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St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary awards health career scholarships, page 18

Tryon Daily Bulletin

The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 86 / No. 119

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Only 50 cents

Pure imagination to envelop TFAC stage by Samantha Hurst

Audience members’ imaginations will be illuminated as a quirky, yet heartwarming host invites them to join on an adventure filled with pops of color and bursts of youthful exuberance July 18-21. And what a world of imagination Tryon Little Theater’s summer production of “Willy Wonka” is with 42 youth performing. Director Jenna Tamisiea said this version, based on Roald Dahl’s classic “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” was perfect for the youth theater program because it includes essentially 22 lead roles. “What you get to see is so many kids letting their imaginations run wild on these characters,” Tamisiea said. (Continued on page 4)

Candy factory workers surround Willy Wonka, played by Tij D’oyen, as he sings “Pure Imagination” and talks of needing to find someone to take over the factory when he is gone. Willy Wonka opens Thursday, July 18 at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. Read the full story on page 4. (photo by Samantha Hurst)

Upstairs Artspace will host an opening reception Saturday, July 20, 5-8 p.m., for exhibits, “Seeing Is Believing” and “Crossing The Line,” preceded at 4 p.m. by an art tour with Bonnie Bardos and Charlotte Fowler.

Polk County election filing ends Friday by Leah Justice

Residents Columbus, Saluda and Tryon have until Friday, July 19 at noon to file for this year’s municipal election. Filing can be done at the Polk County Board of Elections Office, located on the second floor of the Womack building in Columbus.

The filing fee is $5 with most incumbent board members filing for reelection so far along with a few challengers, especially in Tryon. The Town of Tryon so far will see the largest race with the mayor seat (Continued on page 6)

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties

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located at 112 Sparks Drive in Forest City * 828-351-6000 MyRutherfordRegional.com/WoundCare


2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

STAFF Betty Ramsey, Publisher betty.ramsey@tryondailybulletin.com

Samantha Hurst, Editor samantha.hurst@tryondailybulletin.com

Leah Justice, Reporter leah.justice@tryondailybulletin.com

Gwen Ring, Design gwen.ring@tryondailybulletin.com

Lenette Sprouse, Marketing Consultant lenette.sprouse@tryondailybulletin.com

Harry Forsha, Marketing Consultant harry.forsha@tryondailybulletin.com

Kevin Powell, Marketing Consultant kevin.powell@tryondailybulletin.com

Jessy Taylor, Administrative Assistant jessy.taylor@tryondailybulletin.com

Tony Elder, Pressroom Manager tony.elder@tryondailybulletin.com

Jeff Allison, Printing Press/Distribution jeff.allison@tryondailybulletin.com

Jonathan Burrell, Pressroom Ethan Price, Pressroom

How To Reach Us Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Today

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Wednesdays, Fire Department in Green Creek, 7 a.m. - noon. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Wednesday activities include Tai Chi, 9 a.m.; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; Wacky Wednesday and senior fitness, 10 a.m.; bingo and bridge, 12:30 p.m. 828-8940001. Willy Wonka Box Office The youth musical Willy Wonka opens Thursday evening at the Tryon Fine Arts Center to play through Sunday’s matinee. The box office is open Monday - Saturday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. plus Tuesday 4-7 p.m. at the Tryon Little Theater Workshop, 516 S. Trade Street. For tickets: 828-859-2466. Green Creek Community Center, quilters’ group, Wednesdays, 10 - 11:30 a.m. Saluda Center, Wednesday activities, Trash Train, 10 a.m.; gentle Yin Yoga 12:30 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www. saluda.com. Tryon Kiwanis Club, meets Wednesdays, noon, Congregational Church, 210 Melrose Ave., Tryon. Foothill’s Parkinson’s Support Group meets the third Wednesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the Landrum Library. All are welcome to this free meeting. Call 864-457-4419, for additional information. Walk-and-talk on artist Guntram Gersch Wednesday, July 17 1:30-2:30 p.m.: “walkand-talk” on the life and art of Guntram Gersch. Presenter: Art

Historian Michael McCue. Saluda Community Land Trust monthly meeting will be held on July 17, 3 p.m. at Pavilion at McCreery Park. Female Domestic Abuse Intervention, Wednesdays 6-7:30 p.m., Steps to HOPE. 894-2340. Alcoholics Anonymous Tryon 12 and 12 Wednesdays, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m., Tryon Coffeehouse, 90 Trade Street.

Thursday

Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory will be performed July 18 through July 21 at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. The musical, based on Roald Dahls’s book “Charlie and The Chocolate Factory”, features the songs from the classic film starring Gene Wilder. Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Thursdays, 7 a.m. - noon, corner of Hampton Court and Hwy 108. Saluda Center, Thursday activities: knitting group, 9:30 a.m.; gentle Yin Yoga, 5:30 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www. saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Thursday activities include medication assistance, 9 a.m.-noon; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; devotions, 10 a.m.; bingo or movie, 12:30 p.m.; grocery shopping, 1 p.m.; yoga, 6 p.m. 828-894-0001. Willy Wonka, the youth musical presented by the Tryon Little Theater and Tryon Youth Center, opens tonight at the Tryon Fine Arts Center to play through a matinee on Sunday. The box office at the TLT Workshop, 516 S. Trade Street, is open today-Saturday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. For tickets: 828-859-

LOCAL WEATHER Today: PM Tstorms, with 50 percent chance of rain. High 91, low 70. Monday’s weather was: High 81, low 69, no rain.

Tomorrow: Isolated T-storms, with 30 percent chance of rain. High 88, low 70. Tonight’s Moon Phase:

2466. House of Flags Museum, open Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Landrum Library, Lap Babies, 10 a.m., 20- 25 minute session for young children and care givers includes music, nursery rhymes, action poems and short books. Storytime at 10:30 a.m. for preschoolers includes books, music and fingerplays. Call 828457-2218. Polk County Historical Association Museum open Thursdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. AA open discussion meeting, Happy, Joyous and Free, noon on Thursdays, Columbus United Methodist Church, 76 N. Peak Street, across from Stearns gym. Rotary Club of Tryon, meets every Thursday at noon at Tryon Presbyterian Church on Harmon Field Rd. Tryon Tailgate Market, every Thursday, 4 to 6:30 p.m., until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Landrum Library Teen Program will be hosted on July 18, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. at the Landrum Library. Remember the Spirograph from you childhood? Create cool modern art on a large scale as we do Pendulum Painting. Open to ages 12-17 or rising seventh -twelfth graders. If you have any questions about this or other Teen programs please contact the Landrum Library at 864-457-2218. Library Movie Night: (Continued on page 23)

OBITUARIES William H. Meanix, Jr. p. 7

tryondailybulletin.com


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Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Shed creates driving obstacle on Hicks McAbee Rd.

