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Tryon Daily Bulletin The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 85 / No. 58

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Friday, April 20, 2012

Only 50 cents

Tryon approves new three-year BBQ festival contract Contract includes tiered admission payments to town by Leah Justice

The Town of Tryon, Harmon Field Board of Supervisors and the Carolina Foothills Chamber of Commerce have all agreed on a new contract for the Blue Ridge Barbecue Festival. The three-year contract includes a tiered payment system to Harmon Field based on admissions. The Town of Tryon owns Harmon Field. For the first 6,000 daily admission tickets sold, the chamber will pay the Harmon Field Board of Supervisors 25 cents per ticket; for daily admission tickets between 6,000 and 11,999 (Continued on page 3)

Festival-goers line up for food from one of the vendors at last year’s Blue Ridge BBQ and Music Festival. This year’s event will be held June 8-9 at Harmon Field in Tryon. (photo by Leah Justice)

On Monday, April 23, Tryon Garden Club will offer a class in identifying flowering and non-flowering plants in the area, focusing on those that grow in the Pearson’s Falls Glen. The class, taught by Millie Pearson, will be from 10 a.m. - noon at Pearson’s Falls Glen, 2748 Pearson Falls Road in Saluda. Participants will meet at the garden house 15 minutes before class time. Call 828-749-3031 for more information.

Polk to apply for $350,000 expansion grant for Allrail Inc. Company plans to add 10 new jobs by Leah Justice

The Polk County Board of Commissioners has approved applying for a $350,000 grant to help a local company, Allrail Inc., with its expansion plans.

If the grant is received, Allrail, located at the intersection of U.S. 74 and Union Road near the Polk/Rutherford county line, expects to add 10 new employees over a two-year period. Commissioners approved a resolu(Continued on page 4)

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties

 






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2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY cALENDAR cALENDAR Here’s a list of upcoming meetings and events for area nonprofit community and governmental organizations:

Today

Saluda Center Friday events: chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; Trash Train, 10 a.m. Polk Recreation Zumba class, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 - 11 a.m. at Stearns Gym. Patty Rivera is the instructor. The Meeting Place Senior Center Friday activities include movie matinee at 10 a.m. and bingo at 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Seniors on Sobriety (SOS) AA Meeting, Fridays at noon, Polk County Chamber of Commerce Building, 2753 Lynn Rd. (Hwy. 108), Tryon. 828-8940293. PCHS JV/V baseball at home vs. Thomas Jefferson, 4 p.m. PCHS V. softball at home vs. Thomas Jefferson, 4 p.m. American Legion Post 250, weekly bingo games, Fridays, 7 p.m., 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Foothills Astronomy Club meets the third Friday of each

How To Reach Us

Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher

THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

month at 7:30 p.m. at FENCE in the great room. Enter through the back of the building and ask for Jessie Willard. Free. Narcotics Anon., Saluda Senior Center, Friday, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Saluda Center, Friday events: chair exercise, 10 a.m.; Trash Train, 10 a.m. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Friday activities include movie matinee, 10 a.m.; bingo, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Seniors on Sobriety (SOS) AA Meeting, Fridays at noon, Polk County Chamber of Commerce Building, 2753 Lynn Rd. (Hwy 108), Tryon. 828-8940293. Tryon Toy Makers Museum, open Friday 2 - 6 p.m., 43 E. Howard St., Tryon. 828-2906600. PolkFresh Farmers Market, Fridays, Saluda, West Main parking lot, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., VISA/ EBT accepted. Visit polkcountyfarms.org for vendor list or sign-up. American Legion Post 250, weekly bingo games, Fridays, 7 p.m., 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Narcotics Anon., Saluda Senior Center, Fridays, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Grassroots Art Project holds art classes to benefit Lennie’s Fund and the Humane Society, Saturdays from 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. There is no fee for the class and all materials will be provided. Classes are held at the Holy Cross Episcopal Church on Melrose Ave. in Tryon. Call 828-8990673 for more information. House of Flags Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Thermal Belt Friendship Council, monthly luncheon Saturday, April 21, 11:45 a.m. at Southside Smokehouse and Grille in Landrum. All are invited. 864-457-2426 or friendshipcouncil.homestead.com.

Friday, April 20, 2012

Local Weather Forecast:

Today

Tomorrow

Moon Phase

Today: Par tly cloudy, with 20 percent chance of rain. High 76, low 58. Saturday: Par tly T-storms Partly cloudy cloudy, with 60 percent chance of isolated thunderstorms. High 78, low 58. Sunday: Cloudy, with 70 percent chance of rain. High 69, low 47. Monday: Cloudy, with 30 percent chance of rain. High 68, low 41. Wednesday’s weather was: High 54, low 50, 0.38 inches of rain.

Obituaries Caleb Grindley, p. 13

Sunday

Slow Food Foothills will meet Sunday, April 22 at the Saluda Inn at 4:30 p.m. Participants should bring a potluck dish and their own serving plates and utensils. For more information, contact caroljackson@tds.net or mindywiener@gmail.com.

Monday

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Mondays, Harmon Field/Tryon, 7 a.m. - noon. Saluda Center, Tuesdays, chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; bridge, 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., with bridge discussion session at 12:45. 828-7499245. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. Polk Recreation Zumba class, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 - 11 a.m. at Stearns Gym. Patty Rivera is the instructor. The Meeting Place Senior Center Monday activities include line dancing, 10 a.m., senior fitness, 11 a.m., bingo or bead class, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Christian Fellowship Luncheon, TJ’s Cafe, Tryon, Mondays except holidays, noon - 1 p.m.; food, fellowship and discussion of relevant issues; interdenominational. 828-859-5051. Chess Club, Mondays, 12:30

p.m., recreation room, LaurelHurst Apartments, Columbus. Open to anyone in community. 894-3336. Saluda Center Monday activities include line dancing at 12:30 p.m. For more information visit www.Saluda.com. AAUW meets on the fourth Monday of each month at 1:30 p.m. at the Tryon Presbyterian Church fellowship hall. At the April 23 meeting, local author Joe Epley will speak about his book, “Passel of Hate,” about the Revolutionary War battle of King’s Mountain in 1780. Open to public; refreshments. Male Domestic Abuse Intervention Program, Mondays, 6 - 7:30 p.m., Steps to HOPE. 894-2340. Landrum Library, free yoga classes. 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Limited to first 30 people. Thermal Belt Stamp Club, first and third Mondays of each month, 7:30 p.m., Tryon Federal Bank, Columbus. Visitors welcome. Alcoholics Anonymous, Mondays, 8 p.m., Columbus Presbyterian Church.

Tuesday

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Tuesdays, Ozone Drive and Hwy. 176, Saluda. (Continued on page 39)


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• BBQ contract (continued from page 1)

the chamber will pay Harmon Field 50 cents per ticket and for 12,000 daily admission tickets and above, the chamber will pay Harmon Field 75 cents per ticket, according to the new contract. Tryon Town Council met Tuesday, April 17 and approved the contract by a vote of 3-1, with councilman Doug Arbogast voting against the contract. The Harmon Field Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the contract during its April 2 meeting. Arbogast has suggested making the contract a one-year agreement, because of a new provision that states the contract will be reviewed every year, although there are no provisions in the contract that allow the town to change the contract within the three-year period. Mayor Alan Peoples and councilman George Baker also

The crowd waits for one of the bands to start playing at the 2011 Blue Ridge BBQ and Music Festival. (photo by Leah Justice)

expressed concern over some of the new wording that says any changes to the contract must be agreed upon by all parties.

Peoples said he doesn’t like that the town could want something different one year, such as more money, and the chamber

wouldn’t have to agree. But mayor pro-tem Roy Miller (Continued on page 4)


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Friday, April 20, 2012

• Allrail expansion

site, which really needs expansion,” Polk County Economic (continued from page 1) Development Director Libbie tion to apply for the grant from Johnson said. the Community Development Allrail currently employs five Block Grant (CDBG) Small people. Business and Entrepreneurial According to www.allrail.us, Assistance Grant Program fol- Allrail is a family owned and lowing two public hearings held operated company providing over the past couple months. used guardrail, posts and related Allrail has agreed to pay barrier hardware. approximately Tom Calton, $100,000 toAllrail presiward the ex- “You have a good dent, joined pansion, and the commissioncompany that has a grant will fund ers this week approximately good reputation and you a n d t h a n k e d $250,000. The have an entrepreneurial the county for expansion will supporting the include funding community that supports grant. If awardfor equipment the plan.” ed, the grant and commercial -- Teresa Spires of w i l l b e f u n rehabilitation, Isothermal Planning and neled through including movDevelopment Commission the county but ing a modular will not cost the facility to the county anything. property to use as offices; minor Calton said his company is work on existing buildings; the able to take a variety of metals addition of septic facilities and to recycle, such as steel, copper, security lighting, among other brass and aluminum, including work required to expand the fa- vehicles. cility. Commissioner chair Ray If the grant is awarded, the Gasperson said it’s going to be Polk County Economic and Tour- exciting to have a facility of that ism Development Commission nature close by. will receive $5,000 of the total, “It’s less distance and also which it plans to use to enhance encourages people to recycle its website, including resources their own material by not having for entrepreneurs. to travel long distances,” Calton “We are a certified entrepre- added. neurial community and want to (Continued on page 6) apply the $5,000 to the web-

• BBQ contract (continued from page 3)

said the barbecue festival is well established and the town needs to think of itself as having a partnership with the chamber and lock in an agreement for three years. “This is an established festival,” Miller said. “I think the town should get back in the mindset as a partnership with the chamber. Let’s not be on opposite sides of the fence.” C h a m b e r o ff i c i a l s a p proached Harmon Field and the town in March with the tiered system. Previously, the cham-

ber paid Harmon Field 50 cents per admission ticket. The new contract also has the chamber reimbursing the town for employee work, such as Harmon Field employees, police and other public works employees, as well as reimbursements for utilities such as power. Last year’s festival drew approximately 9,000 spectators through the admission gates, which if the town had been using the new tiered payment system would have meant approximately $1,500 less in fees. This year’s festival will be held June 8 and 9 at Harmon Field.


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Friday, April 20, 2012

Polk to switch to U.S. House of Representatives District 10 by Leah Justice

Although Polk County is currently included in the U.S. 101 Mayfield Lane • Tryon, N.C. House of Representatives District 11, with Heath Shuler (D) as its representative, as of November this year, Polk will be included in District 10, whose seat is currently held by Patrick 2c x 2in McHenry (R). F, effective 3/13 thru 5/29/09 It was mistakenly reported DEFT-023477 this week that Polk voters help elect a new Congress representative in District 11. Polk County will be part of a new District 10, which will include the counties of Polk, Rutherford, McDowell, MitchDrew New Balance ell, Yancey and Madison. Dansko Soft Spot The former District 11, SAS We're not just a shoe store! Badorf which Shuler currently repreBirkenstock Jumping Jack 249 e. main st. spartanburg Clarks sents, included Polk, Hender864-585-1579 • closed wednesday All Childrens Shoes! son, Buncombe, McDowell, Yancey, Madison, Haywood, Jackson, Transylvania, Macon, Swain, Graham, Cherokee and 2x2.5 Clay counties. msho-024022 Republicans vying for the House of Representatives seat for the new District 10 include incumbent McHenry of lawn proHickory, - page 6 N.C. and challengers Ken H. Fortenberry of Denver, N.C. and Don Peterson of Cra-

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• Allrail expansion (continued from page 4)

Calton said Allrail retasks and recycles many materials and already does work to produce highway safety materials. He said he is hoping by September or October the expanded facility will be up and running. Johnson said the economic and tourism development board feels that entrepreneurial development is well suited for this area and is very comfortable with Allrail’s plan. Teresa Spires of the Iso-

merton, N.C. Democratic candidates for the District 10 seat include Patsy Keever (D) of Asheville, N.C., Timothy Murphy of Rutherfordton, N.C. and Terry Michelle Bellamy of Asheville. Shuler is not seeking reelection this year for the District 11 seat. Early voting for the May primary has begun. Polling places for early voting include the Polk County Board of Elections in Columbus, the Green Creek Family Life Center on Green Creek Drive off of Hwy. 9 and the Mill Spring Fire Department on School Road near Hwy. 9 in Mill Spring. Polk residents may vote at the board of elections Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. and in Green Creek and Mill Spring Monday through Friday from 1 to 7 p.m. All three locations will be open on the last day to early vote Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. On the regular primary election day, Tuesday, May 8, all Polk’s polling locations will be open. thermal Planning and Development Commission (IPDC), which is administering the grant for the county, said the grant deadline is April 30, with a review scheduled to be conducted within 60 days of the deadline. She also said there is $3 million available this year, which is more than previous years and that Allrail’s application has strong support. “You have a good company that has a good reputation and you have an entrepreneurial community that supports the plan,” Spires said.


A7 Friday, April 20, 2012 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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George Landrum Rutherford Orthopaedics patient

You don’t have to be gripped by pain. We can help. The numbness and tingling George Landrum of Lake Lure experienced with his Carpal Tunnel Syndrome wasn’t just keeping him up at night — it was also keeping the carpenter from holding a hammer and from enjoying riding his motorcycle. “I’d have to pull off the side of the road while I was riding and shake my hand to ‘wake it up,’” George says. He’s had surgery on both wrists, performed by Dr. Charles Bond at Rutherford Orthopaedics. Now, the irritating pain he was living with is gone. “They work fine now. I can sleep at night. I’m so glad I did it.” Rutherford Orthopaedics offers a full range of care, from foot and ankle and joint replacement surgery to sports medicine and rehabilitation. At Rutherford Regional Health System, we’re committed to meeting the medical needs of our community with compassionate, personalized healthcare.

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8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Polk Smart Start to merge with McDowell County Partnership

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Barry Gold, executive director of the Rutherford/Polk Smart Start Partnership, recently announced the McDowell County Partnership for Children & Families voted to proceed with the proposed merger of the two non-profit organizations. The Rutherford/Polk board had previously approved the merger. Effective July 1, the new tricounty organization will become Partnership for Children of the Foothills. The main office for the organization will remain in Rutherford County and the current satellite office in Polk will remain the same. The current office of the McDowell Partnership will be relocated within McDowell County and will become a satellite office of the merged organization. Barry Gold will remain as executive director for the newly merged tri-county partnership and continue to provide Smart Start representation on local Rutherford County committees, boards and teams. Cathy Brooks will remain as director of program and planning and continue to provide Smart Start representation on local Polk County committees, boards and teams. Caroline Rodier, current executive director of McDowell County Partnership, will become assistant director of the new partnership and will provide Smart Start representation on local McDowell committees, boards and teams. This local action is being taken to reduce administrative costs and improve the opportunities for grant funding with the higher population base of a tri-county organization. Smart Start is a public/private partnership created in 1993 to help prepare preschool children for learning. Independent, private organizations work in all 100 N.C. counties through The North Carolina Partnership for Children Inc. and 77 local partnerships. The vision of Smart Start is that every child reaches his or her potential and is prepared for success in a global community. Smart Start’s mission is to advance a high

quality, comprehensive, accountable system of care and education for every child beginning with a healthy birth. Smart Start in Polk County began in 1994, when a local planning team began meeting to explore the local needs of the birth to 5-yearold population. Planning funding was awarded in 1996, and the Polk County Partnership for Children became an incorporated non-profit organization. Smart Start program allocations for each county are calculated on a funding formula based on the birth-to-5-year-old population, as well as all other federal and state funding streams coming into all agencies in that county for various services for that population. Within the new tri-county partnership, the administrative funds will be blended but program allocations will be kept separately for each of the three counties. Currently, the Smart Start funded programs in Polk County are: • Child care subsidy through Polk County DSS • Wage supplements for child care teachers and teacher assistants, based on income eligibility and education level • Child care training and technical assistance for teachers and directors in local child care centers • Child care health consultation, focused on safety, health, nutrition, physical activity and policy consultation and training for all child care centers. Polk Smart Start funds also are allocated to help with the cost of the nursing positions in the Nurse Family Partnership homevisitation program. An additional special project in Polk County involves enhancing the outdoor play area at some of the child care centers to transition the spaces into outdoor learning environments where nature-focused activities along with increased physical activities are supported. – article submitted by Cathy Brooks


