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DELIVERING NEWS TO MID-COLUMBIA SENIORS SINCE 1982

JANUARY 2021

Vol. 9 | Issue 1

Pharmacy buys A new generation takes a swing at Pasco Golfland restaurant to serve long-term For as long as she can remember, Justine VerMulm has known Pasco Golfland as both her playground and care facilities By Jeff Morrow for Senior Times

By Wendy Culverwell editor@tcjournal.biz

In one of the more unusual real estate moves in recent memory, a Chinese restaurant in Kennewick is being refashioned into an independent, closed-door pharmacy catering to adult family homes, nursing homes and similar facilities. Pharmacists Randy and Dawn Johnson, owners of Tri-Cities RX, bought Bamboo Gardens at 8021 W. Grandridge Blvd. in August as the new home for the long-term care side of their business. The duo also owns the independent Tri-Cities RX retail pharmacy on the Kadlec Regional Medical Center campus, which is not affected by the expansion. Bamboo Gardens shut down Aug. 27, the day the $870,000 deal closed. “I had to tell him to turn off the grill and stop cooking,” Randy Johnson joked. Converting the restaurant into a long-term care pharmacy wrapped up shortly before Christmas. The Johnsons expect to relocate to Kennewick in January, once they have secured approval from state and federal regulators. The retail pharmacy caters to the public while the long-term care pharmacy serves institutional clients. It compiles prescriptions for residents of about 70 local care facilities, serving an area from the Tri-Cities to Moses Lake, Walla Walla to Yakima. The business is licensed in Oregon uTRI-CITIES RX, Page 6

her workplace. “My mom was pregnant with me when they were selling golf balls out there from a fireworks stand,” she said. “I worked out there as a kid. As a family, we’ve always celebrated birthdays there, had family gatherings there. My grandparents were always working on the weekends there.” Her grandparents are Bill and Donna McIntyre, who have owned the golf course and driving range at 2901 N. Road 40 in Pasco since 1993. Donna recently passed away. Bill, 79, decided to sell the business to Justine and her husband, Nick. “I had kind of talked about selling it for a while. They decided they’d like to buy it,” he said. “So they’re getting the family price.” What that is, no one is saying,

Photo by Jeff Morrow Bill McIntyre, from left, stands with his granddaughter, Justine VerMulm and her husband Nick and their children at Pasco Golfland at 2901 N. Road 40. McIntyre recently sold the longtime business to the young couple.

but the 29-acre site has a tax value of about $500,000 according to the Franklin County Assessor. But what’s important to both McIntyre and VerMulm is that the business stays in the family.

When it became McIntyre’s facility 27 years ago, it had a couple of practice greens and three holes. “When I took it over, to play nine uGOLFLAND, Page 8

Benton County cannabis sales top $34 million By Senior Times staff

Cannabis sales in Benton County reached more than $34 million in fiscal year 2020. That’s up nearly 43% over fiscal year 2019, when sales reached nearly $24 million. Statewide, sales increased nearly 21% to $1.3 billion, up from about $1 billion. Benton County’s sales made up about 3% of the statewide total. King County boasted the highest sales at $340 million. The data released by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board

covers July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020. Jim MacRae, owner of Seattlebased cannabis industry data company Straight Line Analytics, told the Spokane Journal of Business that cannabis users are seeking comfort in the drug. “I figure this is people dealing with a rough time,” he said. “It would appear that people are availing themselves of intoxicants a great deal more than they used to.” MacRae speculated that the increase in usage is most likely due to existing users consuming larger quantities. He said it’s likely that

some people who were using cannabis after the end of the workday prior to the pandemic are now working remotely and are using more frequently throughout the day. “If somebody wants to get up in the morning and wake and bake, and then go to work for the day from their home office, they can now do that,” he said. Washington state collected a total of $395.5 million in legal marijuana income and license fees in fiscal year 2019, all but $5.2 million of it from uCANNABIS, Page 8

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

MONTHLY QUIZ

When was West Richland incorporated and who was Q&A with Dr. Amy Person

Page 5

Sporthaus has been serving Tri-City outdoor enthusiasts for 40 years

Page 11

its first mayor? ANSWER, PAGE 9

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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

Senior Times welcomes new year with new look 509-737-8778 509-737-8448 fax Mailing address: 8524 W. Gage Blvd., #A1-300 Kennewick, WA 99336 srtimes.com

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Dear Readers, You’ll likely notice a new look to the front page of your Senior Times this month. We wanted to usher in the new year with a new look and feel. Our graphic designer Vanessa Guzmán calls the new design bright and sophisticated. We think it gives the paper a fresh new look, and we hope you like it too. In 2013, TriComp Inc., the parent company behind this paper and the Tri-Cities Area Journal of Business, bought the rights to the Senior Times, which was established in 1982 in the Yakima Valley. We knew Benton and Franklin county seniors would be well served to have a publication specifically for them. And over the past eight years,

uBRIEFS Los Angeles Angels add Dust Devils as affiliate

The Los Angeles Angels have invited the Tri-City Dust Devils to be a High-A long season affiliate franchise beginning with the 2021 season. This invitation is for 10 years through 2030. The Dust Devils have been a short season affiliate since its inception in 2001, playing 76 games from the middle of June through early September. As a long season affiliate, the Dust Devils will now play between 130 and 140 games beginning in April. In addition, the High-A level is two levels higher than short season baseball. The Dust Devils spent their first 14 years with the Colorado Rockies and the past six with the San Diego Padres. This opportunity to partner with the Angels will be the first time they have been affiliated with the Dust Devils, although the Angels were affiliated with a Tri-City team

you’ve made this abundantly clear with your notes, comments and calls. “Thank you so much for your publication of the Senior Times. I read it pretty much cover to cover, and appreciate the news of our excellent community which has been my home for 45 years,” wrote one reader. Another reader wrote “Love the paper” in the memo section of a check when renewing a subscription this summer. Twice a year we connect local seniors with companies that serve them at our Senior Times Expo. The popular event typically draws hundreds. We had to cancel in spring 2020 due to the pandemic but organized a drive-thru expo with your safety in mind for fall 2020. It was wildly successful.