Rainwater flooding property pushed this shed into the road on Hicks McAbee off Hwy. 9 in Mill Spring over the weekend. See more photos of rain damage in the area at www.tryondailybulletin.com. (photo by Leah Justice)

C A R O L I N A

CHIROPRACTICPlus


4 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

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Tij D’oyen (Willy Wonka) , Remy Fifield (oompa loompa), Raines Strader (oompa loompa) and Julien Besnard (Wonka Blues Brother) will bring a bit of fun and funk to the stage. (photo by Samantha Hurst)

• Willy Wonka (continued from page 1)

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“I think that is what makes the work really good is when all the kids feel like they are really involved in creating something.” Tamisiea joined the annual youth theater workshop, hosted by TLT and the Tryon Fine Arts Center, last year to direct Seussical: the Musical. She said she couldn’t turn down the opportunity to be involved again. This year’s musical features songs from the classic film starring Gene Wilder. Jazzing up the show with a current flare are wall projections, black lights, cell phones, references to technology like Siri and hip hop oompa loompas. “We’re adding all the modern flash so that kids can connect with that story on the surface level and then be drawn in deeper,” Tamisiea said. “We’ve got projections and we’ve got some black lights, but really for me what I’m most hoping will be the reason people bring their families is the heart of the story.” Tamisiea said what strikes her is the idea that this wonderful little girl named Charlie can be chosen to take care of this facility because she has such a good heart and is honest. Tamisiea said she hopes kids and their families will connect

with Charlie because she is not rich, she does not have nice clothes, she doesn’t have a dad that will buy her a ton of candy bars but she has a chance to do something great. “So many kids are going through that, so many people are going through what Charlie and her family are going through,” Tamisiea said. “How nice to go to the theater and see such a positive message on stage.” Tij D’oyen, who plays Willy Wonka, said the opportunity to tell a story that profoundly affects people is why he’s so attracted to acting. “My favorite thing is to make people ‘feel,’” D’oyen said. “It’s exciting to know that anything I do while I’m on stage could change their emotion. I can do something that makes them really, really happy; it feels great to be a part of that.” Young actors around Tryon have had the chance to experience a similar feeling in summer youth productions for the last 40 years now. Producer Betty Brewer said she and others worked to launch the program around 1970. “In fact, some of the kids that will be on stage for this production, their parents performed in those early plays,” Brewer said. “It’s fun for me to see these second generation kids coming around.” Those parents now discover


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Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Willy Wonka (continued from page 4)

themselves involved in a multitude of ways – baking cookies for snacks or taking on the monumental task of dressing four-dozen kids for the production. Carol Cloud Rowell said she’s enjoying watching her daughter Cloe Rowell, 10, in her first youth theater production with TLT. Carol played Bloody Mary as a 12-year-old in South Pacific with TLT. Chloe is playing a funky Oompa loompa and a squirrel. “For my child to be here at the fine arts center in her first production has been amazing. I feel so blessed to get to watch her perform and for her to have Betty Brewer in her life just like I did,” Rowell said. “It’s been great to share with her a love of theater and performing.” Tamisiea said Tryon’s youth productions are wonderfully unique because they don’t turn

Wonkettes Bella Marino, Jessica Farr, Olivia Swayze, Adriana Talley and Casey Brown look into a bin of “Good” candy. (photo by Samantha Hurst)

kids away. In fact, when kids cannot afford the small fee associated with participation scholarships are provided. “That is why kids keep com-

ing back every year. The community is so behind it and there is such a rich history there – it’s really beautiful to see it unfold and every year for it to be such

a great experience for the kids,” Tamisiea said. The show runs July 18-21 at the Tryon Fine Arts Center in Tryon.

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6 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Fellowship-trained Foot and Ankle Surgeon Dr. Jason Glover, DPM, is Board Qualified in Foot and Ankle Surgery and Reconstruction. Dr. Glover is a graduate of Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine and completed his foot and ankle Jason Glover surgery residency at The Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. He is one of the few podiatric surgeons to complete an advanced fellowship in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery, and served fellowships at Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Center in Columbus, Ohio, and Weil Foot & Ankle Institute in Chicago. Dr. Glover specializes in: n Reconstructive foot and ankle surgery n Heel pain / Heel spurs n Achilles Tendon Disorders n Ankle sprains n Tendinitis n Sports injuries n Arthritis in the foot and ankle n Diabetic care

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• Election

(continued from page 1)

as well as both council seats contested. The mayor seat is currently held by Alan Peoples, who has filed for reelection. Jim Wright has also filed to challenge the mayor seat. For council in Tryon, the seats of Doug Arbogast and Wim Woody are up for reelection with both incumbents filing. The seats held by Arbogast and Woody are being challenged by Bill Crowell, Happy McLeod, Bill Ingham and Billy Moss, who have all filed. Saluda will also see a race for commissioner as the seats of Johnnie Kinard and George Sweet are being challenged by newcomer Carolyn Ashburn. Kinard and Sweet have also filed for reelection along with incumbent mayor Fred Baisden, who as of Tuesday, July 16 had no challengers. In Columbus, incumbent

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Want to file? What: F ile to run for a council seat or for mayor When: Last day July 19 Where: PC Board of Elections office in Columbus mayor Eric McIntyre has filed to retain his seat with no challengers so far. Incumbent council members Margaret Metcalf and Ricky McCallister have filed to retain their seats. Josh Denton has also filed to run for council. Incumbent Ernie Kan has not filed for reelection. Landrum residents have until Aug. 7 at noon to file for city council. The seats of mayor Bob Briggs and the council seats of Jan Horton, Don Smith and Billy Inman are up for reelection this year. This year’s election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 5.


Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Obituaries

William H. Meanix, Jr. William (“Bill”) Henry Meanix Jr., age 86, died on Thursday, July 11, 2013, at his home in Fairfax Station, Va. He was the beloved husband of June (Higgins) Meanix of Fairfax Station, Va., devoted father of Heather (Steve) Hudson of Fairfax Station, Va., William H. Meanix III (Billy) of Fairfax Station, Va. and Kimberly (Duff) Miller of South Glastonbury, Conn., and proud grandfather of Ryann Brzoska, Shannon Miller, Kelley Miller, Sean Miller, Tyler Hudson and William Miller. He was preceded in death in 2010, by his younger brother Robert Meanix, Sr. but surviving are Robert’s wife, Nancy Meanix of Pisgah Forest, N.C.; and numerous nephews and nieces on both sides of the family. Bill was born June 10, 1927 and

raised in Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass. Encouraged by his parents, William Henry Meanix and Genevieve Augusta (Burns) Meanix, he became an accomplished scholarathlete, graduating with distinction from Roxbury Latin ‘44, US Naval Academy ’49 and Harvard University’s Graduate School of Public Administration ’61. A lifelong learner, Bill studied various subjects on his own such as math and physics but had a particular interest in foreign languages. Bill loved jazz and classical music and was known for being quite a dancer and the life of the party. He also greatly enjoyed following politics, the one subject that could elicit great passion in a conversation. He married Leona (June) Higgins on his birthday in 1959 in California. Bill thrived in the Navy and commanded any room he entered with his full head of Irish white hair, easy smile and a thundering authoritative voice which masked in contrast, a very gentle and com-

passionate soul. He had a fabulous sense of humor and particularly enjoyed the good pun. After a distinguished 30-year career in the US Navy, Bill went back to school and earned his Juris Doctor in Law from the University of Maine ‘79. In his law career, he found private practice most satisfying. Perhaps the only accomplishment he sought which eluded him was mastery of the game of golf. Bill enjoyed helping and rooting for the underdog, which is probably why he was a lifelong and avid fan of the Boston Red Sox and Washington Redskins. After semi-retiring from law and moving to NC, he supported many social causes but gave the majority of his time to the Pacolet Area Conservatory addressing environmental and land use issues. When he wasn’t training for track Master’s competitions himself, Bill also lent his significant experience and expertise by working countless hours with middle and high school hurdlers in Polk County, whom he spoke of