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Friday, April 20, 2012

Lonero to speak April 23 at ICC on Earle’s Fort history The public is invited to attend a presentation by artist and retired art educator Dr. Hedy Lonero at Isothermal Community College’s Polk Center in Columbus Monday, April 23 at 2 p.m. Dr. Lonero will speak about the history of the Earle’s Fort/ Four Columns area and will display four maps she created through her research of the region. Her research documents events and people of the area where the North Pacolet River crosses the N.C./S.C. border and from Red Fox Road to I-26. The four poster-sized works pictorially display the periods of 1776-1815, 1815-1900, 19001970 and 1970-2010. Each map is surrounded by hand-lettered text that tells the story of the

genealogy and history of families from the area. Families included are the Earles, Mills, Hamptons, Landrums, Lees, Christophers, Princes, Slaters, Stotts and Jacksons, many of whose descendants still live in the area. The point of view of the Cherokee Indian tribe before the Revolutionary War gives the back-story for the Hannon massacre. Other facts and events shown include the site of John Earle’s fort and the effect of the Civil War and the world wars on the local people and their land. Lesser known highlights include influence of the Red-Strings, gold mining, cotton growing and the railroad. – article submitted by Kate Barkschat

Heart-healthy cooking class May 2 Polk County Cooperative Extension Service will host a Heart Healthy Cooking Class with author and columnist Linda Watson on Wednesday, May 2 at 2 p.m. Linda is a columnist for the online magazine “GoodVeg” and author of the book, “Wildly Affordable Organic: Eat Fabulous Food, Get Healthy and Save the Planet – all on $5.00 a Day or Less.” She is a researcher and a member of the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She teaches classes at a wide range of venues, from national conferences to grocery stores to co-ops. She gives cooking demonstrations at farmers’ markets and groups interested in cooking great food, controlling expenses, losing weight, raising healthy children, fighting hunger or reducing their impact on the planet. The exciting part about the “Cook for Good” lifestyle, Watson said, is that you can focus on one of those goals and create lots of other goodness as side effects. For more information and

Linda Watson, who will teach a Heart Healthy Cooking Class Wednesday, May 2 at 2 p.m. at The Polk extension. (photo submitted by Jimmi Buell)

to sign up for the class call the Cooperative Extension Service at 828-894-8218. – article submitted by Jimmi Buell


A11 Friday, April 20, 2012 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Tryon, NC $369,500. MLS#1234442 Come home to this spacious 5BR/3BA family home! Many custom features, stone fireplace, wood floors, tile, ample master suite, lower level living area with 2nd kitchen. 1.73 acres. Paul Beiler 828-817-2679

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Red Fox Country Club $345,000. MLS#1221014 FARM ON FETA TRAILS $549,500. Spacious living, 4 bedroom, 3.5 baths, master & Great horse farm on just under 7 acres. Private guest bedroom on the main level. Indoor pool, 3BR/ 3BA home with open living concept - 3 professionally landscaped on 2.1 private acres stall Morton barn, approx 4 acres in fenced overlooking the 14th fairway and green. pasture. Mickey Hambright 828-817-1796 Jackie Brouse 864-285-1870 HambrightProperties.com

FETA Trails $ 724,900. MLS#514404 Godshaw Hill-Tryon $215,200. MLS#1238064 Still Point Farm $1,250,000. MLS#1225211 Horse Farm potential! 53 protected acres, Gracious 3BR/2.5BA Tryon charmer. Built-ins, Carter Brown original on 27+ acres. Full of 3BR/2.5BA home w/ hardwood floors, firewalk in closets, gas fireplace. Enjoy mountain unique architectural details. 3 stall barn, on place, in-ground pool, 2 car garage. 1BR/1BA views from the deck! Convenient walk to NPA Trail System, stunning mountain & pasdowntown Tryon shops and dining. guest house. Roberta Heinrich 828-817-5080 toral views. Madelon Wallace 864--316-3484 RobertaHeinrich.com Jean Wagner 828-817-9291 CarolinaHorseFarmsandMore.com

Land on the Trails in the Carolina Foothills

Burgundy Lane-Columbus, NC - 10.5 wooded acres with a stream on property. In an area of horse farms near the CETA Trail system. Frontage on two roads, property may be divided. $157,500. MLS#1237941 Paul Beiler 828-817-2679 8 acre parcel on CETA Trails - 5.2 miles from FENCE and 4.3 miles from the proposed equestrian center in Green Creek. Paved Road frontage. Mostly level, very suitable for horses. $69,900. MLS#1221729 Roberta Heinrich 828-817-5080 Steeplechase Farms - 15.41 acres with fantastic mountain views. Land has established pasture and stream. Ideal setting for your horse farm. One mile to the FETA trail head. In an area of other horse farms. $239,000. MLS#508034 Roberta Heinrich 828-817-5080 Walnut Creek Preserve - Rolling 22.35 acres with aprox. 11 acres of established pasture. Mountain views w/ several options for homesite. Extensive trail system for hiking and riding. $475,000. MLS#5113831 Roberta Heinrich 828-817-5080 Caroland Farms - Beautiful 17.44 acres on the NPA Trail system. Very private tract of land with well in place. Property has been well cared for and is ready to be fenced and built on! Shared pond on property. $523,200. MLS#1236359 Madelon Wallace 864-316-3484

Beech Tree Hollow at Caroland Farms - Landrum, SC This is the only tract in Beech Tree Hollow permitted for horses. 11.82 acre lot has NPA Trail rights. Located in an area of lovely horse farms. $378,240. MLS#513035 Madelon Wallace 864-316-3484


828-749-9809



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Friday, April 20, 2012

Polk district court results

%//1:5-0) 828-894-6183

In Polk County District Court to heed light or siren and fleeheld Wednesday, April 11 with ing/eluding arrest with a motor Judge Pete Knight presiding, 83 vehicle. Steven Michael Davis was cases were heard. Some cases were continued, dismissed or convicted of failure to appear on misdemeanor. Davis was sent to superior court. The following persons were sentenced to one year unsuperconvicted of a crime (names are vised probation, a $100 fine and 0%-/(%148-1(453)%01)5 F3))45-0%5)4 given as they appear in court court costs. )//,21)   S)1-23-4'26154 Robert Leon Easterly was records): Keith Alan Batchelder was convicted of speeding 92 mph convicted of littering a game- in a 65 mph zone. Easterly was 2x2 land/access area. Batchelder was sentenced to one year unsuperF tfn sentenced to one year unsuper- vised probation, a $92 fine and vised probation, a $25 fine and court costs. Evan W. Grenda was concourt costs. Bradley 0TFN5FRI - INDDDale - page 15 Jr. was convict- victed of speeding 90 mph in a 65 mph zone. ed of possesGrenda was sion of mariCourt Results fined $90 and juana up to ½ court costs. ounce. Bradley David Robert Kelson was was sentenced to 24 hours of community service and court convicted of speeding 64 mph in a 55 mph zone. Kelson was costs. Steven Allen Brogdon was fined $30 and court costs. Ivan Misyuk was convicted convicted of speeding 60 mph in a 55 mph zone. Brogdon was of possession of marijuana up to ½ ounce and possession of malt fined $20 and court costs. Antonio Chavez was con- beverage/unfortified wine while victed of failure to wear hunter not 19 or 20 years old. Misyuk orange and attempt to take deer was sentenced to 24 hours of during closed season. Chavez community service and court was sentenced to one year un- costs for possession of marijuana supervised probation, a $35 fine and two days in jail with credit for time served for possession of and court costs. Jawrell William Cook was malt beverage/unfortified wine. Sujalbhai D. Patel was conconvicted of speeding 90 mph in a 65 mph zone. Cook was victed of speeding 74 mph in sentenced to one year unsuper- a 65 mph zone. Patel was fined vised probation, a $90 fine and $30 and court costs. Derrick Rodgers was concourt costs. William Mark Covil Jr. was victed of level 5 driving while convicted of level 2 driving impaired commercial vehicle, while impaired, level 5 driving speeding 75 mph in a 55 mph while impaired, failure to heed zone and designated lane violalight or siren and fleeing/elud- tion. Rodgers was sentenced to ing arrest with a motor vehicle. one year unsupervised probaOn the level 2 driving while tion, 24 hours of community serimpaired charge, Covil was sen- vice, a $100 fine and court costs tenced to 18 months supervised for driving while impaired and probation, seven days in jail, a one year unsupervised probation $150 fine and court costs. On the and court costs for speeding and level 5 driving while impaired designated lane violation. Richard James Taylor was charge, he was sentenced to 18 months supervised probation, 24 convicted of failure to appear hours of community service and on misdemeanor and driving court costs. He was sentenced while license revoked. Taylor to two years supervised proba- was sentenced to 14 days in jail tion and court costs for failure with credit for 10 days.


B1 Friday, April 20, 2012

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Obituaries

Caleb Grindley

Caleb Armand Newlon Grindley, 25, of Coxe Rd. in Tryon, passed away Wednesday, April 18, 2012. Born in Chattanooga, Tenn., he was the son of Timothy James and Jamie Joy Newlon Grindley of the home. Caleb moved with his family to Polk/ Rutherford County in 1993, coming from Marietta, Ga. He was a graduate of Mount Pisgah Academy, Fletcher, N.C., class of 2005, and attended Southern Adventist University, Chattanooga, Tenn. for two years. Currently, he was employed with NAPA Auto Parts, Landrum, and Larkins Carolina Grill, Columbus. Caleb was a member of Tryon Seventh Day Adventist Church. He is sleeping until Jesus comes again!

Surviving besides his mother and father are: three sisters, Keturah Gorospe (Bruce) of Bern, Switzerland; Annelise Belinsky (Jonathan) of Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada and Marita Grindley of the home; and one brother, Jens Grindley of the home. Memorial services will be held 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22 in the Tryon Seventh Adventist Church, with Pastor Arthur Gibbs officiating. The family will receive friends from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday prior to the service in the McFarland Funeral Chapel, Tryon. Memorials may be made to Mount Pisgah Academy, 75 Academy Dr., Candler, N.C. 28715. An online guest register may be signed at www.mcfarlandfuneralchapel.com. McFarland Funeral Chapel, Tryon.

Benefit dinner at Tryon Methodist April 28, 5-7 p.m. Residents are invited to enjoy an Italian dinner and help out the community at the same time on Saturday, April 28 from 5-7 p.m. at Tryon United Methodist Church. Church members will offer a choice of lasagna or spaghetti, along with a tossed salad, garlic bread and a variety of desserts. Proceeds from the dinner will be donated to several local community service organizations. The dinner will be accompanied by a silent auction of goods and services. Sealed bids will be accepted from 5 until 8 p.m. Although many bidders

will choose to remain until the bids are opened at 8 p.m., it’s not necessary to be present to win. Tickets can be purchased at Cowan’s Hardware and Owens Pharmacy in Tryon and at The Flower Cottage in Columbus. They can also be obtained from the church office and from church members. Tryon United Methodist Church is located at 195 New Market Road. Call the church office at 828-859-9218 for more information. – article submitted by Nancy Hiley

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … With Your Neighbors! OF INTEREST

GARAGE SALES

LAWN CARE

Interested in riding this summer. Looking for someone to help with expenses. Lovely show hunter, safe, loves trail ride. For more information, please call 706-825-1002.

Yard Sale/ Hot Dog Sale Sat. April 21st. Yard Sale begins 8am, Hot Dogs @ 10. Union Grove Baptist Church on Landrum Rd. in Columbus (Past Larry Stott's Garage.) Something for everyone!

GreenWorks Lawn Care Professional lawn service with a focus on quality. Call 828-429-3052 for your free estimate.

Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151

LOST & FOUND

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PROFESSIONAL PRESSURE WASH We wash homes, decks, roofs, exterior/interior of gutters, etc. Also seal or stain wood. Excellent references! For free on-site estimate. Call 828-894-3701.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

ROOFING/ SIDING/GUTTERS

FOUND- Set of keys in parking space across the Weather Proof Roofing street from Tryon Daily Where quality matters. LiBulletin. Please call (828) censed & Ins. Shingles & 859-9195. Tin. Free Estimates. Call Rob (864) 828-0115

6th Annual Upscale Yard Sale, combined with a Craft Sale. Friday from 12pm to 6pm and Saturday from 8 am to 2 pm. Hwy 9 South (1 mile south of Green Creek Fire Depart. & 1.6 miles from SC state line) furniture, antiques, dishes, all sizes of name brand clothing, books, art, household items, crafts and tons more! Rain date 4/27 and 4/28. Yard Sale, Sat. April 21, 9 o’clock until. 484 Turpin Road Inman. Off Hwy 176 in Gramling. Tools, baby items & lots of misc. Too much to list.

HOME

IMPROVEMENT Increase The Value of Your Home! Brick, Block & Rock Underpinning. Veneers, Fireplaces & Foundation. Pictures & local references. 828-817-4726

S SERVICES

Brandburn Oil Company, We Pump Out #1 and #2. Heating Oil and Diesel Oil. Call 864-608-1779.

PAINTING PIERCE PAINTING & FLOOR SANDING Specializing in Exterior Painting - Quality Work Call Gene 864-357-5222

DRIVERS/ DELIVERY/OTR Professional Truck Driver Training, Carriers Hiring Today! PTDI Certified Course, One Student per Truck, Potential Tuition Reimbursement. Approved WIA & TAA provider. Possible Earnings $34,000 first year. SAGE Technical Services & Isothermal, 828-2863636 ext 221 www.isothermal.edu/ truck

HELP WANTED

Immediate Opening for Detailed Janitorial Staff Member in Lake Lure. Must have own reliable transportation, able to pass a background check and drug test. Would preTommy's fer a Lake Lure resident. Home Improvement Position will be for after 5:30pm. Visit our website Roofs, renovations, siding, at www.cleanstreakinc.net carpentry, decks, windows, screening. All Home to print out an application Repairs. FREE estimates. and fax to our office. Home: (828) 859 - 5608. Phone: 828-891-8800 Fax: 828-891-6221 Cell: (828) 817 - 0436. PROTECT YOUR HOME AND FAMILY. USE ONLY LICENSED AND INSURED CONTRACTORS.

Drivers CDL-A:

Your current 10-20 have you down? Why not Get Home, Get Paid, 2012 tractors/trailers to boot? 888-219-8040 LA STRADA RESTAURANT @ Lake Lure now hiring Servers. Previous restaurant exp. req. Apply in person Wed - Sun, 11am to 4pm or call for appointment. (828) 625 1118. La Strada at Lake Lure, 2693 Memorial Hwy.

Classifieds

Mowing, trimming, pruning, fertilization, mulch, ERVICES seeding, spring clean-up, planting, greenhouses, chainsaw, pressure washNeed Glass Work? ing, deck restoration, Call B & J Glass ...and more. Free esti828-289-9116 mates. Fully insured. Commercial & Residential 828-817-2651. Mirrors, Table Tops, Shower Enclosures, Replace Cloudy Insulated PECIALIZED Glass. Custom Screens.

COMPLETE PAINTING SERVICES. Yoder Painting is fully insured, includFound Cat Black & white, has black ing worker's comp. No job large. Call mustache & a black t o o goatee. Please 828-863- 828-894-5094. 2782.

GARAGE SALES

LAWN-PRO Residential Specialist

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED - MEDICAL / DENTAL Bayada Home Health Care needs a skilled CNA to work with a total care patient. Full time position available. Please call 828-696-1900.

