven collage blanket. Great gift! (828) 817-4790

LOST & FOUND

EDUCATION Lake Lure Classical Busing from Columbus Green Creek, Mill Spring Free public school option Now enrolling K-10 Info at 828.625.9292

1-77-2+&0%'/;,-8)

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*YPP0IRKXL1MRO ;LMXI&VS[R 7M^I  Do you have available jobs? Call 828.859.9151 to let others know about job opportunities at your business.

CARE GIVERS

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

DRIVERS/ DELIVERY/OTR

,SRIWX(ITIRHEFPI COMPLETE r(VST ,SSO*VIMKLX 'LVMWXMER[SQER r*EQMP]%XQSWTLIVI PAINTING SERVICES PSSOMRKJSVETSWMXMSR %TTP]SRPMRI$ Yoder Painting is fully WMXXMRK[MXL]SYVPSZIH [[[WLMTXVYGOWIVZMGIGSQ insured, including worker's SRIW,SYVW%ZEMPTQ SVGEPP

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HELP WANTED CLERICAL The Tryon Daily Bulletin

Has an immediate need for a part-time ad assistant in our marketing department. We seek a team player who is well organized, dependable and trainable. Excellent customer service and strong computer skills are required. If you enjoy a fast paced environment and have a "can-do" attitude this may be the job for you. Please send your resume to betty.ramsey@tryon dailybulletin.com No phone calls, faxes or walk-ins, please, qualified applicants will be contacted directly.

HELP WANTED RESTAURANT

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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … With Your Neighbors! HELP WANTED RESTAURANT )\TIVMIRGIH(E]8MQI 7IVZIV RIIHIHJSVFYW]-XEPMER 8VEXXSVME6IWTSRHMJ]SY EVIERIRIVKIXMGWIPJ WXEVXIVI\TIVMIRGIHMRHI PMZIVMRKSYXWXERHMRKGYW XSQIVWIVZMGI[MXLE TPIEWERXERHSYXKSMRK TIVWSREPMX]%TTP]MRTIV WSR8YIWHE]XS7EXYVHE] 4QXS41XS +MEVHMRM8VEXXSVME ,[])'SPYQFYW

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MISCELLANEOUS

;IVRIV*X*MFIVKPEWW )\XIRWMSR0EHHIV Furniture for Sale. 'EFPILSSOWERH:ORSXW 'LETEVVEP0) New & Vintage. Landrum JSVTSPIW+SSHGSRHMXMSR Antiques & Furniture Co. 7OMFSEX1IVG'VYMWIV  0MXIV)RH&SEVHQSXSV 221 E. Rutherford St, Lan JXPSRK[MXLEPPEPYQMRYQ drum. 864-457-4000 XVEMPIV8ERHYQE\PI6IEP EGALS RMGI'EPP ,ERHWSQI,IOQER  )\IGYXMZI;SSH(IWO 2SXMGIXS'VIHMXSVW   ANTED O ,EZMRKUYEPMJMIHEW)\IG UY EHICLES YXVM\ SJ XLI )WXEXI SJ OUSEHOLD 'LVMWX] %RRI 'SSTIV SJ WE BUY 4SPO'SYRX]2SVXL'EVS TEMS Cheap running cars and PMREXLIYRHIVWMKRIHHSIW 'LMRE4G7IXXMRK junk cars. Up to $1000.00. LIVIF]RSXMJ]EPPTIVWSRW +SPHTPEXXIVIXG Come to your location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

1SWXP],[] OOD HINGS VH7IEX-RKVIEXWLETI )\IGYXVM\ O AT &MVGL6YR6SEH 'EPP (IRZMPPI2. FOR SALE 1995 “Picnics are fun at” Mercedes E320 Estate .SWLYE+,S[IPP Parker-Binns Vineyard Wagon. Looks good, runs )EWX1MPPW7X 7382 Highway 108 E good. Has oil leak, auto- 'SPYQFYW2' Mill Spring, NC matic, excellent heat & ac. (828) 894-0154 Hurry (a steal) at ONLY 8V]SR(EMP]&YPPIXMR Like Us On Facebook $1995.00, call 828.YP]%YKERH 980-2326 

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Our best selling 3 bd / 2 ba singlewide with designer decor Please call 828-684-4874

MOBILE HOME RENTALS

HORSES & .IXXE)\GIPPIRX EQUIPMENT )78'334)6 GSRHMXMSR [LMXIXERPSEHIH2I[ WE CAN +PMROS[WOM1EVEXLSR OCALLY S:ILMGPI UPPORT YOUR LOCAL MERCHANT 4MVIPPMXMVIW  WYRVSSJ Do you have S

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T HINK G LOBALLY ... SHOP L Looking for a home?

Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

FOR RENT IN GREEN Do you have CREEK: 2 BR, 2 BA, nice mobile home on 1/2 acre available jobs? Call 828.859.9151 to let lot. Garbage, grass mowing & water included. others know about job $550/m. No pets. Call opportunities at your 828-899-4905 business.

HELP.

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B4 16 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

kim@sheelahclarkson.com www.sheelahclarkson.com

Read more online at www.tryondailybulletin.com Rohn Jewell

Free concert by guitarist Rohn Jewell at Chapman Center Aug. 11 Chapman Cultural Center features local musicians each Sunday 2-4 p.m. for a free concert. In this week’s SingerSongwriter Sundays concert, on Aug. 11, experience the masterful acoustic guitar of Rohn Jewell. The performance is open to all ages. All Sunday concerts occur during normal Sunday hours, 1-5 p.m. Jewell moved to South Carolina from his home state of Florida in 1991 to assist with the local family business – Jewell’s Small Engine and Repair. Upon his father’s passing, he rooted himself permanently in the Upstate and began playing the music scene. Not only did he perform at many venues, he also started teaching his craft. His students were a major motivation in urging Jewell to share his original compositions, music he describes as dark and melodic with many stories to tell. Though Jewell is a member of the local six-piece band Projects, he is currently in the process of producing an album. He employs a finger-style

Want to go? What: Rohn Jewell at Chapman Cultural Center When: Sunday, Aug. 11 Where: Chapman Cultural Center picking technique to produce mesmerizing acoustic rock and instrumentals with alternate tunings. He plays Taylor and Fender guitars, both acoustic and electric. Some of his major musical influences include Travis Meeks, Pink Floyd, Led Zepplin, Stevie Ray Vaughn and Warren Haynes. In addition to the free concert, patrons can enjoy the center’s Art Market at which local artists sell their wares in the Zimmerli Plaza. All museums and exhibits are open on Sunday, and most are free. For more information, call Chapman Cultural Center at 864-542-ARTS. – article submitted by Cody Owens