One reader wrote us to say: “I’d like to thank you for the senior fair this fall. I thought it worked very well and found the bag’s contents both enjoyable and useful.” We always welcome your comments, feedback and story ideas. Feel free to write us at 8524 W. Gage Blvd., #A1-300, Kennewick, WA 99336, email us at info@tcjournal. biz, or call 509-737-8778. Be sure to leave a message as our office remains closed to the public. We are thankful you continue to support and read the Senior Times. We wish you good health and a positive outlook as 2021 stretches before us. Happy new year to all of you.

in 1963 and 1964. As the team continues to navigate through the offseason and prepare for 2021, it will continue to monitor the status of Covid-19 and await direction from Major League Baseball as to when the 2021 season will begin.

Survey: Most nursing homes at risk of failure

Friends of Badger Mountain raising money for next trail

Friends of Badger Mountain, the nonprofit responsible for hiking trails on Badger and Candy mountains, is seeking donations to support its next project, the $1.5 million Little Badger Mountain Preserve. It has raised about half of that and needs to raise the rest by fall. The Little Badger trail will link it to Badger Mountain, a critical step to realizing the group’s vision of system of trails between local ridges. Go to bit.ly/lbm_donate to support the initiative.

Sincerely, Kristina Lord, publisher

Two-thirds of U.S. nursing homes say they won’t survive another year because of Covid-19 costs, according to a survey commissioned by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living. Mark Parkinson, president and chief executive officer of the AHCA, called on Congress to replenish emergency funding to aid the industry. The survey of 953 nursing homes found that 66% say they cannot continue to operate because of the increased costs associated with coronavirus. Additional staff pay was the leading challenge, followed by personal protection equipment costs and Covid-19 testing. Nearly all the properties surveyed said they have asked staff to work overtime or double shifts. In addition, 86% percent said they paid bonuses to staff and 68% reported hiring additional staff.


SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

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Advisor Benefits lives on as Advisor Health Benefits with new employee owner Kevin Husted, a longtime Tri-City insurance benefits broker, had a busy fall. Husted bought the insurance side of Advisor Benefits Group in the middle of not one but two open enrollment periods, Medicare and Washington’s Health Benefit Exchange. Husted is a 20-year insurance benefits and Medicare professional who previously worked for Marvin Liebe at Advisor Benefits Group in Kennewick. He established Advisor Health Benefits as the successor to Advisor Benefits Group after Liebe sold part of the insurance business to Epic Trust, a multidisciplinary financial services firm in Richland. Husted retains his focus on advising clients on health and other types of insurance, including life, dental, vision and annuities. He serves all ages but specializes in helping clients navigate the com-

plexities of the Medicare and Wa s h i n g t o n Health Benefit Exchange. He also helps clients with s up pl e m e nt a l Kevin Husted policies and resolving issues while serving as manager for the Washington Health Plan Finder’s Tri-City enrollment center. Clients come to Husted to evaluate their options and enroll in health and other benefit plans. The Washington Exchange enrollment is typically Nov. 1 to Dec. 15. Because of the pandemic, it was extended to Jan. 15. He also is available to anyone seeking health insurance coverage between jobs or because they are newly arrived in the community. If people on Washington’s lowincome Apple plan are forced off because of rising income, he can help them choose new coverage. He emphasized that it is free to use

an agent to navigate the health care exchange. That includes enrolling in a plan, evaluating plans and helping sort through issues during the year. “There is never an increase or charge. We do not charge a fee,” he said. He also helps seniors enroll in Medicare when they turn 65. He advises those preparing for Medicare to contact him three to six months before their actual birthday to get the process started. Best of all, he can help clients enroll online. “You don’t have to go to the Social Security office. I can help people navigate that,” he said. Husted is also available to help small business owners choose plans. “We’re honest with them. In some cases, if it is an owner and one or two employees, typically it is less expensive to be on an individual plan,” he said. Husted grew up in Ephrata and moved to Seattle for college. He

launched a cleaning business, which he sold when he decided to return to Eastern Washington in 1990. He is a former executive director for the American Red Cross who moved to the insurance industry about 20 years ago. He started as a trainer for Sterling Insurance and joined Lieb 15 years ago. He may have left nonprofit work, but he retained an interest in supporting the community as a member of the leadership Tri-Cities Class II and Kennewick Jaycees. He is also past president of the board of Senior Life Resources, which operates Mid-Columbia Meals on Wheels. Husted retained the Advisor Benefits name signal continuity of services. He is joined by an office manager and intends to bring on insurance advisors to build and expand the business. “All of our clients will continue to receive the same customer service,” he said. Husted can be reached at kevin@ advisorbenefits.com or 509-308-4118.

uBRIEFS

Mid-Columbia Libraries

unexpired term on its governing board of trustees. Applicants must reside in Benton County. Richland residents are not eligible because the city is not part

of the regional library system. The term expires Dec. 31, 2022. Go to midcolumbialibraries.org/ about/board-of-trustees for information or call 509-737-6356.

By Wendy Culverwell editor@tcjournal.biz

J.C. Penney exits Chapter 11

J.C. Penney’s, the storied but struggling retailer, completed its Chapter 11 reorganization and exited bankruptcy in early December. Under the plan, Simon Property Group and Brookfield Asset Management acquired the retail and operating assets in a deal that included $200 million in cash and a new term loan of $500 million. The company operates about 700 stores nationwide. Lenders holding first liens will control 160 of its real estate assets as well as distribution centers.