CABINS

HOUSES FOR RENT 3BR, 2BA Private on 10 acres between Lake Adger and Lake Lure. Large front porch, big yard, well water. $625/ month. (864)680-9559. Brick, 3bd/2ba, sun & bonus room, 2 car garage, basement, in Sunny View. Security System. No pets. $1000/month. Call 828-243-2617 For Rent - 2 & 3 bedroom homes. NO SMOKERS, NO PETS. $800 and up. Requires 1st and last mo rent. References. First Real Estate 828-859-7653

HOUSES FOR SALE For Sale By OwnerPark-like setting in Stoneybrook. 3 Br. 2 1/2 Ba, sunroom, hearth rm,. media rm./office, 2 fp + woodstove. kitchen and sitting gardens, 2 stall barn on 2+ ac. Lots of charm. 894-3219, (864) 2668273

HOUSES FOR RENT 2 BR, 1 BA HOUSE FOR RENT IN TRYON’S OLD HUNTING COUNTRY. 1,200 sf furnished guest house featuring living/dining rm combo w/fireplace, full kit, 1 extra lg bdrm & 1 regular size, lg screened in front porch and stone patio. Water and landscaping included. $900.00 mth. Call 305-494-5344 3 BR 2 BA on horse farm in Green Creek. Fenced in yard, pets welcome. Horses possible. Available pasture for horses. $700 / mo 817-4970

APARTMENTS

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

1 Bdrm Apartment

20 W. Main St., Saluda, 1,500 sq ft plus an upstairs office, high visibility & plenty of off street parking. Ideal for any use. Beautiful 2 BR apartment. Mr. Eargle 828-243-4300 1200 sq. ft. Lg rooms, high ceilings, new paint, carpet Beautiful professional & appliances. Fireplace & screened porch. Beautiful office space for rent in neighborhood. Walk to Tryon / Columbus area. town. $675/ mo. No smok(Behind Chamber of ers, no pets. (828) Commerce.) 450 square 859-6190 feet/ 3 offices. Call Mike Appliances included. $300/month Call 864-590-0336

at: 828-817-3314 Downtown Tryon, Elegant, 2 BR/1BA Duplex (1100 sf) on Pacolet St. New ACATION kitchen, bathroom, and wood floors, front and side ENTALS porches. $650.00. LAKE LANIER, TRYON: FOR RENT TRYON FUR- 828-894-2029 Vacation lake front furNISHED, SPACIOUS Downtown Tryon, Large nished rentals. Time COTTAGE. Living/ dining + charming, 1 B.R./1 BA available for daily/weekly/ room, fully equipped on Chestnut St. Wood monthly. Call Paul Pullen, kitchen, laundry room, floors, walk-in closets. Town and Country Realcarport. Nestled in beauti- $450.00, 828-894-2029. tors. 828-817-4642. ful Gillette Woods. Walk to town, shopping, restauFOR RENT: rants, churches. $800/ PREMIUM one bedOMMERCIAL mo. Call (828)859-5175. room apartment: fully

North Carolina Mtns FURNISHED RENTALS -

Log Cabin on 3.02acs $139,900. stone fireplace, new well septic and appliances, lg deck, covered porch, creek, ez access, move in today. 828-286-1666

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1-2-& 3 bedroom homes. included. Located in Downtown Landrum comShort and long term. First Harmon Field area of mercial building for sale. Real Estate 828-859-7653 Tryon. Enjoy the spec- 1500 sq. feet finished space, plus an unfinished House Share Near Lake tacular views and se- basement that is great for Lure, 1 to 2 people. Pri- rene setting. $750/mo. storage. $145,000. Call Inquire at vate entrance & private 407 620 8118 parking. 1100 sq. ft, 828-817-9748. heated, with two covered porches. Utility & DirectTV Large Apartment for URNITURE included. No indoor smok- Rent in Tryon.3 rms, 1 ing. Fully furnished ba, kitchen, carport, heat $850/m, empty $750/m. & water. Ref., lease & deChair Caning posit required. No smokCall 864-978-7983. ing. $640/m 828 817-1209 Chair seats replaced with cane, binder cane, splint & Peniel Rd. Brick 4 br/ 3 Tryon Apartment rush. Call: Lon or Leslie @ 1/2 ba. 3000 sf Ranch with Mtn. Views. New Ber- 175 Broadway. 1bd/1ba, (828) 894-7033. ber carpet, storage galore. appliances, wood floors, heat pump, screened $1350/m, 2 car garage, AWN horses possible. Call 828- porch or fireplace. $495. 864-895-9177 or 894-2029. ARDEN 864-313-7848 Tryon: Main Floor, In For Sale: Aged cow matown 2/1 Gourmet ONDOMINIUMS nure, clay free bottom land Kitchen.1400 Sq Ft. Retop soil, rotted sawdust, modeled and very nice. OR ENT pine and hardwood bark W/D included. Landlord mulch, sand, gravel, fill Condo For Rent. 2 Bedpays 1/3 utilities, carport. dirt. Delivered in dump room, 2 bath, central air Available first of April. truck or pickup size loads, and heat, deck, carport, $690/mo plus 1 mo secuor pick up yourself. Also gas fireplace and a small rity deposit. 817-9897 will haul off brush, trash, storage unit. Lease and Very private small home in deposit required. $585 per etc. 863-4453 Gowensville. 3 bedrooms, month. Call 828-817-3393 1 bath. Hardwood floors and new carpet. Outside OMESTIC ETS ARMS deck on 2 sides. Rent CREAGE $700/ month. Call: (864) Miniature Australian Shep616-0033 Potential Horse Farm herds for Sale. Blue Wonderful 1 Bdr Home. on Hogback Mt. Rd, 23 Merles. Females with blue Living / Dining Room, rolling acres with amazing eyes. 5 weeks old Ready Hardwood Floors, Ter - views. Good location to to go home in 3 weeks. race. Includes heat & Greenville or Spartanburg Call 817-0783 or email: hot water. $650 / mo & Tryon. With Restrictions curtis1981@windstream.n Call 864-415-3548 828-817-4970 et

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

page

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … With Your Neighbors! HORSE BOARDING

MOTORCYCLES / ATVS

Board at Harley Horse Farm. Large stalls, daily turn out, on FETA lt. mnt. trail. Lots of TLC. Lighted rings. Call Valerie at 828-817-3521, lv. msg.

Polaris ATF - new tires, winch. 250cc ATV, 2 new back tires. Call (828) 817-6238 or (828)863-4551

WANTED TO BUY - VEHICLES

WANTED

Want to buy junk vehicles! No title, no problem. Must have ID. Will pick up anywhere, 24/7. Never any towing fee. Price is $325 cash to max. $3325 cash, on the spot. Call (828)748-6739 or (864) 356-6076.

WANTED TO RENT/ LEASE: Small house or cottage for professional horsewoman with dog. Wonderful references. Must be close to Green Creek, NC area. Quiet, clean, & tidy. Need ASAP, Please call Kate at 843-798-3023

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WANT TO BUY: Junk ISCELLANEOUS cars, trucks and vans. Call anytime for pick up. 2002 Exiss Event Horse (828)223-0277 Trailer for Sale: 2-Horse straight load, Dressing Room w/ Saddle rack/ WE BUY spare tire. (7' wide/14' Cheap running cars and long, 7 1/2' inside height) junk cars. Up to $1000.00. Great condition Model: Come to your location. SS20 RP - $6900. obo FAST SERVICE. Call 828-863-2483 (828) 289 - 4938.

CARS 2002 Lincoln LS. 129k miles Best offer. Call 828-429-0381 98 Cadillac Deville, KBB Value @$5500. Come see & make an offer. Call Steve 828-817-2265.

Need to find the right employee?

WE CAN HELP. Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE 11 SP 7 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE  NORTH CAROLINA, POLK COUNTY

 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by C MARK FEAGAN TENANT IN SEVERALTY to MOUNTAIN 1ST BANK ORGANIZERS, LLC., Trustee(s), which was dated August 12, 2005 and recorded on August 17, 2005 in Book 331 at Page 223, Polk County Registry, North Carolina.  Default having been

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LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

made of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust, and the holder of the note evidencing said default having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on April 30, 2012 at 1:00PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Polk County, North Carolina, to wit:  TRACT ONE: BEGINNING at an iron pin said iron pin stands North 77 degrees 40 minutes West 268 feet from Clouds rock corner, and runs thence South 12 degrees 20 minutes West 230 feet to an iron pin, the Northwest corner of Lot No. 13; thence South 77 degrees 40 minutes East 248 feet to an iron pin; thence North 12 degrees 20 minutes East 230 feet to any iron pin on outside line; thence with outside line North 77 degrees 40 minutes West 248 feet to the BEGINNING, containing 1.31 acres, more or less.  The above described land is a part of Lots Nos. 13 and 14 of Denton Springs, Park Extension as represented by a plat thereof made by A.A. Merrick, Engineer and Surveyor by date of June 16, 1926.  TRACT TWO: BEGIN-

NING on an iron pin in or near the northern margin of North Carolina Secondary Road Number 1545, (known as Blanton Street Extension) said iron pin being the northwestern corner of the 1.31 acre tract of land described in a deed from Archic A. Feagan to Leona Loy Feagan dated August 20, 1959, recorded in Book 115, Page 76, Polk County Registry and running thence from said beginning iron pin North 79 degrees 20 minutes 40 seconds West 20.61 feet to and iron pin, a corner of the Hugh E. and Harriette Feagan Walker property; thence with the Walker line two calls as follows: South 17 degrees 20 minutes West 235.55 feet to an iron pin in the Max H. and Virgie H. Feagan line; thence with the Feagan line North 17 degrees 20 minutes East 20 feet to an old iron in the Southeastern. Corner of the property hereinabove referred to conveyed by deed recorded in Book 115, Page 76, Polk County Registry: thence North 72 degrees 40 minutes West 249.70 feet to an old iron pin: thence North 17 degrees 20 minutes East 216.87 feet to the BEGINNING, containing 0.226 of an acre.  Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record.  Said property is commonly known as 900 Blanton Street, Columbus, NC 28722.  Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢)

per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing.  Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are C. Mark Feagan.  An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, af-

ter receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination.  If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy.  Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Attorneys for Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587  File No.: 08-15649-FC02 Tryon Daily Bulletin April 20 and 27, 2012 FC/FEAGAN, C. MARK

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR PRE-QUALIFICATION OF BIDDERS The City of Landrum, SC will accept Pre-Qualification Statements from contractors interested in bidding on the renovation of its Railroad Depot, located at the corner of North Trade Avenue and East Coleman Street in Landrum, SC. The project consists of interior and exterior renovations (including mechanical, electrical and plumbing work), limited site work, and a freestanding exterior canopy. The depot area is approximately 2000 sf. Only pre-qualified general contractors will be allowed to bid on the project. Subcontractors are not required to file for prequalification. Copies of the Pre-Qualification Statement Forms are available at the Landrum City Hall, 100 North Shamrock Avenue, Landrum, SC 29356, or by contacting Vernita R. Brelsford at 864-457-3000. Submittals are due on or before May 11, 2012. Steve Wolochowicz, City Administrator City of Landrum, SC Tryon Daily Bulletin April 20, 2012 PRE-QUALIFICATION

Do you have

available jobs?

Call 828.859.9151 to Sell your home in let others know about the classifieds call job opportunities at 828.859.9151 your business.


e use the following business-card size advertisement in your paper Friday, A. M. to the Sunday School er 24, 2008. Please send 10:00 statement above address, to the attention of Jane Joyful Worship X rds, Secretary. Thanks! 11:00 A. M.

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6:00 P. M. Youth “Refuge� Choirs for all ages

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Wednesday 10:00 A.M. Bible Study & Prayer Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Dr. Bill Henderson, Pastor in the Interim

First Baptist Church of Tryon    

Please place picture!of church over the X.      

WE WANT TO SHARE OUR CHURCH AND OUR LORD WITH YOU.

New owners to renovate Asheville’s Grove Park Inn

Sundays are for Worship!

A private equity firm focused on travel and leisure plans to buy the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, N.C. and invest $25 million in a renovation that will preserve the Wednesday historic character of the resort. 10:00 A.M. Bible Study & Prayer KSL Capital Partners LLC Jeffrey C. Harris, pastor Dr. Bill Rev. Henderson, Pastor in the Interim said it has agreed to acquire the inn from an affiliate of Sammons Enterprises Inc., a Dallas-based Please place picture of church over the X. 2x2 firm that has owned the property since 1955. KSL says it plans to 12/4 F tfn renovate the Grove Park Inn’s TBAP-033564 guest rooms, dining areas, meeting spaces, public areas and spa. The 512-room resort, listed on the National Register of Historic Places and a member of Historic Hotels of America, feaTRYONBAPTIST - page 31 tures an 18-hole golf course designed by Donald Ross and a full-service spa. Founded in 1992, KSL has grown to manage eight resorts and maintain offices in Denver and New York. – source: Asheville Citizen Times, 4/10/12; Charlotte Business Journal, 4/11/12 10:00 A. M. Sunday School 11:00 A. M. Joyful Worship 6:00 P. M. Youth “Refuge� 5 Choirs for all ages

Friday, April 20, 2012

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TBAP-033564

style Realty, said he is “very, very optimistic that it’s not just a blip,� and the market is moving up along with overall consumer confidence in the economy. – source: www.citizen-times.com, 4/5/12 *** Home sales also showed improvement in South Carolina in the first quarter. “S.C. Realtors� reports statewide home sales rose 6.1 percent compared to the first quarter of 2011. The median price statewide also rose 2.1 percent for the same period. The greatest improvement in home sales was seen in the Columbia and Spartanburg markets, where the number of units sold rose 15.3 percent and 14.3 percent, respectively. Greenville sales were up 9.9 percent. The Western Upstate market, the smallest in the state, saw the greatest median price increase at 12.7 percent. The median price was up 6.4 percent in Greenville and 3.3 percent in Spartanburg. Pending sales were up 8.6 percent in March, while new listings fell 11.3 percent, indicating the positive trend may continue. The average length of time on the market for homes sold in March was 139 days, six days less than a year ago. – source: www.gsabusines. com, 4/16/12

Around the Region

*** The real estate market continues to improve in Western North Carolina. Sales of existing homes in Buncombe, Henderson, Transylvania and Haywood counties rose 27.8 percent in the first quarter of this year compared to the first quarter of 2011, according to figures from the N.C. Mountains Multiple Listings Service. Sales were up 27.2 percent for the same period in Buncombe County alone. Sales still lag well behind the torrid pace seen at the height of the real estate market in the last decade, and the number of homes sold as a result of a foreclosure or distressed situation remains relatively high. However, real estate companies say the trend shows clear improvement. Mark Ledbetter, director of operations at Prudential Life-

*** Banks are lending more to small business in North Carolina, but it’s unclear how much impact it will have on employment. The U.S. Department of Treasury reports banks have increased lending by $124.4 million to small businesses in North Carolina since they received capital through the Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF). (Continued on page 17)


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• Around region (continued from page 16)

Lending increased by $50.5 million in South Carolina over the same period. The SBLF, created in 2010 to help small businesses grow and create jobs, invested more than $4 billion in 332 institutions in 48 states. Neal Wolin, deputy secretary of the treasury, said the latest report on lending shows the fund is having “a powerful impact” and helping local entrepreneurs invest in their businesses and create jobs. However, a recent survey by the National Federation of Independent Business found that a net 0 percent of respondents plan to add jobs in the coming months. The federal government also recently enacted into law the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, which will help small businesses and high-growth enterprises raise capital from investors more efficiently.

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

– source: Charlotte Business Journal, 4/13/12 *** The number of people in North Carolina without health insurance rose significantly between 2005 and 2010, according to the N.C. Institute of Medicine. The institute reports the number of uninsured citizens increased by 291,000 to 750,000. The total shows nearly one in five nonelderly people in the state lacked health insurance in 2009-2010. The institute reports that two-thirds of the uninsured are in families with at least one full-time worker. The percentage of uninsured who live in families with no workers, parttime workers and one full-time worker increased 12 percent in five years, probably because of the recession, said the institute. According to the report, more than two thirds of the uninsured

in the state live in urban areas, while the number of uninsured in rural areas declined by more than 4 percent over the five-year period. – source: www.wsoctv.com, 4/16/12 ***

Racing is retu rning to the Cleveland County Fairgrounds. After several decades without racing, the fairgrounds will start hosting weekly events beginning this Saturday, April 21 at 1 p.m. Thousands of fans are expected to show up this weekend at the oval short track that hosted its first race in 1956. The last race was held at the track on Aug. 5, 1965. After the opening event April 21, races will continue at the fairgrounds each Friday night into the fall, from 8 to 11 p.m. – source: www.shelbystar.com, 4/17/12

Around the Region

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A warm winter and early spring prompted apple trees and other crops to bloom early this year, putting them at risk when temperatures plummeted recently. Marvin Owens, the N.C. Extension Services agent in Henderson County, said the recent cold snap damaged the apple crop in Western North Carolina. Owens says it will take several days to assess the extent of the damage. Temperatures dropped to around or just below freezing during the latest cold snap. Kenny Barnwell, a farmer in Henderson County, says the cold weather caused extensive damage to his 10 acres of peach trees and also damaged his apple crop. The mild winter caused apple trees to bloom about two weeks earlier than normal. – source: www.citizen-times. com, 4/13/12 *** (Continued on page 18)


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

• Around region

Following a controversy earlier this year at North Windy Ridge Intermediate School, the school board decided it should put into writing the requirement that school officials and employees must follow federal law and neither “advance nor inhibit” religious beliefs. A mother of a student at North Windy Ridge complained after her son came home with a Bible left at the school by Gideons International. The district’s new policy states that the superintendent will provide training for staff and publish guidelines for students and staff. The guidelines state that students can read their Bibles, say grace before meals, “and pray or study religious materials with fellow students during recess, the lunch hour or other non-instructional time to the same extent that they may engage in non-religious activities.” – source: www.citizen-times. com, 4/13/12

Shade Garden Specialists • Hostas • Hardy Ferns • Wildflowers • Lenten Roses • Rhododendron • Native Azaleas • Many Other Shade Plants

Plants-A-Plenty Farm 890 Crowe Dairy Road, Forest City, NC

828-286-2493

Hours: Wed.-Sat. 8:30-5:30 Monday-Tuesday by appointment only

www.plantsaplentyfarm.com

(continued from page 17)

Warm weather may have contributed to a jump in the number of people visiting Great Smoky Mountains National Park so far this year. The park reports a 19.5-percent jump in the number of visitors through the first three months of this year compared to the same period last year. More than 200,000 more people traveled to the 500,000acre national park so far this year. March was particularly busy at the park with a 21.7 percent jump in visitors compared to March 2011. – source: www.blueridgenow. com, 4/19/12

Around the Region

*** Henderson County commissioners voted this week to allow solar farms of 30 acres or less, clearing the way for several property owners who are interested in the land use. The amendment to the county’s Land Development Code passed on a 3-2 vote after commissioners had a lengthy discussion about the change and heard from residents. Several landowners urged commissioners to approve the change because they are struggling to keep their land, and solar farms would provide more revenue than agriculture. Some solar companies expressed interest in leasing land for solar farms in the county if the amendment was passed. Land owners can begin immediately applying for a special use permit to allow the farms. – source: www.blueridgenow. com, 4/19/12 *** The Buncombe County school board approved a policy last week to make it clear that school employees “shall not use their positions to disparage, endorse, or promote a particular religious belief, viewpoint, expression or practice.”

