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THE kILLINg OF gRAHAM NIvEN: 25 YEARS LATER In the early morning hours of Aug. 13, 1994, Graham Niven was beaten to death outside a convenience store in Coquitlam. The effects of this random and brutal slaying reverberate to this day. See story, pages 18-20

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2019

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OUt OF tHe OLD, intO tHe neW

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Families need, get help for kids, school Community groups filling backpacks with food and more Diane StranDberg dstrandberg@tricitynews.com

A worker moves the Terry Fox Library’s collection of more than 260,000 items from the older building (right) into its new home (left) at the Port Coquitlam community centre next door on Tuesday. The move took two days and, the library’s manager, Kimberly Constable said, everything will be in place, along with several new items and features, in time for the complex’s grand opening Tuesday at 4 p.m. More details, page 9. MARIO BARTEL/THE TRI-CITY NEWS

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Back-to-school preparations can be stressful for both adults and children but, thanks to community efforts, hundreds of families will get help to start the year successfully. This year, Tri-City community groups, church outreach programs, social service agencies and the food bank will make sure fridges are filled, children get fresh hair cuts and their backpacks are filled with school supplies. The need is great, according to the latest statistics, which show one in five B.C. children living in poverty. In the Tri-Cities, Share Family and Community Services is seeing a 20% increase in the number

of kids getting some of their food from the food bank. In 2013 when The Tri-City News wrote about school food programs, there were 1,300 children under 18 in families using food banks in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody. That number has grown to more than 1,600 this year — a 23% increase. “It is surprising, B.C. is one of the most affluent provinces in Canada,” said Ron Goyette, past president of Rotary Club of Port Coquitlam Centennial. But Goyette, who started a Starfish Pack program for PoCo elementary and middle schools in 2017, says pockets of poverty are found throughout School District 43, with the weeks leading up to a new school year among the most stressful for many families because of all the financial demands.

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

NEWS IN TRI-CITIES

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Fundraiser will help fill backpacks for kids, families continued from front page

To ease the worry of local families, the PoCo Starfish Pack program provides a weekly backpack full of cupboard essentials — such as rice, pasta, pasta sauce and peanut butter — to 34 children at three elementary and one middle school. Businesses, credit unions and Build a Biz Kids have worked with Rotary Club of Port Coquitlam Centennial to provide consistent support for these families, a commitment Goyette said is making a difference. “Hopefully we can have a positive impact on these youth in their younger years,” he said. Gaye Simms agrees. The current president of Rotary Club of PoCo Centennial told The Tri-City News last week that it’s gratifying to see youngsters walking home with backpacks or shopping bags full of groceries that will help their families stretch their dollars. “It’s a really easy program to support and when people realize the program is there, they want to help out,” she said. To get a Starfish Pack, children are identified by school youth workers or counsellors, families are asked if they want to participate and, if room is available, students will be added to the list, benefitting from a $525 annual commitment in food from PoCo Rotary. The program is not cheap, said Simms, and PoCo Centennial Rotary would like to be able to help more families. To that end, the service group is hosting a Naked Pallet Paint Night fundraiser on Aug.

Vishad Deeplaul, with his son, Zrav, at a fundraiser for the Backpack Buddies program. SUbMitteD PhOtO

Help with Backpack Buddies on Aug. 31 grant granger ggranger@tricitynews.com

Gaye Simms, president of Rotary Club of Port Coquitlam Centennial, and past president Ron Goyette with some of the backpacks they’ve prepared for Port Coquitlam elementary and middle school students with the help of the community. A fundraiser planned for Aug. 29 will raise money for the Starfish Pack program. Diane StranDberg/the tri-City newS

“Hopefully we can have a positive impact on these youth in their younger years.”

Ron Goyette Rotary Club Port Coquitlam Centennial

29 at the Kinsmen Clubhouse,; for a $60 contribution, participants can create an art project while guided by artists, and enjoy a dinner. More information is available at www.pocorotary.ca.

Across town in Coquitlam, another group is providing backpacks of food for students and the Coquitlam Firefighters Charitable Society is getting ready to provide breakfast and snacks for students when school starts, with a fundraiser gala planned for Sept. 28 at Riverside Community Church in PoCo. To help families start off the school year on the right foot, the CityReach Care Society is hosting its first ever Back to School Blast. Saturday, Aug. 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., the group will give away 200 backpacks with school supplies along with free haircuts, free back to school portraits, a free barbecue, and a used clothing sale. Tri-Cities community outreach director Craig Savage said he expects a good turnout at the event, which will be held

at Broadway Church, 1932 Cameron Ave., PoCo. His group has been providing food programs at three schools in Port Coquitlam and one in Coquitlam, where registered families get a selection of fruits, vegetables and dairy. Savage said through the school program, he is seeing families who are struggling, sometimes just on a shortterm basis because of a recent family issue. He hopes the Back to School Blast will make their first weeks in school happier and healthier. “The idea is to have a bunch of supports in place for families facing those additional costs so parents can feel good about sending their kid back to school.” • More information about this event is available at www. cityreach.org/backtoschool.

Anyone stocking up their backpacks for school at Coquitlam Centre on the last Saturday before classes begin is being asked to help fill backpacks with food for hungry children. As part of its 40th anniversary celebration, the mall is teaming with the Backpack Buddies program on Aug. 31. The Community First Foundation’s initiative distributes enough food for a weekend to students whose families struggle to put food on the table. “We basically fill the hunger gap for the weekend,” said Vishad Deeplaul, marketing and communications coordinator for Community First Foundation which runs the program. This year, Deeplaul decided to organize his seven-yearold son Zrav’s school, Pinetree elementary, as a donor school that donates to the program each month with the food being distributed in the Tri-Cities area. The first school in the region to join the program, which started in 2012, was Meadowbrook elementary in Coquitlam a year ago. In the 2018/’19 school year, Backpack Buddies distributed to schools in Metro Vancouver nearly 25,000 bags of food, more than 3,000 a month, from 18 donation schools to 48 recipient schools. On Aug. 31, shopping families are encouraged to donate $10 and then pack a backpack themselves. Deeplaul said it’s an opportunity to teach children how other kids aren’t as fortunate and show them they can actually make a difference. The event will be held between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the mall’s event central area on the upper level near the Lululemon store. The first 100 who donate $10 will receive a $10 gift certificate.

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

AUGUST 22 – 28 CALENDAR Thursday, Aug. 22 Neighbourhood Night at Panorama Park 6 – 8 p.m. coquitlam.ca/neighbourhoodnights

Tuesday, Aug. 27 Coquitlam Library Anime Convention 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. coqlibrary.ca

Wednesday, Aug. 28

NEIGHBOURHOOD NEWS

TRAFFIC HOT SPOTS

LOOKING FOR A FOREVER HOME

Neighbourhood Night at Panorama Park

Como Lake Avenue FortisBC Gas Line Upgrade

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Come on out Panorama Park area residents and get to know your neighbours on Thursday, Aug. 22 from 6:30 – 9 p.m.! Join the City’s Outdoor Recreation Team for our final Neighbourhood Night. Be a part of building relationships, promoting neighbourhood safety and creating a sense of community while having fun! This free event includes kids’ games, family activities and light refreshments. A special thank you to Envision Financial our Presenting Partner. coquitlam.ca/neighbourhoodnights

Eastbound Lanes will be closed between North and Clarke roads – a detour for traffic travelling east on Como Lake Avenue is in effect. Motorists will be detoured south on North Road, east on Smith Avenue and north on Clarke Road. One westbound lane will remain open for traffic and access will be maintained for local residents. Streets and properties on the south side of Como Lake Avenue will be accessible by left-hand turns, while those on the north side will be accessible by right-hand turns. Motorists will not be able to exit on to Como Lake Avenue via Farrow or Tyndall Streets. This detour is expected to end in early September with work continuing in the area, with one eastbound and one westbound lane open for traffic. Businesses in the area remain open. talkingenergy.ca

Performance on the Patio with Caviar & Lace 6 – 8 p.m. coquitlam.ca/dogwood

Meet Cat Benatar, a spunky and friendly spayed female! She is approximately six to eight years old and is a lovely cat that will curl up and cuddle in your lap, or be playful and chase toys around. She has a huge personality and will tell you exactly what she wants. Her favourite activity is drinking from the faucet – she will stand at the tap and meow until you turn it on. Cat Benatar will make an incredible companion and is best in a home without other cats or dogs. For more details visit coquitlam.ca/animalshelter.

Lansdowne Drive Briarcliffe Drive to Guildford Way

FITNESS & FUN

Summer Lunch and Music Come and enjoy a delicious luncheon accompanied by musical entertainment with Greg Hampson on Thursday, Aug. 29 from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Lemon Tree Café in Glen Pine Pavilion. The cost is $11.71 and pre-registration is required – barcode #645153. coquitlam.ca/signmeup

Through Saturday, Aug. 31, construction work will take place Monday to Saturday between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays. Traffic delays and parking will be restricted on Lansdowne Drive during construction. Please plan an alternate route to avoid delays. coquitlam.ca/roadwork

visitcoquitlam.ca

Check out for info on more activities, events and celebrations in Coquitlam.

DID YOU KNOW?

Dog Off-Leash Trails in Mundy Park Did you know that many of the trails in Mundy Park are off-leash areas for dogs from dawn to 10 a.m. daily? The exceptions are the Mundy Park Community Path and the trails leading to Mundy Park – dogs are prohibited from this environmentally sensitive area at all times. Visit coquitlam.ca/dogparks for maps and to find out more about Mundy Park and Coquitlam’s other dog off-leash areas.

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Ballet Core Fusion – FREE ‘TRY IT’ Class Ballet Core Fusion is our version of Barre-fused with Pilates and ballet for a toning experience you will love. FREE ‘TRY IT’ classes are available starting Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. at Centennial Pavilion, but you must register in person at Pinetree, Dogwood, and Poirier Sport & Leisure Complex or online – barcode #651672. coquitlam.ca/signmeup

See our ad on page 27 for free events, sport try-its, fun volunteer opportunities & more!

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

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B U R K E M O U N TA I N

City land up for sale and is ready for development Two lots are zoned for more than 160 townhouse units

CCAC is closed for maintenance Annual work means swimmers should head to Poirier

GRANT GRANGER ggranger@tricitynews.com

Coquitlam is putting two city development lots on Burke Mountain up for sale that are ready for construction. The Smiling Creek neighbourhood lots total 9.5 acres and are already serviced, zoned for townhouses and come with pre-paid community amenity contributions. “These opportunities don’t come up that often in Metro Vancouver,� said Curtis Scott, Coquitlam’s manager of land development, in a press release. “We’ve eliminated a lot of the risk by taking care of the rezoning. They’re development-ready.� The city is nearing completion of Riley Park, a 3.5-acre site adjacent to the lots with a playground, plazas and pathways that is set to open in the fall. It will also be a short walk from the future 39-acre Burke Mountain Village, which is planned to have a plaza, grocery store, recreation centre, shops and condos. The city also has plans for a coffee shop and what it calls a “discovery centre� across from

R E C R E AT I O N

Premier John Horgan at a school announcement this spring on Burke Mountain in Coquitlam. TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO

Riley Park. The city is telling potential buyers it has a “desired vision for the prime properties surrounding the future village.� One lot is ready for approximately 70 units and the other would have about 96. The city’s concept calls for a mix of townhouses, duplexes and triplexes. “It’s not a piecemeal approach,� Scott said the press release. “We are invested in this for the long haul, by doing the master planning

to ensure elements the community wants and needs are realized.� The city said approximately 13,000 residents already live in the area, which will be getting two elementary schools and a middle/secondary school in the future. (In May, the province announced a new elementary school would be built on Burke but a joint middle/ secondary school for the area isn’t on the immediate horizon.)

Scott said Coquitlam is not wavering from its long-term vision for the area and continues to develop roadways, parks and services. The city said the approach it is taking to this area gives it greater control over the development and provides a source of revenue. Requests for offers on the properties will be issued in the near future, said the city. More information can be found at coquitlam.ca/ burkemtn and coquitlam.ca/ landsales.

If you want to take a dip at an indoor pool in Coquitlam next month, head up to the Poirier Sport and Leisure Complex. From Sept. 3 to 30, the City Centre Aquatic Complex (CCAC) will close for annual maintenance. During that time, city crews will be cleaning the pool tanks, resurfacing the floor in the change rooms, rebuilding the sauna and hot tub filter, and servicing the slide and wave machine. As well, the change and shower rooms, life jackets, pool toys and other equipment will get a scrub. As for the adjoining fitness centre, it will get a

deep clean too when it’s closed between Sept. 3 and 10. Afterwards, until Sept. 29, the fitness centre will open weekdays, 5:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. It will be closed Sundays. The public fitness centres at Pinetree community centre (1260 Pinetree Way) and Glen Pine Pavilion (1200 Glen Pine Crt., for adults only) will be available during the CCAC maintenance schedule in September. The Poirier pool is located at 633 Poirier St. The city’s two outdoor tanks — Eagle Ridge and Spani — are open until Sept. 2 (lengths only at Eagle Ridge until Sept. 27 and at limited times).

SETTING IT STRAIGHT

• Re. “22% of local sex assault reports in 2018 called ‘unfounded’ by policeâ€? (front page, The Tri-City News, Aug. 15). The referenced article gave an incorrect title for Janine Benedet; she is a UBC law professor and a former director of the university’s Centre for Feminist Legal Studies. • Re. “‘Pandering’ to Chinese $â€? (Letters, The Tri-City News, Aug. 15). The referenced letter to the editor said UBC has more than 4,000 mainland Chinese students (as of 2016); the correct number is approximately 5,000.

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

Celebrate the opening of PHASE 1!

AUGUST 27, 4-7 PM

4-7 PM – OUTSIDE

COMMUNITY BLOCK PARTY: › FREE barbecue › Live entertainment › Fire truck and RCMP cruiser › Displays, games and more

4-7 PM – INSIDE › › ›

Tours every 15 minutes Full library services and activities Activities in Wilson Lounge, games room and multi-purpose rooms

5 PM – LOBBY ›

Opening remarks, plaque unveiling and ribbon cutting

5:30 PM – ARENA 3 › ›

First skate – Mayor, council & contest winners FREE skating until 7 pm

6 PM – ARENA 2 ›

Exhibition hockey game: Fire vs. RCMP

portcoquitlam.ca/pccc


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

PORT COQUITLAM NEWS

A9

SUMMER FESTIVALS,, ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

2019

portcoquitlam.ca/summer

POCO COMMuniTy CenTRe

POCO CRiMe

Bring your skates to opening of revamped PoCo complex

Invasion investigation in PoCo

Construction ongoing but two rinks and library to open Janis Cleugh jcleugh@tricitynews.com

The big reveal for Phase 1 of the new Port Coquitlam community centre is next Tuesday afternoon. And PoCo residents can lace up their skates to be among the first to take a spin on one of the two rebuilt rinks. The inaugural public skate, which will be free, will happen from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Arena 3 (purple rink). Mayor Brad West and city council — plus 10 contest winners — will get the initial crack at the ice during the grand opening party that runs from 4 to 7 p.m. at the $132-million facility. Besides the skate, the bash will also include a community block party outside — with a free barbecue, RCMP and fire displays and live entertainment — and, inside, tours every 15 minutes, activities, free coffee and cookies in the Wilson Lounge, and ice cream at the concession. The speeches, plaque unveiling and ribbon cutting are at 5 p.m. and, at 6 p.m., Mounties will face off against

Workers on Tuesday moved Terry Fox Library’s collection into its new home at the Port Coquitlam community centre next door. The community centre’s grand opening is scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 27 starting at 4 p.m. MARIO BARTEL/THE TRI-CITY NEWS

PoCo firefighters for an exhibition hockey game on Arena 2 (green rink). With construction ongoing, attendees are asked to walk, cycle, take transit or carpool as parking is limited. West said he’s looking forward to welcoming PoCo residents to see inside the first part of the rec complex.