"The office is clean and well-equipped; the staff is very friendly and knowledgeable. Dr. Walters is friendly, professional, knowledgeable and honest. If you are looking for a place that practices integrity, this is the place." ~ J.R. "Everything was done with efficiency and I was made to feel at ease. Everyone was pleasant and very gentle with me and any fears that I had. Dr. Walters has been my dentist since he came to Landrum and his staff is wonderful, very pleasant and knowledgeable. I appreciate each one of them and the care they give... making me feel like family." ~ J.C. "Going to Dr. Walters is always a pleasant experience. The staff is friendly and professional. If you are afraid of dentists, then make an appointment with Dr. Walter's he will change your mind about dentistry forever." ~ A.W.

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fondly and with great pride. A funeral mass will be offered on Friday, July 26 at 3 p.m. at Church of the Nativity, 6400 Nativity Lane, Burke, Va. Visitation will be the hour (2-3 p.m.) preceding the funeral at the smaller chapel of the church. A private military burial ceremony will be performed at sea by the United States Navy at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Conservation Fund, 1655 North Fort Myer Drive, Suite 1300, Arlington, VA 22209.


8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Opinion

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Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Ours

Yours

Polk fortunate to have new EMS director While many people may take a vacation or at least a rest before starting a new job, Polk County Emergency Services Director Michael Crater found himself out in rain and thunderstorms this past weekend ensuring people were safe. He was supposed to begin his new position on Monday, July 15. When asked about how he felt to begin his new job early, he humbly shrugged it off, as if anyone would do the same. We’re not so sure. Crater and emergency management’s Penny Storey, as well as other staff, many volunteers and N.C. Department of Transportation employees went above their call of duty during the area’s excessive rains this past weekend that shut down bridges and washed out roads. Some residents found themselves trapped at their homes for days with EMS frequently calling them to make sure they didn’t need them to bring them anything. Storey called the Bulletin’s reporter Leah Justice on Sunday afternoon to see if the paper wanted to interview Crater about the roads since several were closed at the time. Storey then used her personal vehicle, with Crater driving, to take the Bulletin and news channel 7 on a tour of damaged areas that the public would have otherwise not gotten to see up close. Due to their time, the Bulletin was able to inform the public of the closed roads on its website over the weekend. Polk County is fortunate to have someone with Crater’s experience and love for this county to take the lead with Polk EMS. He has worked with Polk EMS since 1994 and understands it takes a little more dedication to work in a small county. As Crater said himself, few realize what our volunteers do for safety in this county or the time our paramedics spend with patients compared to larger areas. While the Bulletin has always had a good relationship with the county’s EMS and other departments, Crater’s first impression as EMS’s new leader was not taken lightly. The Bulletin thanks Crater and the EMS for taking the time to truly show how much they care that people in their county are safe. – Editorial staff, Tryon Daily Bulletin

The Tryon Daily Bulletin The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Editor Designer Reporter

Betty Ramsey, Publisher

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Samantha Hurst Gwen Ring Leah Justice

Your rights shouldn’t violate rights of others To the editor: It would appear that the majority of Polk County commissioners are not particularly interested in a problem that is affecting the rights and health of some of the county’s taxpaying citizens. At a meeting on Letter July 8, 2013 the com- to the missioners refused Editor to consider a noise ordinance similar to the one that is working well in Henderson County. Several of those in attendance spoke of constant annoyance with noise resulting from gunshots, loud music being played throughout the night and other disturbances. They related their health concerns from being unable to sleep, and their fears of guns being fired indiscriminately. Commissioner Ray Gasperson spoke in favor of an ordinance, but other commissioners criticized the Henderson County ordinance as being “too complicated.” Members of the Silver Creek community told of calling the police on numerous occasions, only to be told that without an ordinance, they were unable to bring charges. The main reason I felt this was needed was to give law enforcement the ability to do something

Letter to the Editor

Of bourbon and water To the editor: Imagine that you are a shop

and make a reasonable decision on the issue at hand. Every call they go on is a waste of taxpayer money if they go to the call with their hands tied in legal hogwash with no resolution. I have tried for many years to get the police the power to make a judgment call on a noise complaint and resolve the matter. I guess in Polk County, the county police will never have this power to use their heads. I was very disappointed by the attitude of the other commissioners at the meeting, they did not even have an open mind about this matter; they had their minds already made before the meeting ever started. I tried to present everything in a correct, open and honest way. Some of the commissioners expressed the opinion that such an ordinance would be infringing on personal rights. I was taught in school that rights in a democracy also carry a responsibility to use them wisely. That means that rights are necessary, but they do not include actions that violate the rights of others by affecting their sleep, their health, their happiness and their general welfare. Let’s hope in the next election, Polk County citizens will remember those commissioners who do not seem to grasp that concept and support candidates who show interest in the concerns of all the people of the county. – Ronald Deal, Mill Spring owner and that you open your doors for business one morning and determine that over 10 percent of your inventory is missing. There is a range of reactions that you might exercise. You (Continued on page 9)


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Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Preserving family lands: Important legacy to pass on Land can be permanently preserved through a method called a conservation easement, also known as a conservation agreement. The Pacolet Area Conservancy has been working with willing landowners for almost 25 years to help people preserve and conserve their special lands. There are criteria that must be met, and restrictions to future uses, but there is flexibility in each agreement. The agreement is legally binding and applies to all future owners of the land. Right now there is also an enhanced tax incentive in place. The U.S. Congress passed a fiscal cliff deal that renews the enhanced income tax deduction for conser-

vation easements through 2013, and retroactive to the beginning of 2012. This incentive will help land trusts, such as the Pacolet Area Conservancy, increase the pace of land conservation. Below are some questions and answers to help landowners better understand: 1. How does the enhanced easement incentive change the law for conservation donations? The enhanced easement incentive: Raises the deduction a donor can take for donating a conservation easement from 30 percent of their adjusted gross income in any year to 50 percent; Allows qualifying farmers and ranchers to deduct up to 100

percent of their income (see the above link for more details); and Extends the carry-forward period for a donor to take tax deductions for voluntary conservation agreements from 5 to 15 years (in addition to the year of donation). 2. Can you give me an example? Without the enhanced easement incentive, a landowner earning $50,000 a year who donated a $1 million conservation easement could take a $15,000 deduction for the year of the donation and for an additional 5 years – a total of $90,000 in tax deductions. The enhanced easement deduction allows that landowner to deduct $25,000 for the year of the donation and then for an ad-

ditional 15 years. That’s $400,000 in deductions. If the landowner qualifies as a farmer or rancher, they can zero out their taxes. In that case, they could take a maximum of $800,000 in deductions for their million dollar gift. The PAC staff encourages interested landowners to contact them at 828-859-5060. As of now, these enhanced tax incentives are only secured until Dec. 31, 2013. There is a lot of work that needs to be done in drawing up a conservation easement, such as site visits, baseline documentation, research and legal documentation. That takes about five to six months to complete. – article submitted by Mary Walter