B5 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Sidestepping muscle soreness Whether I’m training beginners lating blood flow and increasing or experienced fitness profession- circulation. This speeds removal als, one parallel I observe through of pain-producing inflammatory all levels of fitness is muscle substances. Be sure to start your workouts slowly and go light with soreness. This condition is common and the weights, until you’ve warmed temporary, but can be a little alarm- up properly. 3. Take vitamin C. ing to folks who’ve never exerConsuming vitamin C helps cised before. I’d like to offer some tips to help ease post-workout reduce muscle soreness two ways. First, it helps speed removal of aches and pains. lactic acid and First, what Diet & Exercise other metabolic causes that sore, stiffness that by David Crocker waste materials produced durusually occurs ing, and immediately following, 24-48 hours after a workout? This condition is called “De- exercise. Vitamin C also tempers layed Onset Muscle Soreness muscle discomfort by increasing (DOMS),” and is thought to be the collagen production. Collagen is protein that is involved in tissue result of two factors. Buildup of lactic acid in muscle repair. It makes up about 30 percent tissue and microscopic tears within of the body’s protein content and muscle fibers, is usually part of the acts like a type of glue that holds muscle adaptation process, which cells together. I recommend taking Reacta-C, increases strength and stamina. Don’t mistake DOMS (soreness) two to three times a day, splitting for the sharp acute muscle pain the dosage up. Caution … don’t that can happen during a workout, take vitamin C within an hour of which can be the result of a muscle taking calcium, because when combined in your stomach will strain or a sprain. Here are a few remedies for neutralize each other, plus check with your doctor before starting a your discomfort. vitamin C regimen. 1. Drink coffee. 4. Try curcumin. I’m not a coffee drinker myself, Curcumin is the essential curbut this beverage can ease muscle tenderness. Caffeine blocks the cuminoid of the spice turmeric, action of adenosine, a pain stimu- and is a potent anti-inflammatory lating chemical found in muscle. and antioxidant. Some research A particular study found that one indicates curcumin, like NSAIDs, dose of caffeine, taken in pill inhibits chemicals that increase form reduced muscle discomfort inflammation. Diet or exercise question? by 50 percent compared with just 10 to 30 percent diminution with Email me at dwcrocker77@gmail. NSAIDs in other research. Try 2 com or visit fitness4yourlife.org. to 5mg of caffeine for every 2 ½ David Crocker of Landrum has been a nutritionist and master pounds of body weight. Many coffees contain 95mg personal trainer for 27 years. caffeine per cup, while caffeine He served as strength director pills can contain 200mg caffeine. of the Spartanburg Y.M.C.A., Don’t take if caffeine makes you head strength coach for the USCjittery, as this can be very danger- Spartanburg baseball team, S.C. ous in the weight room. Also, state champion girls gymnastic check with your doctor to see if team, and the Converse college caffeine in contraindicated for any equestrian team. He was a water safety consultant to the United condition you might have. 2. Perform an easy workout. States Marine Corps, lead trainer Believe it or not, doing a light for L.H. Fields modeling agency, version of the exercises that made and taught four semesters at USCyou sore in the first place will ab- Union. David was also a regular breviate your discomfort, by stimu- guest of the Pam Stone radio show.

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Sports

Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper F18 riday, March 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

18

7/8 yearolds regular season and tournament winners Top: The Polk Red team won this year’s regular season for Division One 7/8-year-olds. Teammates pictured are top row, left to right: assistant coach Merlin Troyer, head coach Joey Whiteside, assistant coach Robert Car ter; middle row, left to right: Brandon Troyer, Auston “Buster” Ledford, Cole Pereira, Carson Metcalf, Bryson Jones and Larry “Neon” Traber; front row, left to right: Mark Frantz, Cooper Snyder, Elliott Whiteside and Lawson Carter. Bottom: These kids recently won the Division One 7/8-year-olds tournament. Teammates pictured are: top row, left to right: Merlin Troyer, Rober t Car ter and Joey Whiteside. Middle: Brandon Troyer, Elliott Whiteside, Mark Frantz and Cole Pereira; bottom row, left to right: Lawson Carter, Bryson Jones, Gunner Alm and Auston “Buster” Ledford. Not Pictured: Cooper Snyder, Carson Metcalf and Larry “Neon” Traber. (photos submitted by Olivia Whiteside)

Friday, August 9, 2013

Friday, August page 9, 2013 18

Tryon Daily Bulletin / The World’s Smallest DailyNewspaper


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wolfe and fellow runners train in Boulder

John Spencer Wolfe of Tryon with NC State Cross Country teammates and friends while training for a month in Boulder, Colo. This town is on the eastern edge of the Rockies, with 200 miles of off-road running trials. Here the runners take a break from running to hike up South Arapahoe Peak (13,280ft. elevation). Shown are: Vibushan Sivakumaran (NCSU), Sam Roberson (NCSU), Sam Parsons (NCSU), John Spencer Wolfe (NCSU), Isaac Presson (UNC), Frances Hernandez (Auburn), Thomas Graham (Stanford) and Craig Engels (NCSU). (photo submitted by Nina Wolfe)

LHS mandatory fall sports meeting Aug. 20 Landrum High School will hold a mandatory fall sports meeting for parents and guardians of students intending to play a sport during the fall of 2013. The meeting will take place Tuesday, Aug. 20 at 6:30 p.m. at the LHS Cafeteria. Attendees are asked to enter from student parking lot side. The meeting will cover paperwork and information regarding insurance, concussions, medical care, team rules and more. Paperwork must be completed before a student-athlete is eligible to play in an official game or contest. Attendance is critical. Call the LHS athletic office if you have any questions at 864457-2606, ext. 4900 or email: john.cann@spart1.org. – article submitted by John Cann

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B8 20 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Ronzello to teach composting at ICC Polk Center Aug. 19 Organic gardener and farmer Jamie Ronzello will teach “Intro to Composting” at the ICC Polk Center in Columbus starting Monday, Aug. 19. Ronzello will cover the down and dirty basics of compost building including materials to use and how to build and maintain a pile. Students will learn the proper uses of compost and what composting techniques are required for it to be used on a certified organic farm. This class will also include a segment on vermicomposting and hands-on experience building an actual compost pile. The class will meet each Monday and Friday from 9:30 – 11 a.m. Aug. 19 – Sept. 6. A native of Polk County, Ronzello has worked on and managed several farms from the Pacific Northwest to the South Pacific. She currently owns and operates a small organic farm on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, where all of the

vegetables are grown with what she likes to call “beyond organics” or through the use of “biological farming.” She doesn’t rely on bagged fertilizer but utilizes time-old techniques such as cover cropping, crop rotation, composting, rotational poultry management, intercropping and IPM management. Ronzello, owner and creator of Barking Deer Farm gourmet products, is also a passionate cook who focuses on using local fresh whole foods. She has studied medicinal herbs for several years, apprenticed at the Herb Pharm in Williams, Oreg., is a certified master food preserver and is working towards her certificate in holistic nutrition consulting at the American College of Healthcare Sciences. Ronzello also developed and managed a sustainable agriculture internship for a 15acre biodynamic farm where she