“I encourage people to join us at the grand opening and get a first-hand look of the new centre,� he told The TriCity News. “I’m sure they’ll be impressed with the look and feel of the building. It’s quite something.� Started by the previous council, the capital project is the largest in the city’s history

and was funded with: borrowing ($52 million over 30 years); internal and reserve funds ($41.2 million); the sale of city land ($17 million); a federal infrastructure grant ($12.5 million); tax levies from 2015 to ’19 ($7.3 million); and an annual parcel tax ($2 million). The $25 parcel tax ends next year.

gaRy MCKenna gmckenna@tricitynews.com

The complex is being built by Ventana Construction — the same general contractor responsible for the Langley Events Centre and the Prospera Centre in Chilliwack — with city oversight by Tango, which provides progress reports to PoCo’s committee of council each month. Still, while the first phase opens Aug. 27 and includes the two ice sheets, the new Terry Fox Library, multipurpose rooms, recreation administration, games room, Wilson Lounge and a commercial kitchen, the leisure pool and fitness centre won’t ready until early next year. As for Phase 2, its opening will be gradual as well: The summer of 2021 is the projected opening for the third ice sheet, the gym, a children’s area and large multipurpose room. And the fall of 2021 will see the opening of the underground parking, cafÊ and outdoor plaza. Demolition of the south facilities for Phase 2 is expected to begin soon while regular schedules for Phase 1 start next Wednesday; it will be open Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sundays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Visit portcoquitlam.ca/ pccc or call 604-927-7529 for programs or 604-927-5420 for construction project inquiries.

Coquitlam RCMP is investigating a home invasion in Port Coquitlam earlier this month. The Mounties did not issue a press release after the attack and were tight-lipped last week when contacted by The Tri-City News about the incident, which occurred at around 2:30 a.m. Aug. 1 in the 1500-block of Elinor Crescent. “It is actively being investigated at this time,� said RCMP Const. Jenifer Barker. Police did not confirm how many suspects were involved or whether weapons were used in the commission of the home invasion. Investigators were seen canvassing the neighbourhood shortly after the incident and several residents took to the Mary Hill Safe Streets Facebook page to post what they saw. “Police just showed up banging on my door,� Tamara Overbye wrote the next morning. “Apparently, there was a major incident and they needed to see my [security] cameras (which unfortunately don’t capture the laneway).� “They just came to my house as well,� added Alicia Hokins-Grotke. “They said it happened further down the lane to the north of the entrance.�

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A10

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

Resident caretakers required

NOTICE OF CONSTRUCTION

Murray Street Upgrades Project

The City of Port Moody requires a resident caretaker for Rocky Point Park. The City offers living space (including heat, light, water). Monthly rental is based on market rates plus GST. The caretakers’ activities include reporting to the Port Moody Police Department and the Manager of Facilities any and all acts of damage or public nuisance occurring in and around the park site, and observing, recording and reporting the incidents that they witness. The caretaker is expected to perform these activities at regular intervals each day of the week. Submissions of interest must be received by Monday, September 16, 2019. Interested parties should include details of past caretaking positions, and other related experience. Caretakers under final consideration must provide a satisfactory police records search. Send submissions by email to parks@portmoody.ca.

September 2019–May 2020 The City of Port Moody’s Murray Street Upgrades Project includes replacing an aging watermain, installing new traffic signals, and creating new multi-use paths for pedestrians and cyclists. This project also includes improvements to the parking lot at Rocky Point Park and the retaining wall at the Port Moody Station Museum.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

PORT MOODY NEWS

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PUBlIC GaRDENS

Museum on lookout for veggie thieves Multiple thefts this year from garden at PM Station Museum

ALSO, MEAT

A PoMo butcher continues her travels on the meat competition circuit. tricitynews.com

GRaNT GRaNGER ggranger@tricitynews.com

A produce pilferer has plundered the Port Moody Station Museum’s heritage garden four times this year. “It is extremely frustrating,” said the museum’s executive director Jim Millar, who added this year’s thefts are on top of several others last year. “I’m determined to catch these people.” Millar said he has reported every incident to Port Moody police but no celery stalker, beet burglar or radish rustler has been apprehended so far. Postings to social media indicated a security camera showed two people absconding with the veggies and taking off in a vehicle. Although Millar said other community gardens in the area have also been victims of a veggie snatcher, Coquitlam RCMP said they could not find any files for community garden thefts. The garden’s produce consists mostly of older varieties such as zuke melons, scimitar peas and quince, said Millar. In this latest produce plundering they picked some quince which Millar said won’t be ready

Investigators from Port Moody Fire Rescue are still trying to ascertain the cause for the fire that destroyed two buildings — one of them a protected heritage structure — on Clarke Street July 28. Ron Coulson, the department’s chief said it has been determined, though, that the fire was accidental. TRI-CITY

for eating for another six weeks. They also pulled a dozen flower plants out by their roots and didn’t dig them out. Although the station did not have a garden back in the day, many stations along the Canadian Pacific Railway did. Millar said they served two purposes: The first was to help feed the workers who also lived at the station, and they helped to convince potential homesteaders that the town was a good place to set down roots. The society that runs Port Moody Station Museum decided to build the garden in 2001 to honour that part of the railway’s past. “I do make my lunch out of it every day,” said Millar. He added although the non-profit society sells some of the produce to raise money, some of it is sent to the food bank run by Share Family and Community Services or passed on to schools to show kids how things grow.

NEWS FILE PHOTO

PORT MOODY FIRE

No cause yet for Clarke Street fire: PoMo chief Fire that damaged buildings ‘not suspicious in any way’ MaRIO BaRTEl mbartel@tricitynews.com

Port Moody Fire Rescue says it will likely never definitively determine the cause of the July 28 fire that destroyed two buildings on Clarke Street — one of them a protected heritage structure that once housed the old Roe &

Abernathy grocery store. Ron Coulson, the department’s chief, said the nature of the destruction makes it difficult for fire investigators to pinpoint an exact cause but they have enough information to ascertain the blaze started accidentally. “It’s not suspicious in any way,” Coulson said, adding the ongoing investigation will also include a review of video shot by bystanders at the scene as well as discussions with police. Coulson said the investigation should be wrapped up by the

end of the month. Nobody was hurt in the fire, which erupted around the dinner hour. Aside from the vacant grocery store, the fire also destroyed the Gallery Bistro, which was closed at the time for a private birthday party for its owner, Helen Daniels. Several tenants in apartments above the stores were also displaced and three neighbouring businesses suffered smoke and water damage. One of them, the Silk Art Gallery — owned by Port Moody Coun. Zoe Royer —

reopened Tuesday (see story on page 35). Daniels, who safely escaped the blaze along with her party guests, said, “It’s too early at this point to think about what lies ahead” for her business, which had become a focal point for the city’s arts and music community, displaying visual artworks on its walls and hosting concerts, jazz nights and open-mic events. Several fundraising efforts have also been organized to support the residents and businesses affected by the fire.

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A12

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

OPINIONS & MORE

A13

Find a variety of voices online: tricitynews.com/opinion

The Tri-City News is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, published at 118-1680 Broadway Street, Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 2M8

OPPOSING VIEWS

Topic: SD43 officials’ trip to China

“So these [trips] have been questioned so many times, have we heard any response from these school board officials yet? Or are they deaf on this issue?”

“A communist dictatorship threatens Canada and [School District 43 officials] feel it is a good time to visit?”

Jojo Calimbas

Martin Schikora

via Facebook

via Facebook

THE TRI-CITY NEWS’ OPINION

W E E K LY O N L I N E P O L L

25 years after Graham Niven was killed, are we better, safer?

Last Week t

Social media amplifies bad acts but we see plenty of good THE TRI-CITY NEWS newsroom@tricitynews.com

T

wenty five years ago, 5,000 people gathered at a rally at Coquitlam’s Town Centre Stadium to protest what many believed were lax laws that failed to make young offenders accountable for their crimes. The catalyst for this event was the shocking death of 31-year-old Graham Niven, who was stomped to death by 18-year-old Stephen Stark and his 15-year-old accomplice, John Biniaris, outside a convenience store in Coquitlam. Today, you would be hardpressed to get that many Tri-

City residents out for a protest. After all, the economy is good, the community is relatively safe, crime is down and that kind of random attack is rare. But beneath the current seemingly glossy picture are some realities that can’t be ignored. Anxiety amongst youths is high; suicide is the leading cause of injury-related death among children and youth in B.C.; gangs continue to recruit young people; online sexual exploitation of youth is growing; bullying has not slowed and, in fact, many experts are saying it’s been exacerbated by social media. Recent sensational crimes, such as the murders of Australian tourist Lucas Fowler, his U.S. girlfriend Chynna Deese, and Canadian botanist Leonard Dyck alleg-

edly by two Port Alberni teens, have left many appalled about the state of young people, while others decry the actions of those teens who watched and recorded the tragic overdose death of Langley teen Carson Crimeni. Here in the Tri-Cities, we’ve seen young people die tragically from illicit drugs and the bullying of Amanda Todd lead to her suicide death. It could be argued that the advent of the internet and social media has made us all too aware of the criminal acts of just a few, and while our outrage grows with each senseless act, we are often left with a sense of helplessness. So what have we learned in the 25 years since Niven was killed for doing nothing more talking with the wrong person at the wrong time? As in everything, the world

is what we make of it and we can focus on the negatives or we can focus on solutions. We can also say that for every single act of violence carried out by a young person, thousands more actions taken by TriCity youth are being done to reduce stigma about mental health, improve the environment and generally make the world a kinder place. Back in 1994, just days after a killing that shook this community, The Tri-City News wrote an editorial about Graham Niven’s murder, saying his death should have meaning. Honouring him requires more than outrageous comments on social media; it requires a focused attention to finding solutions to ensuring our youth grow up healthy and safe, and morally and ethically strong.

Do individual Tri-City residents and businesses do enough to protect bears?

NO

84%

YES

16%

This Week t Have you and your family already started back-to-school preparations? Vote at tricitynews.com

Delivery Newsroom Display Ads Classified Ads

118-1680 Broadway Street, Port Coquitlam British Columbia V3C 2M8 tricitynews.com

604-472-3040 604-472-3030 604-472-0979 604-444-3056

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Concerns? The Tri-City News is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact editor@tricitynews.com or 604-472-3030. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information.

Audited circulation: 52,962

Publisher/Sales Editor Digital Sales Circulation Production

Shannon Mitchell Richard Dal Monte Alex Salama Kim Yorston Matt Blair

publisher@tricitynews.com

The Tri-City News is an independent community newspaper, qualified under Schedule 111, Part 111, Paragraph 11 of the Excise Tax Act. A division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, it is published Wednesday and Friday. Copyright and/or property rights subsist in all display advertising and other material appearing in this issue of The Tri-City News. Second class mailing registration No, 4830 The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.


A14

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

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Panel Date: September 11, 2019 Join Business in Vancouver for an afternoon of stories, advice and networking. Our panel of business leaders will address the challenges women face at work, and share strategies that help women win in the workplace. The conversation will cover issues around equal pay, developing your voice, balancing work and family, and how successful women rise through the ranks. The discussion will deliver pratical insights for women in any sector, at any state of their careers.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! Event Date: September 18, 2019 Join us to celebrate standout technology leadership and breakthrough innovation when Business in Vancouver hosts the inaugural BC CTO Awards. The event will honour Chief Information Officers, Chief Technology Officers, and others in top IT posts across BC in multiple categories at public companies, private companies, and non-profit organizations. SPONSORED BY:

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NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN! Deadline: October 15, 2019 Business in Vancouver is once again recognizing BC’s most outstanding business women in private or public sector companies. Honourees have risen through the ranks to become senior executives or entrepreneurs. Through corporate board placements they help influence and shape policy at some of Canada’s largest companies. Winners will be profiled in a February issue of Business in Vancouver. SPONSORED BY:

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REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! Event date: November 13, 2019 Business in Vancouver presents the BC CEO Awards. Winning CEOs will be profiled in BIV on October 1st and honoured at a gala dinner where each winner will share their leadership lessons to an audience of Vancouver’s business community.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

YOUR LETTERS

A15

Find even MORE letters online: tricitynews.com/opinion/letters

SCHOOL DISTRICT 43 CHINA TRIPS

TRI-CITY BEARS

SD43 is setting a bad example

Bears aren’t dangerous

The Editor, Re. “Trip to China just business: SD43” (The TriCity News, July 18) and “‘Pandering’ to Chinese $” (Letters, The Tri-City News, Aug. 15). The School Act indicates that there must be a board of education for each school district that consists of trustees. A person elected or appointed as trustee must take an oath of office. A trustee makes the solemn promise to abide by the School Act and faithfully perform the duties of their office, and not allow any private interest to influence their conduct in public matters. But School District 43 trustees and staff have been letting

The Editor, Re. “3 people arrested, 3 bears are killed” and “Bear that made itself at home is caught, destroyed” (The Tri-City News, Aug. 1). I just read your articles about bears being euthanized in Coquitlam. There were comments made along the lines of “We can’t take the chance that a child won’t be killed or injured by a black bear.” Here are the facts: In all of North America in the last 10 years, there has been just over one fatality per year caused by black bears. It seems to me there are much better alternatives than killing black bears. Cordell Pennington, Coquitlam

TRUSTEE BARB HOBSON

the Chinese government cover the entire cost of their yearly trip to China, which has been happening since 2007. In his book Claws of the

Panda : Beijing’s Campaign of Influence and Intimidation in Canada, author Jonathan Manthorpe wrote: “In the case of the Coquitlam School Board, questions about the probity of the trustees arose when it was found out that many had taken handouts as part of the Confucius Institute deal.” CUPE Local 561 president Dave Ginter, in his letter to The Tri-City News, says he considers the trip a conflict of interest and demands more transparency from the trustees. In addition, the former chair of the Vancouver School Board, Patti Bacchus, told The Tri-City News the free trips should raise several red flags

about the ethical behaviour of public servants taking handouts from foreign governments. She also said that there should be a lot more scrutiny to ensure that it is not subjecting Canadians to Chinese government propaganda during these all-expenses-paid junkets. Although the trips have been questioned so many times, Barb Hobson, chair of the SD43 board of education and a Coquitlam trustee, and superintendent Patricia Gartland, together with the international education program’s director of marketing, surreptitiously took a trip to China in late May that the district paid for. What was the

motivating force that took them to China? These public officials even have the nerve to disregard the request of The Tri-City News for an interview. Aren’t they laughing at the system that sees more and more people disengage from politics and that discourages them from voting? Are we in a democracy where transparency and accountability are expected or in a moneycracy that is twisting Canadians’ values? Is this the example the board of education is transmitting to the students whose education the board is supposed to take care of? Marta Posilovic, Coquitlam

Join the conversation at facebook.com/tricitynews

New Student Registration On Tuesday, September 3, over 32,000 students in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody and the villages of Anmore and Belcarra will be returning to school. School District No. 43 (Coquitlam) welcomes all students and wishes all of them the very best for the year ahead.