Ben Franklin restores some bus routes

Ben Franklin Transit resumed regular bus service in west Pasco in midDecember. The changes are the transit agency’s first step toward restoring routine bus service in Pasco after scaling back in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Routes 66 and 67 resumed regular Monday-Saturday service, while Route 268 resumed with modified service times. It will not operate on Saturdays. As part of the change, Route 69E, a temporary route that combined routes 66 and 67, was discontinued. Route 61E, launched to replace routes 64 and 65, will operate until further notice. Go to bft.org/services/route-mapsand-schedules for the most current schedule information.

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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

True or false: Seniors report being happier than they anticipated How does aging live up to your expectations? Several studies, including a recent AARP study, found that more adults age 60 and older were happier than people age 18-39. We wanted to better understand what areas of life are most satisfying for older adults and how those things compared to how they imagined aging as youths. With Generation X officially joining the 55-and-older crowd in 2020, we also wanted to understand what younger generations think they might have in store as they grow older. To find out, we surveyed more than 800 American adults among the silent generation, baby boomers, Generation X, millennials and Generation Z.

Senior satisfaction

We asked seniors over 55 to rate their life satisfaction compared to their expectations at youth, and discovered some good news. More than one in two said their lives were either “better” or “much better” than they expected, while just over 2% said their lives were “much worse” than they expected. The biggest predictive factor in current life satisfaction was income.

However, having the most money did not equate to having the most happiness. Rather, the middle-income Jeff Hoyt group – those SeniorLiving.org with household GUEST COLUMN income between $100,000 and $149,999 – were most likely to say their lives were better than they’d expected. Those with income below $50,000 were more likely to rate their lives as worse than expected.

What’s best about aging?

If the majority of seniors are happy, and more than half of those 55 and older say their lives are better today than they expected when they were younger. What makes getting older so great? Some reasons relate to no longer being part of the workforce. Some are a bit more ethereal. More than one in three older adults said having more leisure time is the best aspect of their age, followed by retirement (27%) and financial stabil-

New year, new beginning. It’s time to enjoy your golden years.

ity (25%). The Silent Generation and Boomers were equally as uninterested in second careers and more responsibility. But they differ in notable areas, including: • More time for leisure: Just over 48% of the silent generation rated this in their top three, compared to about 25% of boomers. This may reflect that not all baby boomers have reached retirement. • Financial stability: Secure fiscal status was the second-rated positive aspect by the silent generation (about 30%), while just over 20% of baby boomers put this in their top three. This may reflect that millions of boomers worry they might not be prepared for full retirement. • Inner peace: Baby boomers appear to be more connected to personal growth, as they were much more positive about having greater self-awareness (19% vs. 10%) and gaining wisdom (25% vs. 15%). This is perhaps not surprising for the Woodstock generation. Men and women were about equally as likely to list having less responsibility and spending time with grandchildren among their top three. Women were several percentage points more likely to rate greater self-awareness and personal/spiritual growth or wisdom. Across generational and gender groups, having more time for leisure was the highest-rated positive aspect about aging.

Expectation vs. reality

To measure expectations, we asked, “When you were younger, what did you most look forward to in becoming an older adult?” By far, seniors said they were most expecting to enjoy travel, financial stability and having more time for leisure. In every case, the expectation didn’t exactly come true. Nearly 52% of older adults said

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travel was among the things their younger selves most looked forward to. Only 22% of seniors said travel was one of the best things about aging. Of course, we’re living in the time of Covid-19, so perhaps the pandemic is cramping seniors’ travel style. Just under 51% of older adults said their younger selves expected financial stability to be among the best things about getting older. The reality is that was the case for less than half that number (just under 25%). Respondents also varied along both gender and generational lines. Silent generation men were most likely to rank financial stability highest, while silent generation women rated travel and leisure time highest. Baby boomer men most looked forward to financial stability, while leisure time was No. 1 for their female counterparts. How did their predictions stack up to reality? About 9% of silent generation men said they looked forward to a second career when they were younger, but just over 5% rated that as one of the best parts of their lives today. Also, 59% had been most looking forward to financial stability, while just under 31% rated it as one of the best aspects of getting older. About 45% of silent generation women looked forward to experiencing financial stability but only 28% rated it highly. Similarly, 58% had high travel expectations, while only 32% put it among their favorite aspects of life. Both male and female baby boomers were accurate in their predictions of their enjoyment of a second career (turns out it’s not as important) and spending time with children and grandchildren (very important). Boomer men and women (47% and 49%, respectively) said they expected uHOYT, Page 8


Q&A

SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

DR. AMY PERSON

Health Officer Benton-Franklin Health District

Number of employees you oversee: The Benton-Franklin Health District employs almost 95 individuals, although with the Covid-19 response, there are additional temporary staff assisting with contact tracing and data management. I engage with all staff, but my role is not supervisory.

criticism or bad press personally.

Brief background of your organization: For the last eight months, BFHD has been primarily been engaged in the Covid-19 pandemic response. The BFHD has been serving Benton and Franklin counties since 1946. Public health in the broadest sense works with the community to ensure that all of us can learn, work, play and thrive to our greatest potential. The role of the BFHD and public health has evolved over time. We’re working collectively and strategically with community partners, not just in health care, but in education, business and grassroots coalitions to eliminate the barriers that keep people from being healthy. BFHD’s work includes immunizations, inspecting food establishments, partnering with new mothers through intensive visiting home nurse programs, working with local municipalities to increase walkability or building community resiliency to address adverse childhood experiences.

If you had a magic wand, what would you change about your industry? Sustainable funding for public health to address the systemic, preventable issues that keep people from achieving their highest level of health.