• Water

$3,000 worth of liquor disappears, the matter was immediately immersed in political “hocuspocus.” First, the store was closed and then it was announced that the $3,000 “boo-boo” could be repaired with a $30,000 band-aid and the store was to be reopened. The political fairy tale gets better. Town Letter officials decided that to the since the store has not Editor made a profit in years, a bold new retailing model would be introduced. Why not constrict the inventory offering and reduce the hours of operation. This liquor escapade is “home grown” government at

its best. Now consider citizen Whitmire. For 14 years, she has tried to get the Town of Tryon to accept its responsibility relative to the malfunction of one of its utilities and the resulting damage that is being done to her property, including a real threat to her health and well being. For 14 years she has been “stiffed armed” by the town. Additionally, the town has exhausted its list of designated “official numb nuts” to look into the matter and to develop a solution. Thus, the town was forced to develop a new stance – “If you

believe that we (Tryon) have a responsibility for our actions as leaders and managers – then you should sue us.” This attitude is compatible with their position on their responsibility to provide certifiably safe drinking water and their role as owners of Lake Lanier. Not quite the putrid political solution put into the liquor store heist. Two events separate in nature, separate in process and separate in result. For each event, whose interests were considered and served? Lay them both side-byside and you have a clear and definitive picture of the soul and character of a community. – Michael Verbonic, Landrum

(continued from page 8)

might decide to internalize the circumstance and proceed with business as usual. You might approach the situation forensically and attempt to determine the what, when, why and how of the event. Consider the recent Town of Tryon liquor store heist (I can call it a heist as there has not been an explanation of how $3,000 worth of liquor disappeared). Also, the number $3,000 is probably fictitious and should be taken as an understatement of the actual loss. Rather than disclosing to the town residents any facts of how

of Landrum Get The NAPA Know How


10 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

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TPEWXIVVITEMV [[[HIWIVMIW ALE 8V]SR+VIIR'VIIOEVIE GPYHIH'EPP .MQ,SPPS[E] GPIERMRKGSQ Lake Lure Classical 4SXIRXMEPJSVLSVWIW SV ,SYWIJSV7EPI SV Busing from Columbus 0IEWIERH(ITSWMX &(61&%%PP%TTPM  Green Creek, Mill Spring  *SVVIRXHYTPI\ ERGIW-RGPYHIH'MX];E Free public school option 'SPYQFYW&6&%JYPP ELP ANTED XIV*PEX8ST6SEH Now enrolling K-10 ,SYWIJSVVIRX&(61 FEWIQIRXGIRXVEP, % 0]RR Info at 828.625.9292 &%%PP%TTPMERGIW-R HIR[[SSHFYVRMRKJMVI ERVICES  GPYHIH'MX];EXIV 'PIERMRK7IVZMGI TPEGIOMXGLIRETTPMERGIW *PEX8ST6SEH0]RR 2IIHWLIPT'EPP KEVEKI;(LSSOYT , ZMPPI'SRZIRMIRX[ 463*)77-32%0 TIVQSRXL

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Is looking for the following positions. 7a.m to 3p.m RN Shift Supervisor Please contact Tisha Davis @ 828-749-2261

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APARTMENTS For Rent: 595 Vineyard Rd, Tryon. Walk-out basement apartment. 2 BR, 1 bath, full kitchen, washer/dryer hookup, new flooring. $525 per month plus $525 deposit. Call 864-612-0165 Sell your home in the classifieds call 828.859.9151

CONDOMINIUMS FOR RENT For Rent 1BR Condo Melrose Avenue, Tryon. $600 all utilities included. ALSO Small Studio Apartment $325.00 per month, all utilities included 828-899-0701 0SGEXMSR0SGEXMSR%X XVEGXMZI&6&%GSRHS =SY[MPPFIEFPIXS[EPOXS XS[RTIVQSRXL 'EPP 


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Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work ‌ With Your Neighbors! CONDOMINIUMS FOR RENT

FURNITURE

8V]SRFIHVSSQFEXL Furniture for Sale. JYVRMWLIHGSRHSWYFPIX New & Vintage. Landrum XLVIIQSRXLW3GXSFIV Antiques & Furniture Co. 2SZIQFIV(IGIQFIV 221 E. Rutherford St, Lan 'EVTSVXERHHIGO[ drum. 864-457-4000 FEVFIUYI;EPOXSXS[R QSRXLMRGPYHIWYXMPMX OOD HINGS MIWQSRXLEHZERGIVIRX O AT 6IJIVIRGIW    “Picnics are fun atâ€? TXIV[M$GLEVXIVRIX Parker-Binns Vineyard 7382 Highway 108 E Mill Spring, NC FFICE PACE (828) 894-0154 Like Us On Facebook 3JJMGI7TEGI%ZEMPEFPI MR,MWXSVMG&YMPHMRK AWN XSWUJXWTEGIW ARDEN XSTIVQSRXL 1MPP7TVMRK%KVMGYPXYVEP 42 local artists, teak furn, 'IRXIV *EVQ7XSVI pottery, wtr features, bird 3TIR1SR7EX houses, Pawleys Island JIEXYVMRK0SGEP*SSH'EPP Hammocks, Thompson SV Garden Gallery [[[TSPOGSYRX]JEVQWSVK 828-859-3135

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Offices and possible retail space available in downtown Columbus. Ample parking and one of the highest daily traffic counts in Polk County. Particularly interested in computer related business and willing to trade portions of rent in exchange for services. 828 817-1068

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12 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Multiple barriers standing in way of finding good jobs A lot of conversation lately has centered on finding jobs, finding quality jobs, living wages and why it’s so dog gone hard to find a good job. Allen, 62, (not his real name), has been unemployed for 14 months and lives in Polk County. He has a degree in mechanical engineering and project manager credentials. He has an excellent work history. Still, he finds himself frustrated by the lack of opportunities. Stanley, 54, (again, not his real name) has a high school diploma and has taken some community colleges courses in the past, although most of his skills are now outdated. He has exhausted unemployment benefits from his last job and feels he cannot afford to go back to school. Both men have tapped their respective networks of previous co-workers, friends and family. Both men are panicked.

