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SANTA FE

LOOKBOOK

architecture+ art+design+cuisine

WINTER WIN SPRING 16 ISSUE

Display through April 2017 $9.95 CDN $9.95 US U.S. $7.95 Can. $9.95 64

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Block out the world, and let in the light...

Tile Lighting Hardware Bath Accessories Fans

621 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM 87505 Tel: 505.986.1715 Fax: 505.986.1518 Monday - Friday 9am-5pm allbrightlockwood.com

Photo courtesy of Hubbardton Forge Henry Floor Lamp


DA N N A M I N G H A

POINTS CONNECTING (#s 4 and 5 in the series) Acrylic on Canvas Each 30” X 22” Dan Namingha ©2016

Exclusive Representatives for Dan, Arlo, and Michael Namingha 125 Lincoln Avenue • Suite 116 • Santa Fe, NM 87501 • Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm 505-988-5091 • nimanfineart@namingha.com • namingha.com


Photography: Daniel Nadelbach Photography, LLC


Full Service Interior Design Antiques, Home Decor, Objects

405 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.983.3912 | www.vrinteriors.com convenient parking at rear of showroom


www.allanhouser.com - fineart@allanhouser.com - (505)982-4705 - Allan Houser Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave. #112 - Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.


wo o dS

photography by Wendy McEahern

de sign | bu i l der s

Consis t e n t ly t h e be s t Designing and building the finest homes in Santa Fe for over thirty-nine years

wo o dS d e S i g N b u i ld e r S 302 Catron Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

•

505.988.2413

•

woodsbuilders.com


RAMEY FINE ART

EDGE

(DIPTYCH) 2016

4 8 ”X 7 8 ”

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS

DICK EVANS

73-111 E L P A S E O S U I T E 109

PALM DESERT, CALIFORNIA

RAMEYART.COM

760/341 3800


BEEMAN J EWE L RY DESIGN john@johnbeeman.com 425.422.3990

Photo: Boncratious

Nuts, seeds and jet beads with vermeil spacers




Yo u r H o m e



Yo u r S t y l e

©nadelbachphoto.com

Yo u r L i f e

Full Ser vice Interior Design



Furnishings



Art



Objects

Lisa Samuel ASID, IIDA, NMLID #313 607 Cerrillos Road, Suite A



Santa Fe, NM 87505



505.820.0239

samueldesigngroup.com



8 4 4 . 2 8 4 . 6 9 9 9 To l l f r e e


Photos by Peter Ogilvie


NOW A HUNTER DOUGLAS SHOWROOM

R E S I D E N T I A L A N D C O M M E R C I A L I N T E R I O R S A ND IN OUR SH OWR OO M ANTIQUES • FURNITURE • ACCESSORIES TEL 505 984-8544 1 5 0 S O U T H S T. F R A N C I S D R I V E , S A N T A F E , N M 8 7 5 0 1 W W W. W G D I N T E R I O R S . C O M ©Wendy McEahern for Parasol Productions and the EG


LA MESA OF SANTA FE

225 Canyon Road • Santa Fe NM 505-984-1688 • lamesaofsantafe.com

Joan Platt Lisa Smith

Bonnie Lynch

Gregory Lomayesva

Russ Vogt

Melissa Haid

Handcrafted dinnerware, pottery, glass art, lighting, furniture, and fine art by more than fifty contemporary artists.


S TAT E M E N T S

Erica Ortiz, Neubleu Interior Design & Daniels Construction Photo - Richard White

TILE / LIGHTING / KITCHENS / FLOORING

1441 Paseo de Peralta, 505-988-4440


Courtesy Kate Russell Photography

Owner / Artist Diego Velazquez 505.438.3857 505.438.3859 (fax)

www.santafemetal.com 2811 Siler Lane Suite #2, Santa Fe, NM 87507

LIGHTING |

COUNTERTOPS |

FURNISHINGS |

ART


OrigamiintheGarden

A monumental outdoor sculpture exhibition created by American artists Kevin and Jennifer Box. The exhibition features Box’s own compositions as well as collaborations with internationally renowned origami artists Dr. Robert J. Lang, Te Jui Fu, Michael G. LaFosse and Richard L. Alexander. Artis—Naples in Naples, Florida October 19, 2016 - April 23, 2017 Naples Botanical Garden in Naples, Florida December 3, 2016 - April 23, 2017 The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois (Chicago area) May 19, 2017 - October 22, 2017 see more mo at www.origamiinthegarden.com


FLAMENCA ALUMINUM EDITION OF 12 108” X 84” X 36” PHOTO: CHARLES WAYNICK

DELGADO STREET

SIRI HOLLANDER

HOLLANDER GALLERY | 225 DELGADO STREET | SANTA FE, NM 87501 SIRIHOLLANDER.COM | SIRIHOLLANDER@GMAIL.COM | 505.927.2072


CHARLES WAYNICK

CHASM FINE ART BY APPOINTMENT | 225 DELGADO STREET | SANTA FE, NM 87501 720.938.6430 | CHASMFINEART@GMAIL.COM | CHASMFINEART.COM

LA LLORONA FRICTION FIT FOUND OBJECT ASSEMBLAGE 25”X9”X4” CAST ALUMINUM AND STEEL EDITION OF 25

GHOST CORRAL (ABOVE)

MULTI-LAYERED SHIELDING SYSTEM FRICTION FIT FOUND OBJECT ASSEMBLAGE 36”X28”X7”

PHOTOS: CHARLES WAYNICK

GHOST CORRAL 324 U.S. CAVALRY FORGED IRON CORRAL POSTS CIRCA 1850-1880 NINE 3’X3’ FABRICATED STEEL PLATFORMS PRESENT CONFIGURATION 27’X3’X5’


RECLAIM

S E X Y. S A C R E D . S E C R E T.