How did you land your current role? Fortune smiled, I was looking for new opportunities when the position became available. How long have you been in it? 9 years. Why should the Tri-Cities care about public health? Health impacts all areas of our lives. Healthy families, healthy workforces, healthy neighborhoods and healthy environments improve length of life and more importantly, quality of life. One dollar spent on community health saves $5.50 in health care costs so it’s a wise investment as well. What is one characteristic that you believe every leader should possess? Thick skin – you need to be able to focus on your goals and not take

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What is the biggest challenge facing business owners/managers today? In public health, one of the biggest issues is succession planning as many public health leaders are nearing or passing retirement age.

What advice would you give someone going into a leadership position for the first time? Be strong enough to be vulnerable. Too often people feel that they are giving up power if they ask for help or admit their mistakes. Who are your role models or mentors? My mother – her journey as a woman and person of color moving up in the field of nuclear chemistry 60 years ago has helped me overcome adversity and racism as well. How do you keep your employees motivated? I believe that everyone can rise to their potential if they feel supported by their leadership and if they know they have permission to fail during that journey. How did you decide to pursue a career in public health? Throughout my two decades in medicine, I became increasingly aware of how much health was

impacted by where people lived, not just their physical but also their social and emotional environment. Public health allows me to make a lasting contribution. How do you measure success in your workplace? Measuring success in public health requires a long-range view. Improving access to safe places to walk to healthy foods will reduce rates of obesity and diabetes, but not overnight, or a year or even five years. What do you consider your leadership style to be? The principles of servant leadership resonate with me. I consider empathy and listening to be my key assets. How do you balance work and family life? I’ve always been happiest working several jobs; making a difference in the world is what gives me reason to wake up every morning. Knowing that about myself, I chose not to pursue a family life. What do you like to do when you are not at work? Improve my Mandarin language

Dr. Amy Person skills by watching Chinese soap operas on Netflix. What’s your best time management strategy? Don’t let perfection be the enemy of good. Best tip to relieve stress? I enjoy yoga as it helps me to center myself and keeps me aware of my body and when stress is starting to take its toll. What’s your favorite book? My favorite book is usually which ever one I’m reading now, but with the Covid-19 response, it’s been several months since I’ve had the time. Do you have a personal mantra, phrase or quote you like to use? Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.


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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

TRI-CITIES RX, From page 1

with an eye to expanding into Hermiston and Umatilla. Its pharmacists fill prescriptions for all the residents of its clients. Some fill prescriptions by the month, others on a weekly basis. It delivers 99% of the prescriptions it fills and provides medication management services. The new location will not cater to the public. A former Chinese restaurant is an unlikely spot to move a pharmacy business, but Randy Johnson said it made perfect sense for the long-term service. Unlike retail pharmacies, a longterm pharmacy operates like a warehouse, with a need for the types of open spaces found in restaurant dining rooms. It has to house specialized equipment to package prescriptions according to its clients’ needs. Bamboo Gardens, which had been for sale for several years, caught his eye about a year ago. Johnson’s business was outgrowing its Richland space, and the lease expires in February 2021. The Johnsons made an offer for the 5,500-square-foot Bamboo Gardens building in February but backed off when the Covid-19 pandemic hit. The building’s owner pulled the property off the market.

Photo by Wendy Culverwell Randy Johnson and his wife, Dawn, purchased the former Bamboo Garden restaurant, 8021 W. Grandridge Blvd. in Kennewick and are renovating it as the new home for their closed-door pharmacy serving long-term care centers. The couple, both pharmacists, also operate the Tri-Cities RX retail pharmacy at Richland’s Kadlec Regional Medical Center campus.

But they reconnected in April and reached a deal. Johnson never doubted the wisdom of investing in the business, even in a pandemic. Johnson was born and raised in the Tri-Cities. He graduated from Kennewick High School before leaving for college, first at the University of Idaho and then Washington State University. “I have a lot of faith in our com-

munity,” he said. The new pharmacy will occupy part of the building. Johnson said he could use the balance for a retail or even compounding pharmacy in the future. He wants to absorb the cost of purchasing and renovating the property before making another big move. Johnson took a circuitous route to the pharmacy industry. He went to Idaho to play football, then trans-

ferred to WSU after his playing days ended. He took business courses and later, engineering ones to please his father. A course on career options prompted his love of pharmacy work. Johnson met his wife in school. The couple moved to the Tri-Cities when he was offered the chance to manage an independent pharmacy on 14th Street in Pasco. He spent five years managing it for a remote owner who ended up selling to Walgreens. He worked as a pharmacist and manager for Walgreens for several years. He called it an educational experience, but part of the education was personal. “I didn’t want to work for a big pharmacy chain for the rest of my career,” he said. He launched the retail business on the Kadlec campus while Dawn worked in corporate pharmacies with a focus on long-term care. The couple spied a need for long-term care pharmacy services in the Tri-Cities. Local facilities relied on providers in Spokane, Seattle and Portland – too far to be nimble. They opened near Kadlec, to be close to the retail pharmacy. Tri-City RX employs 30, including 6.5 FTE pharmacists as well as pharmacy technicians, assistants and couriers.


SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

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Mission to build homes for Hanford workers results in mini town By East Benton County Historical Society