MEDIEVAL Save on passes at

If you are new to the area or have moved over the summer, registration for new students will take place in public schools the week of August 26. To register, bring proof of citizenship for parent and child (e.g. birth certificate, PR card, passport), and proof of local residency to your local catchment area school. Please refer to the Funding Eligibility Checklist posted online at www.sd43.bc.ca/schools/registration. Non-residents can contact the International Education Department at 604-936-5769 for more information.

For registration information, visit www.sd43.bc.ca/schools/registration or call 604-939-9201.


A16

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

A TRI-CITY NEWS SPECIAL REPORT

A random attack. A brutal murder. A shaken community. T H E K I L L I N G O F G R A H A M N I V E N : 2 5 Y E A R S L AT E R

Everything changed The response to the killing of Graham Niven Aug. 13, 1994 in Coquitlam reverberates to this day in Tri-Cities STEFAN LAbbé slabbe@tricitynews.com

A

t around 1:30 a.m. on Aug. 13, 1994, Graham Niven ambled towards a Mac’s convenience store in strip mall on Ridgeway Avenue in Coquitlam. The 31-year-old had recently returned to the Lower Mainland from Calgary and, after a playing few games of pool at the John B Neighbourhood Pub on Austin Avenue, he left, meeting 14-year-old Kevin Valin, a Quebec resident who was stuck for a ride to his father’s house in Burnaby, where he was spending the summer. Niven offered the teenager some money to get home but because the buses had stopped running, the two of them went to the Mac’s to call a taxi. Only neighbours and certain parents knew it, but the increasingly scruffy strip of small businesses on Ridgeway had become a way station for young people out drinking, looking to score drugs and, for some, getting pulled into prostitution. As Niven and Valin walked out of the convenience store to wait for the taxi, they crossed paths with four teenagers on their way in to buy food. Niven and the other teens started chatting, and the topic of drugs came up. Three years later, Valin would tell a court that when 18-year-old Stephen Stark said he did heroin, Niven warned him it would mess up his head. That’s when Stark, who Valin would describe as “the fighter,” got angry. “I’ll f--king cut a hole in your head,” Valin remembered Stark saying. Just then, someone else arrived at the store. When Niven opened the door for the man, Stark warned Niven, “Go in. That’s your chance. Save yourself.” Stark then grabbed Niven, smashed him into the store’s plate glass window and threw him on to the pavement, where he cracked his skull on the concrete. Stark jumped on top of Niven and started punching him in the gut. Then, one of the other three teenagers Stark arrived with, 15-year-old John Biniaris — Valin described him as “the stomper” — entered the fray, repeatedly kicking Niven’s head into the ground before the two aggressors fled the scene. When police and ambulance arrived, the 30-second attack had left Niven unconscious with an imprint of Biniaris’s running shoe still visible on his forehead. Paramedics rushed him to Royal Columbian Hospital but Niven never regained consciousness. Roughly 10 hours later, he was pronounced dead.

SHOCK, OUTRAGE, ACTION

Coquitlam RCMP arrested Niven and Biniaris at 11 p.m. the same day and, as news of the murder spread, the For more photos, follow us on Instagram #tricitynews

Thousands of Tri-City residents and concerned people from other Lower Mainland communities carried protest signs as they marched into Coquitlam Town Centre Stadium (now Percy Perry Stadium) in a September 1994 rally, which demanded changes to the Young Offenders Act. TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO

outpouring of grief quickly turned to outrage. The single act of violence was a culmination of a rising tide of crime and would transform the Tri-Cities in ways nobody could have predicted. “How could two young men commit such a brutal murder?” many openly questioned. Over the coming weeks, letters poured into The Tri-City News from community members trying to make sense of the murder. “The death of Graham Niven must have some meaning,” opened an editorial in this paper the week he died. At the time, crime was peaking across Canada and drew plenty of political heat. A number of U.S. states had just begun rolling out three-strikes laws as part of a popular campaign to “get tough” on crime. For many people in the Tri-Cities, Niven’s murder represented the latest brutal example of a flawed justice system, a horrific spark that ignited thousands of citizens to call on government to revamp what was then known as the Young Offenders Act (YOA). Within days, Coquitlam’s mayor, Lou Sekora, started circulating a petition to reform the YOA and, on Aug. 22, 300 people stood shoulder to shoulder with then Coquitlam-Port Moody Reform MP Sharon Hayes at the Port Moody recreation centre. In a candlelight vigil, community members and family embraced in an outpouring of public grief. By the end of the month, an ad-hoc victims’ rights

group came together under the name Tri-City Citizens for Justice and Youth. Hayes joined the group’s steering committee, along with Niven’s father, Robert Niven, and Chuck Cadman, another dad whose son, Jesse, had been senselessly stabbed to death by minors two years earlier. “It was a very scary time. It really made people feel unsafe in their own community,” said Diane Sowden, who also joined the group. “There was a lot of things happening in the communities with drugs, violence and the sex trade that the average person was not aware of.” Like Cadman, Sowden had been waging her own private campaign to change the YOA. But where Cadman was lobbying to ramp up penalties for young criminals, Sowden struggled to have a stronger hand in the life of her daughter, who was then pivoting between the streets and Willingdon Youth Detention Centre after she got hooked on crack and was sold to a pimp to repay a drug debt. As Sowden’s daughter was slipping through her fingers, lost to a world of drugs and prostitution, the young mother struggled to get her daughter off the streets and remain in rehab. The summer turned to fall and the number of Tri-City petitioners ticked into the thousands. On Saturday, Sept. 28, more than 5,000 people marched to Coquitlam’s Town Centre Stadium in what Sowden said was the largest protest rally she’s ever seen in the Tri-Cities. “WE’VE HAD ENOUGH,” read one protest sign. “TAKE BACK THE STREETS,” read another.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

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From left: Graham Niven’s killers, Stephen Stark and John Biniaris. And his father, Robert Niven, breaking down while addressing a September 1994 rally in Coquitlam aimed at demanding an overhaul of the Young Offenders Act. Bottom: David Niven, Graham’s brother, outside the Port Coquitlam courthouse. TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTOS

In the end, nearly 20,000 people signed the petition to overhaul the Young Offenders Act. “It was the first time I spoke publicly about my daughter’s situation,” Sowden recently told The Tri-City News. “It was huge.” Robert Niven appeared, too, breaking down during his speech. “We want to make our streets safe for every one of us — you and me included — to walk in.” Cadman, who would later go on to champion youth justice as an MP, said, “Frankly, I’m getting a little tired of meeting grieving parents like Bob.” Stark was convicted of second-degree murder in 1995 and, after having his case raised to adult court, Biniaris was convicted of the same crime in 1996. In the meantime, reform at the national level was slowly marching forward — maximum youth sentences for serious crimes crept up to 10 years by the late 1990s, a knee-jerk reaction to public pressure, Sowden calls it. “If your child has been murdered, it is very easy to have the communities rally around you. I mean, they should,” she said. “But if you’re on the other side, it’s very scary. It’s a silent group of parents.”

“At that rally, the theme was a very punitive response to justice. And I just felt that did not respond to underlying issues that led to this kind of incident in the first place. And that maybe it made people feel good but it would achieve nothing.”

Sandy Burpee Started Together Against Violence, advocate for the homeless

COMMUNITY RESPONSE

From parents to police and politicians, the murder of Graham Niven sparked a realization that more needed to be done for young people in the Tri-Cities, a tragic moment that formed the genesis of many of the youth social services that serve the community today. The year Niven was killed, Sowden founded the Children of the Street Society and, until her retirement in June, the former Coquitlam school trustee continued to work as a relentless advocate for trafficked children. Others, like Sandy Burpee, were disgusted by the widespread calls to give longer, adult sentences to teenagers and children. “I thought at the time that there were at least two tragedies here: One, obviously, was Graham Niven being in the wrong place at the wrong time; and the other was the youth [Biniaris]. “At that rally, the theme was a very punitive response to justice. And I just felt that did not respond to underlying issues that led to this kind of incident in the first place. And that maybe it made people feel good but it would achieve nothing.” That November, Burpee launched Together Against Violence, a month-long marathon of activities designed to bring awareness to the community. And while it lasted another five years, the big change came at the turn of the millennium, when Burpee secured funding from the three cities, plus Anmore and Belcarra, to launch one of the first restorative justice programs in the province, eventually known as Communities Embracing Restorative Action (CERA). From the streets of Ireland following “The Troubles” to the ever-evolving peace process in Colombia, restorative justice has played out in different ways around the world. What each case has in common is to provide an alternative to the court system. Victims, perpetrator and families often sit down with a facilitator over weeks, months and

even years to try and right the wrong. “It gives the victim a chance to be heard and gives the perpetrator a chance to explain why they got involved in it in the first place,” said Stacey Robinsmith, a high school teacher and current chair of CERA’s board of directors. Like other restorative justice organizations across Canada, CERA has carved out a space for itself following the enactment of the Youth Criminal Justice Act in 2002. While lumping violent, high-risk offenders into one category with the option of longer sentences, the law also opened up the door for police to use their discretion in less serious cases. CERA got its first referral in January 2000 and, as the decade wore on, more came filtering in from police agencies, school districts, ICBC and Crown prosecutors. Most of those cases include offences such as theft, assault or break and enter. Last year, the group received 110 referrals — its most ever — and is on track to meet

or exceed that in 2019, according to Robinsmith. Former Coquitlam RCMP officer Bryan Massie “truly embraced that philosophy,” said Robinsmith, and since his departure to become the officer-in-charge of the Chilliwack detachment, others have taken up the mantle, breeding street cops with the understanding that there’s a way to deal with youth crime that doesn’t involve the courts and jail. Police also ramped up their presence in the community following the Niven murder; Coquitlam’s first community police station opened seven doors down from the Mac’s a short time later. Just as CERA has ramped up its work in the Tri-Cities, crime rates across Canada have steadily dropped since their peak in 1991. Critics say our laws are still too soft on minors; others point to the decline in youth incarceration rates as evidence that the justice act has succeeded. “When we look back, we can see a lot fewer young people per capita in custody than we saw 25 years ago — both adult and youth custody — and we’re not having more youth crime. We’re actually having less,” said Nick Bala, a renowned professor of children, youth and family justice at Queen’s University. Youth custody rates are affected by more than how hard courts choose to throw the book at minors. Mental health, education policy and the state of the economy all have a massive effect on how many young people commit crimes and end up in prison.

A LEGACY OF CARING

Twenty-five years after The Tri-City News’ editorial called for Niven’s murder to have meaning, the legacy of that death can be found in the work of people like Burpee, Sowden and a younger generation that has taken up their causes. If, back then, the public conversation revolved around youth justice, today it has shifted to drug use and homelessness, and Burpee has followed. see

ADVOCATES, next page

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

T H E K I L L I N G O F G R A H A M N I V E N : 2 5 Y E A R S L AT E R

Advocates see similarities with current hot topics continued from page

19

In his 11 years helming the Tri-Cities Homelessness and Housing Task Group, he was an instrumental in advocating for the homeless shelter and transition housing units that would be built at 3030 Gordon Ave. in Coquitlam. When Burpee looks at drug use and homelessness today, he sees the same divide in public opinion that Niven’s murder provoked during the crime wave of the early ’90s — both vast challenges to public policy, both revolving around gathering enough public compassion, and support, to guide people away from cycles of abuse and towards opportunity. “It takes a lot of time to understand the other side, and if it’s not something that’s

What happened to the people who killed Graham Niven?

affecting you and your life, people don’t see the importance,” Burpee said. “The divide in public interest and perception is very much the same, whether you come from kind of a hardcore, less compassionate point of view or a point of view that recognizes that not everyone has had the same opportunities and not everyone has been exposed to the same abuses in their earlier years.” When Sowden looks back at Niven’s murder, she also sees the divide that existed, and she’s still struck by how it brought parents from wildly different sides of the same story together to speak as one. • A note regarding this story: The Tri-City News made attempts to reach out to relatives of Graham Niven but was unsuccessful.

n Stephen Stark was charged with second-degree murder in 1995 and has been convicted of nine additional offences while in prison, including one case of attempted murder where he cornered another inmate in a courtyard, stabbed him 24 times and kicked him in the face 19 times. “Violence is well ingrained in your lifestyle,” said a 2007 parole board decision reported by the Vancouver Sun. “Your violent acts are planned, calculated and closely related to gang wars within the institution.” In December 2018, The Tri-City News obtained the latest parole board decision, which said that Stark presented a moderate high-risk to violently reoffend. He remains behind bars. n John Biniaris, 15 at the time of the murder, had come from a healthy family but quickly spiralled out of control after began using cocaine and drinking alcohol in the lead-up to the night of Graham Niven’s killing. His case was raised to adult court 1996 and his seconddegree murder charge was upheld after his appeal was overturned by the Supreme Court of Canada in 2000. He was released from prison on parole in 2001 and, according to Parole Board of Canada decisions obtained by The Tri-City News, refrained from intoxicants for many years, married, upgraded his education and found consistent work in the construction industry. In a 2014 parole board decision, Biniaris was said “to demonstrate a high level of accountability and stability” and has “exceeded expectations” since being released on full parole in 2001.

Krista Mumby, 8, Graham Niven’s niece, is overcome with emotion during a candlelight ceremony only a few days after Niven’s murder in 1994. TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

THINGS-TO-DO GUIDE

WHEN: Saturday, September 28, 2019 WHERE: Executive Plaza Hotel (North Rd, Coquitlam) WEAR: Semi-formal TICKETS: $195 or $1900 for a table of 10

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COMMUNITY EVENTS

Improv, concerts and a book launch JANIS CLEUGH jcleugh@tricitynews.com

Aug. 23 MINOR LAX

Cheer on the young players competing in the Canadian Minor Lacrosse National Championships, today and Saturday at Poirier Sport and Leisure Complex (633 Poirier St., Coquitlam). Organized by the Coquitlam Minor Lacrosse Association, it’s the first time the event has been held in the city. Call 604-927-6027 or visit coquitlamlacrosse.ca.

Authors Madison Revealey and Megan Williams will be at Chapters at Pinetree Village in Coquitlam on Sunday to sign copies of their second book. photo submitted

multi-instrumentalist who is one third of the folk act Tiller’s Folly. The shows are free. Visit portcoquitlam.ca/summer.

POCO PROUD

Help visual artist Steve Baylis as he finishes the Pride Public Art project at Leigh Square. Public workshops to paint the tiles around the fountain area are tonight at 5 p.m. and Saturday at 1 p.m. Register via experienceit.ca for Friday’s session (barcode #38984) or Saturday (barcode #38985). Call 604-927-8442 or visit portcoquitlam.ca/pride.

The Comic Strippers return to the Evergreen Cultural Centre in Coquitlam Friday and Saturday night, featuring new sketches and “dances.” photo submitted

title for The Comic Strippers’ two shows at the Evergreen Cultural Centre (1205 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam) tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m.. The 19+ improv show featuring Roman Danylo and his Vancouver TheatreSports friends offers sketches by a fictitious male parody stripper group — with each cast member called “Chip.” Their performance was named Best Live Production at the Canadian Comedy Awards in 2016. Call 604-927-6555 or visit evergreenculturalcentre.ca.

MAkE A SPLASH

Staff at Port Coquitlam’s Design Roofing will turn their company lot (1385 Kingsway Ave.) into a party block for a BC Children’s Hospital Foundation fundraiser. There’ll be a dunk tank, bouncy castle, carnival games, axe throwing and other activities. Proceeds support the Timbermart Heroes Challenge to grant a wish for a sick child. Tickets at $5 can be bought online at conta. cc/2O5LObg.