*** Warren Haynes, a Grammywinning blues-rock musician, recently delivered a $210,000 check to the Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity. The donation came from the annual Christmas Jam concert held by Haynes and his wife, Stefani Scamardo. This year’s proceeds from the concert were the largest since the event began and raised the total the couple has contributed to the Asheville Habitat organization to $1.16 million. Lew Kraus, executive director for Habitat for Humanity in Asheville, said the donations provided by Haynes and his wife have been enough to build 21 homes. Haynes, a former member of the Allman Brothers Band and Phil Lesh and Friends who also gained fame through his own groups Gov’t Mule and the Warren Haynes Band, played a sold-out show recently at The Orange Peel in Asheville. – source: www.citizen-times. com, 4/16/12


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Polk Democrats honor party members

Editor’s note: This photo is being rerun to correct misspelled names in the caption the Tryon Daily Bulletin originally published April 18. Polk County Democrats honored their own during the county convention Saturday, April 14. Recognized were Jack Jolley, Liston B. Ramsey award; Dr. Marian Bosien, Lifetime Achievement; Jean Prewitt, Volunteer of the Year; and Franklin Smith, Community Service. (photo by Samantha Hurst)


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Congressman McHenry visits House of Flags Congressman Patrick McHenry (N.C. 10th District) visited the House of Flags Museum on Wednesday, April 11. Polk County will be part of the 10th District starting in January 2013. McHenry said he was impressed with the museum and that it was an excellent history lesson for all, particularly school-age children. Rep. McHenry said he will return soon and present a U. S. House of Representatives flag to the museum to add to the collection of flags on display. Shown here are Robert Williamson (left), board chairman; board members Scott Camp and Paul Sutherland, U.S. Representative Patrick McHenry and board member Joyce Preston. The House of Flags Museum is open on Tuesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Admission is free. Tours at other times can be arranged by calling 828-8942514. (photo submitted by Paul Sutherland)


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Visual snapshots in my heart Welcome to mid-April Saluda Hall at Episcopal Church of the news and notations! On morning Transfiguration. Guest speaker walks to downtown Saluda, I see will be John Vining. SCLT meets a busy little town — swings flying at 3 p.m. on the first and third high at the park, proud grandpar- Wednesday at the Pavilion at ents playing with younger gen- McCreery Park. SCLT phone is erations, folks strolling sidewalks 828-749-1560; their website is and peeking into shops. Scents saludaclt.org of warm baking bread from the Saluda Center: enjoy a combakery, lunch specials from the munity potluck on Thursday, April restaurants tantalize the senses. 26 at 6 p.m., and an art reception Huffing and puffing back uphill April 27 at 5:30-7 p.m. for Jane toward home (going downhill was Ratchford of Columbus. The wonderfully friendly Samuch easier than the hard climb back up), I never fail to turn and luda Tailgate Market begins its look back at all this: holding a third season on May 4 at 4:30 visual snapshot of my little town at the city parking lot off Main Street. If you’d like to sign up, in my heart. Speaking of ‘up hill’ and ‘down visit saludatailgate.com or contact Shelley DeKay hill,’ I find myat 828-606self looking at Saluda Offerings yet another birthNews & 5713. throughout the day coming up. Notations growing season Over the years, include fresh I hav e com by Bonnie Bardos vegetables, fruit, pletely changed honey, baked my attitude and thoughts about birthdays. Used to items, plants and much more.
 Art Notes: Several Saluda be, I was inexplicably sad on that particular day: despite whatever artists will be on the Art Trek celebrations happened, I couldn’t Tryon open studio tour along with shake that feeling underneath. A more than 30 area artists on May 5 and 6 with a preview party at turning point did come. These days, I greet each and the Upstairs Artspace in Tryon on every day (including birthdays) May 4. Participating artists will with heart - felt gratitude of hav- be featured in a gallery exhibit for ing one more day. That wisdom two weeks; this is always a fun evolved from the school of life event. Mark your calendar for the (and hard knocks) itself, from the ninth annual Saluda Arts Festival ebb and flow of birth and death of on May 19. There’ll be more than loved ones, from various dogs and 65 artists and craftspeople. Thank cats: and watching their joy of the you Polk County Community simple things, of just being right Foundation for sponsoring music here and now instead of acting for this great event! Saluda Fire and Rescue Auxlike a silly human dwelling on past and future. At this point, I’m just iliary needs donations (drop off at downright happy to be still alive fire department) for their May 5 and kicking, to have friends who yard and plant sale; funds raised are family and love me despite my will help members and families in eccentricities and stubbornness; our community who are affected in getting up and making art. It by disasters. Saluda School will have a doesn’t take much to make me happy — a hot, fresh cup of morn- Family Fun Night on April 26 with ing coffee on the porch swing on a Scott Kinard. Don’t miss it! Happy April Birthday to: sweet iris-scented spring day, and warm hugs along the way: what Martha Ashley, Melody Gibson, Dave Prudhomme, Kaye Vazquez, more does a girl need? 
Saluda Community Land Trust Cindy Keeter, Betty Anna Brown, will have their fifth annual meeting on April 25 at 6:30 p.m., Parish (Continued on page 21)

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

UU Fellowship meets April 22 The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship will meet at the Tryon Youth Center on Hwy. 176N at 10:30 a.m. April 22. The speaker will be Reverend Don Burger, who will speak on the topic “A Healthy Grace.” “What is “grace?” Like love, Burger said, grace has meanings and applications that vary almost to the point of losing understanding. Yet, where it appears, in “graceful,” “grace period,” “God’s grace,” and even “grace note,” there are elements of benevolence and mystery about it. “We will look more carefully at the word, how it appears in our lives and world, ultimately taking it “out of the box,” and suggest a radical practical application,” said Burger. This talk will be a direct follow-up to Rev. Burger’s previous presentations at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. In particular, he will build upon the concept of spiritual nutrition, based upon his own practice as a “grace ninja.” Burger, who has a master’s degree in education, retired from 34 years’ service in literacy, educational television and staff development. In 2000, he was

ordained an Interfaith Minister through the United Nationsaffiliated Inter-faith Seminary. He developed a statewide model and curriculum in recovery-specific pastoral counseling for addictions personnel, implemented in more than 1,600 programs in New York State. He lives in Brevard and is a member of the worship team of the Unitarian Universalists of Transylvania County. In retirement, Burger teaches mountain dulcimer, musical composition and watercolor painting. He dabbles in woodworking and plays in several string bands. “It’s Great to Be Alive in Transylvania County,” one of Burger’s compositions, is a local favorite singalong celebrating life in this area. His wife, Deb, is a writer, crochet artist and home school educator. She will join him in presenting this service. Members are invited to have lunch with Burger and his wife after the service April 22. The group has a reservation at Melrose Inn (55 Melrose Ave., Tryon). Come early for fellowship and refreshments. For information call 828-894 5776 or visit www. uutryonnc.org. – article submitted by Dan Dworkin

Gospel singing, supper April 21 Bibleway Baptist Church on John Smith Road in Green Creek will hold a gospel singing and supper Saturday, April 21 at 4 p.m. Proceeds will benefit the church. The Far City Boys will per-

form. The pastor is Larry McKee. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call 864-5037363. – article submitted by Bibleway Baptist Church

• Saluda Notes

want you to feel as if you’re having a front porch visit with me, enjoying birds singing and sun sparkle over flowers in the garden. Keep in mind if you have something of note, feel free to contact me at bbardos@gmail.com; or 828749-1153. You may also visit my website at bonniebardos.com.

(continued from page 21)

Marion Fairey, Hope Pace, Diane Pace, Ruth Anderson and Bonnie Bardos. Please add your birthday to the list. Thank you, dear readers for reading this column; as ever, I


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Promoting a healthy balance with the use of probiotics These days you can hardly pick up any health or nutrition publication without reading some article about “probiotics.” Just what are probiotics? Are they beneficial? Are they safe? Probiotic comes from the Greek word pro, meaning “promoting,” and the word biotic, meaning “life.” Probiotics are actually live micro-organisms, most of which are bacteria. Did you know in our world there are five “nonillion” different kinds bacteria. By the way, that’s a 5 with 30 zeros. Of all these bacteria, only 30 percent are considered “pathogenic” or harmful to humans. Probiotics are “micro-organisms” like bacteria that actually help make us healthier. Our bodies actually contain both harmful and good bacteria. These two need to be in balance for good health but with our lifestyles, over use of anti-biotics, and sanitizers, this balance can become off kilter.

Most anti-biotics and anti- choose plain yogurt. Yogurt bacterial agents don’t discrimi- that is processed with fruit, nate. There kill both bad and sometimes doesn’t contain live good bacteria. You actually have probiotics. You can add fruit to good or friendly bacteria that plan yogurt though. lines your intestinal tract. These Another probiotic, “bididobacteria aid in digestion and bacterium,” also helps replace keep you healthy. When these are intestinal “flora,” or friendly killed, you are then vulnerable to bacteria. In addition to boosting infections like yeast, E.coli and the immune system and aiding salmonella because these friend- digestion, studies have shown ly bacteria keep probiotics bad bacteria in helpful in the Diet & Exercise check. of by David Crocker treatment Also, withChrohn’s disout good bacteease and ulcerria, you can’t digest food prop- ative colitis. erly, which means that in addition Probiotics are also helpful in to possible gastrointestinal upset, prevention and treatment of acute you can’t use proper nutrients diarrhea, even in children. The from food. Journal of Pediatrics reported imOf all probiotics, the best provement of children’s diarrhea know is “lactobacillus.” These symptoms caused by antibiotics. can be found in cultured dairy One Swedish study showed foods like yogurts and butter- promise that probiotics could milk, and can be found in pill strengthen the immune system, form. If you get your probiotics help prevent colorectal cancer, from yogurt, I recommend you and even help fight carcinogens.

Probiotics are a great addition to your diet and nutritional supplement regimen, but don’t start then without first consulting your doctor. Your doctor can tell you if this is right for you or contraindicated. Also, I don’t recommend giving probiotics to children under the age of three. Diet or exercise question? Email me at dwcrocker77@gmail.com or visit fitness4yourlife.org. David Crocker of Landrum has been a nutritionist and personal trainer for 26 years. He served as strength director of the Spartanburg Y.M.C.A., head strength coach for thee S.C. state champion girls gymnastic team, USC-Spartanburg baseball team, Converse college equestrian team, lead trainer to L.H. Fields modeling agency, and taught four semesters at USC-Union. David was also a regular guest of the Pam Stone radio show.


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Robert Zachary Smith Jr. and Ciara Michelle McClead

McClead – Smith engagement The families of Ciara Michelle McClead and Robert Zachary Smith Jr. announce the engagement of their children. Ciara is the daughter of Ms. Marsha Horsley of Spartanburg, S.C. and Mr. Shawn McClead of Myrtle Beach, S.C. Ciara’s grandparents are Mr. John Horsley of Spartanburg, S.C., Ms. Amanda Ingram of Lilesville, S.C., Mr. Eugene McClead and Ms. Mary Ann Miller of Conway, S.C. She is a 2011 graduate of Boiling Springs High School and is employed at Copper River Grill in Boiling Springs, S.C. Zack is the son of Dale and Jean Horton of Mill Spring and

Zack and Aimme Smith of Charlotte, N.C. His grandparents are Barbara Selby of Tryon, Don Davis (deceased) of Del Barton, W.V., Betty Ware of Boiling Springs, S.C., Bobby Smith (deceased) of Boiling Springs, S.C., Cheri Rogers of Rutherforton, N.C. and Lonnie and Debra Horton of Green Creek. He attended both Polk County High School and Boiling Springs High School, graduating in 2011. Zack works at Communication Services LLC in Tryon. The sunset service will be held June 2 with all close family and friends surrounding the couple. – article submitted by Jean Horton

Foothills bridge results for April 5, 6, 12 The results of Foothills duplicate bridge played Thurday April 5 were as follows: Morning restricted pairs: Section A North-South 1. Silvia Crouse - Carolyn Jones 2. Jack Williams - Virginia Ambrose 3. George Cashau - Earl Virts 4 / 5 . C h r i s Te r K u i l e Charlotte Lindsey

4/5. Donald Cobb - Leslie Tucker East-West 1. Robert Palmer - David Hart 2. Marily Williams - Janice Matthisen 3. Roger Yike - Marilyn Yike 4. Stephanie Williamson Donald Williamson Morning restricted pairs: (Continued on page 26)


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Local author Epley featured Steps to HOPE observes at April 23 AAUW meeting Denim Day April 25 The American Association of University Women (AAUW) will meet Monday, April 23 at 1:30 p.m. at the Tryon Presbyterian Fellowship Hall. Joe Epley will discuss his historical fiction novel, “Passel of Hate,” set during the American Revolutionary War. The novel details how families were divided during the battle of King’s Mountain in 1780, with some members remaining fiercely loyal to the king, while others fervently supported the revolution. “Passel of Hate” has been described as capturing the essence of the war in the backcountry, while providing stunning historical detail and well-crafted characters. It has been hailed as epic and fact-based. In addition to adding “author” to his life’s accomplishments, Epley was known as a business icon.