Jamie Ronzello

studied and practiced biodynamic farming for two years. To register or for more information, call Isothermal Com-

munity College Polk Center at 828-894-3092. – article submitted by Kate Barkschat


B9 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Cullen’s pottery featured at Thompson Garden Gallery Thompson Garden Gallery’s current featured artist is potter Jim Cullen whose world goes round. He lives in a round house; he throws mostly round pots in a round studio. Cullen is a retired filmmaker who relocated to Polk County from the midwest. He discovered the art and craft of pottery in 1976. After taking numerous workshops with various instructors in many locations, he started to teach others. He has instructed classes at the Spartanburg County Museum Art School and at Tryon Arts & Crafts. Educating others about pottery has become a life goal. In 2001, Cullen became a charter member of the Potters Council, a nonprofit subsidiary of The American Ceramic Society. The council is open to individuals who are passionate about pottery and who want to continue making the craft accessible to anyone interested. Also,

the council provides forums for knowledge exchange and for professional enhancement. For Cullen, his ceramics provide surfaces to paint and to carve patterns. These elements convey Cullen’s thoughts and feelings. “For me, throwing and decorating pots are forms of meditation,” Cullen said. “In these processes, I gain immense satisfaction as well as a sense of accomplishment.” Thompson Garden Gallery’s owner, Erin Thompson, comments, “We feel so fortunate to carry Jim Cullen’s pottery here. There’s an amazing variety in his work — all at affordable prices.” Thompson Garden Gallery showcases approximately 40 regional artisans among handpicked items for the home and garden. Summer gallery hours are from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. During the Saturday, Aug. 10, Gallery Trot, come by and meet

Jim Cullen experiments with his pottery – using various clays and glazes, carving designs, adding elements such as bamboo or horsehair. (photo submitted by Mara Smith)

Jim Cullen at Thompson Garden Gallery at 83 Palmer Street in downtown Tryon. On this special occasion, Cullen will be on hand from 5–8 p.m. to answer any questions about pottery. In the meantime, check out his website

www.roundhousepottery.com. There you can see photos of his pots, bowls, plates and platters and learn more about the science of pottery. – article submitted by Mara Smith


B10 22 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Other side of the coin Last week’s tale (Whose fault live a normal life without further is it?) elicited a huge response complications and I offered to pay all expenses. I’ve recently from friends and readers alike. I had offers to buy the boxer, changed his name from Nub to offers to pay all expenses and help Lil Bear because everyone says get authorities involved if needed. he looks like a bear. Oops, I’m getting ahead of Bless you all for this is how things get done. Use your voice and myself; I am really excited about make a stand. I’ll check and see this wonderful pup. Many have alhow things are next week with or ready seen him and fallen in love. Lil Bear was born without without authorities and hopefully a penis and without a tail, not things are improving. from inbreeding, Meanwhile, just a very rare Sasha (hit by a Humane Society birth deformity. van) should be Special Cases Of course, the on her way to Leonard Rizzo tail is not a probrescue; she’s lem; it’s just a healing well. Jollie (pup hit by a golf cart) tiny nub that you must feel for, is getting along just fine; full of about an inch off center. His other herself and needs some more problem would have caused pain, discomfort and infection down the face time. Auntie Peg’s (found in a ditch) line and if it couldn’t be remedied, hair is growing back, legs are euthanasia would have been the getting stronger and she is full of humane thing to do. For now, Lil newfound love. All need homes. Bear just leaks and I, having held And now, the other side of him often, can attest to the issue. He’s fully weaned and eats like his the coin: Three weeks ago, I received new name. When he’s put down, word that a Golden Retriever he scoots around fearlessly in a puppy was scheduled to be put to constant play mode. I know it’s sleep unless someone could take the epitome of redundancy, but he on expenses and care. He was still is one cute golden pup. Now comes the next part of nursing and the breeders (responsible people) were hoping to save the equation: he is currently at him if possible. He was brought to Landrum Vet being spoiled rotten, the Upstate Veterinary Specialists, but needs a foster home till he’s where Dr. Magolite (Kate) and big enough for his procedure. I Dr. Allen (Keith), who did such a called Danielle Scruggs, who fantastic job on Sasha, examined among other things is my favorite him. Kate determined there was Golden and Chihuahua rescuer. “Hi Lennie,” Danielle said, a procedure that could help him

Lil Bear

“What can I do for you?” This is, without a doubt, my favorite response to one of my calls. Danielle knew about Lil Bear because she knew the owner of the litters’ sire. “He needs a foster home till he’s big enough for the procedure, Dannie.” “I have a few teenage girls who would love him for a playmate. Tell Lil Bear, mi casa, su Ccasa.” As soon as Lil Bear receives all his shots, he’ll be off to the

best foster home possible and, if I know Dannie, far more will be done for him. Stay tuned. For now, the other side of the coin looks bright indeed. Except for one, which I’ll check on next week, all my little mischievous misfits are on the mend waiting for loving homes. If somehow you are lucky enough to wind up with one of my precious kids, you should thank the Lord. I believe He sends them to me just for you. Thanks for listening.


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Hart encourages more carriage driving in Tryon Rain, rain go away. What a summer for ducks, not so great for equestrians. Jane Hart and her riding ådriving horse have not had their time on the trail interrupted. Between raindrops, you can see Hart, her horse “Buddy” and one of her three dogs trotting down Hunting Country and River Roads in her cross country four wheeled vehicle. A lifelong equestrian, Hart has a vast history with horses. Growing up with milk wagon horses still in use, she would, when school was out, follow old “Charlie” on her bike, as he made his rounds in her neighborhood. Now, many years later, she can choose her speed and route to suit her. Not having to stop and deliver a bottle or two to every other house. Hart is on the board of directors of the local carriage club, and invites anyone interested in

Jane Hart out enjoying a carriage ride. (photo submitted)

learning more about carriages and driving to join the friendly group. The carriage club has a pleasure show coming up Sept. 21 and 22 at Harmon Field in

Tryon. Volunteers are always needed, and for those who volunteer, refreshment and lunch will be served. If interested, call Hart for

more information at 894-4781421 or check the group out at carolinacarriageclub.com. - article submitted by Jane Hart

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B12 24 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