Aug. 24 GREAT CLEANUP Join volunteers at Noons Creek hatchery (behind the Port Moody recreation com-

COMIC STRIPPERS

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plex, 300 Ioco Rd.) for the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, along Noons Creek, the Shoreline Trail and Rocky Point Park. Bring three shopping bags, gloves and boots. Drop in is between 9 and 10:30 a.m.. Registration is required via shorelinecleanup. ca. Visit noonscreek.org.

HAPPY SUDS

Coquitlam’s only brewery, Mariner, will have its second birthday bash at its pad (H1100 Lansdowne Dr.) from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. featuring limited releases from this year’s most popular exploratory batches, specially brewed cask releases, live music and cake. Visit marinerbrewing.ca.

BACk TO SCHOOL If you’ve got kids head-

ing to elementary school next month, head over to Broadway Church (1932 Cameron Ave., Port Coquitlam) where CityReach Care Society will give out free backpacks filled with school supplies to students (registration required). The group, which serves families in East Vancouver and the Tri-Cities, will also host a free barbecue, games and photos plus sell second-hand clothing for $3 a bag, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Email lydiap@cityreach.org to sign up for the free swag.

PARk SONGS

Skyline Park rocks out at Lions Park (2300 Lions Way, Port Coquitlam) at 1 p.m. for the city’s Music in the Park series. The band will be followed at 2 p.m. by Bruce Coughlan, a

Aug. 25 SHOP, STITCH

It’s the last chance to help the Coquitlam Heritage Society make a community quilt. Mackin House volunteers and staff will be at the Poirier Street Farmers Market (in the parking lot of Dogwood Pavilion, 1655 Winslow Ave., Coquitlam) from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to show sewers of all ages how to link two quilt squares with a needle and thread. Also Coquitlam Coun. Bonita Zarrillo, who is running for federal office under the NDP banner, will be at the market to chat with constituents. The market starts at 9 a.m. Visit makebakegrow.com.

NEW BOOk

Minnekhada middle student Madison Reaveley and her stepmom Megan Williams will be at Chapters (2991 Lougheed Hwy., Coquitlam)

from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to launch their second publication, I Don’t Want To! — a sequel to their inaugural work Don’t Call The Office, a story about blended families with illustrations by Cathryn John. Call the store at 604-464-2558 or visit meganwilliams.ca.

SUMMER SUNDAYS

Tom Lavin and the Legendary Powder Blues liven up Rocky Point Park (2800block of Murray Street, Port Moody) for the penultimate Summer Sundays show of the season. The free concert with the Juno award-winning band starts at 2 p.m. Donations to Crossroads Hospice Society are accepted. Visit summersundays.ca.

THESPIAN CALL

Stage 43 Theatrical Society holds auditions for The Lion in Winter, a play directed by Wayne Nolan that will run in January. Try-outs will be held at the Evergreen Cultural Centre (1205 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam) from 1 to 3 p.m. Visit stage43.org.

Send your community events for our weekly Things-to-do Guide at least one week in advance to jcleugh@tricitynews.com

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TRI-CITY PEOPLE

Months after diagnosis & treatment, PoMo’s Fenn is riding to beat cancer He’s been having chemo and he’s riding this weekend

“It’s like a form of meditation. Your mind drifts. There’s a lot of introspection.”

MaRIO BaRTEL mbartel@tricitynews.com

Graham Fenn Ride to Conquer Cancer participant, on cycling

F

or a guy still going through chemotherapy treatment for colorectal cancer, riding 220 km with his butt perched on a hard bicycle seat seems an unlikely way to spend a weekend. But for 35-year-old Graham Fenn, participating in the Ride to Conquer Cancer is an important milestone on his road back to health as well as a way to give back for the top-notch care he has received since he was diagnosed in February. Fenn, a Port Moody resident and a director of manufacturing for a paper and notebook company, said he has always been active, playing soccer, snowboarding and travelling for work. The busy schedule, along with some upgrade courses he was taking at BCIT in the evening, left him tired. But last Family Day weekend, Fenn was stricken with stomach pains so bad that he went to St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver to get them checked out.

HOW YOu CAN HELp

The Ride to Conquer Cancer runs Aug. 24 and 25. Proceeds benefit the BC Cancer Foundation. To find out more, register as a participant or to donate to a rider, go to ride.conquercancer.ca/vancouver19.

Port Moody’s Graham Fenn is preparing to participate in the Ride to Conquer Cancer as a way to give back for the treatment he’s receiving for colorectal cancer after he was diagnosed in February. MARIO BARTEL/THE TRI-CITY NEWS

The diagnosis of colorectal cancer was a shock, Fenn said. “I thought it was really minor,” he told The Tri-City News. “It was a bit of a difficult time.” Within a week, Fenn had surgery to remove a piece

of his colon, as well as some lymph nodes to determine if the cancer had spread; three weeks later, he was getting chemotherapy treatment. It was during a discussion Fenn had with his oncologist, Dr. Jonathan Loree, about

the impact the disease would have on his activity that the doctor told him about the Cancer Derailleurs, a cycling team he captains that’s seeking to raise $500,000 to advance development of liquid biopsies to make it easier to

diagnose cancers and track a patient’s response to therapy. Fenn said he’s “more of a motocross kind of guy” but liked the idea of riding a bike to maintain his fitness while he recovered. He reached out to his cousin, former Canadian Olympic mountain biker Warren Sallenbach, who loaned him one of his old road bikes, a black and orange steel-framed Ritchey. His first ride, last May, was with a couple of friends, down from his home on Heritage Mountain to Barnet Marine Park for a picnic. “It was really fun,” Fenn said. “About halfway through

the ride, I couldn’t get the smile off my face.” Since then, Fenn has upped his training to a few rides of 30 km to 80 km a week. He said getting on the bike offers an escape from the drudgery and nagging uncertainty of treatment. “It’s like a form of meditation,” Fenn said. “Your mind drifts. There’s a lot of introspection.” More importantly, he said, riding has helped make him feel healthy again, even as he continues chemotherapy treatments every two weeks. “It’s pretty important to have that.”

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A26

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

B ECAU S E H U N G E R DO E S N ’ T TAKE TH E WE E KE N D O F F HELP THE KIDS WHO ARE HELPING KIDS Your donation of just $10 will help buy food so that student volunteers can pack more than 24,000 backpacks a year. These Backpack Buddies help feed elementary school kids across Metro Vancouver who otherwise would have nothing to eat on weekends.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 31 12:00PM TO 4:00PM EVENT CENTRAL, LEVEL 2 BY LULULEMON ATHLETICA First 100 people receive a $10 Coquitlam Centre Gift Card.* For more information visit Guest Services, Level 1, near Hudson’s Bay, or coquitlamcentre.com

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

A27

LITERACY & LIBRARIES

BOOK OF THE WEEK

Anime, languages and plenty of medals This feature, written by librarians with Coquitlam Public Library, Port Moody Public Library and Terry Fox Library in Port Coquitlam, is published each Thursday to highlight programs and happenings in the Tri-Cities’ three libraries.

COQUITLAM

• Summer Reading Club medal awards ceremonies: Collect a medal for working so hard as a reader this summer. You can pick up your medal at the Poirier Branch Saturday, Sept. 7 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. • Coquitlam Public Library anime convention: Youths from 11 to 19 years old, head to CPL’s City Centre branch Aug. 27 for a half-day celebration of anime culture, featuring an art marketplace, a cosplay contest, an Osu! tournament, a scavenger hunt, a karaoke contest and more. This event runs from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 pm in Rooms 127, 136 and 137, and the computer lab. For more information, contact librarian Chris Miller at 604-554-7339 or cmiller@coqlibrary.ca. Info: www.coqlibrary.ca. The City Centre branch is located at 1169 Pinetree Way and the Poirier branch at 575 Poirier St.

PORT MOODY

• Little Explorers: This hands-on storytime will explore early concepts in science, technology, math and engineering through songs, a story and a fun activity. Preschoolers can become junior scientists and explore the topic of colour either Sept. 13 or 27 from 11:30

a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Register at portmoodylibrary.ca or by calling 604-469-4577. • Learn with Mango: Whether you want to know a few phrases for an upcoming trip or become a brilliant conversationalist, Mango has you covered. Learn a new language on your computer, tablet or smartphone with Mango. Check portmoodylibrary.ca and visit “Digital Content” for more details. Info: library.portmoody.ca or 604-469-4577. Port Moody Public Library is located at 100 Newport Dr., in the city hall complex.

n Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road by Kate Harris n Reviewed by Kathy Johnson, Coquitlam Public Library

many of Fraser Valley Regional Library’s exciting Playground experiences and complete a scavenger hunt in the library for a chance to win a prize basket Tuesday, Aug. 27 from 4 to 7 p.m. — drop in. Info: www.fvrl.bc.ca, the Fraser Valley Regional Library Facebook page or 604-927-7999. Terry Fox Library is located 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo.

In Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, we meet author Kate Harris, a modern-day explorer. In this engrossing memoir, she tucks us into the panniers of her bike and takes us along with her and longtime friend Mel Yule on this epic journey along the Silk Road. As a scientist, she brings to this tale insights into the environmental, social and economic challenges of the lands through which she travels. Unlike earlier explorers who imposed themselves on the cultures they encountered, Harris is an observer and highlights connections between people, culture, science and literature; she has a keen insight into the human heart. Harris seeks the wild places of the world and will make you fall in love with these ancient lands.

Building community pride, environmental responsibility & beautification

TERRY FOX

• Pop-up Library Babytime: Make language fun. Help your baby develop speech and language skills — enjoy bouncing, singing and rhyming with stories. Babytime is a fun, social bonding activity for babies and caregivers that next runs tomorrow (Aug. 23), from 10:15 to 10:45 a.m. at the Port Coquitlam community centre in the lobby — drop in. • Summer Reading Club Medal Ceremony with Norden the Magician: Celebrate a summer of reading. Norden will have you laughing until your sides hurt Aug. 28; 6 to 6:45 p.m., Norden’s performance; 6:45 to 7:30 p.m., medal ceremony. This drop-in event takes place at the Leigh Square bandshell. • New library: Celebrate the new Terry Fox Library at the grand opening of Phase 1 of the new Port Coquitlam community centre. Try out

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Try It! DISC GOLF Learn how to play disc golf and practice using our equipment. BC Disc Sports will be on-site to provide demonstrations, instructions, and review game rules and etiquette. There will be snacks and music too! Bring your friends and family for some morning fun. Saturdays, Aug. 31 & Sept. 21 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Mundy Park Everyone Welcome

The Pop-up Youth Park is located in Mundy Park between the lacrosse box and the disc golf course. The area features an outdoor lounge with portable furniture, a volleyball court, a mobile bike track, a pop-up beach, basketball courts in the lacrosse box, and even a sports equipment lending library with lots of fun stuff to borrow while in the park! Drop-by with friends for music, treats and games like our giant inflatable volleyball! Tuesdays – Saturdays, 2 – 7 p.m. | Mundy Park Open to teens 13 – 17 years old

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A28

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

TRI-CITIES SPOTLIGHT SHOUT OUTS

Search local events. Farmers Markets

1

2

Youth camps Jr. Mountie & Camp Ignite ➊ Representatives from the new PoCo company burb helped to clean up the shores of Coquitlam River last month.

pHOTO SUbmITTed

marIO barTel/THe TrI-cITy NeWS

3

➋ Some 100 youth in the Junior Mountie Police Academy were taken through scenarios last Wednesday in the Poirier rink.

➌ Indigenous youth took to their paddles for the Burrard Inlet Fish Festival, held at Rocky Point Park this month. The event to promote ecological arts, education and community building was presented by Red Fox Healthy Living Society,Stephen Armstrong, Stephens Coffee and J Peachy Gallery.

➍ Pizza Huts in the Tri-Cities sliced in $9,939 for this year’s Sun Life Walk to Cure Diabetes, with the Austin site bringing in half that total. The B.C.wide campaign raised nearly $105,000 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

STeFaN labbe/THe TrI-cITy NeWS

4

5

➎ Port Coquitlam’s Nicola Lodge Care Community offered $650 to Share — money raised this month from its Samosas for Seniors event. “It was a pleasure to give back to a local charity in our community,” said Nyan Phyo, director of resident programs.

NOrTH VaN. HelpS plea

The district of North Vancouver this summer granted $1,800 to the Coquitlam-based Children of the Street society, a nonprofit group — started by former SD43 trustee Diane Sowden — that’s now under the auspices of PLEA Community Services. It’s the third year in a row the municipality has given cash to the group to provide free school-based prevention workshops in North Vancouver to educate students about how to keep safe from sexual exploitation. Other workshop supporters this year have included the PoCo Community Foundation and the ladies auxiliary of the Maple Ridge Eagles #2831.

pHOTO SUbmITTed

QUarTer FINalS aT pageaNT

A Coquitlam resident made the Top 20 at last Saturday’s Miss Universe Canada pageant. Natasha Smith was in the quarter finals for the Toronto competition that was won by Alyssa Boston of Tecumseh, Ont. Smith, who speaks English and Polish, is a kinesiology undergrad at SFU and volunteers in the emergency room at Royal Columbian Hospital; she has also spent time on campaigns for Operation Smile, Variety the Children’s Charity, Free the Children, The Children’s Wish Foundation and SOS Children’s Villages, according to her pageant biography. In 2017, Smith was in the Top 10 at Miss Universe Canada.

pHOTO SUbmITTed

aNNIVerSary gIFT TO cHarITy

A company that serves Metro Vancouver marked its first anniversary by donating $300 to the Crossroads Hospice Society, which has its hospice centre in Port Moody. Veronica Marraffa, an owner of A Basket Because, made Crossroads the firm’s charity of choice as the society is “near and dear to her family,” said development officer Anna Wilczewski in a press release. “We were truly honoured to have been chosen.” Besides its hospice care to terminally ill patients from the Tri-Cities and New Westminster, Crossroads also provides resources to individuals and families. For more photos follow us on Instagram #tricitynews


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

A29

THE ENVIRONMENT

Protecting greenspace protects species

I

n June, the Globe and Mail reported on Canada’s disappearing habitats and B.C.’s grim climate cycle. These articles resonated with me deeply, not only as an ecologist, but as a civic volunteer who struggles to get senior environmental staff, contractors and developers to come to grips with our new reality and to start doing everything, fundamentally, differently. According to the Globe’s science reporter, Ivan Semeniuk, the more than 700 species of plants and animals listed or recommended for listing under the federal Species at Risk Act map almost exactly onto the most densely settled or farmed areas of the country. B.C. tops the list at 295, with more than 100 found within Vancouver alone. This should give us pause. Vanishing habitat is the reason most species end up listed. The David Suzuki Foundation reported back in 2010 and 2012 that our incredible coastal environment of mudflats, wetlands and forest not only supports a vast array of fish and wildlife but these complex

LIVING GREEN Melissa Chaun

ecosystems are critical to all life, filtering and purifying our air, water and soil, recycling essential nutrients, acting as a carbon sink, and moderating the micro-climate, to name a few of their innate wonders. According to Lenore Fahrig, a landscape ecologist at Ottawa’s Carleton University, we need to find ways to better integrate human spaces with the wilderness that is on our doorstep. Dr. Tom Kosatsky, the BC Centre for Disease Control environmental health lead, said cities can change their infrastructure by adding more greenspace because trees counteract the heat-retaining properties of concrete.