In 2008, Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) awarded him the Golden Anvil, their highest individual award. As a founding partner in Worldcom Public Relations Group, which included businesses in 35 countries, he helped establish professional, ethical public relations in Russia shortly after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. In 2005, the Russian Public Relations Association made him a lifetime member. Epley, a native North Carolinian, was once a television news reporter and anchor in Asheville and Charlotte, N.C. Epley and his wife, Dorcas, are active volunteers locally. The meeting is open to the public, and refreshments will be served. – article submitted by Audrey Ortiz

Editor’s note: In observance of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Steps to HOPE has submitted several articles on related topics during April. The following is the third of these articles. Italy, 1990s. An 18-year-old girl’s driving instructor takes her to an isolated road on her first lesson, pulls her out of the car, wrestles her out of one leg of her jeans and forcefully rapes her. The perpetrator is arrested, prosecuted, convicted of rape and sentenced to jail. The perpetrator appeals the sentence, and the case makes it all the way to the Italian Supreme Court. Within a matter of days the case against the driving instructor is overturned, dismissed and the perpetrator released. According to the chief judge, “Because the victim wore very, very tight jeans, she had to help him remove them,

ConCert: 7:00 ($25) BBQ Dinner & ConCert: 5:30 ($40)

and by removing the jeans, it was no longer rape but consensual sex.” Enraged by the verdict, women in the Italian Parliament launched into immediate action and protested by wearing jeans to work. This call to action motivated and emboldened the California Senate and Assembly to do the same, which in turn spread to Patricia Giggans, executive director of Peace Over Violence, and Denim Day in L.A. was born in April 1999. Denim Day in L.A. has continued every year since throughout the U.S. Steps to HOPE invites the community to make a social statement with your fashion statement! Join Steps to HOPE and wear jeans with a purpose on Wednesday, April 25. For more information call Steps to HOPE at 894-2340. – article submitted by Debra Backus, Steps to HOPE


THE 1 AMERICA

Call 1-800-274-1400 TRUSTS volunteers and their contributions. Send your stories of outstanding TU barbecue volunteers to: Favorite Volunteers, page 26 Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The Tryon Daily Bulletin, 16 N. Trade St.,Wanted Tryon, NC 28782. R��fs

B14 The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Bridge results

Friday, April 20, 2012

1. Patrick Collins - Karl Kachadoorian (continued from page 24)     

   

2. Raymond Stover - John References Available Memory Section B 2x3   

       

Foothills duplicate bridge North-South 6/27;7/1,3,7,9,11 828-859-6623 1. Margaret Kennard - Jane results for April 12. Morning restricted pairs: Janke Section A 2. Eilene Morgan Pam 2x1 North-South Mattern Tu, F 1. Chris Ter Kuile - Charlotte 3. Kathy Bartlett - Ken Lindsey Yeager TDB Communications Policy 2. George Cashau - Mariana 4. Louise Hagy - Elaine • The Tryon Daily Bulletin welcomes your letters of 600 Tarpley Riley words or less. Please include name, address and daytime phone 3. Silvia Crouse - Carolyn East-West number for verification. Unsigned letters will not be TDB Communications Policy 1. Elaine Jenkins - Bruce Jones printed. • The Tryon Daily Bulletin welcomes4.your lettersParker of 600 -words Sandra Teenie Fritz • All letters are subject to editing. We edit letters for length, grammar or less. Please include your name, address and daytime phone Elliott 2. Janice Dunn Kris Diggs and clarity and will reject letters that contain personal attacks or material number for verification. Unsigned letters will not be printed. East-West 3. Patricia Komorous we deem unsuitable for publication. 1. letters Andrea Kahngrammar - Kathy Virginia C Davis • All letters are subject to editing. We edit for length, • We reserve the right to limit each letter writer to two letters per Bartlett 4. Marilyn Clarkson Nan and clarity and will reject letters that contain personal attacks or material month. Shively we deem unsuitable for publication. 2. Mel Rogers - Ruthann Cox • "Thank you" letters are considered paid advertisements. 3. Elizabeth - Norma Afternoon pairsto limit each letter • We reserveopen the right writer to Easley two letters per • Typewritten letters preferred, neatly handwritten letters are acceptable. Evola North-South month. email to news@tryondailybulletin.com or brought in digitally in .doc 4. Leslie Tucker - Marily 1. Chris Ter Kuile - Robbie • "Thank you" letters are considered paid advertisements. or .txt format are accepted. Printed copy must accompany digital Williams Ter Kuile submissions. • Typewritten letters are preferred, butMorning neatly handwritten letterspairs: are restricted 2. George Cashau - Esther • Letters will appear when space is available, based on the size of the acceptable. Letters may be emailed to news@tryondailybulletin.com Section B Taylor letter, not strictly in the order they are received. or brought .doc or .txt format are best. Printed copy North-South 3. Donaldin digitally Cobb - inDaniel must accompany digital submissions. 1. Eilene Morgan - Pam Dworkin • Letters appear -when space is Mattern available, based on the size of the 4. Marilywill Williams Mariana letter, not strictly in the order they are received. 2. Hoppy Long - Rosamond Tarpley Dauer East-West 3. William Kelly - Peggy 1. John Memory - Jim Henson Jackson 4. Mickey Brandstadter 2. Patrick Collins - James Dianne Brandstadter Cobb East-West 3. Deane Smith - Sally Jo 1. Pat Fiol - Kris Diggs Carter 2. Stephanie White - Nancy 4. Louise Caser - Karl Symmes Kachadoorian 3. Martha Frederick The results of Foothills duplicate bridge played Friday, Elizabeth Murray 4. Deborah Bundy - Janice April 6 were as follows: Dunn Morning restricted pairs Afternoon open pairs North-South 0TFN3TUE - page 7 2x3.5 2x2.5 North-South 1. Tom Jackson - Vicky 1. Jack Williams - Mariana Jackson 2/3. John Davis - Paul Madar Tarpley 2. George Cashau - Ken 2/3. Barbara Schuvart - Kris TDBPROMO - page 82 Yeager Diggs 3. Silvia Crouse - Edwina East-West 1. Edward Krainer - Jack Burger 4. Charles Cannon - Linda DePriester 2. Deborah Bundy - Janice Sherer East-West Dunn 1. Karl Kachadoorian Afternoon open pairs Richard Caser North-South 2. Mel Rogers - Ruthann Cox 1. Linda Sherer - Helen 3. Andrea Kahn - Pat Fiol Trevathan 4. Archie Hardy - Curtis Ross 2. Ronald Wingo - Charlotte – article submitted Lindsey by Marily Williams East-West

We GeT LeTTers‌

We Get Letters‌


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Credit card reviewers Is there a more dreaded phrase helping to support a marvelous cause a few weeks ago with a in the English language than: “Would you mind swiping few over-priced chicken finger your credit card through again?” baskets. Now, we’ve all heard of ‘Big I think most of us have been there before. As you slide your Brother’ but, frankly, this sort of card with trembling hand, hold- interference can only come from ing up a que of customers, your an annoying “Little Brother,” thoughts are leaping like a bronc delving into our lives and stirring out of the shoot: “Oh, no, have I up trouble. Who are these ‘remade a mistake in my checking viewers,’ anyway? The Amish? The next victim was Susan’s account?” or “But I just made a deposit!” and “This is mortify- sister, Sharon, the same week, when her card was denied for a ing!” Ah, but then all is well the purchase of $101 at a car wash. next moment. “It’s fine.” says the A call to the card company was prompt with her cashier. “We’ve “I’m Just explaining that been having a lot of problems with Saying...” she was attempting to purchase this machine, toby Pam Stone $60 in gas and day.” $41 for a deWhew! It wasn’t so ‘whew!’ for my tailed cleaning job of her SUV. “Oh,” exclaimed the woman friend, Susan, who recently shared her tale to me. Her busi- on the other side of the phone. ness requires frequent moves and “We would have never stopped she uses cards quite often as she your card for the gas- that’s your finds it’s the easiest way to sort number one expense. But at a transactions for taxes and keep carwash?” “So,” said Sharon, as she both her business and personal life, straight. So when her depart- relayed the story. “I think my ment store Visa was declined, she profile must say I’m basically was both surprised and troubled. unclean!” She went on to add, “The A call to the company was in order and she was curtly informed scariest part is how much they by the representative, “We can- know about us!” Or little, in this case. celled your card immediately I tend to be a cash-only gal, because our reviewers saw a charge of $56.50 in Charlotte, and after hearing these stories, that’s probably a good thing. North Carolina, to a saloon!” Saloon? Exactly what century Mostly because my weekly are we in? And when did she get spending schedule is as follows: feed store, grocery store, feed the hell out of Dodge? The ‘saloon,’ Susan hastily store. And once in a mad while I pointed out, was the comedy club have to buy an outlandish gown that hosted our recent benefit for for some kind of high-profile Burundi, Africa and the $56.50 event. Boy, if I were using a card, was the price paid for food and wouldn’t that trip the alarm bells beverage during the event. How- at Visa! They’d assume either a ever, the ‘reviewers’ decided this thief had pilfered their bit of plaswas terribly out of character and tic or I had neglected to take my she must have run right off the meds and was on a manic shoptracks and started knocking back ping spree. I doubt even making whiskey at an alarming rate! I a phone call would change their say, as she is an educator trying mind. Once a hick, they probably to help underprivileged children think, always a hick. But even Ellie Mae Clampett amid slashings in funding, if anyone is deserving of a lot of had to get away from her critters recent elbow bending, it’s Susan, every once in awhile... but she was doing no more than

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Snowflake finds new home at Steps to HOPE

9th Annual HUNTER PACE FOR HOPE Sunday, May 6, 2012

Raindate: Sunday, May 13, 2012

Greenspace of Fairview and Golden Hills of Fairview 9:00 am – 2:00 pm WC HUNTER PACE SERIES Hunter Division (Jumps Optional) Trail Rider Division English/Western Riders – ALL Welcome Current Negative Coggins Required Protective Headgear Required $35 per Rider / $15 Children 12 and under Children must ride with a paying adult

A $2 donation toward the Polk Equine Emergency Rescue horse ambulance would be greatly appreciated.

LUNCH INCLUDED Donations are TAX DEDUCTIBLE Proceeds to benefit Steps to HOPE, Polk County's shelter for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

For additional information, visit: www.WCHPace.org, www.stepstohope.org, or call 828-894-2340.

Snowflake, a unique stuffed pony based on an actual horse in Wells Fargo’s history, was recently donated to Steps to HOPE by the bank’s Landrum branch. Snowflake will reside in the shelter’s playroom, where she can be enjoyed by children of all ages. The real-life Snowflake led a team of horses that helped deliver money, merchandise, packages and important business papers from Jersey City to customers in Manhattan via Hudson River ferry in the 1880s. Pictured are Lee Alexander (left), Wells Fargo Landrum store manager; Rachel Ramsey, Steps to HOPE executive director, and Gracie Bagwell, Wells Fargo teller. (photo submitted by Debra Backus)

Presbyterian Church offers Tai Ch’I class Landrum Presbyterian Church invites the surrounding communities to an exercise program using Tai Ch’I, an ancient Chinese exercise consisting of slow and gentle body moves while breathing deeply. The gentle moves promote relaxation and relief from stress. Studies have shown Tai Ch’I may help maintain bone health, provide beneficial relief from the symptoms of fibromyalgia and knee osteoarthritis, improve sleep quality, promote cardiopulmonary fitness through deep breathing and improve balance. This exercise is for all age groups. The only requirements are that you must be able to stand and do very gentle stretching.

The next session will begin May 3. Mr. Ed Kan of Isothermal Community College is the instructor. Each session is limited to 12 participants to allow for one-onone instruction. There will be two morning classes: Thursday and Saturday. Both classes will begin at 10 a.m. You may register by calling 864-457-2761. Leave your name and number and any questions you may have regarding the Tai Ch’i exercise program. Landrum Presbyterian Church is located at 404 Rutherford Street, directly across from the post office. – article submitted by Jan Ludwick


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Polk health dept. has funds available for cancer screenings

“A Hard Rain,” by Pat Cole-Ferullo. (photo submitted by Pat Cole-Ferullo)

Ferullo Fine Art Studio to participate in Art Trek May 5 - 6 Ferullo Fine Art Studio will participate in the fourth annual Art Trek Tryon: Foothills Open Studios on Saturday, May 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, May 6 from noon to 5 p.m. A selection of their work will be shown, along with works of other participating artists, at the Upstairs Artspace preview party on Friday, May 4 from 5-8 p.m. Well-known artists Dom Ferullo and Patricia ColeFerullo are preparing a large selection of paintings, mixed media and sculpture to welcome art lovers during this festive weekend. Dom and Pat create their

original work using color, shape and line to evoke imaginative personal response in the viewer. “Based in the Abstract Expressionist tradition, our work emits a strong emotional energy,” Pat Cole-Ferullo said. “References to the natural world of nature, the human figure, and universal themes are found in my paintings, while Dom’s mixed media paintings and sculptures carry strong masculine energy springing from his connection to the earth.” For more information, call 828-859-3177. - article submitted by Pat Cole-Ferullo

Saluda Center community potluck Held April 26 The Saluda Center will host a community potluck on Thursday, April 26 at 6 p.m. The entertainment for the evening will be Terry Wetton from WTZQ radio, featuring oldies from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Guests are asked to bring their favorite dish.

On Friday April 27 from 5:30 - 7 p.m. there will be an artist reception for the featured artist of the month, Jane Ratchford of Landrum. Ratchford uses multi-media techniques, oil, acrylic and pastels to create her work. - article submitted

The Polk County Health Department has received additional funding from the N.C. Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program to provide more breast screenings, mammograms, if appropriate, and cervical screenings for women 40-64 years of age who do not have insurance, Medicare or Medicaid. If a woman qualifies for the BCCCP program and is diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer after being screened in the program, she may be eligible for BCCCP Medicaid to pay for surgery and treatments if needed. Since July 2011, the Polk County Health Department BCCCP program has screened 24 women for breast and cervical cancer. These women received breast exams, pap

smears, mammograms and colposcopys when appropriate at no cost to them. In January 2012 federal health officials with the Centers for Disease Control said fewer women were being screened for breast and cervical cancer. Screening rates for Asian and Hispanic women were especially low. Officials said early diagnosis would make a huge difference in the ability to treat cancer effectively. Call the Polk County Health Department at 828-894-8271 to see if you qualify for this program and to make an appointment. You may call Debbie Kennedy, RN, coordinator of the program at 828-894-8271 if you have questions about the program. – article submitted by Helen White


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Walend visits Rotary

Representative Trudi Walend visited a recent meeting of the Rotary Club of Tryon. Walend represents the N.C. 113th legislative district, which includes Transylvania, Polk and Henderson counties. She retired from the General Assembly after five terms but was recently reappointed to fill the vacancy of Representative David Guice, who was appointed by Governor Beverly Perdue to head the Division of Community Corrections. Representative Walend provided the Rotarians an update on the recent activities in the General Assembly. The program was arranged by Paul Sutherland, who is pictured with Walend. (photo submitted by Bill Hillhouse)

Friday, April 20, 2012

Financial, estate planning for those with special needs dependents On Tuesday, April 24 at 6 p.m., the Polk County/Foothills Area Parent & Family Autism Support Group will host a program for families with special need dependents called “Your Dependent with Special Needs: Making His or Her Future More Secure.” Featured speaker Mike Palczuk, from Raleigh, N.C., is a professional special needs planner who is specifically trained to assist families in planning for the financial future of their children. In this session, he will address important issues that face families. Palczuk will discuss government benefit eligibility; guardianship and conservatorship/guardian ad litem and financial security and funding options. The program will take place at the Polk County Public Library in Columbus at 6 p.m. The Polk County/Foothills Area Parent & Family Support

Group is sponsored by the Autism Society of North Carolina. Each meeting offers an educational focus in addition to support for one another. Families – some from as far away as Hendersonville, N.C., Forest City, N.C. and Greenville, S.C. are active participants. Local educators also attend the meetings to get tips and strategies they can use in their classrooms and school environments. All of the group’s programs are open to the public. Although the group is focused on autism, this program will benefit all families with disabled members. Light refreshments will be served. The next public program for the support group will be scheduled in the fall. For information regarding the parent support group, contact Tracey Daniels at tracey@mmpublicity.com. – article submitted by Tracey Daniels

Lanier Library recent acquisitions Biography ““Favored Daughter.” Koofi, Fawzia “Great Northern Express.” Mosher, Howard Frank “First Lady of Fleet Street.” Negev, Eilat “Story of Charlotte’s Web.” Sims, Michael Fiction “Lunatics.” Barry, Dave “Shadow Patrol.” Berenson, Alex “Force of Nature.” Box, C. J. “Forgotten Country.” Chung, Catherine “No Mark Upon Her.” Crombie, Deborah “Bond Girl.” Duffy, Erin “Gods of Gotham.” Faye, Lyndsay “Arcadia.” Groff, Lauren “Victims.” Kellerman, Jonathan “Retribution.” McDermid, Val “Expats.” Pavone, Chris “Lone Wolf.” Picoult, Jodi “Cell 8.” Roslund, Anders “American Spy.” Steinhauer,

Olen “Iguana Tree.” Stone, Michael Mystery “Hush Now, Don’t You Cry.” Bowen, Rhys “Sandburg Connection.” de Castrique, Mark “Kill My Darling.” HarrodEagles, Cynthia “Defending Jacob.” Landay, William Non-Fiction “2011 Official Visitors’ Guide (Continued on page 31)


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Library Upstairs Artspace sponsors open studios weekend • Lanier ( 30) continued from page

The Upstairs Artspace in Tryon announces the fourth annual “Art Trek Tryon: Foothills Open Studios,” on Saturday, May 5, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, May 6, noon to 5 p.m. Thirty-four artists in Polk County and Landrum will open their studios to the public free of charge and sell art throughout the weekend. The art covers most styles and mediums, including painting, drawing, woodturning, ceramics, textile art, metalwork, indoor and outdoor sculpture. Studios range from one room in an artist’s home to separate buildings for studio and a gallery. Art Trek Tryon is a selfguided tour. A brochure with map and driving directions is available at the Upstairs and area businesses, as well as each artist’s studio. Brochures can be mailed on request. An exhibit of work by par-