World War II was over by two years in August 1947. Hanford had played a huge role ending the war, with its production of plutonium for a plutonium-based atomic bomb. It was dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945, after a uranium-based atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima three days earlier. Japan announced surrender less than a week after Nagasaki. But, Hanford’s work was not done. It now geared up to meet the demands of the Cold War with the United States, facing a new adversary in the Soviet Union. This “war,” cold as it was, required new plutonium-production facilities, along with other nuclear facilities at Hanford. That meant Hanford needed more housing for what was expected to be 25,000 workers and their families. It was clear the few barracks in north Richland at the end of World War II for housing existing Hanford Engineer Works employees were insufficient. The Atomic Energy Commission, Hanford’s governing authority, and General Electric, operator of Hanford, announced in 1947, plans for “a gigantic expansion of the Hanford plutonium manufacturing capabilities.” On Aug. 15, 1947, authorization was given by a Hanford Engineer Works directive to begin on the North Richland Construction Camp. It would grow to become “the largest peacetime construction project in American history up to that time,” according to historical accounts. The camp could be considered a town in itself. Although designed to be only temporary, it nonetheless came with the amenities of a permanent community. “It consists of prefabricated houses, barracks, trailer sites and community buildings,” according to a historical accounting of its construction. “Its streets are laid out on a grid on flat former farmland about four miles north of Richland.” Completion was set for 1948 when the peak population was anticipated. Many residents referred to living in “North Richland” rather than Richland. The north Richland site was considered to have “ample room for expansion and “easy access to adjacent power, light, and water facilities.” About 16,000 of the anticipated

workers were slated for living in barracks, and 4,000 living in a trailer camp with about 10,000 family members. The first stage of construction authorized in August 1947 was not to exceed $15 million. Speed in construction was considered essential so there would be little or no interruption to Hanford’s atomic production. “Design and construction work was simultaneous,” one account of the North Richland Construction Camp noted. Among buildings moved in their entirety to the construction camp were 46 Navy barracks from Naval Air Station Pasco, which were floated across the Columbia River. “Thousands of trailers were brought in and many new buildings were constructed,” accounts of the construction said. “Most of the construction crews worked six days a week.” The end result of the camp completed in November 1948 included sites 40-by-40 feet for 2,211 trailers, plus 82 barracks, and 200 prefabricated houses. Residents of the barracks in the early 1950s were paying 50 cents a day to the Room and Bedroll office at Hanford for their housing. To help keep the trailers cooler for families, shelters were built over them. Also comprising this “temporary city” for 25,000 were a “mess hall, school, post office, fire station, commercial establishments (drug stores and grocery stores) and patrol headquarters.” Bathhouses served barracks occupants and the infrastructure included roads, sidewalks, sewers and phone, water and electrical lines. Avenues running north and south had names in alphabetical order from A to W. Streets running east-west were numerical in name, from First to 13th. The north Richland residents also had amenities built by General Electric to help keep morale up in the wake of boredom and ever present dust and sand storms. They included a “recreation building, theaters, taverns, parks, playgrounds, baseball diamonds, horseshoe and tennis courts and an auditorium and dance hall.” Old-timers recalled that Hanford workers, when they were done with a day’s work, could unwind sitting in a north Richland tavern at what was then the largest horseshoe bar in the world. With a wind down of Hanford construction in the early 1950s, the pop-

Courtesy Hanford History Project at Washington State University Tri-Cities Aerial view of the Hanford Construction Camp. Noted in caption, “H.E.W. Hanford Construction Camp - Trailer Section, Photo by Robley L. Johnson.”

ulation in the North Richland Construction Camp dropped. By 1954, it was down to 7,500 and dwindling continued. Today, there is little evidence of the camp. Parts of some old infrastructure, old street names and foundations, along with manholes, remain. Modern installations have replaced it, with entities like the Port of Benton and its facilities, Pacific

Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Washington State University Tri-Cities taking up occupancy. The USS Triton Sail Park lies between the historic C and D avenues used by North Richland residents. The park, built by the Port of Benton, was dedicated in 2011. It displays the sail and the conning tower of the nuclear submarine USS Triton.


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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

GOLFLAND, From page 1

holes, you had to go around three times,” he said. So one summer, he had six more holes built for a nine-hole course. Over the years, McIntyre added on to the facility and improved it. In 2000, he built an overhang so golfers could practice not only with overhead shelter, but at night too with the lights. “Billy put in all of the irrigation out there, then he built six more holes. He developed the place into what it is now,” said VerMulm of her grandfather. “He had those trees around the driving range planted. It’s such a nice

facility. There is a reason we call the place the Jewel of Pasco.” It’s the perfect place to work on all aspects of your game. “The thing of it is, it’s not only a good golf course for beginners, but for good players,” McIntyre said. VerMulm, who has worked there for the last seven years, starting while in high school, understands that. “We want it to be a family-friendly course,” she said. “We have ideas, things like maybe Family Friday Nights. Have a Glow Ball tournament one night a month.” Maybe even get kids to golf in some free events. Not only is Pasco Golfland a good

place to play nine holes or even 18, but “it’s a great practice facility, for new and old golfers,” VerMulm said. “It’s a really great place to develop your short game, with chipping and putting.” PGA professional Mike Kasch has been Pasco Golfland’s head pro. “Mike has been here for 17 years. We have two PGA pros who help with our younger golfers,” VerMulm said. “We have a large junior program, and Mike and Craig Lanning work with them. All of the local college and high school golfers come to our facility to practice – Chiawana, Pasco and CBC.” VerMulm said Pasco Golfland also has played host to the annual district Drive, Chip and Putt event for several years. “We also have a large men’s league and women’s league,” said VerMulm, who touts the facility’s cheaper prices compared to other area courses, as well as how quickly golfers can get around the course. “It’s a low-time commitment, and a low-price commitment,” she said. Golf has been an outdoor activity that Gov. Jay Inslee has allowed during the pandemic – although all state golf courses were shut down most of March and all of April. “Everything was a little rough this year,” VerMulm said. “The snow has shut us down before. But never a pandemic. It was hard, but we made it

through.” When the courses opened back up in early May 2020, VerMulm said Pasco Golfland got busy. “Covid brought out a lot of golfers ... because there hasn’t been much else to do,” she said. VerMulm, 26, – her husband who is 27 – plans to keep Golfland as her family’s place to be. “We’re pretty young to take this over. We have young children,” she said. “We have a 1-year-old and 3-year-old. But it’s always been a fun place to hang out.” As for her grandfather, “Billy is trying to decide what he wants to do. He poured his life into Golfland.” McIntyre thinks he might try living in Arizona in the winter. “I’m not going to miss too much (at Golfland),” McIntyre said. “I’ll still help out, but I won’t have any titles anymore.” VerMulm said she and her husband are excited to keep the family business going. “We’ve been in the process of (getting the deal done) for a few months,” she said. “It’s always been in the back of his head, and in the back of our heads for a long time. And I think grandpa was happy to keep it in the family.” Pasco Golfland: 2901 N. Road 40 in Pasco; Pascogolfland.com; 509-5449291; Facebook.