On my civic committee, I’ve been advocating for my city to question the carte blanche approval of redeveloping sites in the name of density. Developers are unquestioningly allowed to cover over 95% of a site rezoned as multi-family, resulting in an alarming cumulative loss of old conifers (cedars, Douglas fir) and pervious natural ground. The literature has long documented that paving our watersheds with more than 10% in impervious materials changes stream hydrology and reduces water quality. Not only are the fish in trouble but health authorities warn that drought or flood can bring waterborne disease, cause psychological

harm and affect drinking water, particularly in small watertreatment systems. We can adapt to shrinking snowpacks and longer drier summers by planting heat-loving crops and more droughtresistant trees and shrubs, but we need to scale up our priorities. As Faisal Moola, an environmental policy expert at the University of Guelph (Ont.) says, cities should be leveraging their local geography to create networks of greenspace at the scale of individual lots and neighbourhoods that connect to larger corridors and spaces for nature on a regional scale. All levels of government need to be thinking about a threestep process that begins with saving whatever habitat is left, restoring habitat that exists but has been degraded by invasive species and human impact, and then looking to increase habitat wherever possible. Melissa Chaun of Port Moody is an ecologist with a passion for all things sustainable. She is events co-ordinator with the Rivershed Society of BC and volunteers on various city committees. Her column runs monthly.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP Remember the Blue Dot Movement? Most have forgotten. Our right to clean air, water and soil begins with watershed CPR — conservation, preservation and restoration. With this in mind, here’s what you and I can do: • Choose low-carbon alternatives. Eat plant-based foods as much as possible. Support local farmers who use organic or no-spray practices. To enjoy fruits and vegetables out of season, embrace canning and pickling — or those who do. • Make your garden a bird and pollinator sanctuary. Incorporate more native plant species, less lawn and a shallow bird bath. Avoid invasive species such as butterfly bush and English holly, which can invade natural areas. • Join invasive plant pulling events and encourage your city council to ensure staff and developers go beyond the status quo to protect and enhance green infrastructure. Redevelopment should protect mature evergreen trees, incorporate passive energy design and rainwater capture, and landscape with native species. Remember, we all live in a watershed. • Encourage our provincial government, by contacting your MLA, to pursue tax incentives to keep natural habitat intact. The cost of buying prime farmland continues to be greater than the cost of clearing a stand of trees. As Peter Arcese, a UBC conservation scientist says, in some instances, the tax system works perversely against conservation. In the Lower Mainland, a property owner can receive a tax reduction for keeping land agricultural (e.g., grazing cattle) but not for allowing native forest to regrow on the property. B.C. needs to change its tax laws to extend the notion of productivity to storing carbon and other ecosystem services a natural landscape provides.

Join the conversation at twitter.com/tricitynews

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A30

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

OUT & ABOUT CALENDAR

Search local events. Farmers Markets

TUESDAY, SEPT. 3 • Have you considered becoming a foster parent? There are children and youth in the Tri-Cities who require skilled, caring foster parents. To learn more, the Ministry of Children and Family Development invites you to attend an information session, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 200-906 Roderick Ave., Coquitlam. Info: call North Fraser Recruitment Team, 604-764-8098.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 5 • Rotary Club of Port Moody 20th anniversary party, 5-9 p.m., Vancouver Golf Club, 771 Austin Ave., Coquitlam. Info: eventbrite.ca (search “Rotary Club of Port Moody”). • Coquitlam Needlearts Guild meets, noon-9 p.m., Royal Canadian Legion Branch 263, 1025 Ridgeway Ave., Coquitlam. Info: 604-939-1810.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 7 • Brew-HaHa 2019 Festival of Beers, 3-7 p.m., Leigh Square, PoCo. Join PoCo Heritage for Port Coquitlam’s first ever craft beer festival, featuring brews

action with others on the same or similar journey. Info: 604-4729988 or estherc@rside.ca. • Coquitlam Needlearts Guild meets, noon-4 p.m., Parkwood Manor 1142 Dufferin St., Coquitlam. Info: 604-939-1810.

AUG. 29: POCO HERITAGE HAPPENINGS • An Evening at the Museum, 7-8:30 p.m., PoCo Heritage Museum and Archives; a special evening at the museum associated with the current exhibit, Naturally PoCo! Refreshments will be served. Info: pocoheritage.org. • PoCo Heritage at Port Coquitlam Farmers Market, 3-5 p.m. While you are shopping at Leigh Square, visit the PoCo Heritage booth to learn a little about the city’s history and heritage, and participate in fun games. from Taylight Brewing Inc., Northpaw Brew Co., Patina Brewing, Tinhouse Brewing Co. and West Coast Cider Co. In addition to the craft brews there will be entertainment, door prizes, a 50/50 draw, snacks and a food truck, kids and family activities and more. This festival is a fundraiser for PoCo Heritage, with proceeds used to better preserve the city’s history and heritage through supporting work to better care for at-risk collections.

A31

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 • Riverside Community Church’s GriefShare, a course for those mourning and grieving the loss of spouse, dear family member or friend, 7-9 p.m., 2329 Fremont Connector, PoCo. This course offers care and support through videos, discussion and meaningful interaction with others on the same or similar journey. Info: 604-472-9988 or estherc@rside.ca.

Cost: $45, adults; $10 designated drivers; $5, children. Tickets: pocoheritage.org/event/brew-haha2019-festival-of-beers.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 19 • Coquitlam Needlearts Guild meets, noon-9 p.m., Royal Canadian Legion Branch 263, 1025 Ridgeway Ave., Coquitlam. Info: 604-939-1810.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 10 • Riverside Community Church’s DivorceCare, a course for those journeying through separation and/or divorce, 7-9 p.m., 2329 Fremont Connector, PoCo. This course offers care and support through videos, discussion and meaningful inter-

TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 • Coquitlam Needlearts Guild meets, noon-4 p.m., Parkwood Manor 1142 Dufferin St.,

Coquitlam. Info: 604-939-1810.

CLUBS • The Circle of Friends, a social group for 50+ singles looking to meet new friends and participate in social events such as walking, dancing, dining out, travel, theatre, etc., meets on the third Sunday of each month, 12:30 p.m., at Roo’s Pub, 2962 Christmas Way, Coquitlam, plan events. Info: Nina, 604-941-9032. • Do you love to sing? The Maple Leaf Singers invite you to join its dynamic show chorus. Group performs a varied repertoire, including Broadway and movie musical numbers; gospel, folk, classical, and inspirational pieces; and swing, rock, and pop hits. Practices are Monday evenings at Burnaby Lake Pavilion. All are welcome to audition. Info: 778-245-4445, joinus@mapleleafsingers.com or www.mapleleafsingers.com. • Hoy/Scott Streamkeepers meet the third Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m., Coquitlam Public Library Poirier branch. Info: hoyscottcreeks.org or hoyscottwatershed@gmail.com.

• Coquitlam Gogos meet the third Wednesday of each month at Parkwood Manor, 1142 Dufferin St., Coquitlam, 1-3 p.m. Gogos raises awareness and money for African grandmothers caring for children orphaned by AIDS by supporting the Stephen Lewis Foundation’s Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign. New members are welcome. Info: coquitlamgogos@gmail.com or Pam, 604469-0265. • The Cutie Circle meets on the second Sunday of each month (except December) from 2 to 4 p.m. in the rehearsal hall of the Evergreen Cultural Centre for some lively and joyful strumming, singalong and open mic. All welcome. Light refreshments are provided. Cuties volunteers perform and teach in the community and also offer a free annual seven-week ukulele workshop series for absolute beginners at Leigh Square in the spring. Info: cutiecircle.com or 604-552-8537 (UKES). • Tri-Cities Women’s Friendship Club is an active social group for mature women. Info: 604-202-9009.

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

A32

B AC K

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Send kids back to school healthy and safe Everything you need to know to tackle back-to-school anxiety, lunches, sleep habits and more SOURCE: FRASER HEALTH

W

hat’s really important to prepare your child for success at school is to make sure they are as healthy as possible when they sit down to learn. That means ensuring they are eating and sleeping well and are able to recharge after school in a healthy way to prepare for the next day. It also means paying close attention to their mental health, helping them cope with any back-to-school anxiety and supporting teenagers to make good choices in high school when faced with relationship or peer pressure issues. (And remember, you can find detailed resources outlined below at fraserhealth.ca.)

School anxiety in children

• Coping with transitions: For some children, going back to school can spark anxiety. New schools, new teachers and classmates, and new expectations and routines are a lot to adjust to. Help your child cope with our tips on managing anxiety in children and youth. Plus, here are 15 ways you can help ease their minds.

• School avoidance: Is your child so worried about school that they pretend to be sick to avoid it? We have guidance on how to help your child develop positive mental health skills to help control their anxiety. Plus, parents share how they learned to support their children. Read “What if no one likes me, mom?” • School bullying: Is your child worried about heading back to class because they have to face a classroom bully again? We have advice on how to empower your child to speak up and how you can help prevent bullying. Plus, see infographic for free apps help cope with back to school anxiety. • Child and youth mental health: Learn which signs to watch for in your child that may indicate they are struggling with their mental health and quickly find resources and support to help them in our child and youth mental health web resource.

nutrition & exerciSe

• Go for the goal: Good nutrition for school sports: Help ensure your child has the energy to enjoy the game. Learn about the best fuel to give them and when they need to hydrate and what they should drink and get ideas for the healthiest before and after practice snacks. • Lunches kids eat: Packing a healthy school lunch is key for giving your child a healthy energy boost during their school day.

Visit our Healthy Eating for children resource for comprehensive advice on feeding your family: with tips on everything from feeding vegan and vegetarian kids to managing picky eaters, plus tips on healthy breakfasts, lunches and dinners in a hurry.

Safe travel to/from School

• Tips for drivers to protect kids walking or riding to school: While drivers need to watch for people of all ages walking and cycling throughout the year, the roads can be especially busy as kids return to school. Everybody has a part to play when it comes to keeping our kids safe on the roads. Read about some simple ways you can keep kids safe on their way to school. • Walking to school helps kids make the grade: Children who walk, bike or use other forms of active transportation to school have been shown to have lower risks of obesity and asthma, better mental health and better performance. We have tips to help you ensure their safety and rally your community to share walk-to-school duties to make active school transport a reality for busy families.

healthy after-School fun

• Free-range play: During the school year, children are challenged all day during class. In the evenings and on weekends, they need

some downtime to recharge. One of the best ways to refresh your children is to encourage free-form healthy active outdoor play. Read how one parent learned to embrace a form of free-range parenting to help her children flourish. • Unplugged after school activities: After a long day at school, many kids want to come home and unwind in front of a screen. But we’ve all heard how too much screen time can negatively-impact our children’s health. Here are some options for easy after-school and weekend crafts, sports and activity ideas, straight from kids themselves.

Sleep & dental hygiene

• Better sleep means better learning: Sleep is your child’s secret weapon to school success. Good quality sleep enhances learning, helping your child concentrate better, remember more and maintain good behaviour. Learn what to watch for and how to help them catch more ZZZs. And check out these tips for helping students adopt better sleep habits for back to school. • Brush up your kids’ dental habits: Back to school is a great time to get a dental checkup and cleaning for a fresh start to school. It’s also a seasonal reminder to replace your see

TIPS FOR TEENS, next page

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

B AC K

Tips for teens on drugs, booze, relationships continued from page

32

child’s toothbrush. Confused about manual or electric as the better choice? We have tips on dental health and overcoming dental anxiety for youth plus tips on finding the right brush.

Personal safety

• Overdose awareness and prevention: Good information helps youth make good choices. This is crucial when it comes to preventing drug overdoses, alcohol and substance abuse in youth. Read our overdose resources for schools and parents for clear information on talking to children about drugs, complete with video examples of how to start the conversation in a way that works. We also have a guide on how to talk to your loved one if you believe they may be using substances unsafely. • Tobacco, alcohol and substance use: Experimenting is a natural part of growing up. But when kids experiment with substances such as alcohol, tobacco and drugs it can have serious consequences. Get the facts on youth substance use services. • Sexual health: Modern parents know our children need clear, consistent and non-judgmental information about their bodies, sexual

reproduction and sexuality. But these can be tough topics to broach. We have a comprehensive guide written by public health experts to help you learn how to talk to your school aged child about sexual education, sexual identity, and puberty. • Gender and sexual identity: In today’s society, youth seem to be tuning in to their authentic gender identity and sexual orientation much earlier than in their parents’ generation. We have expert advice to help parents and teachers provide your child the language, concepts and acceptance they need to feel good about themselves and their orientations so they can develop healthily without shame or fear. For youth, we have tips from our health experts on coming out. • Healthy relationships: High school is commonly when youth experience their first romantic and dating relationships. Make sure your child has the knowledge and tools to form and negotiate healthy relationships that enhance their lives. We have advice from health professionals on how youth can talk about sex and sexuality with their partner and make sure they are ready, how to practice safer sex with infor-

TO

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S C HO O L

MORE SCHOOL HEALTH ADVICE Check the Fraser Health website for everything you need to know about school health at fraserhealth.ca/schoolhealth. For general child and youth health advice, visit fraserhealth.ca/childandyouth.

For information and/or to Register Online for all Regular and Sessional courses, find us at:

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placedesarts.ca • 604.664.1636 1120 Brunette Avenue, Coquitlam

Did you know we also have an ADAPTIVE SOCCER PROGRAM for kids with special abilities?

This program is offered to girls and boys, aged 6-16, and is suitable for those players who may not be able to play in mainstream soccer. All youth with disabilities/abilities are welcome.

www.portmoodysoccer.com/adaptive-soccer-program


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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

What principals & v-p’s are where in School District 43? New faces in school offices when Tri-City children go back to school starting Sept. 3 A number of School District 43 administrators have changed schools since the end of June. The appointments for the 2019/’20 school year:

pal at Blakeburn elementary to principal at Minnekhada middle. • Cheryl Lloyd has moved from v-p at Kwayhquitlum middle to v-p at Maillard middle. • And Tanya MacDonald has moved from teacher co-ordinator with learning services to vice-principal at Kwayhquitlum middle.

ELEMENTARY

SECONDARY

• Dawn Holden returns from leave to become principal of Bramblewood. • Lisa Salloum has moved from Bramblewood to principal at Mary Hill elementary. • Michelle Reid has moved from Mary Hill to principal at Blakeburn elementary. • Theresa Roberts has moved from acting principal to principal at R.C. MacDonald. • Anita Young, vice-principal of Dr. Charles Best is principal at Riverview park. • And Laurie Sviatko, vice-principal at Maillard middle, has become acting principal at Roy Stibbs elementary.

MIDDLE

• Pamela Becker has moved from princi-

• Chris Martin has moved from teacher at Heritage Woods to vice-principal at Pinetree. • Dave Phelan has moved from viceprincipal Pinetree to v-p at Terry Fox. • Kelly Zimmer has moved from v-p at Centennial to the same position at Gleneagle. • And Bryan Jackson has moved from teacher at Moody middle to vice-principal at Centennial. In other appointments, Susa Ross moved from principal at Minnekhada middle to district principal, school services and special projects (alternate education) while Todd Smith moved from vice-principal, Terry Fox secondary to v-p of human resources (a secondment).

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Get Set for School Success with Parlez-Nous en Français!

Poirier Branch • Nancy Bennett Room Fridays, September 13–October 18 • 3:45–4:30 pm Teens in grades 8–12 help French Immersion students in grades 1–6 with grammar, pronunciation, reading, conversation and homework assignments.

Discover LEGO Robotics

City Centre Branch • Room 137 Tuesdays, September 17–October 8 • 4:00–5:00 pm Children in grades 1, 2 and 3: Have fun building LEGO robots and operating them with the help of a Robokids instructor.