Keith Spencer’s studio, one of the studios on the Art Trek Tryon selfguided tour Saturday, May 5, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, May 6, noon to 5 p.m. (photo submitted by Karen Jones)

ticipating artists opens at the Upstairs on Friday, May 4, with a preview party from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibit continues through Sept 5. The Upstairs is located at

49 S. Trade Street. For information, call Karen Jones at 571-216-6093 (cell) or 828859-2828 (gallery). - article submitted by Karen Jones

Charleston, South Carolina.” “Anatomy of Injustice.” Bonner, Raymond “Scapegoat.” Campbell, Charlie “Voyagers of the Titanic.” Davenport-Hines, Richard “I’m Feeling Lucky.” Edwards, Douglas “World of Downton Abbey.” Fellowes, Jessica “Book of Secrets.” Holroyd, Michael “Trip of the Tongue.” Little, Elizabeth “Ultimate Guide to Asheville & the Western North Carolina Mountains.” Pantas, Lee James “Mark Inside.” Reading, Amy “Wild.” Strayed, Cheryl “Londoners.” Taylor, Craig DVDs “Downton Abbey – Complete Season 2.” “Case Histories.” – article submitted by the Lanier Library Media Selection Committee


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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Greensboro Symphony Youth Orchestra coming to TFAC April 28

Tryon Fine Arts Center will present the Greensboro Symphony Youth Orchestra on Saturday, April 28 at 3 p.m. as part of the Arts in Education 2011-2012 season. Nathaniel Beversluis will conduct the 60 high school students in a repertoire including Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Capriccio Espagnol,” Schubert’s “Rosamunde Overture” and Gershwin’s “Lullaby for Strings,” among others. This concert is presented free to the public. Call TFAC for more information at 828-859-8322 ext. 213, or email marianne@tryonarts.org. (photo submitted by Marianne Carruth)


A17 Friday, April 20, 2012

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Diva Day benefits Hospice House in Landrum May 3 Hospice of the Carolina Foothills’ Friendship Circle will present its annual spring luncheon, “Passion for Fashion - The Shoe Must Go On” on May 3 at The Piedmont Club in downtown Spartanburg. Among the silent auction items (dressage lessons, handmade heirloom quilts and pet portraits), Dillard’s has offered a “Diva Day” for 10 women. For all 10 women, the “Day” will include a makeover at the cosmetic counter of your choice, 10 – 15 minute massage, an informal fashion show, lunch from Jason’s Deli, mini manicure and other opportunities for personal pampering by specially trained assistants throughout the store. In addition, Dillard’s is creating a gift basket full of cosmetics, skin care and accessories to be given to one of the ladies through a drawing. All proceeds of “Passion for Fashion” will benefit Hospice House of the Carolina Foothills in Landrum. Other event sponsors include Millard & Company, JM Smith Corporation and Patty

and Dale Holl. Reservations must be made by April 20. For more information, call Diane Nelson at Hospice of the Carolina Foothills 800-6177132. – article submitted by Marsha Van Hecke

Thermal Belt Friendship Council holds luncheon April 21 Thermal Belt Friendship Council will hold its monthly luncheon this Saturday, April 21 at 11:45 a.m. at Southside Smokehouse & Grille in Landrum. All are invited. The Friendship Council is active in bringing people of various races and ethnic backgrounds together in the various events it sponsors, such as the annual Friendship Picnic at Harmon Field in June, Christmas caroling and potluck and the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration held at Tryon Fine Arts Center every year in January. The Friendship Council has

no membership requirements and no dues, and there is never a charge for its events. Council members meet the second Tuesday of each month (except June, July and August) at 7 p.m. at the Roseland Community Center, located on Peake Street in Tryon, to plan activities. All members of the community are invited to come and participate in the meetings. More information on the Friendship Council can be found by visiting friendshipcouncil. homestead.com or by calling 864-457-2426. – article submitted by Lynnea Stadelmann

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

From left, Big Brother Allen Burdett, his Little Brother Matias (with sign), Little Brother Isaias, Little Sister Belen, Big Brother Bob Hutchison and his Little Brother Aaron comprised the Bowl for Kids’ Sake team of Bigs and Littles sponsored by Raymond James & Associates Inc. of Landrum. (photo by Susan Newlin)

Big Brothers Big Sisters benefits from generosity of community The year started out with a bang for Big Brothers Big Sisters with a grant from the Unrestricted Fund of the Polk County Community Foundation, an organization dedicated to the improvement of the community. In addition, two donors with the Polk County Community Foundation have established an enrichment fund at Big Brothers Big Sisters that provides opportunities for children in the BBBS community-based program. These funds are for summer camps, swim lessons, music lessons, cultural experiences, visits to college campuses and other beneficial activities. Volunteer Bigs are even allowed some reimbursements from this fund for enrichment-oriented outings with their Little Brother or Little Sister. A contribution from the Foundation’s Arthur M. and Frances H. Wilhelm Fund sup-

ports group activities for Bigs and Littles. The local Big Brothers Big Sisters organization holds several group outings each year, including a Christmas party, a pool party and picnic, and last year, Bigs and Littles enjoyed a kayaking experience on the Green River, through Green River Adventures in Saluda. Participants said they gained a sense of accomplishment by navigating the river. Special friends of Big Brothers Big Sisters have also set up an endowment fund at the Polk County Community Foundation for BBBS, through which contributions are encouraged to help build financial security for the organization’s future. Fundraising is a nearly constant challenge, on the agenda year-round. Big Brothers Big Sisters has already held two fundraisers this year, introducing the successful “Have

a Heart” for BBBS hosted by the Upstairs Artspace, and the organization’s annual signature event, “Bowl For Kids’ Sake,” which is supported by business sponsors, clubs and individuals. An annual mail campaign will commence in a few months, typically bolstered by a considerable response from local supporters. By early fall it will be time again to begin plans for the next bowling event. The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters is to provide children facing adversity with strong enduring relationships that will change their lives for the better. Matches are professionally supported by trained staff while parents or guardians are involved as essential partners. Youth paired with a volunteer Big are aided in attaining greater confidence, improved school performance and better relationships. According to organizers,

Littles are less likely to engage in risky behaviors and more likely to have higher aspirations. They said these matches positively impact not only the child, volunteer and family but area schools and communities as well. “Nonprofit organizations often spend an inordinate amount of time and energy on fundraising, which may detract from the ability to serve their targeted population,” Karen Dacey of BBBS said. “Having the support of the Polk County Community Foundation in this community is such a blessing, and celebration of good news from them is tempered with a sigh of grateful relief rippling out from all those who benefit. Area citizens who donate to the foundation can truly see the value of their gifts at work.” – article submitted by Karen Dacey


A19 Friday, April 20, 2012

Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

‘Cooley-McNamara’ opening reception April 28 Skyuka Fine Art’s next show, “Cooley-McNamara,” is a twoman show featuring the paintings of Gary Cooley and Michael McNamara. The opening reception will be on Saturday, April 28 from 5-8 p.m. The show will run through May 31. During the run of the show, the next Tryon Gallery Trot is scheduled for May 12 from 5-8 p.m. Both Cooley and McNamara hail from Detroit, Mich., and both studied at the Center for Creative Studies (now College of Creative Studies). Both studied illustration and worked or are working as illustrators now. Cooley and McNamara will attend the opening reception and show new plein air landscapes which they will produce while visiting the Tryon area. Cooley now resides in Atlanta, Ga. and has produced illustrations for books, magazines and Broadway posters. His work has appeared in numerous illustration publications. Although he primarily creates his illustrations digitally now, Gary enjoys painting traditionally with oils. His work includes landscapes, farm scenes and a portrait series of jazz and blues musicians, including Muddy Waters, Nina Simone and Sam Cooke. Cooley also shows his humor and has painted a series of vintage toy space guns floating in mid air. McNamara splits his time between New York and Detroit, painting full time after being a professional illustrator for more than a decade. McNamara paints from life on the streets and captures the flavor of wherever he is on canvas. He painted emotional pieces during the aftermath of 9/11 and is a featured artist at the 9/11 Memorial Museum. A short film documentary by Martin J. Spinelli, “New York Canvas - The Art of Michael McNamara,” shows McNamara at work in the streets of the city. “Much of my work explores the complexities of the urban

“Chrysler Sunrise,” by Michael McNamara. (photo submitted by Kim Nelson)

“Muddy Waters,” by Gary Cooley. (photo submitted by Kim Nelson)

environment, both graphically through the geometric relationships of an intricate man-made infrastructure, and emotionally by depicting the effects and conditions which this environment creates for the community,” McNamara said. “Using color and value to establish the emotional impact of the subject, I emphasize the repetition of form and overlapping planes to create rhythm and space. It is a sense

of spiritual content which binds it all together by revealing the struggle, as well as the beauty, which exists all around us, yet so often remains unnoticed.” Skyuka Fine Art is located in downtown Tryon at 133 N. Trade St. Visit www.skyukafineart.com, call 828-817-3783 or email info@skyukafineart. com for more information. - article submitted by Kim Nelson


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Some members of the Hunting Country! Team pose for a photo during the Pacolet Area Conservancy’s 2011 PACWalk for Preservation. (photo submitted by Carole Bartol)

Hunting Country supports PACWalk May 5 The Hunting Country (HC) Association board is again supporting the Pacolet Area Conservancy’s PACWalk for Preservation. All Hunting Country residents are encouraged to join the HC Team and participate in the 10 a.m. walk on May 5. Registration at Tryon Estates begins at 9 a.m., with the walk starting at 10 a.m. PACWalk can be enjoyed by people of all ages. Last year, the HC! Team was recognized as one the largest teams in the walk and HC association organizers said they hope to have many residents participate this year. The Hunting Country newsletter will go out to Hunting Country residents the last week of April and a registration form will be enclosed. Residents can fill out the form or register at Tryon Estates May 5 and then join the HC! Team. The Rotary Club of Tryon, Kiwanis, SOS and Unitarian Universalists are some of the other teams that have participated in previous years. If you would like more information about forming a team or participating

as an individual, call the Pacolet Area Conservancy office at 828859-5060.

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Tryon Daily Bulletin  /  The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Friday, April 20, 2012

Medical alert devices that can help keep seniors safe Dear Savvy Senior I’m interested in getting my mother, who lives alone, a medical alert device with a wearable SOS button that she can push in case she falls or needs help. What kinds of devices can you recommend and how much do they cost? ~ Searching Daughter Dear Searching, There’s a wide variety of medical alert systems on the market today that can help keep elderly seniors safe, while living in their own home. Here’s a breakdown of some different styles and prices to help you choose. Monitored Alerts The most popular medical alert systems available today are the ones that will connect your mom to a 24-hour emergency monitoring service when she needs help. These units come with waterproof “SOS” buttons – typically in the form of a necklace pendent or bracelet – and a base station that connects to her home phone line. At the press of a button, your mom could call and talk to a trained operator through the system’s base station receiver which works like a powerful speaker phone. The operator will find out what’s wrong, and will notify family members, a neighbor, friend or emergency services as needed. If you’re interested in this type of alert, there are literally dozens of services to choose from. One of the most widely used is the Philips Lifeline Medical Alert Service (lifelinesys.com, 800-380-3111) which costs $35 per month, plus an $82 start-up fee. Phillips also offers a new Auto Alert option (for $48 per month) that has fall detection sensors in the SOS button that

Savvy Senior can automatically summon help without your mom ever having to press a button. Some other major players in the industry that are a little less expensive (under $30 per month) include: LifeFone (lifefone.com, 877-849-8942), LifeStation (lifestation.com, 877-478-3390), Bay Alarm Medical (bayalarmmedical.com, 877-722-9633), Alert1 (alert-1.com, 888-919-3692), LifeGuardian (lifeguardianmedicalalarms.com, 800-378-2957) and MedicalAlert (medicalalert. com, 800-800-2537). One other unique product worth consideration is the MediPendant (getmedipendant.com, 888-216-0039) which runs under $35 a month. This system allows your mom to speak and listen to the operator directly through the SOS pendant, versus the base station speaker phone, which often makes for easier communication. No-Fee Alerts If you’re looking for a cheaper option, consider a no-fee medical alert device that doesn’t have professional monitoring services. These products, which also come with an “SOS” button and a home base station, are pre-programmed to dial personal contacts (relatives, friends, caregivers or 911) if the SOS button is pushed. Most devices store about four phone numbers, and the system dials each number, one-by-one until a connection is made. If you like this style, the Freedom Alert made by LogicMark (logicmark.com, 800-519-2419) is a good product that allows you to speak through the pendent. The

purchase price: $300, with no ongoing monthly fees. Also check out Telemergency (telemergencysystems.com, 888-558-7420), which offers a variety on no-fee medical alert devices that cost under $190. Mobile Alerts If your mom is interested in a device that works outside the home too, there are several mobile products that will let her call for help anywhere. These pendent-style devices, which fit in the palm of your hand, work like little cell phones with GPS tracking capabilities. To call for help, your mom would simply push one button, and an operator from the device’s emergency monitoring service would be on the line to assist her. And because of the GPS technology they would know her exact location, which is critical in emergency situations. Top products to check out in this category include the new 5Star Urgent Response sold by GreatCall (greatcall.com, 800733-6632) for $50 plus a $35 activation fee and $15 monthly service fees, and MobileHelp (mobilehelpnow.com, 800-8001710), which runs between $37 and $42 per month. You also need to know that Medicare and most other insurance plans don’t cover medical alert systems, although in some states Medicaid will if your mom receives Medicaid-funded homecare services. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Spartanburg Humane Society presents home school program The Spartanburg Humane Society will be at the Landrum Library on Thursday, April 26 at 2 p.m. for a home school program.

Ingrid Norris will bring a furry friend and present a program about pets. Children may bring a roll of paper towels to donate to the

S.H.S. For more information, call 864-457-2218. – article submitted by Nancy Caldwell


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A23 Friday, April 20, 2012

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and more! Students recognized at Terrific Kid of the Year luncheon The Kiwanis Club of Spartanburg and Boiling Springs held its annual Terrific Kid of the Year Luncheon on Thursday, April 12. Among the 52 students recognized were Gracie Valentine of

• Calendar (continued from page 2)

Polk County Transportation Authority makes a regular trip to Hendersonville on the first and third Tuesday of each month. 828894-8203. Hospice of the Carolina Foothills, “We Care” is a weekly informal social group open to women coping with loss. The group meets at 9 a.m. at TJ’s Cafe in Tryon and is open to newcomers. For more information, contact Shannon Slater at 828-894-7000, 800-617-7132 or sslater@hocf.org. 9:30am The Meeting Place Senior Center, Tuesday activities include ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; art class, 10 a.m.; bingo or movie, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. American Legion Auxiliary

Campobello-Gramling School and Isaiah Adderholdt of O. P. Earle Elementary. Geoff Hart from WYFF News 4 was the guest speaker. The students were presented with an engraved plaque, a T-shirt, a

Saturdays certificate for a free meal courtesy of Zaxby’s, and aa.m. letter of con8-11:30 gratulations from South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley. Polk Tailgate Market – article Columbus submitted by Paula Brooks

1x1.5 a.m. Open to meets on Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the Tuesday 5/23, at f 10:30 ends 11/21 American Legion Hall in Tryon. House of Flags Museum, open Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum, open Tuesdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Landrum Library, Book Discussion Group, 4th Tuesday every month, 10:30 a.m. at the library. 864-457-2218. LIFECare of Polk County/ Adult Day Health Care provides services Monday - Friday. Pet therapy is scheduled every Tuesday. An opportunity for participants to interact with a trained pet therapy dog in a safe and meaningful environment. Call 828-894-2007 for more info. Polk County Library will have preschool story time every

all area children and caregivers. Tuesday, April 24 will be an Earth Day storytime. Green Creek Community Center, Zumba exercise class, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., in gym. Cracker Barrel, 1 p.m. Tuesdays, conference room, Congregational Church. PCHS JV softball at Owen, 4 p.m. PCHS JV/V baseball at Owen, 4 p.m. PCHS V. softball at Owen, 4 p.m. Please submit Curb Reporter items in writing at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number of a contact person. Items will be printed in order by date of event, as space allows.

Lee C. Mulligan, Esq. Is there a way I can tell my children?