This is a familiar scenario even to online applications. Online job with assurances that the Great applications have probably hurt Recession ended June 2009. For the job market more than any other many, only in 2009 and 2010 did single thing. the economic downturn begin to A CBS MoneyWatch segbecome entrenched. ment looked at the problem of Savings, for many who were online job searches and how they dipping in to the cookie jar, were have worsened the job crisis. The starting to dwindle. Wharton School of Business at So, why is it the University of so hard to find a Pennsylvania reETDC job even as we cently noted that Director hear the economy one company’s is improving? online resumeLibbie Johnson One big reascreening process son is technology. Yes, technology- found not one qualified engineerthat thing that was going to make ing job applicant out of 29,000 our lives easier. For starters tech- resume submissions. Not one. nology has replaced many of the This scene is created by a muljobs that in years past were done titude of HR resume screening by living, breathing human beings. software programs that look for Robots it appears do not get sick or the “perfect” candidate and rejects require vacation time and always all others based on keywords. The gets along great with management. result is, sadly, that candidates Secondly, and maybe the one that desperately looking for jobs can’t is causing job seekers to drink gin get them, and employers continue out of the cat bowl, is the move to complain that they can’t find the

right talent. In essence, both groups are still facing each other across the virtual divide, trying to figure out how to meet in the middle. The online system should be easy, but it’s not; It’s a nightmare. The applications are long and cumbersome. After a significant amount of time and effort to match key words and make sure every question is answered, it’s submitted, and ta-da ... nothing. The resume has become a resident of the Great Black Hole. Another equally frustrating alternative is the local Craig’s List. Job seekers will sift through the openings posted in Greenville/ Spartanburg and Asheville. The problem is jobs are posted and forgotten. One local applicant found a warehouse manager job in Duncan, S.C. that required job seekers to apply in person. After (Continued on page 13)


Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Stott’s Ford supports Steps to HOPE A 2013 Ford Focus, generously provided by Stott’s Ford of Tryon, will be the hole-in-one prize at Steps to HOPE’s 10th Annual Golf Tournament this year. All proceeds from the tournament, held on Nov. 1, will suppor t Steps to HOPE – Polk County’s non-profit domestic violence and sexual assault prevention and treatment center. For more information, contact Steps to HOPE at 828-894-2340. (photo submitted by Debra Backus)

• Good jobs (continued from page 12)

having driven to the advertised address, he was told,” Oops! The job was already filled. We forgot to cancel it. Sorry.” And finally, the elephant in the room: a weak economy means employers can offer wages sometime significantly under the appropriate wage for the skill set. All kinds of reasons (and excuses abound), but the bottom line is supply and demand. Why hire a seasoned professional with experience and skills when you can hire TE NEW ADDRESS

an inexperienced applicant for half the salary, train them in-house and hope for the best? In Polk County, we need quality jobs that offer good wages. A living wage in our county starts at $9.11 an hour for a single person. Living wages and quality jobs offer rewards for the employee and the community at large that go beyond the bottom line: overall job satisfaction, sense of pride and accomplishment, fewer missed work days, greater contributions to the workplace and more. Quality jobs: a tall order for sure, but one worth the effort.

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14 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Summer horse show season at FENCE in full swing Rainy weather may stop some sports, but equestrian athletes and their equine partners ride rain or shine. The summer horse show season at FENCE is in full gallop and the action is non-stop. Folks from all over the southeast and beyond are trotting, jumping, bathing and brushing all over the show grounds at FENCE. Dorothy Trapp of Topsail, N.C., the United States Equestrian Federation steward (rules official) for the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club Charity Show says, “I have worked shows here (at FENCE), many times and it is a very pleasant experience. This is a beautiful show grounds that is continually being improved.” All shows at FENCE are free to the public and provide a fun (Continued on page 15)

Claire Kaplan with her horse, Mia Bella. (photo submitted)


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Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Dale Mills riding Colbalt at a recent show and Dorothy Trapp with Zelda. (photos submitted)

• FENCE

(continued from page 14)

outing for anyone interested in watching top competitors and their equine partners jump big obstacles.

Teen program at Landrum Library July 25 Teen Summer Reading is almost over, so join the library for one last day of fun. The library will play outside games, both old and new on Thursday, July 25 from 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Landrum Library. The program is open to ages 12-17 or rising seventh-12th graders. Contact the Landrum Library at 864-457-2218 for information on this or other Teen programs. - article submitted by Beth Diehl

tryondailybulletin.com check us out on the web

The show grounds are located at 3381 Hunting Country Rd, just minutes off I-26 at the Landrum exit. For up to the minute information on current horse shows call the show office at 828-

859-9092. For information about other activities at www.fence.org or call the FENCE Center at 828859-9021. -article submitted by Carrie Knox

“This is a beautiful show grounds that is continually being improved.” -- Dorothy Trapp


16 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Air Conditioning • Power Brakes • Alloy Wheels • Power Locks • AM/FM • Power Mirrors • Bucket Seats • Power Steering CD • Power Windows • Cruise Control Sun Roof • Driver Airbag • Tachometer 2012 Toyota Camry XLE Handsfree Wireless • Tilt Wheel • Interval Wipers • Tinted Windows • Keyless Entry Woodgrain • Passenger Airbag Local 1 Owner Trade In 15,428 Miles • $22,800

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Exhibits & Events

Ferullo Fine Art Studio, 140 Pacolet St., Tryon. 828-859-3177. Color Pouring and Markmaking Workshop scheduled for Saturday, July 27 has been cancelled and re-scheduled for a later date. New date will be set an announced at a later time. New watercolors by Pat Cole Ferullo and mixed media collage by Dom Ferullo, along with selected watercolors by the Thursday Expressive Watercolor class. Call 828-859-3177 or e-mail patdomferul@windstream.net for information on classes, workshops and for gallery hours.

Holy Cross Gallery, 150 Melrose Ave., Tryon. 828-859-9741. Featuring photography by Elisabeth Moore now through August 31.

Honking Tonkers Gallery, 78 East Main St., Saluda. 828-749-1070. Offering mandala classes every Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Live music this weekend. Kathleen’s Gallery, 66 E. Main St., Saluda. 828-749-2640. Gallery hours are Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. For more information, call 828-859-8316. New View Realty, 285 N. Trade St., Tryon. 866-498-0088. Showing works of Jim Shackelford and Linda Page Hudgins. Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Skyuka Fine Art, 133 N Trade St., Tryon. 828-817-3783. Skyuka Fine Art’s Dave Capalungan “Big Blooms” show will run until Aug. 9. For more information, email rich@richnelson.com or call 828-859-0318.

Thompson Garden Gallery and Outdoor Living, 83 Palmer St., Tryon. 828-859-3185. Showcasing local artists and craftsmen. Gallery and showroom hours 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday - Saturday. For more information, call 828-859-3185.

Tryon Arts & Crafts School, 373 Harmon Field Rd., Tryon. 373 Harmon Field Rd. Tryon. 828-859-8323. Guitar building workshop with Gerald Anderson July 16-25. Tie Dye for the 21st Century with Christine Mariotti. Call 828-859-8323 for information about new classes and schedules.