The Red Shed: Memories in a name

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is, still standing in my mind’s eye, “Everything shimmers just as clear as the day I last saw with the sound of the train it. Sometimes you can go home rattling over the bridge especially the ears and nostrils again, if only in those names that conjure up a shaded Green Pond, and teeth back in Tomberlin’s Woods. of the horse riding out Saluda Tailgate Market starts to the pasture of death at 4:30 p.m. Fridays at the city where the long train runs parking lot off Main Street; many on diesel fuel Saluda businesses are open later that used to run on coal. on Friday. I keep listening Saluda Welcome Table is for the crickets and birds and my words fall down be- every Tuesday from 5:30 -7 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Saluda low.” – Joseph Millar, excerpt United Methodist Church. All from “One Day” welcome for dinner; donations One of my favorite things in life accepted. Saluda Community Land is a dripping tomato sandwich held Trust (SCLT) will have a monthover the kitchen sink. ly meeting at 3 Thanks to p.m. on Aug. 21 B.J. and Julie Saluda at the pavilion at Precourt out in News & McCreery Park. Mill Spring, Notations Another fun day I had one of of celebrating those for a late by Bonnie Bardos the reopening lunch; my toof Twin Lakes mato plants had given up the ghost after too much is Aug. 17 (rain date Aug. 24) from 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Catch a shuttle ride rain — I knew how they felt. So, while watching humming- from Saluda Fire Department, and birds mob the back deck feeder, I enjoy swimming, food and friendly stood at the kitchen sink, thinking folks. It’s time for the Saluda School about this and that. One thing led to another over that juicy sandwich of reunion: Aug. 16 at the Party Place mine, and thoughts drifted (they do and Event Center, starting at 6 p.m. that alot) back to those days when Checks payable to Peggy Johnson, dinosaurs roamed the earth, and I PO Box 187, East Flat Rock, NC 28726 need be sent by August 12. was 8-years-old again. It dawned on me how we Contact Tona Lawter at 828-674named everything: as if to mark it 2629 for info. The N.C. Small Town Main and map it in memory and place. The Red Shed. The Green Pond Street “Top of the Grade Con(where many a sunfish was caught certs” are on the second and fourth on a cane pole with garden worm). Fridays (Aug. 9 and 23) through Up on the Hill. The Tiger Tree (that October at McCreery Park; bring a was an ancient cedar tree with lawn chair; food is available. Come out and support the third ladder-like branches) perfect for climbing at the edge of the woods annual Cruisin’ for Telemedicine to gaze out over Mr. Baucom’s Old Car Show to benefit Saluda vast red-clay fields that grew cot- Medical Center at The Party Place ton, corn or soybeans. There were & Event Center, Aug. 9 starting at the Taylor Woods. The old Pierce 6 p.m. Music, raffle, hotdogs and old cars. Place. Art Notes: Bill Jameson’s Mr. Tomberlin’s Woods, and his fields too. Then there was the reception for “Exploring the Blue Moat. Maybe it was a vernacular Ridge” at Skyuka Fine Art in thing, for a family to name places Tryon; is Aug. 10 from 5-8 p.m. Richard Baker will have a like that. But to this day, my brother can call me up out of the reception at T.L. Norris Gallery blue, and when he mentions The (Continued on page 25) Red Shed, I know exactly where it

redeemed - 19


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Seasoning summer meal for families Backyard Oasis

2011 Toyota Camry LE 4 door , FWD, Sedan, 6-Speed Automatic, 2.5L I4 16V MPFI DOHC $15,900

John Cash of Nature’s Storehouse donated seasonings for Tryon Congregational Church Feed-A-Family Summer Program. For 10 weeks this summer the church’s board of outreach delivered ingredients for a family meal to needy families in the community. Shown with Cash, right, is Linda Byington, a member of the Tryon UCC Board of Outreach. (photo submitted)

• Saluda News (continued from page 24)

in Greenville, SC, Aug. 9 from 5:30-9 p.m. “Crossing The Line,” with my own works and those of Charlotte Fowler, at Upstairs Artspace in Tryon continues through Aug. 31, along with “Seeing Is Believing.” The Upstairs will have Open Stage evening on Aug. 16 starting at 7 p.m. for anyone who would like to share their poetry, writing and music. Saluda artist Beverly Pickard has published ‘Art Clues: Ideas for Creating and Enjoying Art,’ which features a number of Saluda artists and Beverly’s art columns from Saluda Lifestyles. For information, call her at 828-749-1248. Tryon Garden Club’s “Let It Sizzle, A Celebration of Seasons” silent auction of artwork inspired

by Pearson’s Falls by many area artists, is Aug. 10, 6-9 p.m. at Tryon Fine Arts Center. The Saluda Center annual gala will be held on Sunday, Aug. 18, 6-8 p.m. at the Party Place and Events Center. For more information, contact Karen Bultman at 828-749-1264. Happy August Birthday to B.J. Kent, Linda Kaye Haynes, Cindi Miller, Paul Stoney, Jen Pace, Zack Pace, Don Mintz, Caroline Tindal, Nora Ward, Samantha Ward and Reeda Ward. Thank you, dear readers for reading this column: each and every one of you is appreciated and your comments are valued! If you have something of note, feel free to contact me at bbardos@gmail. com; or 828-749-1153. You may also visit bonniebardos.com or find me on facebook.


B14 26 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Shingles vaccine can protect seniors Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about the shingles vaccine? I just turned 65 and have been thinking about getting vaccinated, but would like to know how effective it is and how it’s covered by Medicare. - Afraid of Needles Dear Afraid, Older adults who get the shingles vaccine can actually cut their risk of getting the painful condition in half, and those that do happen to get it are likely to have a milder case if they’ve been inoculated. Here’s what else you should know about the shingles vaccine, along with how it’s covered by Medicare. Shingles overview Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a burning, blistering, often excruciating skin rash that affects about 1 million Americans each year. The same

Savvy Senior virus that causes chickenpox causes it. What happens is the chickenpox virus that most people get as kids never leaves the body. It hides in the nerve cells near the spinal cord and, for some people, emerges later in the form of shingles. In the U.S., one out of every three people will develop shingles during their lifetime. While anyone who’s had chickenpox can get shingles, it most commonly occurs in people over age 60, along with people who have weakened immune systems. But you can’t catch shingles from someone else. Early signs of the disease include pain, itching or tingling before a blistering rash appears several days later and can last up to four weeks. The rash typically occurs on one side of the body, often as a band of blisters that extends from the middle of your back around to the breastbone. It can also appear above an eye or on the side of the face or neck. In addition to the rash, more than one-third of people who get shingles go on to develop severe nerve pain that can last for months or even years. Vaccination coverage The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone age 60 and older should get a one-time shingles vaccination – called Zostavax. Even if you’ve already had shingles, you still need the vaccination because reoccurring cases are possible. See zostavax.com or call 877974-4645 for more information or to locate a vaccine provider in your area. The vaccine is also very safe. For most people the worst side effect is mild redness or arm soreness. You also need to know that Medicare covers the shingles vaccine as one of its preventive benefits. But, unlike some other