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1x1 children some personal things outside of my estate plan? 5/2 A. Yes, we have had clients 6/2 be very creative in the ways they choose to communicate with their loved ones after they are gone. My own uncle left a very touching and inspirational0tfn5fri letter to - inDD each of his sons. I have had clients leave detailed letters outlining their wishes for future generations, their values and philosophy of life. Several have even videotaped their messages to children and grandchildren. Many of these messages have been quite well done and much appreciated by the recipients. Call (828) 696 1811 for info on legal planning techniques.

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This year the ride will start at 7 a.m. to take advantage of cooler morning temperatures and will also feature healthier fare for lunch afterwards. All proceeds go to raise funds for the Rotary Club of Tryon’s Gift of Life program. For more information about the ride or how to become a sponsor, visit www.fabulous4thbiketour. org. – article submitted by Katie Malone

this ad with a mailing label. Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin.

The Fabulous 4th Bike Tour will take place on Wednesday, July 4, starting from Harmon Field in Tryon. The ride this year is organized by the Rotary Club of Tryon and is under the direction of Katie Malone. Malone is a local resident who has been involved in endurance sports her entire life and has made it her career to coach triathletes,

runners and cyclists as well as organize events. She said she hopes to grow the Fabulous 4th event by encouraging intermediate and beginner riders to take part in the new, shorter route of 34 miles. More experienced riders can still ride the popular 67-mile route through Hunting Country, up the Greenville Watershed and down the Saluda Grade. Malone said she believes that including all ability levels gives the Fabulous 4th bike tour something for everyone.

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Malone directs Fabulous 4th Bike Tour this year

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Riders in a previous Fabulous 4th Bike Tour. (photo by Chris Bartol Photography)

Friday, April 20, 2012

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66th Block House Steeplechase

Frisday, April 20, 2012


66th Block House Steeplechase

Friday, April 20, 2012

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66th Block House Steeplechase

Frisday, April 20, 2012

Glance back to 2011 Block House Steeplechase

Those attending the 65th annual Block House Steeplechase, last year, relished beautiful weather and a unique time with family, friends and fellow horse racing enthusiasts. There were stick pony races, hat contests, tailgating contests, heaps of delicious food and drinks to be served. Then there was, of course, the competition with local amateur racers and seasoned veterans. (photos by Samantha Hurst and Fulton Hampton)


Friday, April 20, 2012

66th Block House Steeplechase

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66th Block House Steeplechase

Frisday, April 20, 2012

66 th Block House Steeplechase

In memory of Gerry Helder

This year’s 66th running of the Block House Steeplechase is dedicated to the memory of the late Gerald Helder who, for two generations of race fans, was the official “Voice of Tryon” as the announcer who called the card each spring for 47 years. Helder, who passed away in June of last year, had attended the races every year even after he retired from his announcing career in 1994. It was a career that began quite by accident with the very first Block House Steeplechase organized by Carter P. Brown and held on April 5, 1947. Helder – like Carter Brown a native of Holland, Michigan – was working at Brown’s Pine Crest Inn that spring and agreed to his employer’s suggestion to act as the host for the radio announcer from Spartanburg who’d been assigned to call the three races on that first card. “Mr. Brown had asked me to take the sports reporter from WSPA to lunch, so I could bring him up to speed on the horses and jockeys who’d be running,” Helder once recalled. After lunch, Helder led the reporter up onto the roof of the Block House, overlooking the original racecourse on Blockhouse Road, where a platform had been erected for officials.

“Gerry never missed a Block House race, so I’m sure his spirit will still be there when the starter’s flag goes up for the first race this year.” -- Charles Lingerfelt

“But when the horses started coming out of the paddock,” Helder went on, “the man froze up and forgot everything I’d told him. Next thing I knew, he handed me the microphone.” Helder did such a fine job that he returned for the job every year afterward. But Helder’s participation in the races wasn’t limited to announcing. He and his brother Jimmy were among the riders in the steeplechase’s race over timber for several years, as both men were enthusiastic horsemen. Nor was his announcing limited to the Block House Steeplechase. Helder frequently announced at equestrian events in and around Tryon, including the Tryon Riding & Hunt Club’s annual spring horse show at Harmon Field and at hunter trials held at Fairview Farms during the mid-1970s. “Gerry was a fixture of the races for

Gerry Helder

so many years, it’s hard to realize he’s gone,” said TRHC President Charles Lingerfelt. “Gerry never missed a Block House race, so I’m sure his spirit will still be there when the starter’s flag goes up for the first race this year.” – article submitted by Laura Weicker


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Anxiously awaiting Block House Steeplechase’s big move The question on many minds this year is “when will the Block House move to the Green Creek Equestrian Park?” To this point, progress has been hindered by the lack of growth of grass on the steeplechase track. The good news is there is now a beautiful stand of grass rapidly coming up. Having appropriate footing on this new surface is imperative to the future success of races. Owners and trainers are understandably concerned with any conditions that may affect their animals. Therefore, the Tryon Riding & Hunt Club is making every effort to ensure the state of the track is close to perfection as possible before the inaugural race. “We don’t want to make a rush judgment to move the Block House and not have things right the first time,” said TR&HC President Charles Lingerfelt. The safety inspector for the National Steeplechase Association inspected the course while here to check the track at FENCE. His opinion and that of the owners, riders and trainers visiting during the 2012 Block House will decide whether the races will move in 2013. A decision will be made in early summer. Members of the Tryon Riding & Hunt Club will be given the first tour of GCEP to let them preview the potential parking layout and to choose their new parking spaces.

Riders enjoy “A Day in the Country” at the Green Creek Equestrian Park in October 2011. (photo submitted)

“As with the current facility, spaces will be assigned based on seniority, which is determined by the number of TR&HC membership years added to the

number of years of Block House attendance,” said TR&HC Assistant Director Jen Hicks.

– article submitted by Laura Weicker


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Conway wins poster contest The Tryon Riding & Hunt Club held a contest, open to both professional and amateur artists, to find artwork for the 66th running of the Block House Steeplechase. “Reaching a decision is never easy, especially when the submissions are great and this year is no exception,” contest judges said. “Many worthy options were considered and the committee had a hard time narrowing it down.” The grand prize winner of a finish line box is Anthony Conway of Greenville, S.C. His original artwork will be featured on the Block House poster, program and adult T-shirts. Two other entries didn’t escape notice. Alice Feagan’s design has been selected to appear on the children’s T-shirts. In addition, artwork by Samantha Kincaid, an Isothermal Community College student,

will be on the front of every shirt. Conway graduated from the New York Parsons School of Design and trained with David Leffel at Manhattan’s Art Students League. Conway first gained international recognition for his artworks of the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Since then, Conway has been in high demand for his portraiture, landscape, figurative, equine and Americana subjects. Feagan is a freelance illustrator and native of Polk County. She works both traditionally and digitally in the medium of cut paper. Feagan has illustrated for the book, magazine, advertising and packaging markets. Samantha Kincaid of Kings Mountain, N.C. is a student at Isothermal Community College. – article submitted by Laura Weicker

Artwork for kids’ T-shirts designed by Alice Feagan.


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Block House Steeplechase schedule of events

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Steeplechase hat contest brings out creativity

The annual hat contest, this year sponsored by Play It Again Sports, will be held at 11:30 a.m. in the paddock at the Judge’s Tower. Categories for both adults will include funniest, most unusual and most appropriate, while children (12-under) categories will include most unusual and most appropriate. (photo by Samantha Hurst)


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Be jockey of your own stick horse or tailgating affair

Greenville Foothills Pony Club members are anxious to get your child, or you, saddled up with a stick horse for the second running of the Block House Stick Horse Races. Starting at 3:30 p.m., the event will include five divisions. Division one, sponsored by Little Mountain Farm Supply, will feature 6 and under; division two, sponsored by Premier Equine Insurance, for 7-11-year-olds; division 3, sponsored by “See” Horse Trailer Repair, for 12-18-year-olds; division four, sponsored by Greenville Foothills Pony Club, for three-legged couples; and division five, sponsored by Stone Soup, for adults in silly hats. Bring your own stick horse or purchase one beore the event. Judging for the tailgate contest will take place from 11-11:30 a.m. Categories include most unusual, best country tailgate, most elegant and judge’s pick. (photos by Samantha Hurst)


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Who do you like in the

$25,000 Glassy Mountain Farm Block House?

Flight Movie. 2006 dk. b. or br. g., Touch ‘n’ Fly--Fritzie’s Michelle, by Skip Away. Owner: Marilyn S. Ketts. Trainer: Lilith Boucher. Jockey: Richard Boucher. 2012 record: 1-1-0-0, $15,000. 2011 NSA record: 1-1-0-0, $6,000. 9-2 odds. Unbeaten over hurdles. Scored front-running win in $25,000 Celebrate Aiken allowance race on March 24 after maiden claiming win at Foxfield Fall in October. Block House will be class test. Cuse. 2001 gr. or ro. g., Wekiva Springs--Cayman Queen, by *Recupere. Owner-trainer: Karen M. Gray. Jockey: Gus Dahl. 2012 record: 1-1-0-0, $12,000. 2011 record: 10-3-0-0, $37,500. 5-1 odds. Veteran campaigner began 2012 with front-running score in Sandhills Cup at Stoneybrook Steeplechase in North Carolina on April 7. Won an open allowance race at the Steeplechase at Callaway in Georgia on Nov. 5 but showed nothing in starter allowance at the Colonial Cup two weeks later. Inti (Uru). 2005 gr. or ro. g., Dubai Dust--Rigolina, by Ritz. Owner: Meritage Racing. Trainer: Cyril Murphy. Jockey: Roddy Mackenzie. 2011 record: 5-1-2-1, $13,800. 15-1 odds. Had a respectable debut season with a maiden victory at the International Gold Cup and a good second in the Montpelier Cup, an optional allowance at the Montpelier Races on Nov. 5. Class Brahms. 2008 b. g., Brahms--Class Babe, by Class Secret. Owner: Mede Cahaba Stable. Trainer: Lilith Boucher. Jockey: Richard Boucher. 2012 record: 1-1-0-0, $6,000. 2011 record: 5-1-0-0, $10,015. 10-1 odds. Mede Cahaba homebred won 2012 debut in $10,000 CenturyLink claiming hurdle at Stoneybrook Races in Raeford, N.C., on April 7. Won maiden victory at Virginia Fall Steeplechase on Oct. 2 before fourthplace finishes in the Gladstone Stakes at Far Hills, N.J., and the Raymond G. Woolfe Memorial at the Colonial Cup behind 3-year-old champion Wanganui. Divine Fortune. 2003 ch. g., Royal Anthem--My Tombola, by Northern Fling. Owner: William Pape. Trainer: Jonathan Shep-

Competitors head down the last stretch at one of the many races at the 2011 Block House Steeplechase event. (photo by Samantha Hurst)

pard. Jockey: Brian Crowley. 2011 record: 4-1-1-0, $64,000. 4-5 odds. Won A. P. Smithwick (Gr. 2) for second straight year and then was disqualified from fourth to sixth in Saratoga’s New York Turf Writers Cup Handicap (Gr. 1) for bumping incident. Finished good second in the Colonial Cup (Gr. 1) after losing jockey in Grand National. – article submitted by Don Clippinger


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FIRST RACE THE WELLS FARGO PURSE $15,000. HURDLE. FOR MAIDENS, FOUR YEARS OLD AND UPWARD. Four-year-olds, 142 lbs.; older, 154 lbs. Two Miles and Three Furlongs over National Fences.

OWNER

1 2 3 4 5 6

Irvin S. Naylor Green, yellow and white yoke, yellow cap.

TRAINER JOCKEY Brianne Slater

MEMORIAL MANIAC [L]

154

ROYALE [L]

154

Willie McCarthy

BRUNO FRIGERIO [L]

142

Brian Crowley

b. g. 7, Lear Fan-Enlightening by Cozzene 2012 1 0 1 0 $2,700 2011 2 0 0 1 $3,750 Magalen O. Bryant Arch Kingsley, Jr. Light blue, dark blue sash, light and dark blue halved sleeves, dark blue cap. b. g. 6, Kingmambo-Diane Suzanne by Compliance 2012 2 0 1 0 $1,800 2011 1 0 0 0 $0 Julie Braswell Jonathan Sheppard Peach, gray sash, gray hoop on sleeves, peach cap. dk.b/br. g. 4, Agnes Gold-Tanskin by Island Whirl 2011 1 0 0 1

$2,500

Karen M. Gray Owner Grey, pink cross sashes, pink hoops on sleeves, grey and pink cap.

DANCE RAVEN DANCE [L]

134

Gustav Dahl

ALMARMOOQ [L]

154

Roddy Mackenzie

WINDSOR COURT [L]

142

Richard Boucher

dk.b/br. f. 4, Dance With Ravens-Buttenwood by Woodman 2012 0 0 0 0 $0 2011 0 0 0 0 $0 Irvin S. Naylor Katherine S. Neilson Green, yellow and white yoke, yellow cap. dk.b/br. g. 5, Dynaformer-Tuscoga by Theatrical 2012 1 0 0 0 $0 2011 4 0 0 2 $3,850 Why Not Stable Lilith Boucher Red, black circle, black "W," black chevrons on sleeves, black cap. b. g. 4, Domestic Dispute-Windedawler by Sovereign Dancer 2011 0 0 0 0 $0

Information appearing with the horse's name indicates records of Starts, Wins, Seconds, Thirds and Money Earned in Steeplechase races only.


TFAC81_QtrPg_TDB_r3:Layout 1

66th Block House Steeplechase

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SECOND RACE THE CANNON HARMON MEMORIAL

3/16/12

1:38 PM

Page 1 page

TRYON F I N E ARTS C E NTE R PRE S E NTS

PURSE $10,000. HURDLE. FOR MAIDENS, FOUR YEARS OLD AND UPWARD. Four-year-olds, 144 lbs.; older, 156 lbs. Claiming price $15,000. For each $1,000 to $10,000, allowed 2 lbs. Two Miles and Three Furlongs over National Fences.

OWNER

1 2 3 4 5

TRAINER JOCKEY

Marilyn S. Ketts Lilith Boucher Gold, blue diamond frame, blue hoops on sleeves, gold and blue cap.

AMERICAN CROSSING [L]

138

b. m. 5, Regal American-Miss Naomi by Marine Brass 2012 2 0 0 1 $1,000 2011 1 0 0 0 $400 Karen M. Gray Owner Grey, pink cross sashes, pink hoops on sleeves, grey and pink cap.

RUN UP THE SCORE [L]

*141

gr. g. 6, Even The Score-Eve's Valentine by Deerhound

Richard Boucher $10,000

SUMO POWER

156

dk.b/br. g. 6, Dynaformer-Connie's Spirit by Theatrical 2012 2 0 1 0 $1,800 2011 8 0 1 0 $7,550 Rafael A Fernandez LLC Rafael A. Fernandez White, purple and black ball, white cap.

PRIMERO PERU

146

dk.b/br. h. 7, Weekend Cruise-Eva's Baby by Theatre Critic 2012 1 0 0 0 $450 2011 4 0 2 1 $5,500 PenWood Jumpers Brianne Slater Robin's egg blue, white diamond with hunter green PWJ, white cap.

MISTER DEAN [L]

Mark Watts $15,000

Roddy Mackenzie $10,000

156

dk.b/br. g. 5, Devil His Due-Royal Ring Dancer by Chief's Crown 2012 1 0 0 0 $0

Garden Tours

Saturday, 9am - 5pm (raindate 5/13)

Garden & Art Bazaar

Saturday, 9am - 5pm, downtown Landrum & Tryon

“A Tale of Two Gardens” presented by Sally Spangler Barnett Art & Sculpture Exhibit and Reception Sunday, 4-6pm, Tryon Fine Arts Center

Tickets: $20

Gustav Dahl $10,000

Manown Kisor Jr. Michael Berryman Royal blue, white hoops, royal blue cap.

MAY 12 - 13, 2012

$15,000

Information appearing with the horse's name indicates records of Starts, Wins, Seconds, Thirds and Money Earned in Steeplechase races only.

Call TFAC at 828-859-8322 or visit art-in-bloom.org

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66th Block House Steeplechase

Think

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THIRD RACE THE GREEN CREEK EQUESTRIAN PARK PURSE $10,000. HURDLE. FOR FOUR-YEAR-OLDS AND UPWARD WHICH HAVE NEVER WON TWO RACES. Four-year-olds, 146 lbs.; older, 158 lbs. Claiming price $15,000. For each $2,500 to $10,000, allowed 3 lbs. Non-winners in 2012, allowed 4 lbs.; since September 1, 8 lbs.; in 2011-2012, 12 lbs.