Reading Buddies

Poirier Branch • Nancy Bennett Room Wednesdays, October 16–November 27 • 4:00–5:00 pm or City Centre Branch • Room 137 Thursdays, October 17–November 28 • 4:00–5:00 pm Teens in grades 9–12 are paired with kids in grades 1–4 to help them improve their reading skills.

REGISTRATION:

See coqlibrary.ca or contact librarian Chris Miller at cmiller@coqlibrary.ca or 604-554-7339.

coqlibrary.ca


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

ENTERTAINMENT & THE ARTS

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August 23 & 24 | 8pm

visual arts

Out of the Ashes is the title of a renewed exhibit at the Silk Art Gallery, a business that was close to burning down last month when a fire broke out along Port Moody’s Gallery Row. Tuesday night, gallery owner and city councillor Zoe Royer (centre) reopened her floral realism display three weeks after the blaze that claimed a vacant grocery store and the Gallery Bistro. It features original paintings by Gerry Thompson (a former Port Coquitlam resident) and Sydney artist Sandy Terry, right, as well as abstracts by Valerie Butters and Claire Sower. None of their art was damaged in the July 28 fire. JANIS CLEUGH/THE TRI-CITY NEWS

visual arts

Sew two squares for a heritage quilt New quilt to complement Coq. Heritage Society exhibits janis cleugh jcleugh@tricitynews.com

Over the past year, dozens of people of all ages have had a hand in the Quilt Project. The cover for the twinsized blanket started with the Coquitlam Heritage Society’s

Heirlooms and Treasures exhibit at Mackin House. And during the course of the project, it often employed a 1920s motorized Singer sewing machine — donated by the Ghuman family, which had ties to the Fraser Mills sawmill — for visitors to try joining two 2x2-inch squares. Adults in an ESL class gave it a go, as did others in quilting bees organized at Mackin House, Place Maillardville and during the Canada Day

festivities at Town Centre Park. Sunday will be the last chance for the public to make its mark on the community quilt. Between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., a volunteer and society staffer will be at the Coquitlam Farmers Market (in the parking lot of Dogwood Pavilion, 1655 Winslow Ave.) to help guide shoppers with the sewing needle to create patch blocks. Afterwards, society program manager Jennie

Johnston will finish up the loose ends before the quilt is unveiled Sept. 21 at the annual open house at Mackin House — a bridge between the society’s two exhibits. Its next show, The Home Front: World War II, which demonstrates the impact of war on Coquitlam residents and businesses and includes a 1940s quilt used as a fundraiser, runs from Sept. 10 to June 6, 2020. Visit coquitlamheritage.ca.

Jennie Johnston, program manager for the Coquitlam Heritage Society, with squares. JANIS CLEUGH/THE TRI-CITY NEWS Join the conversation at facebook.com/tricitynews

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

jennifer hAyes ARts notes

Hayes at Frankie’s Coquitlam singersongwriter Jennifer Hayes returns to a popular Vancouver music venue on Friday night. Hayes — along with Chris Gestrin (piano), Paul Rushka (bass) and Craig Scott (drums) — will be at Frankie’s Jazz Club (at Frankie’s Italian Kitchen and Bar, 765 Beatty St., Vancouver) for a show at 8 p.m. In 2016, Hayes released her second studio album titled And So It Goes, a name borrowed from the tune by Billy Joel. She also collaborated with the Dal Richards Orchestra for more than half of her career and performed with Jim Byrnes and Michael Kaeshammer.

fouRth, fIfth

Two Grade 1 pipe bands with Tri-City musicians just missed placing in the Top 3 at last weekend’s world championships in Scotland. The Glasgow Green title was awarded to Inveraray & District — an ensemble that took second spot at last year’s competition — while the defenders Field Marshal Montgomery won silver. St. Laurence O’Toole clinched third place for the fourth year in a row; it was also named best drum corps. ScottishPower Pipe Band, which has Port Coquitlam residents David and Shaunna Hilder (formerly with the Dowco Triumph Street Pipe Band), placed fourth and SFU finished fifth. Managed by Coquitlam’s Robert MacNeil, the 44-member SFU group includes TriCity residents Mackenzie Webster, Richard Gillies, Danielle Millar, Lauren Tietze, Alistair Lee, Allison Anderson, Andrew Lee, Reid Maxwell and Stephen Paynter.

Amanda Ding, a Grade 11 student at Coquitlam’s Gleneagle secondary, is the co-organizer of an anime convention on Aug. 27 at the City Centre branch of the Coquitlam Public Library.. janis cleugh/the tri-city news LIBRARY

Get social with anime Teen Advisory Council hosts anime gathering next week jAnIs cLeugh jcleugh@tricitynews.com

If you know what Osu!, cosplay and Dragon Ball refer to, you’ll want to swing by the City Centre branch of the Coquitlam Public Library next Tuesday. Between 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Aug. 27, the library’s Teen Advisory Council (TAC) will host its first-ever anime convention, a gathering that’s expected to draw hundreds of youth and admirers of the Japanese animation form. The council’s main organizers, 15-year-olds Amanda Ding and William Zhang, pitched the idea to TAC last fall, hoping to stage a gathering on a smaller scale than AniRevo — the anime convention held each August at the Vancouver Convention Centre. Last week’s Anime Revolution drew top anime musicians, voice actors, sound directors, content producers, cosplayers, illustrators and YouTubers from around the world. While the three-day pass to hear the guests and watch screenings cost $75, the Coquitlam event is free. “The

[AniRevo] tickets are expensive and we didn’t want that,” said Ding, a Grade 11 student at Gleneagle secondary. “What people really want to do is just meet and talk about anime.” TAC modelled its Coquitlam convention on The Summer Festival, a familyfriendly bash presented in July by the SFU Anime Club at the university’s Burnaby campus. And though the library convention is split over four rooms — for an art marketplace, cosplay and karaoke contests, and an Osu! tournament — it’ll likely take up most of the library branch for the scavenger hunt, said programming and community connections librarian Chris Miller, the TAC supervisor. Artists will be on hand to speak about their characters and contest prizes such as anime figurines will be doled out to winners. Geared to anime fans ages 11 to 19, the convention is open to anyone, Ding stressed. “Many, many people know about anime — not just teenagers,” she said. “It’s such a broad topic and it’s very social. It’s all about the culture and the connection.” • To register for the contests or to display and sell anime artwork at marketplace, visit coqlibrary.ca. Call 604-554-7339 or email cmiller@coqlibrary.ca.

Join the conversation at twitter.com/tricitynews


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

ARTIST OF THE WEEK: ren shieh

Coq. potter makes functional stoneware with celadon glazes It was 16 years ago when Ren Shieh’s life changed. Then, he met Korean pottery master Clay Kim, a recent immigrant to Canada, who taught Shieh how to throw, trim, carve and fire. Today, the former engineer and IT technician has a studio in Coquitlam called Grass Mountain Pottery, where he sculpts functional pots and figures, and mixes his own celadon glaze formulas with non-toxic materials. Shieh’s latest work can be seen in the new exhibit by Clay for You Korean Potters Group called Lines and Shapes of Korea, which opens tonight (Thursday) at the Port Moody Arts Centre. port moody arts centre

For more photos follow us on Instagram #tricitynews

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

Arts notes

The Centurions Project at ECC, dog art at PdA Kim Yeonmi’s Talk to the Moon (acrylic on reclaimed wood with fabrics and thread) is in the Port Moody Station Museum’s 50th annviersary exhibit, which opens at the Port Moody Arts Centre tonight (Thursday) . port moody arts centre visuAl Art

Heritage society upcycles for its 50th Opening reception for two new shows at PMAC is tonight jAnis cleugh jcleugh@tricitynews.com

Long ago, when money and resources were scarce, B.C. residents often looked at what they had and fixed it up or reused it for another purpose. Clothing, furniture and equipment weren’t tossed away like today and replaced with something brighter and shinier; rather, they were repaired and given a longer life. With that concept in mind, members of the Port Moody Heritage Society called on artists this spring to submit entries for its show at the Port Moody Arts Centre (PMAC), an “up-cycling” exhibit to mark the society’s 50 years. The artists had free rein, said the museum’s executive director, Jim Millar: They were allowed to use any material they wanted — as long as it wasn’t new — and create whatever form or functional-

Significant Place is the multi-media work by Tiki Mulvihill for the PoMo Station Museum exhibit. port moody arts centre

ity they desired, he told The Tri-City News. “We were looking for innovative things,” Millar said, “the idea of taking an older item and preserving it or reusing

it so it’s got a second, or even third, chance.” In June, a jury chose 11 artists, whose work will be unveiled tonight (Thursday) at a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at PMAC (2425 St. Johns St.). Admission is free. There’s not necessarily a local connection with the artwork, Millar said, but the pieces demonstrate the four Rs for sustainability: reduce, reuse, recycle, repair. Besides the exhibit, which runs until Sept. 19, the society has also recognized its halfcentury with photos in the city calendar and by displaying 50 artifacts at the Port Moody Station Museum, located on Murray Street in Port Moody’s 1908 CP Rail station. There has been a digital display at city hall and a potluck, where honorary lifetime memberships were given to Irene Reid, Gerrit DeWall and Robert Simons. Next month, the society will have another 50th bash when it hosts the Ioco Ghost Town Day Fest, Sept. 22 from noon to 4 p.m. at Ioco Road and 1st Avenue.

Participants required for a major national hearing study. Connect Hearing and Professor Mark Fenske at the University of Guelph are seeking participants for a hearing study that investigates factors that can influence better hearing. The test will take approximately 60 minutes. Participants must: • Be over 50 years of age • Have never worn hearing aids • Have not had a hearing test in the last 24 months Why Participate? It is estimated that 46% of people aged 45 to 87 have some degree of hearing loss*. By taking part in this hearing study you’ll be playing an important part in determining the key factors around identifying hearing loss and what influences the decision to seek information. You can register to be a part of this major new hearing study† by calling: 1.888.242.4892 or visiting connecthearing.ca/hearing-study *Wingfield,A.,Tun,P.A.,&McCoy,S.L.(2005).HearingLossinOlderAdulthood:WhatItIsandHowItInteractsWithCognitivePerformance.CurrentDirectionsinPsychologicalScience,14(3),144–148.†Studyparticipantsmustbeover50yearsofageandhavenever worn hearing aids. No fees and no purchase necessary. Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC. VAC, WCB accepted. 1. Cruickshanks, K. L., Wiley, T. L., Tweed, T. S., Klein, B. E. K., Klein, R, Mares-Perlman, J. A., & Nondahl, D. M. (1998). Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Older Adults in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin: The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study. Am. J. Epidemiol. 148 (9), 879-886. 2. National Institutes of Health. (2010).

A play featuring TriCity actors Jade Lim and Anthony Goncharov is at Evergreen Cultural Centre this week. The Centurions Project — a collective of emerging and professional thespians — presents the Sally Stubbs work Centurions, a story about a young man accused of a violent crime. Directed by Lynna Goldhar Smith, the show also includes actors Chantal Gering, Finnegan Howes and Sarah Roa. Its final run

is tonight (Thursday) at the Coquitlam venue (1205 Pinetree Way) at 7 p.m. Call the box office at 604-9276555 or visit evergreenculturalcentre.ca.

PAWcAsso Art

Bring your pooch to Place des Arts next month as it launches its first pARTy@ PdA for the new season. By popular demand, the Coquitlam venue (1120 Brunette Ave.) is bringing back the outdoor painting class for dogs and their 19+

owners on Sept. 7 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. If it rains, the workshop will move inside to the Leonore Peyton Salon. Non-toxic paints will be used as Fido dips in his paws and walks over a canvas; owners can then embellish the painting with their own brush strokes. Dogs must have their vaccinations up to date and be on leash. The cost is $26 per person/dog combo, or $42 for two people. Call 604-664-1636 or visit brownpapertickets.com.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

TRI-CITY SPORTS

A39

Carriers needed! Call 604-472-3040.

LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL

World Series a once-in-a-lifetime experience Coquitlam team learned lessons about life and sport MARIO BARTEL mbartel@tricitynews.com

The Coquitlam All-Stars, Canada’s representative at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Penn., are scheduled to return home Friday. The team was eliminated from further play in the 16-team international tournament when they lost 8-1 Monday to Curacao. Whether all the memories, life experiences and lessons learned will fit into their bags for the flight from Toronto to Vancouver is still unknown. One of the team’s coaches, Robert Piasentin, said the journey from the provincial and Canadian championships to Williamsport was “an experience the kids, coaches and parents will never forget.” He said the 11- and 12year-old boys who comprise the team matured and grew emotionally and physically “in ways that are tangible and brilliant to see.” After losing their first game 5-0 to Mexico, the Coquitlam kids rallied to defeat Italy 10-0 last Saturday. Piasentin said that was a huge moment for the young ballplayers. “The joy on the boys’ faces after we won a game at the

World Series is something we will never forget.” But more significant, he said, were the experiences the team had off the field, forging new friendships with kids from all over the world during the post-game gatherings in the Bullpen area at the Little League complex. Tuesday, the team travelled to Pittsburgh to participate in on-field activities prior to a Major League Baseball game between the hometown Pirates and the Washington Nationals. That was a reprise to the players’ big-league Sunday, when they got to hang out with members of the Chicago Cubs prior to that evening’s Little League Classic against the Pirates. Another highlight was the Grand Slam parade that opened the World Series’ festivities. Kids from all the teams were cheered by more than 50,000 spectators along the route through downtown Williamsport, showered with candies, treats and frisbees — even asked to sign autographs. Through it all, Piasentin said, the players remained grounded and focussed. “We are humble in our successes out there because you never know when your successes will be turned on their heads,” he said. That’s an enduring lesson for the players, he said, noting, “This is a special group.”

Clockwise from top, Canada fans line the route of the Grand Slam parade in Williamsport, Penn., that launches the Little League World Series.Coquitlam catcher Everett Bertsch hangs out with Rowan Wick of the Chicago Cubs. SUBMITTED PHOTOS Coquitlam Little League players live out their World Series fantasies at a viewing party at Mackin Park last Friday when the live broadcast of the All-Stars’ first game was delayed. STEFAN LABBE/THE TRI-CITY NEWS Coquitlam starting pitcher Matthew Shanley overcame a shakey start against Mexico. LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL Join the conversation at facebook.com/tricitynews

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League started in 1969

Application requests can be sent to: THE UNIVERSITY OR BRITISH COLUMBIA

pete@rainwatermanagement.ca YOU MUST BE 35 YEARS OR OLDER, A PORT COQUITLAM RESIDENT OR TAXPAYER!