“Early signs of the disease include pain, itching or tingling before a blistering rash appears several days later and can last up to four weeks. The rash typically occurs on one side of the body...” -- Jim Miller

vaccines paid through Part B, the shingles vaccination is covered by Part D. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, it will pay for the vaccine itself and for your doctor or other health care provider to give you the shot. You are only responsible for paying the plan’s approved copay at the time you get vaccinated, which usually runs around $60 to $80. But, you need to make sure you follow your plan’s rules in order to keep your out-ofpocket costs down. If you’re vaccinated at a drugstore, check to make certain it’s in your Part D plan pharmacy network. Otherwise, the shot will cost you more than your usual copay. If you’re inoculated in a doctor’s office, check to make sure the office can bill your plan or at least can work through a drugstore in your plan’s network. Otherwise, you’ll have to pay the entire bill upfront and then claim reimbursement from your plan. Just to be safe, call your Part D drug plan ahead of time and ask what pharmacies and doctors in your area you can use to receive the shingles vaccine at the plan’s regular copay. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

WCCR presents “The Merriment Players,” Inner Sanctum and Jazz Greats The Western Carolinas Classic Radio (WCCR) Club will meet Monday, Aug. 19 at 2 p.m. on the ICC Polk Campus. Bill Drake and Gary Poole (AKA the “Merriment Players”) will give a live performance of radio show skits as performed on radio in the 1920s to the 1950s and range from soap operas to sporting interviews. They have some super funny material for your enjoyment. Professor Hoyt will offer his great trivia quiz. The radio/TV presentation will feature an Inner Sanctum Mystery, “Port of Regrets,” which first aired on TV Jan. 16, 1954. It is only one of four episodes known to exist from this vintage television program. Inner Sanctum aired on radio from 1941 to 1952. Raymond, the MC, will always be remembered closing the show with “and now it is time to close that squeaking door-goodnight-pleasant dreams

Want to go? What: When: Where:

WCCR meets Monday, Aug. 19, 2 p.m. ICC Polk Campus

everyone.” Lucky Strike asked Columbia Record Productions in the late 1940s or early 1950s to custom press a promotional album of original recordings of unforgettable hits. The community is invited to come and hear Basie, Brown, Dorsey, Satchmo, Ellington, Callaway, James and others at the most significant never-to-be-replaced moments in their careers. Come and remember the greats. Everyone is welcome and the program is free. It is just a lot of fun recalling “the good old days.” - article submitted by Bob Reynolds

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Parade planners offering free transportation for disabled veterans The Patriot Salute to Veterans Association, which is planning Veterans Day events in Columbus, is seeking names and addresses of disabled veterans who will need transportation. Veterans Day events will include a parade beginning at 9:30 a.m. followed by a memorial service at the Veterans Memorial Park In downtown Columbus. The activities should end around noon. As a service to veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs will have counselors available to provide information about benefits, health care and any personal claims the veterans may have. “We need to know if there are disabled or elderly veterans in our area who need a ride to and from the Veterans Day

events,” said Frank Ortiz, vice president of the Patriot Salute. “More specifically, we need to know where they live and whether or not they will need a wheelchair lift to make the trip. We want all the vets to come.” Those veterans needing transportation can call Frank at 828-894-3428 or email him at faortiz@windstream.net. It is important that veterans desiring this service call or email as soon as possible as these arrangements will require advance planning and coordination. This service is being offered by the Polk County Transportation Authority and will be funded by generous contributions of patriots in the community. – article submitted by Otis Livingston

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B16 28 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

St. Luke’s Hospital staff, patients and visitors will enjoy a new exhibit of original art on display by local artists through the efforts of Jean Wright and PJ Rosen of Tryon Painters and Sculptors. (photo by Kathy Woodham)

Art hangs and heals throughout hallways of St. Luke’s Hospital Once again, the hallways at St. Luke’s Hospital provide a relaxing and entertaining way

for patients to heal through the display of original artwork provided by the Tryon Painters and

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Sculptors (TPS) and numerous area artists who willingly share their work. “Our patients, our staff and visitors often comment about the wonderful world of art on display in hallways,” said Ken Shull, hospital CEO. “It’s nice to watch people slow down and take note of the paintings and the artists. It’s like we have our own personal gallery here, but we always welcome the community to come enjoy as well.” This recent exhibit features several amazing pieces by artists throughout Polk County, including a vividly colorful series of downtown Tryon by Marie King, a former employee of St. Luke’s Hospital. About 100 original pieces are currently on display. What once was a small exhibit has more than tripled to represent about 30 local artists, and the exhibit has grown to fill several hallways throughout the hospital as well as the Outpatient Rehab Center, located at 799B West Mills St., Columbus. St. Luke’s certainly appreciates the hard work and commitment of Jean Wright and PJ Rosen of TPS, who have

“It’s nice to watch people slow down and take note of the paintings and the artists. It’s like we have our own personal gallery here, but we always welcome the community to come enjoy as well.” -- Ken Shull, hospital CEO

worked with other artists to transform St. Luke’s into an art gallery to showcase the tremendous talent in Polk County. “We’re extremely pleased to provide a venue for local artists to display their talent, but we’re also hopeful that these original paintings are truly healing arts,” Shull said. “Not only will staff and visitors appreciate creative expressions, I know our patients benefit greatly.” Anyone attending this Saturday’s Gallery Trot in Tryon is invited to stop by St. Luke’s Hospital first before heading to the delightful art stroll from 5-8 p.m. that will feature about 16 galleries and businesses. – article submitted by Kathy Woodham


A13 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Rec campers have lunch at the PBA Care kitchen Po l k C o u n t y r e c r e a t i o n campers ate with the Polk Baptist Association Care Kitchen last Friday, Aug. 2. Pictured are front row (left to right) Courtney Halford, Ben Holtey and Rebecca Elliot; second row (left to right) Aliya Conner, Mark Frantz, Sasha Watson, Michelle Ketwitz, Nicole Frantz and Tyler Bowling; back row (left to right): Jenny Wolfe, Madison Yellen, Lauren Ketwitz, Grace Holtey, Donovan Kaiser, Eloise Thwing and Angie Levi. Levi and Thwing are both part of the PBA Care Kitchen staff. (photo submitted by Ann Carswell)

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A14 30 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Friday, August 9, 2013

4-H Livestock Club works with animals

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The 4-H Livestock Club has been busy working their sheep for an upcoming show. Alea Morgan and all the other members of the club meet once a week to train their animal. This is possible because the Modlin family of Old Mule Farm have graciously opened their farm to the youth, giving them the opportunity to work with animals. The program will culminate with a show at the Green Creek Heritage Festival at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7. (photo submitted Helen Clark)


A15 31

Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Eubanks wins DCI Scholarship Jessie Eubanks of Columbus is a winner in the DCI Scholarship Program. The program is sponsored by Dialysis Clinic Inc. (a non-profit corporation). Eubanks is the daughter of Debbie Eubanks. Jessie Eubanks attended Polk County High School and intends to major in nursing at Gardner-Webb University. The following is a partial list of Eubank’s school and community activities: Deasn’s List marching band drum major, HOSA and concert band. The DCI Scholarship Program was created to benefit the children of Dialysis Clinic Inc. employees based on belief in the importance of education. Five recipients were chosen to receive scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $2,500. Based in Nashville, Tenn., Dialysis Clinic Inc. is a nonprofit organization with 72 clinics in 16 states. DCI also operates three procurement divisions, a medical research di-