CANNABIS, From page 1

legal cannabis taxes, license fees, and penalties are distributed as follow, according to the 2019 report: General fund, $116.5 million; basic health, $188.3 million; cities, counties, $15 million; education, prevention, $9.5 million; research, $0.4 million; and other, $49.2 million. Benton County collected $283,593 in distributions in fiscal year 2020 and $267,077 in fiscal year 2019, according to data from the state Liquor and Cannabis Board.

HOYT, From page 4

adults have learned not to worry about some of the things younger people worry about. Although studies have shown there’s a serious happiness shortage in the U.S. (and it’s getting worse because of the pandemic), if our study is any indication, the best years may still be ahead.

the state’s marijuana excise, or sales, tax. The 2019 report, the most recent available, also shows that the marijuana revenue was $172 million more than that of liquor, and that the marijuana tax income to the state for fiscal 2019 of $395.5 million grew by slightly more than $28 million from the prior fiscal year. Revenue collected by the state Liquor and Cannabis Board come from

leisure time to be one of their favorite aspects. Only a quarter said that was one of the best features of their current lives (26% for men and 24% for women). The bottom line: The quality of one’s life is intensely personal, and it can change depending on the day. With aging, many seniors experience lesser stress of daily activities and running a household. And life experience is a great teacher – older

 Jeff Hoyt is editor-in-chief at SeniorLiving.org, a directory of living options to help older Americans age with ease.


SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

Just for Fun

Crossword

Across 1 Illustrative craft 4 Knitted wrap 9 --- Falco of “Nurse Jackie” 10 Hawaiian Punch fruit 12 Lawsuit 14 Exclamation of contempt 15 Writing fluid 16 Blaster’s material 17 Wedding vow sites 19 Sunday rite 20 Pro bono promo, briefly 21 Female sibling 22 Encourage in wrongdoing 24 Most pleasant

9

Solutions on page 11

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7 “Hey, that’s not right!”

28 Rollaway

8 Film critic Jeffrey ---

29 Dove sound

9 Able was I ere I saw ---

30 Impish

11 Pangolin food

33 Skiers’ haunts

13 Old Italian money

34 Taverns

18 Nova Scotia hours

35 Gin

19 It may be open at a bar

36 Append

21 Location

Down

22 Cash caches, perhaps

1 Words after make or close

23 Prepares eggs

2 Just the one

25 Narrow sea channel

3 Long Island iced cocktail

26 Throw

24 Din

4 Crosses

28 Singer who’s got you, Babe!

5 Writer for hire

31 IRS forms expert

6 Disposed

32 By way of

Word search - Card games Gin

Rouge et Noir

Bunko

Grab

Rummy

Canasta

Hearts

Skat

Carlton

Hi-Low

Solo

Crib

Misere

Spades

Demon

Nap

Stop

Fan-Tan

Ombre

Whist

Faro

Poker

Red Dog STR8TS STR8TS

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Str8ts example

Easy Easy

© 2021 Syndicated Puzzles

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Sudoku - Tough

Tough Tough

© 2021 Syndicated Puzzles

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SUDOKU SUDOKU

© 2021 Syndicated Puzzles

Str8ts - Easy

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© 2021 Syndicated Puzzles

Brag

How to beat Str8ts: No single number, 1 to 9, can repeat in any row or column. But rows and columns are divided by black squares into compartments. Each compartment must form a straight, a set of numbers with no gaps but it can be in any order, eg: 7, 6, 8, 9. Clues in black cells remove that number as an option in that row and column, and are not part of any straight. Rules of Sudoku - To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 such that each row, column and 3x3 box contains ever number uniquely. For more strategies, hints and tips, visit www.sudokuwiki.org and www.str8ts.com.

To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering numbers numbers 1 to 9 such that each row, column and 3x3 and 3x3 1 to 9 such that each row, column box contains everyinnumber uniquely.premiered on CBS. Jan. 12: the Family” box“All contains every number uniquely.

5 strategies, hints and tips, Jan. 17: Baltimore Colts defeated the ForThe many strategies, hints and tips, 3For 2many visit www.sudokuwiki.org for Sudoku Dallas Cowboys 16–13, with a field goal in the visit www.sudokuwiki.org for Sudoku 2and1www.str8ts.com for Str8ts. and www.str8ts.com for Bowl Str8ts. V in Miami. last five seconds of Super 1 5 If you like Str8ts and other puzzles, check out our If you like Str8ts and other puzzles, check out our 4books, Jan. 31: Apollo 14 lifted off more fromonCape iPhone/iPad Apps and much our store.

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Kennedy, Florida.