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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

BCHL

Selling the Express a grassroots effort for Best grad Team’s first pre-season game is Sunday in Delta MARIO BARTEL mbartel@tricitynews.com

The players in the main arena at the Poirier Sport and Leisure Complex are chasing balls on smooth, grey concrete but Ryan Lepper is already thinking about when that floor will be covered with ice. For the 24-year-old Dr. Charles Best grad, hockey season has already started. Lepper is back in his hometown after wandering the hockey hinterlands for three years, selling ticket subscriptions in Prince George for the Western Hockey League’s Cougars and broadcasting play-by-play for the Salmon Arm Silverbacks. As the new manager of business operations for the Coquitlam Express, he has been charged with the herculean task of making the BC Hockey League team relevant in a market that mostly lives

Ryan Lepper used to volunteer with the Coquitlam Express, filing stories for a hockey website. He’s now the team’s new business operations manager. MARIO BARTEL/THE TRI-CITY NEWS

and breathes for the NHL’s Vancouver Canucks. That work started as soon as Lepper walked through the doors of the Express office, across the street from Poirier, last spring. While most people have settled into the summertime routine of golf or

tennis, he has been working the phones talking with local businesses about sponsorship programs, season ticket holders about renewing and local community groups he hopes will forge connections to the team. It can be a tough sell,

Lepper said. “The business community has so many options for them where they can spend their money,” he said. “There’s so much competition.” Pitching a team that had 13 more wins and 27 more points than the year before, and

made the playoffs, has helped ensure a more receptive audience for some of those calls, Lepper said. But it can still be a slog getting people to think ahead to hockey season when they’re more concerned about the weather forecast for the next summer weekend. Building interest for a junior hockey team in an urban market more tuned to the nearby professional sports is a grassroots effort, he said. Already he’s reached back to his high school connections to engage his alma mater for students looking to fulfil requirements for volunteer hours with the Express. Get them involved, he reasons, and they might tell their friends about the games. Lepper is also connected with local groups like the Royal Canadian Legion and the Girl Guides for special ticketing campaigns. He has to be realistic, he said. The Express are unlikely to sell out the Poirier rink every home game, so he has to focus his efforts on a few showcase games in the schedule with special promotions or

notable opponents, then hope some of those fans come back for more. “If every single person comes to one or two games, eventually it’s a packed barn,” Lepper said. “You have to start small and go from there.” Still, in the sunny summer months, selling the Express is still more theoretical than practical, Lepper said. The team’s improved performance last year has already faded from memory and nobody yet knows how this season’s incarnation will come together. Lepper said some new players, like the addition of seventh-round Carolina Hurricanes’ draft pick Massimo Rizzo, have the potential to bring buzz. The Express will also benefit from an older, more experienced lineup that’s likely to include several 19-year-olds. “Experience has shown the teams with more senior players tend to do better,” Lepper said. But until those players hit the ice, it’s hard to know. In the meantime, Lepper has ad space to sell on that ice.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

A41

JUNIOR A LACROSSE

Coquitlam Adanacs sidelined at Minto Cup Defending champions eliminated after loss to Victoria The Coquitlam Adanacs are in an unfamiliar position today; they’re watching the Minto Cup instead of contesting it. The defending Junior A

lacrosse national champions were eliminated from this year’s tournament at the Langley Events Centre on Sunday, when they lost to the Victoria Shamrocks, 15-7. The Adanacs, Shamrocks and Okotoks Raiders all finished the round-robin portion of the tournament with identical records of one win

and two losses, but Coquitlam was the odd team out on the tie breaker based on goal differential. They scored 11 fewer goals than they allowed, while the Shamrocks and Raiders were both -6. The Orangeville Northmen, champions of the Ontario Junior A Lacrosse League, finished atop the standings

with three wins and no losses. That earned them a bye to the best-of-five final that started Wednesday at the LEC (after the Tri-city News’ print deadline). They’re playing Victoria, which defeated Okotoks in a one-game semifinal on Monday, 12-8 in overtime. The Adanacs, which opened the tournament last

Friday with a narrow 11-9 win over a spirited Okotoks team, lost to Orangeville on Saturday, 12-7. Against Victoria, which Coquitlam defeated in two straight games to determine the BC Junior A Lacrosse League champion, the Adanacs surrendered the first six goals of the game and

never recovered. The Shamrocks outscored Coquitlam 4-3 in the second period and 5-4 in the third. The Adanacs had the edge in shots on goal during the game, 50-46. Reid Bowering scored three goals for Coquitlam and Will Clayton had a pair of goals and four assists.

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Bea’s Kloset is a ‘free store’ for women and young girls transitioning to life on their own when they age out of the foster care system, out of the recovery house, or are heading out to begin life on their own with their young children. Bea’s Kloset helps to fill their new home with everyday essentials. Soroptimist International of the Tri-Cities relies 100% on donations from people like you! If you have items in excellent condition that you no longer need, please help us fill our shelves. Currently we need small gently used/clean household items, in particular bath towels, baking utensils, plastic storage containers and kitchen utensils.

Learn how to play disc golf and practice using our equipment. BC Disc Sports will be on-site to provide demonstrations, instructions, and review game rules and etiquette. There will be snacks and music too! Bring your friends and family for some morning fun. Saturdays, Aug. 31 & Sept. 21 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Mundy Park Everyone Welcome

Contact us at beaskloset@gmail.com if you have any questions.

POP-UP YOUTH PARK Presented by The Pop-up Youth Park is located in Mundy Park between the lacrosse box and the disc golf course. The area features an outdoor lounge with portable furniture, a volleyball court, a mobile bike track, a pop-up beach, basketball courts in the lacrosse box, and even a sports equipment lending library with lots of fun stuff to borrow while in the park! Drop-by with friends for music, treats and games like our giant inflatable volleyball! Tuesdays – Saturdays, 2 – 7 p.m. | Mundy Park Open to teens 13 – 17 years old

Family Fun Sport Night

Please check Bea’s Kloset FaceBook page 2-3 days before each donation day for further details and drop-off location. Thank you for your support!

Drop-in with family and friends for badminton, soccer, games, music and more! Thursdays, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Ted Fridge Field, Town Centre Park

Visit our Website: www.soroptimisttricities.org

Everyone Welcome

Upcoming donation days: Saturdays Sept 7 and Sept 21.

Socialize with us! @sitricitieswcr T h a n k s To T h e

@sitricitieswcr

soroptimisttricitiesbc

f o r d o naT i n g T h i s s pac e

| coquitlam.ca/cib


A42

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

Looking for a new home? Start here.

CENTRAL 1 CREDIT UNION FORCAST:

Housing market will drag on strong B.C. economy A slowdown in residential construction investment will be a drag on the B.C. economy over the next year or two, but this will be offset by a boom in non-residential building, according to a forecast released August 16 by Central 1 Credit Union. Housing starts in the province are currently high, supported by presales in the active markets of the past few years. But this will slow down along with current new home sales, wrote Central 1’s chief economist Bryan Yu. Yu wrote, “Starts are forecast to dry up. New housing is a lagging indicator of the market and a downshift is anticipated with the cooling of demand. Timing is uncertain particularly given the longer lead time for large, complex multi-family projects. A pull back in momentum in the second half of this year contributes to a four per cent annual decline in starts in 2019, with a decline of 15 per cent in 2020. Residential investment will be an increasing drag on the economy [although] rental construction may pick up some of the slack.” He said that he expects residential investment spending to decline three per cent in 2020 “after eking out a small increase in 2019” and then it will stay flat through 2021. CAPITAL PROJECTS BOOMING However, Yu expressed confidence that non-residential construction growth, especially in major projects, will offset some of these losses to the B.C. economy.

“Rising non-residential construction is … indicative of firm growth. Building permits rose more than 60 per cent through May, with strong gains across private and public sector intentions. Government investments in schools and hospitals have lifted activity, alongside major private sector initiatives including new office space in Vancouver. Adding to this is ongoing engineering work on major projects such as the Site C dam in the Peace region and the liquefied Government investments in natural gas activity in the schools and hospitals have northwest.”

lifted activity, alongside major private sector initiatives including new office space in Vancouver.

Looking further ahead, Yu wrote that major capital projects will be key drivers of B.C. economic activity.

He wrote, “Major capital projects will be key drivers of growth over the coming years. Build out of the LNG Canada liquefied natural gas facility in Kitimat and associated pipelines through to 2023, coupled with ongoing construction of the Site C dam and twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline will highlight the rising investment cycle. Public works projects including the Patullo Bridge replacement, extension of the subway line in the Vancouver Broadway corridor will CENTRAL 1 ECONOMIST BRYAN YU

Burnaby / Tri-Cities HOME SALES* Attached Detached

71 30

MEDIAN SALE PRICE** Attached Detached

$583,000 $1,285,000

TOP SALE PRICE*** Attached Detached

$1,370,000 $3,100,000

ACTIVE LISTINGS† Attached Detached

1,974 1,206

DAYS ON MARKET†† Attached Detached

49 71

.ca

* Total units registered sold July 29-August 4 as of August 20 ** Median sale price of units registered sold July 29-August 4 *** Highest price of all units registered sold July 29-August 4 † Listings as of August 20 †† Median days of active listings as of August 20 All sold and listings information as of August 20

CONTINUE to next page

Jim Korchinski 778-839-5808

4-Acre Estate - 2 Homes Ocean & Mountain Views $7,500,000

l

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

Are you a small business & need advice on how to better market your business & increase sales?

CONTINUED from previous page also lift construction. These projects [will] drive strong gains in non-residential investment, particularly in engineering and building construction through to 2021 before declining in 2022. As the liquefied natural gas project moves closer to completion, natural gas production and to a lesser extent, natural gas exports, will pick up in 2022 onwards.” COMMERCIAL SECTOR STRONG Also supporting the B.C. economy is the commercial real estate market, which is not seeing the declines of the residential sector. With minimum wages rising and unemployment low, officebased employment is expected to grow by 9.3 per cent in 2019, putting additional strain on the already overstretched office market in Metro Vancouver, according to a newsletter to clients from market intelligence group CoStar. The report said, “The Metro Vancouver office market continues

To read the full report, go to www.central1.com/economic-insights

A43

Call today for a complimentary consultation by one of our marketing specialists. 604-525-6397 or Sales@tricitynews.com

CLUB 50

CO-WORKING AT THE BEST KIND OF HOME OFFICE

OO OV WW E NN R W WIT 80 ITHH % 110 0%% SO DDE L PO D O WS NIT

to show signs of strength as the vacancy rate has continued to decline to 3.0 per cent in July. Strong net absorption levels of 2.5 million square feet over the past year have contributed to this decline, along with the lack of new office space … Developers are actively working to alleviate this shortage as there are now 26 office projects totalling 4.9 million square feet currently under construction.” Space is even tighter in Metro Vancouver’s industrial market, said CoStar. The report said, “The industrial vacancy declined… to 1.6 per cent at the end of July 2019. The extremely tight market has caused net average asking rents to increase by 12.7 per cent year-over-year to $12.17 per square foot.” Despite the strong showings of the office and industrial market, CoStar describes the retail sector as the “true gem” of Metro Vancouver’s commercial real estate. The report said, “Metro Vancouver’s true gem of the commercial real estate market belongs to the retail sector, as the overall vacancy rate has declined … to a record low of 1.3 per cent at the end of July 2019. Average net asking rental rates have [risen] 13 per cent year-over-year to $34.44 per square foot. Retailers will now have to make more efficient use of spaces to overcome rising rental costs and continued upward pressure on wages.”

Business Development Representative We are looking for someone with a proven ability to hunt for new business (cold calling and door-to-door). The BDR’s core responsibilities are to grow their portfolio of advertising clients through new business development, nurture business relationships, and execute a multitude of advertising projects.

Core Responsibilities:

Basic Qualifications:

›› Prospect new business in all mediums, including: digital, newspaper, event sponsorship, and magazines

›› Post-secondary education in marketing, sales or another related discipline

›› Develop new sales opportunities through new revenue channels or products

›› Minimum of two years sales experience, preferably in an advertising environment

›› Attend industry networking events

›› Ability to travel locally; access to a vehicle and driver’s license.

Core Competencies:

Preferred Qualifications:

›› Outside Sales Experience

›› Experience selling digital services including SEO, SEM, Social, programmatic and sponsored content

›› Solid planning, analytical and organizational skills ›› Expertise in consultative audience based selling and proven negotiation skills ›› A self-starter who can work in a fastpaced environment with multiple and changing priorities ›› Strong interpersonal skills; proactive, energetic and a team player

The co-working space includes two private meeting rooms and overlooks the Great Lawn.

YOUR OWN PRIVATE CLUBHOUSE Working from home has a whole new meaning at 50 Electronic Avenue. The co-working space with two private meeting rooms at Club 50 offers the home office you’ve always hoped for – and so much more. With over 9,000 sq.ft. of unparalleled private amenities, when it’s time to take a break you can unwind in the lounge or yoga studio, or relax in your one acre backyard. Club 50 is the perfect setting to make lasting connections with family, friends, co-workers, and new neighbours. 50 Electronic Avenue is an inspiring place to live, work and play.

FIRS

GR

›› Ability to write & create proposals and deliver engaging presentations

›› Strong willingness to learn, with a proven ability to meet deliverables Location: 118-1680 Broadway St., Port Coquitlam

Please email your resume by August 31st to: Alex Salama, Digital Sales Manager asalama@glaciermedia.ca

PRESENTATION CENTRE 50 Electronic Avenue, Port Moody Open Daily 12 Noon – 5 PM (Closed Fridays)

50ElectronicAve.com

OO ND FL

604.492.2202

Prices quoted are exclusive of taxes and subject to change without prior notice. In our continuing effort to improve and maintain the high standard of the 50 Electronic Avenue development, the developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. Renderings and images provided are an artist’s conception and are intended only as a general reference and are not to be relied upon. This is not an offering for sale. Please see disclosure statement for specific offering details. E&O.E.

R

CO-WORKING SPACE

HOMES STARTING FROM $479,900

We offer a strong uncapped commission package on top of a base salary, benefits and holidays. Full training program provided.

›› Have a positive attitude and a love of sales

SECO

OO T FL

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TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

SALISBURY AVE

PRAIRIE AVE LOUGHEED HWY

QUALITY, CRAFTSMANSHIP AND SUPERIOR DESIGN

FLINT ST

DORSET AVE SHAUGHNESSY ST

A44

ÉCOLE KWAYHQUITLUM MIDDLE SCHOOL

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

COMMUNITY MARKETPLACE classifieds.tricitynews.com

Book your ad online 24/7: tricitynews.adperfect.com Or call or email to reserve your space, Monday through Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm: 604.444.3000 • DTJames@glaciermedia.ca DTJames@van.net

EARLY COMMUNITY CHILDHOOD SUPPORT WORKER EDUCATION

List it. Guaranteed! 604.444.3000 or email DTJames@van.net forfor details. List it. it. SellSell it. Guaranteed! Call Call 604.444.3000 or email DTJames@glaciermedia.ca details. GARAGE SALES

COMMUNITY

DOWNSIZING YARD SALE Saturday & Sunday Aug 24 & 25 10am to 4pm 2339 Clarke Street PORT MOODY

Announcements

BUSINESS SERVICES

RENTALS

REAL ESTATE

business opportunities

ApArtments/ Condos for rent

Out Of tOwn PrOPerty

Burnaby International Folk Dancers MEET TUESDAYS

Moving ~ Tool Sale Saturday Only Aug 24th • 9 to Noon 540 EBERT AVE COQUITLAM

starting Sep 3 • 7pm to 9:30pm Charles Rummel Centre 3630 Lozelles Ave, Burnaby. • No partner required. • Everyone welcome. Info: 604-522-7468 burnabyfolkdance.org

Karcher Power Washer, Craftsmans Wet Dry vacuum, BD Rooter & bits. Skill Belt Sander. Heat Gun, Weed Eater, Custom Kitchen Table & Chair Set 48”x32”, & TOOLS. Reasonable offers.

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A45

ATTENTION

INVENTORS! Ideas wanted!