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Foothills duplicate bridge results Aug. 2 Morning Restricted Pairs North-South First: Millie Stein - unknown Second: Richard Hopkins unknown East-West First: Evalynn Hyra - Eilene Morgan Second: Joann Hoffman Sally Huffaker Afternoon Open Pairs North-South First: Jackie Caldwell -

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A16 32 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Upcoming classes at ICC Polk Campus A Guided Walk in Paris: Exploring American Revolution History, Instructor Mary Jo Padgett. A PowerPoint walking guide throughout Paris to places connected to the American Revolution and French involvement. Wednesday, Aug. 14 -28, 1 – 3 p.m. Intro to Composting, Instructor Jamie Ronzello teaches the fundamentals of composting including the different methods of composting and which one would be the most suitable for your situation/location/need. Monday and Friday: Aug. 19 – Sept. 6, 9:30 – 11 a.m. Extreme Carving Realism: A Heritage Crafts Class, Instructor Don Blackwell. Wednesday, Aug. 28 – Oct 16, 1 – 4 p.m. Beginning Carving Woodspirits: A Heritage Crafts Class, Instructor Don Blackwell will teach you how to release the “Wood Spirit” from the wood in step-by-step instructions. Thursday, Aug 29 – Oct 17, 9 am-12 noon Open Studio, Instructor Don Blackwell shares techniques and guides students on any projects they are currently working on. Friday, Aug, 30 – Oct 18, 9 a.m. to noon or 1 – 4 p.m. PC Repair I, Instructor Tom Christensen- Learn to diagnose, identify, upgrade and repair components of computers and gain the entry level knowledge to build and maintain desktop computer systems or seek entry level employment as a computer technician. Tuesday Sept. 3 – Dec. 17, 5:30- 9:30 p.m. . Windows 7, Instructor Tom Christensen. This course is designed for the student who is already using Windows 7, but would like to learn more. Tues: Sept. 3 - Oct. 22, 1 – 4 pm. Art and Anxiety: 20th Century, Instructor, Dr. Ben Pfingstag- A color slide presentation on the art movements of the 20th Century, often characterized by “isms,” such as Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism. Thursday, Sept. 5 – Oct. 10, 10

a.m. tp noon. Intermediate Watercolor, Instructor,Jeanne Parsons- Improve your watercolor skills and explore new possibilities. Beginning watercolor or equivalent training is a prerequisite. Thursday Sept. 5 – Oct. 24, 1 - 4 p.m. History of Appalachian Music, Instructor: Alicia KnightenListen to various types of music, learn about regional events and begin your journey into the sound-landscape of the Appalachian mountains. Thursday, Sept. 5 – Oct .24, 10 a.m. to noon. In-Class Writing, Instructor Brittany Hampton-Tokar- Find inspiration and share with others. A great fit for serious writers and for those who simply enjoy writing for fun. Mon, Sept. 9-16, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Beginning Watercolor, Instructor, Jeanne Parsons- Have you wanted to paint with water colors but didn’t know where to start? This class is for you! No experience necessary. Mon: Sept. 9 - Oct. 28, 9 a.m. to noon. Tai Ji Intermediate, Instructor Ed Kan- Advance to the next level in Tai Chi. Students should have prior experience with Tai Chi. Monday Sept. 9-Dec. 16, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Poetry Appreciation, Instructor, Kiesa Kay- Let’s talk about poetry, what we love and how it can add joy and depth to our everyday lives. Tuesday, Sept. 10, 6 – 9 p.m. How to Have Your Own Website & Not Be a “Geek”, Instructor Alicia Knighten- This course is designed for the “nontechie”, but all are welcome! Get your site up and going with content management tools that are free & easy to set up. Wed, Sept. 11 - Oct. 30, 6 – 8 p.m. Sold! How to Sell Online Using eBay, Amazon and More, Instructor Alicia KnightenLearn how to use online selling sites to grab new customers, get traffic to your website anddevel(Continued on page 33)


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Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• ICC classes (continued from page 32)

op a customer list. Thursday, Sept. 12, 5 – 9 p.m. Sustainable Poultry 101, Instructor: Kirk Wilson- Learn about care of baby chicks, breeds, feeds and feed¬ing, disease and pest management, housing, predator control and maketing. You’ll also get handson experience constructing a simple poultry shelter. Monday, Sept. 16 – Oct. 7, 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 12 Qi Gong, Instructor Ed KanAn easy to learn exercise program combining simple stretch movements with breathing. Most of the exercises can be practiced in a simple folding chair. Monday, Sept. 16 - Dec. 16, 2 - 3:30 p.m. Wine Evaluation aka: Don’t Smell the Cork! Don’t Click Glasses When You Toast! Instructor, Chuck Blethen- Learn how to describe and evaluate wines, hold a wine glass properly, properly toast and more in this informative and fun class. Must be 21 or older. Thursday, Sept 19, 6-8 p.m. Tai Ji for Health, Instructor Ed Kan- Learn the basic and easy postures of Tai Chi and discover the many body/ mind benefits of the slow, deliberate, graceful movements. Thurs, Sept 19- Dec 12, 6:30 – 8 pm. Computers~ Past, Present and Beyond, Instructor: Alicia Knighten- Learn the history of computers, the internet & technology & their impact on the world. Thursday, Sept. 19, 12:30 – 4:30 pm. Broadcast Yourself on the Internet, Instructor: Alicia Knighten- An introduction to the skills and techniques needed to record and publish podcasts to the Web. Thursday, Sept. 19 – Nov 7, 6-8 p.m. More In-Class Writing, Instructor Brittany HamptonTokar- This course includes writing exercises, time to share what is written in class and discussion. Monday, Sept. 23 - 30, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Self-Care for Caregivers, Instructor Kiesa Kay- Do you take care of other people, either as a parent, a grandparent or in your work? This class will give you the tools you need to take great care of YOU, avoid burnout, and feel stronger and better than ever. Thursday, Sept. 26, 6 - 9 p.m. Call 828-894-3092 to register or for more details. A full listing of classes is available online at www.isothermal.edu/ learnstuffpolk. - article submitted by Kate Barkschat

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A18 34 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Spencer wins first place in Tryon Garden Club juried exhibit Artist Keith Spencer won first place in the juried exhibit “Four Seasons of Creativity Inspired by Pearson’s Falls” held in honor of the Tryon Garden Club’s 85th anniversary. The exhibition was judged by Frank Thomson, curator of art, Asheville Museum of Art. A silent auction of the artworks created by 50 area artists will be held during a celebratory event at Tryon Fine Arts Center on Saturday, Aug. 10 from 6-9 p.m. There is a per person donation required to attend the event. The artwork is available to view from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in Gallery II at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. For more information, visit www.pearsonsfalls.org/index. php/about/recent-news/4-seasons-of-creativity or https:// www.facebook.com/PearsonsFalls. – article submitted by Allyn Johnson

Music in Rogers Park Amphitheater - W. Howard St. - Tryon, N.C.