Tryon Fine Arts Center, 34 Melrose Ave., Tryon. 828-859-8322. The executor of the Estate of Guntram Gersch announces the exposition and sale of framed paintings and ceramics from the artist’s Tryon residence. The exhibit will be open to the public for viewing and bidding from now until Saturday, July 20 at Tryon Fine Art Center in Gallery One and the adjacent Mahler Room. By terms of Gersch’s will, the proceeds of this sale will benefit Hospice of the Carolina Foothills. At 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 17 there will be an hour-long “walk-and-talk” through the two galleries presented by estate executor and art historian Mr. Michael McCue. Tryon Painters & Sculptors, 26 Maple St., Tryon. 828-859-0141. Instructors and their students of TPS classes and workshops. www. tryonpaintersandsculptors.com. Gallery and gift shop hours are Thursday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Tryon Summer Tracks Series, Rogers Park, Tryon. 800-440-7848 or 828-894-2324. July 19, Gigi Dover & The Big Love. Aug. 9, Nikki Tally, Letters To Abigail. Aug. 23, The Honeycutters. Upstairs Artspace, 49 South Trade St., Tryon. 828-859-2828. New exhibits “Seeing Is Believing: The Collection of Ray Griffin and Thom Robinson” and “Crossing The Line: Bonnie Bardos and Charlotte Fowler” open Friday, July 19 with public reception Saturday, July 20, 5 to 8 p.m. Preceding reception at 4 p.m. is “Walk & Talk” art tour by Bardos and Fowler. Exhibits run through August 31. Gallery hours: Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Contact 828-859-2828 or visit www.upstairsartspace.org.


Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Live Music BlAck All FriDAy Hare & DAy Zenzera Hound

WEDNESDAY, July 17

SAle Shag Night, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, July 18

Purple Onion Mare Wakefield, 7:30 p.m. Zenzera The new look of comfort Bill and Steph, 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, July 20

Darryl Rice, 7 p.m. Little Hat Night Shade, 8 -11 p.m. Purple Onion The Barefoot Movement, 8 p.m. Party Place and Event Center Sound Investment, 8 p.m. Zenzera Special Edition, 8 p.m.

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Bedding Recliners FRIDAY, J 19 Honking Tonkers Jeremy, 7 p.m. Appliances SUNDAY, J 21 Little Hat Larkin’s in Columbus Double startingOught, at 8 -11 p.m. Infrared Heaters Fred Whiskin, 11:30 a.m. $289.95 Kyoto uly

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reconDitioneD AppliAnceS All MAjor BrAnDS 90-Day Affordable Warranty Prices

Carruth Furniture Co. 104 S. howard ave. , Landrum (hwy. 176) • 864-457-3344

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Mr. C’s Karaoke, 7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, July 23 Purple OnionMany More Markdowns! ® Event Center Fred Whiskin,RegisteR 7 p.m. Party Place and foR a fRee La-Z-Boy RecLineR Saluda Grade Café Blue Ridge Contra Dance, 7 p.m. Old Timey Music, 7 p.m. Zenzera Saluda Wine Cellar Open mic night, 7:30 p.m. Carolina Bound, open at 7 p.m., music starts at 8urniture p.m. ompany Zenzera S. howard ave. , Landrum (hwy. 176) • 864-457-3344 Eric Wieler and104 Friends, 8 p.m.

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CFUR-038245

Movies

2x5 11/26 CFUR-038245 Tryon Theater, 45 S. Trade St., Tryon.

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July 17-21: Fast and Furious 6 July 22-23: Love is All You Need July 24-28: Now You See Me

Music Venues

Hare and Hound - 101 E. Rutherford St., Landrum, 828-457-3232 Honking Tonkers Gallery - 78 E. Main St, Saluda, 828-749-1070 Kyoto’s - 112 N. Trade St., Tryon, 828-859-9043

Larkin’s - 155 W. Mills St., Columbus, 828-894-8800

The Little Hat Tavern - 22349 Asheville Hwy, Landrum, 864-457-4215 Melrose Inn - 55 Melrose Ave., Tryon, 828-859-0234 Purple Onion - 16 Main St., Saluda, 828-749-1179

Party Place & Event Center - Friendship Rd., Saluda, 828-749-3676 Saluda Grade Café - 40 Main St., Saluda, 828-749-5854

Saluda Inn & Wine Cellar - 229 Greenville St., Saluda, 828-216-3421 Tryon Fine Arts Center - 34 Melrose Ave., Tryon, 828-859-8322 Zenzera - 208 E. Rutherford St., Landrum, 864-457-4554

Carruth - page 77


18 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary awards health career scholarships The St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary sheds light on a growing problem—the nation is facing a major shortage of trained and qualified healthcare professionals to care for an aging population and meet an increased need for medical services. Compounding the problem is the fact that many colleges and universities are struggling to expand their programs to increase enrollment levels to meet the growing demand for nurses and allied health professionals. St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary has announced its 20122013 scholarship awards. These awards are given twice per year to students pursuing a career in the healthcare field. Taylor Ayers, daughter of Michelle Ayers of Landrum and Andy Ayers of Hendersonville, was awarded a St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship to assist in her pursuit of a nursing degree at Lander University.

A graduate of Landrum High School, Taylor was a member of the Beta Club, National Honor Society and the Technical Honor Society. She lettered in varsity softball for three years. She has volunteered at Tryon Estates and LaurelHurst, as well as working a part-time job. Meagan Birch, daughter of Lena Birch of Spartanburg and David Birch of Campobello, will apply her St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship to tuition at USC Upstate as she studies toward a nursing degree. Megan is a graduate of Landrum High School. While there, she was a member of the Beta Club and the National Honor Society. She has received the highest academic award and high GPA award. She has volunteered at LaurelWoods and has participated in food drives and Toys for Tots campaigns. She works part-time at Chick-fil-A. Tonda Champion is also the

recipient of a St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship. She is employed at St. Luke’s Hospital as a CNAII, and plans to study at Isothermal Community College to become a licensed practical nurse. Tonda is the wife of Eric Champion and mother of three children. She resides in Tryon. Emily Hardin, daughter of Steve and Deanna Hardin of Columbus, was awarded a St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship. She will attend Isothermal Community College to study nursing. Emily is a graduate of Polk County High School where she was a member of Health Occupations Students of America. She received a varsity letter award for cross country. She is a member of her church youth group and works part-time at White Oak in Tryon. Chelsea Kelly, daughter of Ricky and Jill Kelly of Mill Spring is also a recipient of a St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship. She plans to study nursing at the

University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Chelsea is a graduate of Polk County High School where she was president of Health Occupations Students of America. She was also a member of Future Farmers of America, SkillsUSA, and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. She was in the top 10 in the Health Occupations Students of America regional competition in medical math. Chelsea has accrued a number of hours in various volunteer activities and holds more than one part-time job. McKayla Mullis, daughter of Robert and Michelle Mullis of Columbus, received a St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship to assist her in studying for a nursing degree at Isothermal Community College. McKayla is a graduate of Polk County High School where she was a member of Health Occupa(Continued on page 19)


Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Scholarships (continued from page 18)

tions Students of America, Future Farmers of America, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Key Club and Interact. She was cheerleading captain for two years. She works part-time at White Oak Manor and is an active youth member in her church. Lauren Searcy, daughter of Mark Searcy and Susie Kimbrell, will use her St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship to study for a nursing degree at Western Carolina University. A graduate of Polk County High School, Lauren participated in Interact, Health Occupations Students of America (as Treasurer), Photography Club (as Secretary), and Future Farmers of America. She works part-time at Tryon Estates. She is also active in the youth group at her church. Lakeyah Simpson, daughter of Michelle Simpson of Mill Spring, plans to apply her St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship to the study of nursing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. A graduate of Polk County High School, Lakeyah was a member of Health Occupations Students of America and the National Honor Society. She received the New Century Scholar Award. She has volunteered at blood drives and vision screenings. Abigail Hall, a 2012 graduate of Polk County High School, has received a renewal of her St. Luke’s Hospital Katherine Kirby Nursing Scholarship. She is continuing her studies in nursing at Western Carolina University. Ashley Monk, a 2010 graduate of Polk County High School, has also received a renewal of her St. Luke’s Hospital Katherine Kirby Nursing Scholarship. She is continuing her studies in nursing at Gardner-Webb University. Gail Parres, a St. Luke’s Hospital volunteer, was awarded a renewal of her Auxiliary scholarship to aid in her completion of a degree in Occupational Therapy Assisting at Greenville Technical College.