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MARKETPLACE For Sale - MiSc

ADVERTISING POLICIES

STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE...”SUMMER OVERSTOCK SALE BLAZING HOT DEALS!” 20X21 $5,828. 25X25 $6,380. 28X29 $7,732. 32X33 $9,994. 35X33 $12,120. One End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036 www.pioneersteel.ca

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes will be made in the next available issue. The Tri-CityNews will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

Wanted CASH for your CLUTTER I will pay CASH for your UNWANTED ITEMS! I specialize in English Bone China & Figurines. I LIKE: Collectibles, Tools, Antiques, Records. ETC

Rob • 604-307-6715

EMPLOYMENT General employment

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING

SANDMAN INNS RURAL BC recruiting management couples, both full-time and part-time roles available. Ask us about our great employee perks and accommodation. Apply: sbraid@sandman.ca.

Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

Medical/ dental Help Burke Mountain Medical Centre RN or LPN Experienced RN or LPN wanted two days a week at established medical clinic. burkemedical@telus.net

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FOOD/BEVERAGE HELP

HealtH & Beauty GET UP TO $50,000 from the Government of Canada. Do you or someone you know Have any of these Conditions? ADHD, Anxiety, Arthritis, Asthma, Cancer, COPD, Depression, Diabetes, Difficulty Walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowels, Overweight, Trouble Dressing...and Hundreds more. ALL ages & Medical Conditions Qualify. Have a child under 18 instantly receive more money. CALL BRITISH COLUMBIA BENEFITS 1-(800)-211-3550 OR Send a Text Message with Your Name and Mailing Address to (604) 739-5600 For Your FREE benefits package.

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and everything else.

BC’s largest High School Cafeteria Company .

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ANSWERS


A46

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019

HOME SERVICES Cleaning

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Messy House or Office? The most thorough cleaning ever or it`s Free Call: 604 945 0004

Professional Installation

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PROJECTS

Painting/ WallPaPer Aeration, Power Rake, Lawn Repairs, New Turf, Quality Seed, Landscaping, Hedges & Trees Pruning, Property Maintenance, Pressure Washing, Bobcat Service, Fences, Retaining Walls, Paving Stones, Drainage/Gutters, Home/Business Reno’s, Delivery Service. Fully Insured • Free Estimate RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, STRATA

604-941-1618 604-844-4222 INTERIORS: Baths (reno’s/ repairs) specializing in drywall, doors, flooring, tiling, plumbing, painting,

604.202.1956

miscellaneous, etc.

TO THE NEXT LEVEL

EAST WEST MOVERS 24/7. Reasonable. Reliable. James • 604-786-7977

FIND HELP FOR YOUR

www.HandymanConnection.com

If I Can’t Do It, It Can’t Be Done!

BRING HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Lawn & Garden

604-878-5232

Find the professionals you need to complete your renovations in the Home Services section

agardenerandagentleman.ca

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SPECIAL SUMMER PAINTING DISCOUNT

BC AWNING & RAILING

•Aluminum/Glass Patio Cover •Sunrooms & Windows •Aluminum Railings Vinyl Deck Free Est • 604-521-2688 PatioCoverVancouver.com

REFER TO THE HOME SERVICES SECTION FOR ALL YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT NEEDS

Plumbing

EXTERIOR & INTERIOR

778 PLUMBING AND HEATING

Residential & Commercial

35%OFF

Comm, res, repairs and installs, gas fitting, renos. drain cleaning. Fully ins’d and ticketed. Reas rates. Prompt.

20 years exp. Free Estimates

A. RIGHTWAY PAINTING Ltd.

778-834-6966

778-984-0666

www.lawnsnmore.ca

VERSATILE! EXPERIENCED IN

Flooring

Lawn & Garden

A1 TOPSOIL

• Topsoil • Gravel • Sand • Rock • Architecturally Approved TOPSOIL • $15/yard • 778-237-2695 •

RodDick.ca

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DRAIN Tiles, Sewer, Water,

Drywall

5” Gutter, Down Pipe, Soffit 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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604-240-3408

Drainage

Landscaping

M.T. GUTTERS

ConCrete

NO JOB TOO small! Serving Lower Mainland 28 Yrs! •Prepare •Form •Place •Finish •Granite/Interlock Block Walls & Bricks •Driveways •Stairs •Exposed Aggregate •Stamped Concrete •Sod Placement EXC Refs • WCB Insured

Gutters

D&M PAINTING

OVER 30 LINES OF WORK! *Exterior deck, fence and landscaping

.

Boarding & Taping, Good Rates! Reliable, Free Est. Reno’s & Small Jobs Welcome! Call Gurprit 604-710-7769

Hardwood Floor Refinishing Repairs & Staining InstalIation Free Estimates Century Hardwood Floors 604-376-7224 www.centuryhardwood.com

Paint the town Find help in the Home Services Section.

ties installation and repairs

For positive results Call Robert

SERVICE CALLS WELCOME

CARLO Can Fix It

Res & Commercial Small Job Specialist • Plumbing • Electrical • Carpentry • Drywall • Patios • Decks • Fencing

604-727-1403

FREE

23 years Experience. Fully Ins’d. Lic’d & WCB • SUMMER Clean-up • Lawn Maintenance • Power Rake • New Sod & Seeding • Tree Topping & Trimming • Power Wash • Gutters • Patio’s • Decks • Fences • Concrete • Retaining Walls • Driveways & Sidewalks & Much MORE All work guaranteed Free Estimates

604-724-3832

Magic Star Painting .

SUMMER SPECIALS Seniors Discounts 31 years experience

Top Quality • Quick Work Free Estimates

..

604-240-2881

.

Call • 604-780-6510

Add A SplASH of colouR!

Refer to the Home Services section for all your decorating and design needs

Morrey Infiniti of Burnaby is an Infiniti Canada Dealer of Distinction Platinum Award Winner. We sell the full line of New Infiniti Vehicles, as well as a quality selection of Certified Pre-owned Vehicles.

SEASON OF TIRE STORAGE – OR –

FREE

ALIGNMENT WITH PURCHASE OF 4 TIRES

Interior / Exterior Specialist Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free estimate

For Infiniti owners, our in-house Service Center provides a full range of maintenance and repair services including tires and alignment. We also carry a broad selection of Genuine Infiniti Parts and Accessories. For Auto Body and Glass Repair, learn more about our new state of the art facility at www.morreyautobody.com Morrey Infiniti is part of the Morrey Auto Group, which has been proudly serving customers in Burnaby and Greater Vancouver for over 50 years.

10% OFF

INSTALLED THINKWARE DASH CAMS

10% OFF

AUTOBODY & GLASS

of a MAINTENANCE PACKAGE 604-676-6973

4456 Still Creek Drive Burnaby 604-676-6971


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 TRICITYNEWS.COM

SUDOKU

HOME SERVICES Renos & Home ImpRovement

Home RepaiRs Renovations installations CARPENTRY • ELECTRICAL • PLUMBING PAINTING • FLOORING • TO-DO LIST

Done Quick. Licensed. Done Right. Bonded. Guaranteed. Insured.

604-878-5232

www.HandymanConnection.com

A47

Roofing

A-1 Contracting & Roofing New & Re-Roofing • All Types All Maintenance & Repairs GUTTER CLEANING Gutter Guard Installations -never clean gutters again! WCB. 25% Discount. • Emergency Repairs •

Call Jag at:

.

778-892-1530

All Season Roofing

Sun DeckS

“Your Complete Sundeck Specialists”

• Vinyl Waterproofing • Deck Rebuilds • Custom Built Railings • Patio Covers

778.285.2107

Re-Roofing & Repairs Specialists 20 Year Labour Warranty Available

604-591-3500

Residential & Commercial Commercial Residential “Award Winning Renovations”

37 Years of Experience

604-728-3009

info@jkbconstruction.com www.jkbconstruction.com www.jkbconstruction.com

RENOVATIONS & REPAIR lam/wood flrs/tiling,finishing carpentry, drywall, sundecks, windows/doors & siding repairs. Quality work, Free Est. 10% seniors discount

Tree ServiceS

Bros. Roofing Ltd. Over 40 Years in Business SPECIALIZING IN CEDAR, FIBERGLASS LAMINATES AND TORCH ON.

Liability Insurance, WCB, BBB, Free Estimates

604-946-4333

TREE SERVICES

Pruning, Hedge Trimming Tree & Stump Removal 75 ft Bucket Trucks .

604 - 787-5915 604 - 291-7778

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PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

www.treeworksonline.ca 10% discount with this ad GL Roofing & Repairs. New Roof, Clean Gutters $80. info@ glroofing.ca • 604-240-5362

Rubbish Removal

Can You Dig it? Find help in the Home Services section

778-893-7277

loofaconstruction.ca

• Kitchen & Bathrooms • In-law Suites • Additions •Custom Cabinets www.jenco-online.info

SUMMER SPECIALS Residential / Commercial • Respectful • Responsible • Reliable • Affordable Rates All Rubbish & Junk Removal & Recycling needs. Johnson • 778-999-2803 reddyrubbishremoval.com

AUTOMOTIVE

Utility trailers

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Call Ray 604-562-5934 BOX TRAILER, Exc. cond, 1/2 ton frame. 9.6ftx8.10 ft, 46in tongue. Walls 2ft, 20 gauge metal cover walls & roof, tires 15in. Custom built. New paint. Asking $500.

Dutch Construction Contractor Services • Renovations • Carpentry • PORCHES • Electrical • Plumbing • Demolition Smoke Alarms & Carbon Monoxide Detectors Residential & Commercial Excellent Ref’s. 40 yrs exp. Rodger • 604-618-8985

Call Harold for info; 604-323-6060

Scrap car removal

THE SCRAPPER

A-1 Contracting. Bsmt, bath, kitchen cabinets, tiling, painting, decks and more.

SCRAP CAR & TRUCK REMOVAL

Call Dhillon, 604-782-1936 D & M Renovations. Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work, 604-724-3832

call to place your ad

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ACROSS 1. Scottish tax 5. Filled with horror 11. Type of music 14. Variety act 15. Half-conscious state 16. Discontinued European money 17. Formal declaration 19. Shaft horsepower (abbr.) 20. A way to express concentration 21. Airline 22. Goes well with a carrot 23. Length of pant leg

25. Mark with a cut 27. One who destroys completely 31. Greek sophist 34. Thomas Hobbes’s “De __” 35. Copyreads 38. Talk 39. Endangered 41. Snag 42. Comedienne Tyler 44. Castrate a male animal 45. Taj Mahal site 46. Tending to concede 49. One who accepts

51. Albanian capital 55. Takes kids to school 56. About Moon 60. __ Seamounts: underwater volcanoes 61. __ Lilly, drug company 62. Not working 64. Alaska nursing board 65. Howl 66. Muslim ruler title 67. Famed arena 68. Back again for more food 69. Cheek

24. Heavy club 26. Edible fish 28. Lament for the dead 29. Woody climbing plants 30. Small rooms for prisoners 31. Ottoman military commander 32. “The Crow” actress Ling 33. A way of lopping off 36. Cigarette (slang) 37. Helps little firms 39. Member of small discussion group 40. Copyread 43. V-shaped open trough

45. Pokes holes in 47. Beloved “Captain” 48. Resume 49. On a line at right angles 50. Light up lamps 52. Part of the psyche 53. Leeward Island 54. 1960s counterculture activist 57. Edible seaweed 58. Imitator 59. Look at and comprehend 63. Root mean square (abbr.)

DOWN 1. Raccoonlike animal 2. Small 3. Separates 4. Parties 5. Automated teller machine 6. One who earned his degree 7. Dislike 8. Flowering plant 9. Nova __, province 10. Inhabited 11. Breathing 12. Partner to pains 13. Immature insects 18. The back


A48

TRICITYNEWS.COM THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Patients in British Columbia Find Lasting Relief from Neck, Back & Sciatica Pain without Surgery Bulged Disc Herniated Disc

If your pain is the result of a motor vehicle accident, we will work with ICBC or your lawyer on your behalf.

Sciatica

Why The Spinal Decompression Institute?

Pinched Nerves

The staff at the Spinal Decompression Institute has over 40 years of combined experience in treating patients suffering from back and neck problems. We offer a variety of treatment options for those dealing with back pain. We have helped thousands of people to live pain free!

Stenosis

Live Pain Free id you know that over 30 million North Americans suffer from back and neck pain every day? Whether spine and back problems result from an auto accident, injury, or have crept up over time, sciatica and herniated discs are often misunderstood and improperly treated. They can result in pain and numbness anywhere in the body. This pain affects everything that you do, from work to play, and ultimately your quality of life. You might not even be able to sleep at night without pain. If you suffer from debilitating pain, we are here to tell you that there is hope. We have the technology and decades of experience to help you find relief from disc problems and sciatica. The Spinal Decompression Institute focuses on treating all disc and spine-related conditions with advanced non-surgical treatments. We are so confident that we can help you find relief that we are offering a complimentary consultation to the first 25 callers.

D

Spinal Decompression Allows Back Pain to Heal...Without Drugs or Surgery Decompression relieves pressure that builds up on the discs and nerves. The task of relieving pain comes about as a result of drawing the leaking gel of a herniated disc back into place. Decompression achieves this by creating negative pressure within the disc, referred to as negative intradiscal pressure. This creates essentially a vacuum to draw the bulging and herniated disc material back into the disc space and relieves pressure. Spinal Decompression Institute has over 9 years of experience with nonsurgical decompression, where the body is allowed to naturally heal itself and also offers many other effective treatment options.

Class IV Therapeutic Laser The Spinal Decompression Institute employs a variety of high-tech solutions along with decades of experience to help alleviate your particular pain. Along with spinal decompression, our Class IV Therapeutic Laser Therapy is an outpatient, nonsurgical procedure which is often used in sports medicine to accelerate the healing process. This painfree, non-surgical approach works by stimulating the body’s natural healing processes, providing pain relief and reducing injury and damage. This leading-edge technology has shown results in returning patients to work, sports and competitive activities, as well as everyday life. Laser therapy is just one of the treatment options that Spinal Decompression Institute offers as a non-invasive option for those facing surgery.

We will personally evaluate your condition and determine if our program will help you. It’s that simple! There are no strings attached and you have no obligation. Due to demand, we have opened our schedule to the first 25 callers only. Time slots fill quickly so call today to secure your consultation/evaluation.

No Risk, Free Consultation If you suffer from sciatica, or severe back or neck pain, you may find relief! If you are serious about getting your life back and eliminating your back and neck pain, we are serious about showing you how technology and experience may help. Due to demand, we are extending this offer for a FREE consultation to the first 25 callers with no obligation. These spaces fill up quickly, so call today to book your appointment. CALL TODAY!

Who is a Candidate for Spinal Decompression? With 7 out of 10 people experiencing low back and neck pain at some point in their lives and those types of pain being the most common reasons for patient visits to primary care physicians as well as hospitalization, there is no doubt that back and neck pain exists in epidemic proportions today. Many spinal conditions can be treated, including pain due to bulging and herniated discs, degenerated discs, sciatica, low back pain, neck pain and much more. If you have chronic or severe back pain, you may be a candidate for spinal decompression treatment. At the Spinal Decompression Institute, we will evaluate your condition and only recommend treatment if it’s right for you.

SPACE IS LIMITED TO THE FIRST 25 CALLERS. CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION!

CALL TODAY!

101 - 1108 Austin Ave, Coquitlam BC V3K 3P5 www.mackenziesdi.com

778-217-1241 Spinal Decompression Institute Inc. | Copyright © Epic Marketing 2019

Bulging, herniated or worn discs and other conditions may be to blame for sciatica, pain, and numbness in your legs. Non-Surgical Treatments including Spinal Decompression, and Class IV therapeutic Laser can relieve pressure from your spine, reduce inflammation, and provide relief from pain, without risky drugs and invasive surgery.

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TriCity News August 22, 2019  

TriCity News August 22, 2019  

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