August 9

Nikki Talley Letters To Abigail Sponsored by

Mr. Jerry Steele & WNCW 88.7 radio

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800-440-7848 or 828-894-2324 Friday Nights Rain or Shine

7 to10 pm

Concert moves to Tryon Fine Arts Center in case of rain Wood-Fired Pizza, Water & Soft Drinks for sale


A19 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Hannah Raines, fifth from left, with her fellow NCCC participants in Denver. (photo submitted)

Raines completes national service program in Denver They responded to Hurricane Sandy, fought fires, provided relief to disaster-devastated communities, mentored disadvantaged youth, coordinated thousands of volunteers and developed into the nation’s future leaders. AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) graduated 479 members this July, who completed more than ½ million hours of service and more than 275 projects, including 78 disaster recovery projects. Hannah Raines of Tryon was part of this effort and completed 10 months of full-time service to communities in need. Raines, who arrived at NCCC’s Southwest Region Campus in Denver on Oct. 9, 2012 to begin her term of service, graduated from the program on July 26, 2013. Most corps members departed from their respective campus and began travel to their home of record immediately following their ceremony. Each member was part of a team of about 10 who completed

a series of six- to eight-week-long projects in different communities across the country. NCCC projects support disaster relief, environmental stewardship, energy conservation, infrastructure improvement, and urban and rural development. Among their many projects, some teams in the graduating classes were called upon to respond to Hurricane Sandy, tornadoes in Moore, Okla., and wildfires in Colorado and California. AmeriCorps NCCC certifies 100 percent of its members in disaster relief, and has responded to national disasters since the program began in 1994. There are four other NCCC campuses located in Sacramento, Calif.; Perry Point, Md.; Vicksburg, Miss.; and Vinton, Iowa, each of which is a hub for its respective area of the country, though teams will travel to other regions for disaster relief projects. Before joining NCCC, Raines attended Polk County High School and the University of

North Carolina at Charlotte. She is the daughter of Mary Raines and Keith Raines. AmeriCorps NCCC is a fulltime, residential, national service program in which 1,200 young adults serve nationwide each year. During their 10-month term, corps members – all 18 to 24 years old – address critical needs in communities. In exchange for their service, corps members receive $5,550 to help pay for college or to pay back existing student loans. Other benefits include a small living stipend, room and board, leadership development, increased selfconfidence, and the knowledge that, through active citizenship, people can indeed make a difference. AmeriCorps NCCC is administered by the corporation for national and community Service. For more information about AmeriCorps NCCC, visit the website at www.nationalservice. gov. – article submitted by Heather Dirk

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A20 36 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

To place a classified call 828-859-9151.

Friday, August 9, 2013

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sale

www.tryondailybulletin.com

Architectural drawings, letters and books Holland Brady owned will all be on display. (drawing submitted)

Tryon Fine Arts Center exhibit recognizes Holland Brady Aug. 14-30

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In recognition of the long life and extensive career of architect Holland Brady, there will be an exhibition of his work at the Tryon Fine Arts Center beginning on Tuesday, Aug. 14 and running until Aug. 30. A reception, hosted by Brady’s partner, Dean Trakas will be held on Thursday, Aug. 15 from 6-8 p.m. The event, which is sponsored by friends and associates, will present plans, drawings and photographs of a number of residences and other buildings designed by Brady, as well as items representative of other interests in his life. Computeraided design was anathema to Brady, who used only his imagination, his incomparable breadth of knowledge and his pen throughout his career of 62 years, during which he worked on more than 700 structures. This skill and artistry is clearly evident in the exquisitely detailed drawings that will be on display. Born in Tryon in 1925 at the old St. Luke’s Hospital, which was then located above what is now Owens Pharmacy on Trade Street, he attended Tryon High School in the same class as his future wife, Carolyn Flynn.

Later in his career, he was joined by Julie McIntyre and Dean Trakas, with whom he worked until shortly before his death on June 20 of this year. Brady spent a year at Clemson University before serving as a medic in the US Army in Europe during World War II. After returning from Europe in 1946, he continued his education at the University of Michigan, graduating in 1950. After graduating he worked for architects Paul Schweikher in Chicago, Ill, Roger Bailey in Ann Arbor, Mich. and Anthony Lord in Asheville before returning to Tryon to assist Shannon Meriwether, becoming his partner in 1953. He continued to work in Tryon, forming his own company after Meriwether’s retirement. In the 1960s and1970s, he occasionally collaborated with his brother-in-law, Ligon Flynn, in designing several homes in Tryon and the student housing (Continued on page 37)


A21 Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Tryon Garden Club’s 85th anniversary celebration Aug. 10 The Tryon Garden Club, North Carolina’s fourth oldest garden club, is celebrating its 85th anniversary by combining its love of Pearson’s Falls — purchased by the club in 1931 and now in the Smithsonian Institution Archives of American Gardens and Polk County’s number one tourist attraction — and its pride in the abundance of talented local artists eager to reveal the beauty of the falls. The club invited artists of all disciplines in Polk County and Landrum to participate in “Four Seasons of Creativity Inspired by Pearson’s Falls,” encouraging them to enjoy the glen between September 2012, and July 2013, for inspiration in this unique first-time event. The result will culminate in an exhibition of selected work to be judged by Frank Thomson, curator of art at the Asheville Museum of Art. A silent auction of the artwork will be held during the event at the Tryon Fine Arts Center (TFAC) on Aug. 10 from 6-9 p.m. The Tryon Garden Club is partnering with the artists who will set the minimum price for their work, which they will receive if sold, and any amount

• Brady

(continued from page 36)

at the Brevard Music Center, for which they received an AIA Design Award. Later in his career, he was joined by Julie McIntyre and Dean Trakas, with whom he worked until shortly before his death on June 20 of this year. One of their final projects together is the renovation and extension of the former St. Luke’s Hospital Exchange building on Trade Street, which is now nearing completion. He was honored by the Town

Want to go? What: When: Where:

Silent auction, “Four Seasons of Creativity Inspired by Pearson’s Falls” Saturday, Aug. 10 Tryon Fine Arts Center, Tryon.

bid over that price will be donated to the club. The club’s proceeds will fund “Learning to Grow … Growing to Learn,” a special program for the four Polk County schools’ second grade classes. Polk County High School’s Occupational Class will assist the younger students with the vegetable and herb gardens to help fulfill the Tryon Garden Club’s mission to educate members of the community. Attendees of the Aug. 10 event are asked to donate at the door (or prior to the event by calling 864-415-9791). The celebratory event includes food, drinks and dancing, with music by the Trophy Husbands and Daryl Ryce. - article submitted by Susan McNabb

of Tryon with the proclamation of Holland Brady Day by Mayor Alan Peoples on June 21, the 88th anniversary of his birth. The exhibition will be on display during their opening hours at the Tryon Fine Arts Center from Aug. 14 through Aug. 30: Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will also be a smaller exhibit recognizing Brady at the Lanier Library during the same period. - article submitted by Frances Flynn