The St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary, whose scholarship committee is chaired by Anne Laubengeiger, provided dedication and commitment to patient care through $8,750 in scholarships in 2012-2013 for medical and nursing programs. The Auxiliary is proud to have 150 members who assist with varying needs of St. Luke’s Hospital, a private, not-for-profit community hospital. With their support, we continue to provide exceptional care, close to home. -article submitted by Jennifer Wilson

19


20 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Collins-Harris wedding June 29 Casey Brooke Collins of Tryon and Mason Rance Harris of Boiling Springs, S.C. were married on June 29 at 4:30 p.m. at Tryon First Baptist Church. The Reverend Jeff Harris officiated the ceremony, followed by a reception at the Kenmure Country Club in Flat Rock, N.C. Mrs. Harris is the daughter of Keith and Debbie Collins of Tryon and the granddaughter of Wilbur and Ruth Collins of Landrum, and Martha Covil and the late Ned Covil of Tryon. She graduated from UNCCharlotte with a BSN. She is employed with Spartanburg Regional Hospital. Mr. Harris is the son of Rick and Deena Harris of Hendersonville, NC and the grandson of the late Latha and Alice Harris of Columbus and the late Doyce and Alice McIntyre, also of Columbus. He graduated from Western Carolina with a degree in construction management.

Christie Collins Morrow of Charlotte, N.C., sister of the bride attended the bride as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Anna Ashley of Burlington, N.C.; Alyssa Fincher of Tryon; Claire Reid of Indian Trail, N.C.; Jennifer Teunis of Durham, N.C; and Summer Todd of Albemarle, N.C. Miss J ayden Jackson of Landrum served as junior bridesmaid and Taylor Tuttle of Saluda served as flower girl. Rick Harris of Hendersonville, N.C., father of the groom served as best man. Groomsmen were Justin Harris and Ryan Harris of Hendersonville, N.C., both brothers of the groom; Marshall Jackson of Landrum, brother-inlaw of the groom; and Timothy Morrow of Charlotte, N.C., brother-in-law of the bride. Music was provided by Julie Miller. After a wedding trip to Jamaica the couple will make their home in Boiling Springs, S.C. – article submitted

Wednesday, July 17, 2013


Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

For some, like John Campbell, the uncivil war never ended

John (called John the young- during the war, there were er) Campbell, second child more than 500 deserters, from of John Landrum and Nancy both sides of the war, camping Williams Campbell, was born out around the old Gowensville in 1838. House trading post, called His brother, William Fran- Gowens Fort by some.) cis Campbell, was four years The county sheriff and a older, but both enlisted in the deputy came to arrest John, Confederate Army in Novem- who had packed to leave the ber 1861. territory, with no intention of J o h n returning to his Twice-told company. enlisted at Camp He told the Tales of the Hampton sheriff that he Dark Corner had settled on Nov. 26 the and was asscore with the by Dean Campbell signed to men who had Company H, molested his 16th South Carolina Infantry. wife and wanted no trouble. William enlisted four days later He intended to leave the The World’s smallesT daily NeWspaper page 3 and was assigned to Company territory and if the sheriff and A of the 16th. deputy valued their lives, they William was captured at had better “turn tail.” Missionary Ridge, Tenn. on The two lawmen stormed Nov. 25, 1863, and sent to the the doorway and the deputy hellish Rock Island, Illinois was killed. When the sheriff Prison Camp. He remained ran to get help, John, his wife there until his death on Jan. and small children, left im5, 1865. He is buried in Grave mediately, intending to go to No. 124 in the cemetery south Tennessee. of the prison. Because he was now a deJohn avoided capture in serter and a wanted fugitive, a number of battles. His last he never contacted the family recorded roll call was on Aug. as to his location. He simply 31, 1864. disappeared. He left to go home to check Many years Full Menu for Dinner – later, his mothon his family and farm on er’s will named “my son John’s Tugaloo Road near Gowens- heirs, whereabouts unknown” ville. A number of fighting men for a small inheritance. It was were allowed to do this during never claimed. by three dethe war since women and chilIn the late 1960s, scendants of John Campbell ounty dren had to run the farms. When he arrived at the from Texas visited the GowFire olph, homestead, he found his house ensville area looking for relaNew Winter Hours Chief and animals had been pilfered tives, since John had indicated photo by deserters in the area, and that this is where he was born. - Wed.: by2 p.m. They - 12 midnight his wife had mon. been molested talked with the late p.m. - 2Landrum a.m. two of them. Thurs. & Fri.: 2Furman Campbell now He hunted men- 12 down and learned other relatives sat.:the 2 p.m. midnight • sun.: of Closed and killed both. (At one time in the area.

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EvEry WEdnEsday • 4-8 pm

Drink specials Complimentary Hors D'oeuvres Entertainment: Kenny Parker & Lady Red

Karaoke Tue, Thurs, and Sat.

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21


22 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Celebrations for Hospice of the Carolina Foothills July marks a momentous month for Hospice of the Carolina Foothills. It is the month we served our first patient 32 years ago in Polk County. To that end we are celebrating in two ways. During the week of July 14 – 20, Dine Out for Hospice at one of the many restaurants that is donating a percentage of their sales to us on their chosen “Dining Out” day(s). From Saluda to Spartanburg/Greenville and every town in between, there are many wonderful eats to choose from. Mike Duncan at Carolinas’ Harvest House has this to say: “Hospice is a great organization serving families in the most critical and special time of life. The wonderful and caring people associated with Hospice are truly God sent. Thank you for all you do for families in their hours of need. One of our employees Troy Brooks’ father is in Hospice care now. This is our first year and we

hope to raise a lot of money for Hospice of the Carolina Foothills.” Harvest House is participating on Saturday, July 20. For a complete listing check out the “Let’s Eat” page at DiningOutForHospice.org. While you are out and about, run up/down/over to the Tryon Fine Arts Center (in downtown Tryon) and visit the Guntram Gersch Memorial Exhibition and Silent Auction, which opens Saturday, July 13 and runs through July 20. An informal presentation on the art and life of Mr. Gersch will be held on Wednesday, July 17 at 1:30 p.m. at TFAC. The silent auction will end on Saturday, July 20. For more information about the artist and his prolific work, visit www.GuntramGersch.info “Since we served our first patient in Green Creek in July 1981, Hospice of the Carolina Foothills has been dedicated to providing excellent healthcare to individuals with life-limiting illnesses,”