ANSWER Quiz answer from Page 1

West Richland was incorporated in 1955, and James O. Zwicker was elected its first mayor. — Source: East Benton County Historic Society and Museum


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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

Great Depression changed America for the better. So will 2020 pandemic When we look back 20 years from now at the year 2020, I hope we will see this was a launching point for major achievements for our region and nation. I believe there will be a change in how we continue to live our lives, and history points to shifts in human behavior after periods of strife. With this in mind, the Pasco Chamber of Commerce is goal setting to prepare for opportunities as we move forward. My grandparents grew up during the Depression era. They continued to save plastic foam meat trays until they passed away. As I was growing up, I witnessed the permanent effects of the Great Depression on their lifestyle. Food wasn’t thrown away. Leftovers made the neighborhood squirrels in Pasco fatter, fed the dog and often ended up in my grandfather’s famous grits with chopped leftovers as featured ingredients. But the Depression brought us major technological advances. Agriculture became much more efficient and production techniques and applications increased yields dramatically, primarily driven by the Dust Bowl and weak commodity prices. Locally, we began the foundation of creating the great Columbia Basin, capitalizing on the abundance of water and rich soil. This led to irrigation with the debut of Grand Coulee Dam in 1942 allowing a desert to turn into a prime agriculture-producing region. The Depression also saw the invention of sliced bread, nylon toothbrush-

es and car radios – all this we all use daily nearly 100 years later. What can we take away as positives from Colin Hastings 2020? Pasco Chamber Virtual meetof Commerce ings created a GUEST COLUMN new efficiency by eliminating travel time. Meetings take less time than in person. We also schedule meetings more often in each workday. A drawback is missing human connection that is important to our health and minimizing effective networking that made those meetings take longer. However, this was an excellent opportunity for me and many other families – spending more time together as families and eliminating the rush of “normal” life. Sure, that poses new challenges, such as remote learning and interruptions during Zoom calls inquiring as to what was for lunch. Our dogs seem to be thrilled with the new setup, yet the cats still really don’t care. I believe there will be a permanent shift to remote working for some industries. Some studies show efficiency is maintained in these new hybrid work environments with a decrease in overhead for the business. With this shift, our region is seeing an influx of transplants from Seattle and Portland. This has been indicated by the strong housing mar-

Photo by TCAJOB The Pasco Chamber of Commerce pivoted away from its large community event RiverFest to produce a documentary, “Our Rivers, Our Life,” which tells the story of the area’s river system.

ket in the Tri-Cities over the summer. Anecdotally, we have seen an increase in calls to the Pasco Chamber inquiring about our area. These transplants bring with them higher earnings, but will they use that money to shop local businesses or will they seek goods normally found in metro areas via online shopping platforms? Are they going to bring their ideals and politics that led to policies they are escaping from? It will be interesting how brickand-mortar retail adapt as we come out of this period. Restaurants and clothing stores have suffered immensely, yet food trucks and online shopping have maintained or increased. Will remote work and shifting away from traditional retail have a lasting effect on commercial property? Energy production is more apparent than ever. The increasing need for constant reliable energy is monumental. Washington state has an aggressive goal to rely on 100% clean energy by 2045. As fossil fuel energy plants such as the Portland General Electric coal plant at Boardman, Oregon, shut down, we need to focus on not ending up like California with brownouts and blackouts. We need to maintain baseload energy such as hydropower and add additional energy sources by expanding nuclear. The Pasco Chamber has endured its fair share of interruption of normal routine with cancellations of events with large gatherings. We have adapted and explored new opportunities. For example, RiverFest pivoted away from a large community event drawing thousands of families to Columbia Park to celebrate our river system, to create a quality documentary titled, “Our Rivers, Our Life.” This hourlong presentation has

engaged thousands in the Northwest telling the story of our river system. Watch it at riverfestwa.com. We also helped disperse $400,000 in federal Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security, or CARES, Act business grants on behalf of Franklin County in a matter of hours. This indicates the hardship that many small businesses are facing due to restrictions and lockdowns. In April, the Pasco Chamber urged the governor not to shut down business and to take an approach that would provide measures to keep our population safe but not impact chosen businesses, adversely affecting their livelihood. Unfortunately, a lot of businesses and livelihoods are casualties of war against a virus that can’t be defeated by actions that are influenced by political whims. As Franklin County businesses continue to fight for their livelihoods, the Pasco Chamber seeks to find compromises in their ability to function in some capacity and keep their doors open. The Pasco Chamber will advocate on behalf of our businesses and community to foster growth and adaptation for the future. What will be life changing that is invented because of our recent experiences? I am hopeful that there will be a perfect environment for businesses to become more innovative. Perhaps, the biggest inventions will come in the areas of biotech, medical devices, transportation, broadband, energy and hygiene. We have the resources in our region to make that happen. We can all agree that 2020 has been a different year but looking back, I expect we’ll find that it was the catalyst for a lot of positive change for both our region and our nation.  Colin Hastings is executive director of the Pasco Chamber of Commerce.


SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

11

Sporthaus has been serving Tri-City outdoor enthusiasts for 40 years By Jeff Morrow

for Tri-Cities Area Journal of Business

Steve McConnell’s life changed the day his parents took him skiing for the first time in his life. “I was a basketball player, but I was lucky that my folks introduced me to skiing when I was in seventh grade,” he said. “From the first time I skied down the hill, I knew I found my next sport.” And it’s been his main sport ever since. It also turned into his career. For decades, McConnell and his business partner, Bart Munson, have enjoyed helping customers find the right pair of skis, boots, etc., at Sporthaus Northwest in Kennewick. “I’m 67, and my wife keeps telling me to retire,” McConnell said. “But I like coming to work. My partner, who is three to four years younger than me, feels the same. As far as an exit strategy, we don’t have one.” Which is fine, because the pair love helping outdoor sports enthusiasts year-round. Three outdoor sports enthusiasts opened Sporthaus Northwest opened in 1980 – Jim McClelland was an original partner. Back then, the Tri-Cities had plenty of local sporting goods stores – Ski Racquet, BB&M, and Pete’s Sport Shop. But while those stores faded away, Sporthaus kept going. And even during a pandemic, the store continues to thrive. “The key has been good customer service,” McConnell said. “We struggled for years early on but we started getting repeat customers. Their kids

Courtesy Steve McConnell Sporthaus Northwest owners Steve McConnell, left, and Bart Munson stand in front of their ski inventory. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the store at 26 N. Columbia Center Blvd. in Kennewick.