37


A22 38 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Orchard Inn in Saluda awarded TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for 2013 MarketPlace For the second year in a row The Orchard Inn has been awarded Trip Advisor’s Certificate of Excellence, as well as Green Leader’s Silver Level Designation. The inn has also received a Four Star Top Rating from Restaurant.com. The Orchard Inn, located in Saluda, was originally built in 1926 by The Brotherhood of Southern Railroad as a summer retreat. It is on the National Register of Historic Places as the Railroad Clerk’s Mountain Home and is a member of the prestigious Select Registry group of Inns and B&B’s throughout North America. Marc and Marianne Blazar purchased the inn in 2010 from Bob and Kathy Thompson and

have worked tirelessly to upgrade the amenities and rooms as well as the fine dining restaurant. There are eight rooms upstairs in the inn, one suite downstairs and five cottages situated on 12 acres with stunning mountain views. Marianne, who learned her culinary skills in her native Vienna, Austria, the inn’s chef serving breakfast everyday, dinner Thursday through Saturday and brunch on Sunday. The restaurant, with wonderful mountain views from every table, is open to the public by reservation. The TripAdvisor Award was given to The Orchard Inn based on unsolicited reviews from guests such as the following: “A rare find - simple elegance and genuine hospitality” “My family and I have spent many years visiting the Saluda/ Hendersonville area and thanks

“My family and I have spent many years visiting the Saluda/ Hendersonville area and thanks to the Orchard Inn, we have now begun a tradition of a family reunion/birthday celebration at the Inn each July.” -- Orchard Inn guest review

to the Orchard Inn, we have now begun a tradition of a family reunion/birthday celebration at the inn each July.” Marc makes sure that you are comfortable and that you have everything you need. Marianne is an fantastic chef and there is no need to ever leave the inn because the breakfast is out-ofthis-world (the best scones I have ever tasted) and the dinner is just perfect in every way; the ambiance, the wine selections and the affordable, fixed price menu, which offers interesting and delicious choices so there is sure to be something for everyone.” “I have reviewed other properties and restaurants for Trip Advisor, but I confess that selfishly, it is with mixed emotions that I write about the Orchard Inn because it is simply a oneof-a-kind, fabulous experience and as the word spreads, I don’t want anything to change about this wonderful refuge from the real world.” – article submitted by Marc Blazar

TO THE

TRYON D A I LY B U L L E T I N Call: 828-859-9151


A23 39

Friday, August 9, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

MarketPlace

Steer clear of overhang

• Calendar (continued from page 2)

Info: 828-696-5552.

Monday

St. Luke’s engineering staff Brook Campbell and Lane Blackwell (on ladder) reach new heights to remind drivers to steer clear of the overhang at the front of St. Luke’s Hospital. The overhang – and a truck – were damaged recently but thankfully no one was hurt. (photo by Kathy Woodham)

Hendersonville band seeking members from Polk County The Hendersonville Community Band is looking for new musicians. There are currently two musicians in the band from Polk County – Mannfred Walter and Bill Davies. The 75-member band, conducted by Winford Franklin, will perform on the stage in front of

the historic Hendersonville Courthouse on Main St. during the Apple Festival on Saturday, Aug. 31 at 11:15 a.m. If you would like to become a member of the band this year, you can attend a rehearsal and/ or contact conductor Franklin at 904-742-7931 or band president,

Ron Judd at 828-884-6566. Rehearsals start at 7 p.m. on Sept. 3 at the West Hendersonville High School band room. The band particularly needs clarinets, tenor and baritone saxes, double reeds and percussionists. – article submitted by Ruthie Rose

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Mondays, Harmon Field/Tryon, 7 a.m. - noon. Saluda Center, Mondays, chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; line dance, 12:30 p.m.; Saluda Duplicate Bridge, 1:30 p.m. 828749-9245. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail. com or visit www.saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center, sing-along, 10 a.m.; senior fitness, 11 a.m.; bingo or bead class 12:30 p.m. 828894-0001. Christian Fellowship Luncheon TJ’s Cafe, Tryon, Mondays except holidays, noon - 1 p.m.; food, fellowship and discussion of relevant issues; interdenominational. The present study is The Christian Atheist: Believing in God but Living as if He Doesn’t Exist by Craig Groeschel. 859-5051. Chess Club, Mondays, 12:30 p.m., recreation room, LaurelHurst Apartments, Columbus. Open to anyone in community. 894-3336. Please submit Curb Reporter items in writing at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number of a contact person. Items will be printed in order by date of event, as space allows.


A24 40 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, August 9, 2013

Community members hit the dance floor during the first Top of the Grade Concert. (photo submitted)

Sound Investment performs classic rock at Top of the Grade Concert in Saluda Aug. 9 Want to go? What: Top of the Grade concert When: Friday, Aug. 9 Where: McCreery Park, Saluda anyone who would like to sponsor an event to contact us. Sponsorships are $100. For music scheduling, please contact Judy Ward at judyward@ charter.net or 828-674-5958. For sponsorships, please contact Cathy Jackson at 828-817-2876 or cathy@cathyjacksonrealty.com. – article submitted by Cathy Jackson

“Rally for a Reason” at Melvin Hill Church Aug. 17 Melvin Hill Church, 525 Melvin Hill Road, Green Creek will be hosting “Rally for a Reason” on Saturday, Aug. 17

from 6 –10 p.m. The youth rally will feature worship bands, games, prizes and a hotdog supper.

The event is free and all are invited. - article submitted by Peter McDonald

this ad with a mailing label. Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin.

Community members are encouraged to bring their chairs or blankets. Food, soft drinks and coolers are allowed. Wildflour Bakery will sell freshly made pizzas on site. Events are rain or shine, and concerts will move to the pavilion if it is raining. The events are free to the public, and donations are always welcomed and are tax deductible. The Top of the Grade concerts are organized by the NC Small Town Main Street promotions team to carry out the vision of Saluda becoming a four season destination for both local residents and visitors. The Saluda Business Association organizes the event. To help underwrite the concerts, we invite

Cover up…

Performing the fourth Top of the Grade concert, Friday, Aug. 9, is the classic rock sound of Sound Investment. This upbeat, energetic band appeals to the young and old providing just the right beat for dancing. From Sound Investment, you will hear the sounds of the Beach Boys, Beatles, Aretha Franklin, Sam & Dave, The Four Tops, Young Rascals, Temptations, Righteous Brothers, Kinks, Supremes, Johnny Rivers, Doobie Brothers, Atlanta Rhythm Section and more. All performances will be held on center stage from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at McCreery Park in the area that was previously the skateboard park or in the pavilion if it is raining.

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