The clean you expect. The service you deserve.

Two Miles and Three Furlongs over National Fences.

ServiceMaster of Polk County

OWNER

828-859-7046 Carpet Cleaning

3 Areas + Hall $87 00 4 Areas + Hall $11600

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Not valid with any other offer. Present this coupon at time of service. One area equals up to 250 sq. ft. Residential only. Area rugs may carry additional charge. Moving of furniture may incur additional charge. Expires May 30, 2012.

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Sofa & Loveseat (or Chair) Cleaning – $11000 Additional charges for sofas over 7ft. and dry cleaning. Ottomans are additional $15.00. Expires May 30, 2012.

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2 3 4 5

TRAINER JOCKEY

Michael L. Leaf Owner Royal blue, white diamond with "CLE", royal blue sleeves, white diamond hoop, royal cap.

DURER [L]

152

dk.b/br. g. 5, Smart Strike-Broad Expectations by Broad Brush 2012 1 1 0 0 $6,000 2011 4 0 0 2 $2,750 Debra E. Kachel Ricky Hendriks Red, white circle with "K", white hoops on sleeves, white cap.

EMBEZZLE (GB) [L]

146

b. g. 4, Sadler's Wells-Trick by Shirley Heights 2012 1 1 0 0 $6,000 2011 0 0 0 0 $0 Armata Stables Katherine S. Neilson Cherry and old gold halves, cherry sleeves, old gold cap.

EMBARRASSED [L]

dk.b/br. g. 7, Flatter-Stormy Blast by Kayrawan 2011 10 1 1 2 2010 9 0 0 1 Michael Berryman Forest green, white hoops, white cap.

JOHANN STAR

144

$10,400 $4,775 Owner

140

dk.b/br. g. 8, Johannesburg-Surina Star by Pleasant Colony 2012 1 0 0 0 $0 2011 2 0 0 0 $0 Dominick Falini Leslie F. Young Royal blue, white hoop, white sleeves, royal blue and white cap.

BLACK BAG [L]

Richard Boucher $10,000

Brian Crowley $15,000

Roddy Mackenzie $10,000

Mark Watts $10,000

154

dk.b/br. g. 6, Black Minnaloushe-Dyna Mae by Dynaformer 2011 2 1 0 0 $3,900

$15,000

Information appearing with the horse's name indicates records of Starts, Wins, Seconds, Thirds and Money Earned in Steeplechase races only.


66th Block House Steeplechase

Friday, April 20, 2012

FOURTH RACE THE GLASSY MOUNTAIN FARM BLOCK HOUSE PURSE $25,000. HURDLE. FOR FOUR-YEAR-OLDS AND UPWARD WHICH HAVE NOT WON $15,000 TWICE IN 2011-2012, OTHER THAN MAIDEN, CLAIMING OR STARTER. Four-year-olds, 144 lbs.; older, 158 lbs. Nonwinners of $15,000 twice at any time, allowed 4 lbs.; of two races in 2011-2012, 8 lbs.; of a race in 2011-2012, 12 lbs. (Maiden and claiming races not considered.) Two Miles and One Half over National Fences.

OWNER

1 2 3 4 5

TRAINER JOCKEY

Marilyn S. Ketts Lilith Boucher Gold, blue diamond frame, blue hoops on sleeves, gold and blue cap.

FLIGHT MOVIE [L]

150

dk.b/br. g. 6, Touch 'n' Fly-Fritzi's Michelle by Skip Away 2012 1 1 0 0 $15,000 2010 1 1 0 0 $6,000 Karen M. Gray Owner Grey, pink cross sashes, pink hoops on sleeves, grey and pink cap.

Richard Boucher

*149

INTI (URU) [L]

146

Roddy Mackenzie

CLASS BRAHMS

132

Richard Boucher

DIVINE FORTUNE [L]

158

Brian Crowley

gr. g. 7, Dubai Dust-Rigolina by Ritz 2011 5 1 2 1 $17,400 2010 0 0 0 0 $0 Mede Cahaba Stable LLC Lilith Boucher Emerald green, white insignia, white hoops on navy sleeves, green, blue and white cap. b. g. 4, Brahms-Class Babe by Class Secret 2012 1 1 0 0 $6,000 2011 3 1 0 0 $8,500 William L. Pape Jonathan Sheppard Skipper blue, white diamond braces, blue cap. ch. g. 9, Royal Anthem-My Tombola by Northern Fling 2011 4 1 1 0 $64,000 2010 6 2 1 1 $86,000

Gustav Dahl

Information appearing with the horse's name indicates records of Starts, Wins, Seconds, Thirds and Money Earned in Steeplechase races only.

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66th Annual

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CUSE [L]

gr. g. 11, Wekiva Springs-Cayman Queen by Recupere 2012 1 1 0 0 $12,000 2011 10 3 0 0 $37,500 Meritage Racing LLC Cyril Murphy Pink, black inverted chevron, black sleeves, pink cap.

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66th Block House Steeplechase

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Frisday, April 20, 2012

Divine Fortune returns in Block House race Bill Pape’s Divine Fortune, a multiple graded stakes winner, launches his 2012 season in the $25,000 Glassy Mountain Farm Block House, feature race of the 66th annual Block House Races in Tryon. First post time for the four-race program is 2 p.m. Trained by Racing Hall of Fame trainer Jonathan Sheppard, Divine Fortune will begin his new season in a challenging spot in the 2 1/2-mile Block House against three challengers who already have won this year. Divine Fortune is the standout of the field with victories in the A. P. Smithwick (Gr. 2) at Saratoga Race Course the past two years. The nine-year-old Royal Academy gelding also finished second in last fall’s $100,000 Marion duPont Scott Colonial Cup (Gr. 1). Bred by Sheppard and Pape, Divine Fortune was the Pennsylvania-bred steeplechase champion in 2011. Brian Crowley will ride. Trainer Lilith Boucher entered two 2012 winners, Marilyn S. Ketts’ Flight Movie and Mede Cahaba Stable’s Class Brahms. Undefeated in two starts over hurdles, Flight Movie kicked off the season with a 7 1/2-length victory in the $25,000 Celebrate

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Aiken allowance race at the Aiken Spring Races in South Carolina on March 24. Class Brahms, a four-year-old Mede Cahaba homebred, began his new season with an 8 3/4-length score in the $10,000 CenturyLink Hurdle claiming race at the Stoneybrook Steeplechase in Raeford, N.C., on April 7. Stoneybrook’s feature race, the $20,000 Sandhills Cup, was won by owner-trainer Karen M. Gray’s Cuse, who will seek his second 2012 victory in the Block House. The veteran campaigner set the Sandhills Cup’s pace and won by a half-length. Gus Dahl again has the riding assignment on Cuse. Completing the field is Meritage Racing’s Inti, a Uruguay-bred that has shown racing talent over fences. Trained by Cyril Murphy, Inti won his maiden victory at the International Gold Cup in Virginia last October and then was a good second in the Montpelier Cup optional allowance hurdle. Roddy Mackenzie will be in the saddle. – article submitted by Don Clippinger


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Jockey Richard Boucher seeks success again at steeplechase Jockey Richard Boucher of Camden, S.C. returns to the Block House Steeplechase races this year to see if he can again claim the top prize. Boucher won the big race in 2010 and said even after several decades of steeplechase racing, he never gets enough. “There’s nothing better than galloping along with a horse into a fence and knowing that he’s going to sail it with no problem,” Boucher said of his love for steeplechases. “I think its an achievement for the horse and the rider to win a steeple because there are a lot of little things that can happen within a race that can change your performance. In the end it’s all about having a great partnership with your horse – if you have that you can go a long way.” Boucher and wife, Lillith, of Mede Cahaba Stables have entered three horses overall in Saturday’s races. These horses include a young filly American Crossing that will experience its third start over hurdles. Another of their horses will be making his first steeplechase start. Boucher said they’re hoping to see how he does with timing his jumps and galloping. And finally, Flight Movie, a horse that won last month in Aiken and has run twice over hurdles will likely be Boucher’s choice ride for the BlockHouse feature race. Boucher is looking for a strong season after a back injury last October at Morven Park cut his season short. His record was 289-7-3, $162,700. He said he took the winter to heal and is feeling great this year with two wins out of 10 races so far.

Boucher has been riding in America for about 20 years Steeplechasing, plus several years before that in England. He usually competes in between 40-60 races a year over hurdles and in the summertime rides about 100 flat races. Boucher said the Block House track feels more of a traditional a quarter of a mile longer than many of the newer tracks, meaning jockeys need to help their horses along that last turn toward the finish line. “The race course [Block House Steeplechase] I think is a fair course and an honest steeplechase course,” Boucher said. “Flat tracks deal with a horse with more speed but tracks like Tryon bring out the real steeplechase character where you have the up and down hills and it might be for a more versatile horse.” Boucher said he and his family always enjoy returning to the Tryon area for Steeplechase each year. “We’ve had some good times there. Our horses seem to do quite well there and it’s always a friendly atmosphere with an enthusiastic crowd,” he said. – article by Samantha Hurst


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66th Block House Steeplechase

Meet your pony race riders Kathryn Karns Kathryn Karns is currently a sophomore at Clemson University majoring in marketing. At school she is involved in the Clemson Sports Car Club, but riding is still an important part of her life. Karns has been riding for almost 15 years, competing in most English disciplines with mounted games being her favorite. She has also been a member of the Greenville Foothills Pony Club for many years. She competed across the East Coast and in 2008 went to Australia as a member of the United States Pony Club International Mounted Games Team. This will be her first time riding in a pony race and she said she is excited to be able to have this

new experience.

Samantha Haase Samantha Haase is in eighth grade at Polk C o u n t y M i d d l e School. She is a member of River Valley Pony Club. She has been riding her Welsh/Arab pony, Murphy, for several years.  

LeeAnn Harmon LeeAnn Harmon, 23, of Ellenboro, N.C. works as a vet tech at Foothills A n i m a l Clinic in

Forest City, N.C. She has ridden horses all of her life thanks to her parents Roger and Nancy. She grew up competing in the Blue Ridge Hunter Jumper Association and in USPC. In 2000 she started playing mounted games and became a member of MGA. “Mounted games have given me so many opportunities to represent the United States in competitions all over the world,” Harmon said. This was the second year Harmon has raced in the local race at the Steeplechase. Harmon said she has found it a fun new way to keep her up-and-coming games ponies in shape.

Will Zuschlag Will Zuschlag, a 14-yearold from Greenville, has been riding for three years. Zuschlag is an active member of

Frisday, April 20, 2012

the Greenville Foothills Pony Club and is homeschooled. He enjoys dressage, jumping and fox hunting.

Keileigh McMurray Horses have always been an important part of Keileigh McMurray’s life. The 14-year-old has grown up on Clover Hill Farm in Green Creek. She is an eighthgrade student at Polk County Middle School. “I thought I would have to wait till I was 18 before I could race in the Steeplechase, but I was so excited when I heard they were having a race for kids 13 and over,” McMurray said. “I was not about to miss a chance to race.” McMurray’s pony for the race is DazzlinDaze, a 10-year-old Arabian. McMurray said the pony is very smart and athletic.


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Value of true sportsmanship Editor’s note: This article was written by Austin Brown, son of famed Carter Brown, in 1968. A copy of the article was given to Mr. James Payne of Tryon, who shared it with the Bulletin and asked that it be published in this year’s Steeplechase edition. By Austin A. Brown (1968)

What is a true sportsman? To me it is a person who supports or participates in a sport purely for the love of the game and not for material gains or self- aggrandisement. Who has had the privilege of knowing such a person? I have. The person? My father, Carter P. Brown. At age 75 his record of sportsmanship and love of the game stands untarnished, and is and always has been an inspiration to me. His game? Foxhunting and steeplechasing. He participated as an amateur jockey, and rode in the first Carolina Cup held at Camden, S.C. He also founded the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club, and put together a pack of fox hounds for the club which he hunted himself. He developed more than 500 miles of riding trails through the beautiful countryside around Tryon. He started the now famous Tryon Horse and Hound Show, the Hunter Trails, the spectacular Joint Hunter Trails in which different hunts from throughout the south came to Tryon to compete against each other. In 1947, however, he founded what was his true love, the Block House Steeplechase. From the time of my earliest recollection, his love of fox hunting and steeplechasing was unquestionable. My older brother Carter and I were each taken for our first horseback ride when we reached the

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ripe old age of two weeks. I might hasten to add that these rides are a matter of record and not a matter of memory on the part of Carter and me. For the record, a photograph of each of these rides was taken, and they show my father on his horse with his son sitting in front of him in the saddle. I am told that no photograph was taken of our nervous mother! From that time on, horses and riding were to become of major importance in our lives. Both my brother and I were given our own ponies when we reached the age of 3. At age 4 we rode in our first horse show. At 7, dad taught us to jump, and at 8 he took us fox hunting. Although our ages were five years apart, my brother and I were both brought along on the same schedule in regard to what we did at that age. When I was about 9, my father decided we should have the Brown Family Point- To- Point. This was a race in which my father, my brother and I would ride. The prize - a tin cup! It was cross-country with each rider riding a different measured course from a different starting point to a mutual finishing point. We each synchronized our watches before going to our respective starting points, and then started at a specified time. The first couple of years of the race, a “babysitter” was sent along with me to make sure I got home in one piece. The excitement and competition of that race among the three of us was fantastic. None of us could have been more “up” for it if it had been the Kentucky Derby. There was no way for me to go to sleep the night before the Brown Point- to- Point! The race was run every year until the war came along and Carter went into the U.S. Air Force. It was run for the last time in 1946, but not as a point- to – point, but as a race within a race, so to speak. We shipped our three horses (Continued on page 30)


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Letter to the Editor

Feeding stall closing at FENCE We would like to take this opportunity to show our appreciation to the community for supporting the Feeding Stall at FENCE for the past seven years.  We enjoyed meeting new

66th Block House Steeplechase people and seeing familiar faces at all horse shows and other events that took place there.  As we are getting older we realize that time is very precious and we want to take this time to explore and enjoy this beautiful area of North Carolina. We are grateful for all your kind words, suggestions, and presence. We wish the new concession owners good luck; we know they will like meeting you as much as we did. – Kate and Troy Norman

Frisday, April 20, 2012

• Sportsmanship (

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to Nashville, Tenn.and entered them in a 2-mile steeplechase. There were about six other horses in that race, and a beautiful silver cup was to go to the winner. However, in a way, the Brown boys were more interested in winning the Brown tin cup. I got lucky and won the race and the two cups. Poor dad took a header when his horse made a bad jump and fell. He was badly injured, and as it turned out, it was his last race. Carter and I continued riding races until 1958. The race in Nashville may have been the only time in history that a father and two sons rode in the same race. From the time it all started until this day, my dad impressed on us that, win or lose, we were doing all this for fun and for the love of the game and for no other reason. Every once in a while when Carter or I would come up with some sour grapes about losing a race, dad would put his foot down and say: “When it isn’t fun anymore you’re through riding.” A man once gave me $200 for winning a race on his horse. At age 19, $200 seemed too good to be true. I told dad about it and he said: “You ride for fun, not money,” and made me drive 25 miles that very day and return the money. I wasn’t glad then that dad made me give it back, but I am today, because win or lose, as dad always said at the end of a racing day: “It was fun, old man, and we’ll do it again.” He taught me that dedication and self- discipline, not material gains, were the important ingredients of any venture. That true gratification came from knowing you had “given it your best,” no matter where you finished. I think everyone would like to be proud of his own father, and I feel very grateful that I have a father I can really be proud of, and I am!


Friday, April 20, 2012

66th Block House Steeplechase

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66th Block House Steeplechase

Frisday, April 20, 2012

Wishing You Well Flowers and balloons bring smiles to our patients, but at St. Luke’s Hospital, we deliver more . . . Since 1929, St. Luke’s Hospital has been here, caring for our friends and neighbors in the Carolina Foothills. As a small community hospital, we fill a huge need, providing access to life-saving emergency care, outstanding surgical care, and attentive, compassionate acute medical care. St. Luke’s Hospital is proud to offer the latest in diagnostic imaging, outcomes-based rehabilitation, respectful geriatric-psychiatric care, state-of-the-art orthopedic care and so much more. St. Luke’s Hospital remains committed to providing quality care… a safe, comfortable and caring atmosphere… medical services right here in our community. Flowers and balloons are nice, but at St. Luke’s, we deliver far more— exceptional care, close to home.

Columbus, North Carolina | 828.894.2408 | SaintLukesHospital.com T005-1497176


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