are coming in now, and their kids have kids coming in.” A big reason is the staff’s expertise of the products. “It’s not just Bart and myself. We’ve got a good crew here. I’ve got a great staff,” McConnell said. Nearly every time Sporthaus Northwest employees – there are 10 full-time employees in the winter, 10 part time – head up a mountain, they usually bring along a few products to test. That allows them to feel confident in advising customers. “I test products every time I go up on a mountain,” McConnell said. “We shoot for 20 days every year to do that.” Shoulder surgery has kept McConnell off the slopes for a while. But now he’s ready, although “I probably won’t

start until after Jan. 1.” The team is constantly learning about new products. “We are continually educated through Zoom, clinics, balancing and fitting. We get into that stuff,” McConnell said. That’s why customers keep coming back, he said. “In our state, there are only five or six stores that can do what we can do,”

he said. “I’d tell local shoppers that we’re a unique store. You can’t find the services that we offer around here. Maybe Spokane. But we built our business. We’re good at it. We know that customers trust us.” McConnell said most of Sporthaus’ business comes during the winter season, about 60%. Of that business, 70% is skiing, while the rest is snowboarding. Skis are much easier to handle than snowboards, McConnell said, especially with rapidly changing technology. “Skis have changed a lot in the last 15 years,” he said. “We’re seeing a lot of young families, where the father may have been a snowboarder in his younger days, but now is going back to skis. Mom and dad have their skis, and they get skis for the kids.” The store also rents ski packages. Sporthaus inherited the rental business about four years ago when the chain store Sports Authority shuttered its doors in Kennewick. For about $200, adults can rent a ski package for the season that includes boots, poles and skis. The store also offers ski and snowboard services to tune up, wax or repair gear.

uSPORTHAUS, Page 12

Puzzle answers from page 9

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US 11x11 Wordsearch No.303 Word search Sudoku Sudoku Solution

Str8ts Solution N I B 7G I R 6 R A C 5B A 8S R 9R L B T A O 3R N 4B

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8 9 5 2 4 6 1 3 7

7 2 4 9 3 1 8 5 6

6 3 1 5 7 8 4 9 2

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SENIOR TIMES • JANUARY 2021

uBRIEFS $1.1M Dollar General store coming to Benton City

Simon CRE Insight has filed a permit to build a $1.1 million Dollar General store at 210 Second St. in Benton City. The 9,100-square-foot store is on 1.42 acres. It is scheduled to open in summer 2021 and employ six to 10 people. Dollar General opened its first SPORTHAUS, From page 11

McConnell said he has noticed a change in shopping habits during this pandemic. “What I’m seeing is a lot of people who’ve been renting from us now seem to be buying,” he said. About 14 years ago, Sporthaus joined a buyer’s group to get in on some of the top products available – skis, clothes, gloves, boots, you name it. “It allows us to buy the best models, the best lines and the best deals,” he said. That also includes snowboards, something McConnell stays away from. “Snowboarding was invented in the early 1980s,” he said. “The skate crowd (which took up with snowboards in the winter) was rebellious. Bart is my partner, and he said we’ve got to do it.

store in the state in Cathlamet this spring. The Goodlettsville, Tennessee, company (NYSE: DG) operates 16,720 retail stores in 46 states. The company reported net sales increased 17.3% to $8.2 billion in the third quarter 2020, compared to $7 billion in the third quarter 2019. It also reported its operating profit increased 57.3% to $773.1 million Scottsdale, Arizona-based Simone CRE Insight is a commercial real

estate development company. The contractor for the Benton City project is Collaborative Construction Solutions.

Three Rivers foundation awards nearly $300K

Three Rivers Community Foundation announced it awarded $294,000 in grants to area nonprofits, an increase of $142,000 over 2019. The foundation, which manages charitable goals of its partners, pre-

sented $152,000 from its Covid-19 Response Fund. The nonprofit’s annual grant program makes awards on an application-based process. The foundation holds and invests funds for various donors and organizations. Some are directed by donors while the foundation maintains an unrestricted fund to support broad community interests. Go to threeriverscf.fsuite.com/erp/ donate to support the foundation.

I wanted nothing to do with it, so he learned all about it. We hire young people to sell them.” McConnell said the store turns over its inventory twice a year. “We switch seasons in April,” said McConnell, who admits “we’re not as busy in the summer as we are in the winter. In the offseason, we scale back a bit to six full-timer employees, and four or five part-timers.” Though this year, the store’s “summer business was crazy,” he said. Right around Labor Day, the store switches over to winter sports inventory. “It’s super important to have snow by Christmas, and the week between Christmas and New Year’s can make you or break you,” McConnell said. “The areas have a lot of snow right now. We’re supposed to have a La Niña

this year.” And he’s confident skiing will be a booming business this year around the Northwest. “The industry says it’s flat. We don’t see that,” he said. “The mountains are full, the mountains are busy.” The Northwest did take a little financial beating in March. Jordan Elliot, president of the Pacific Northwest Ski Areas Association, told KREM TV in Spokane recently that last season, resorts in Alaska, Oregon and Washington lost $87 million in revenue when the pandemic forced an earlier end to the season. Because of the pandemic, McConnell does see people staying close to their home mountains. “Bluewood will be one of the safest places this year,” he said. “A lot of people outside the area are not travel-

ing in the pandemic. It’s a good year to ski local.” From McConnell’s point of view, based what he’s hearing from the many customers who come through his door and on what he’s seen at resorts, skiing remains a big business. “More people are getting into, or getting back into, skiing,” he said. “... We’ve seen nothing but growth.” And life has been good for the guys who run a local outdoor sports business that’s been around for 40 years. “We got into the business not to get rich but because we love sports,” McConnell said. “In fact, Thanksgiving is our last day off for a while. But that’s OK. We sell fun.” Sporthaus Northwest: 26 N. Columbia Center Blvd., Kennewick; 509-7357555; sporthausnw.com; Facebook; Instagram.