Jason Cole at Larkin’s Carolina Grill kicks off the weeklong Dining Out for Hospice event on Sunday, July 14, as he serves up made-to-order omelets for hungry patrons. (photo submitted by Marsha Van Hecke)

says CEO Jean Eckert. “Our care is compassionate and peoplefocused, and we are privileged to now provide this service in Polk, Spartanburg and Greenville counties.” Every dollar raised during these benefits is used for patient

and family care, according to Director of Outreach Marsha Van Hecke. For more information, contact Marsha at 828-894-7000, 864-457-9122, or mvanhecke@ hocf.org. - article submitted by Marsha Van Hecke

July 18-21, 2013 Susan Marie Phipps

u.S. cellular center ~ downtown aSheville, nc thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm, Sun.: 10am-5pm admiSSion: $8; children under 12 free www.craftguild.org

828-298-7928


23

Wednesday, July 17, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

New week of Kindermusik and art camp

Friday

N.C. Forest Service Nursery Program open Fraser products available from 1-year-old plugs ready to go into the field. The Forest Service’s nurseries in Goldsboro and Crossnore have a large catalog of tree seedlings. Landowners can find information about the types of tree species, quantities and costs on the inside page of the catalog. Each tree description includes information about ideal planting locations and whether a species

(continued from page 2)

“Holes,” The Polk County Public Library will host a movie night to watch the film “Holes” (rated PG). Families are invited to come and enjoy the move, popcorn and drinks at the main library in Columbus Thursday, July 18 at 5:30 p.m. Al-Anon: Foothills Come to Believe Thursdays, 7 p.m., Polk Wellness Center, 155 W. Mills St., Suite 202, Columbus. Green Creek Community Center Zumba exercise class, Thursdays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., in gym. Mill Spring VFW Post 10349 Bingo at the Mill Spring VFW Post 10349 is open to the public on Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. (year round). 828-894-5098. NAMI Support Group, Thursdays, 7 - 8 p.m. in the blue room of Tryon Presbyterian Church, located on Harmon Field Road in Tryon. The group, sponsored by the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI), is for anyone feeling anxious or depressed and those with a diagnosis of a mental illness. All conversations are confidential. No charge. 828817-0382. Alcoholics Anonymous, Thursdays, 8 p.m., CooperRiis, Mill Spring. 828-859-7099.

A new week of Kindermusik and Art Camp begins next Tuesday, July 23 at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. New friends, new music, new instruments and a new curriculum called “Let’s Play” will bring families together daily through Friday, July 26. Kindermusik, instructed by Bryant Belin, is available from 9:3010:15 a.m. for families with children ages 0-7. Immediately following Kindermusik is an art class on the same topic taught by Lynn Costine for 4-7 year olds. Pictured above are pre-schoolers of all ages exploring music together, using songs and stories to learn about music and the ocean. At right from last month’s art and music classes based on the curriculum “Creature at the Ocean” is Ella McCall making an undersea sculpture full of colorful creatures. For information or to register, visit www. tryonarts.org or call education director Marianne Carruth at 828-859-8322, ext. 213. (photo submitted)

The annual window of opportunity for ordering seedlings from the N.C. Forest Service Nursery Program is open. The forest service is selling hardwoods in quantities as low as 10 and conifers in quantities as low as 50. For customers wishing to purchase larger orders, the nursery also sells tree seedlings by the hundreds and thousands. The nurseries also have a variety of

• Calendar

is typically used for the benefit of wildlife, restoring habitats or as marketable timber. Catalogs are available at local Forest Service offices, which are located in all 100 North Carolina counties. The catalog is also available online at ncforestservice.gov by clicking on the “Tree Seedlings & Nursery Program” link. - article submitted by Brian Haines

Filing for Landrum mayor or council. Anyone wishing to run for a Landrum municipal office must pay appropriate filing fees at Landrum City Hall and complete statements of intention and economic interest. The fee to run for mayor is $200 and to run for council is $100. Filing begins on July 5 at noon and ends Aug. 7 at noon. Please submit Curb Reporter items in writing at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number of a contact person. Items will be printed in order by date of event, as space allows.


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Painting” is a weathered wood cross embellished with a vintage paint brush stamped “Josephine,” a tiny compass and Native American beading. “Slingblade Blue Baby” is distinguished by a rusty blade found in a pasture and a tray from a town dump with blue paint still on it. “Blue and rust are beautiful to me,” says Bardos. Bardos is well known for her landscape painting and, more recently, for fine sculpture. She is represented by Patricia Carlisle Fine Art in Santa Fe, NM and Skyuka Fine Art in Tryon. Her art has been collected by people across the United States, France and Mexico. She is a regularly featured columnist in the Tryon Daily Bulletin. Bardos and Fowler have exhibited frequently at the Upstairs, but never in a two-person show until now. They will give an informal tour of their art during a regular “Walk & Talk,” scheduled for 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 20 just before the opening reception at 5 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For information contact 828-8592828 or www.upstairsartspace.org. - article submitted by Nancy Holmes

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a critic about a past exhibit at Wofford College, “There is nothing new, nothing fabricated for [Fowler’s] art. Instead, there is a common element of the discovery of new forms and combinations in old materials: two laurel roots become an eagle in its nest; a pine knot becomes a small blue heron.” Fowler is in art collections in Russia, Belgium, Italy and Switzerland, as well as the United States. Bardos has lived in Saluda for more than 20 years in an historic Victorian cottage. For “Crossing the Line” she has created a new series of crosses of all shapes and sizes using found objects and wood, much of the latter donated by Packard Woodworks. She also picks up wood from old houses, flooring or along the street. “Every piece has a story, a history, a patina of having lived many lives,” says Bardos about the wood forming the crosses. “I’m just adding another chapter, giving life to things that might be thrown out – and hopefully, wake people up to the art within us.” Though inspired by Mexican crosses, Bardos’ crosses are notable for their different personalities invented by the artist. For example, “Josephine Dreamed of

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When Bonnie Bardos and Charlotte Fowler met at the Upstairs Artspace years ago, they discovered a mutual love of eclectic, colorful art. Such art is at the heart of their new exhibit “Crossing the Line,” opening this Friday, July 19 at the Upstairs. Bardos describes their work as outside the box with its daring re-use of found objects. Both artists have always delighted in saving things from the trash. “We see most trash as part of the art of life,” says Bardos. Some of the found objects that catch Bardos’ eye are vintage jewelry, silver flatware, tape measures, dried plants and feathers. Among Fowler’s favorite finds are desiccated animal bones, throwaway produce crates and melted coins salvaged from a house fire. Fowler is a Polk County native. After graduating from high school here, she and her husband, the poet Royal Fowler, lived up north for awhile, but eventually built a large farm in rural Polk County where her habit of collecting began. For many years Fowler worked days as a registered nurse, then came home to make art at night. Now retired, Fowler lives in Tryon where she hammers, drills and paints art by daylight. Wrote

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Bardos, Fowler turn trash to treasure

TO THE

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Left: Work by Bonnie Bardos. Right: Work by Charlotte Fowler. (photos submitted)

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

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24 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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