TAH-KEH skin care for men. Hand made in Taos Pueblo. By FeatherEagleSky and Robert Mirabal.


PURENESS

AVA I L A B L E AT :

KLOVER SPA | TEN THOUSAND WAVES | BODY SANTA FE order online at feathereaglesky.com


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With her photographer’s eye and poet’s pen, Rima Krisst captures the beauty and mystique of the desert Southwest.

ON THE COVER: An Albuquerque home designed by Devendra Narayan Contractor. Photo by Robert Reck

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ON THE ROCKS

106

ARTISTS IN MOTION

118

WATER IS LIFE

132

SKI STEEP

142

AQUATICA IMMERSIVE

28 From the Publisher 30 Contributors

DESIGNER GENES Jeweler Claire Kahn celebrates the intersection of pattern and color.

By Christina Procter | Photographs by Peter Ogilvie

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ART IS EVERYTHING Eric Swanson’s portraits of nine Santa Fe artists invite us to contemplate the links among creation, delight, and the divine.

CELEBRATION OF LIGHT Devendra Narayan Contractor’s ability to connect seemingly disparate elements is showcased in Robert Reck’s photographs of the architect’s most recent Albuquerque home.

The flowing fabrics, intriguing textures, and vibrant colors inherent to our regional aesthetic come alive in Peter Ogilvie’s fashion spread.

Daniel Quat invites us to contemplate the human body in some of its glorious forms and functions.

Tony Abeyta, Rima Krisst, Noreen O’Brien, and Zoe Urness document communities coming together in a common cause at Standing Rock, North Dakota.

Michael Holmquist takes us on a virtual ride down the most thrilling slopes in the country.

Pen Densham creates photographic abstractions of nature’s watery depths.

ROBERT RECK

in this issue

54

SACRED LAND


The new jewelry works by artist Claire Kahn are interpretations of the luxurious blue, green, red and gold touching her dream studio at the edge of the mesas and mountains of Northern New Mexico. Recognized as one of the most beautiful galleries in Santa Fe, Patina Gallery, in its 18th year, offers the finest in contemporary jewelry, fine art and design.

131 W. Palace Ave, Santa Fe, NM +001 (505) 986-3432 patina-gallery.com

Photos: Peter Ogilvie. Studio: Claire Kahn.

Peaceable Kingdom / Winter 2016 A collection of exclusive new works


PUBLISHER Cynthia Marie Canyon GRAPHIC DESIGNER Janine Lehmann PRODUCTION MANAGER & ASSOCIATE GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jeanne Lambert CONSULTING EDITORS Rena Distasio, Nancy Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Christina Procter PHOTO PRODUCTION Boncratious REGIONAL SALES DIRECTOR Judith Leyba, 505-988-5007

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Rima Kriss, Keiko Ohuma, Christina Procter, Nancy Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Tony Abeyta, Boncratious, Pen Densham, Michael Holmquist, Peter Ogilvie, Rima Krisst, Noreen O’Brien, Daniel Quat, Robert Reck, Eric Swanson, Zoe Urness NORTH AMERICAN DISTRIBUTION Disticor Magazine Distribution Services, disticor.com NEW MEXICO DISTRIBUTION Andy Otterstrom, 505-920-6370 ACCOUNTING Deanna Einspahr SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Knock Knock Social SUBSCRIPTIONS Visit trendmagazineglobal.com and click “Subscribe,” call 505-988-5007, or send $24.99 for one year (four issues) to Trend, P.O. Box 1951, Santa Fe, NM 87504 -1951. PREPRESS Fire Dragon Color, Santa Fe, New Mexico PRINTING Transcontinental Inc., Montréal, Québec Lisa Paxton, 604-319-6381 Manufactured in the United States. Printed in Canada. Copyright 2016 by Santa Fe Trend LLC. All rights reserved. No part of Trend may be reproduced in any form without prior written consent from the publisher. For reprint information, please call 505-988-5007, or email santafetrend@gmail.com.Trend art + design + architecture + cuisine ISSN 2161-4229 is published 4 times a year, with Spring (circulation 25,000), Summer (25,000), Fall (25,000), and Winter Lookbook December 2016–August 2017 (35,000) issues distributed throughout New Mexico and the nation at premium outlets. Ask your local newsstand (anywhere worldwide) to carry Trend. Find us on Facebook at Trend art + design + architecture + cuisine magazine. Editorial inquiries to editor@trendmagazineglobal.com. Trend, P.O. Box 1951, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1951 505-988-5007, trendmagazineglobal.com

26 TREND Lookbook 2017


Water Is Sacred This year will likely go down as one of the most astonishing in recent history, culminating in an election regarded as either hopeful or disastrous, depending on whom you voted for. I choose to be hopeful, regardless of who is in power, which is why it is with extreme gratitude and pride that my team and I bring you this, our new Santa Fe Trend Lookbook. I believe we will always need artists to create, and magazines like Trend to champion those creations, as antidotes to the crudity of thought and design that occasionally causes fear and uncertainty in our lives. Those of us who are passionate about printed imagery and the written word fight the good fight by keeping the integrity of media sources such as Trend magazine alive and well. Now more than ever, it is important that print media retain its position as the fourth estate, whether to challenge the powers that be when they overstep their mandates, or to bring love, light, and beauty to the world. I can’t help but feel that much of the mainstream media operates under a voice that speaks to corporate special interests, resulting in a lack of trust in their ability to objectively report the facts. This has never been as evident as it has with the lack of coverage of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) protests at Standing Rock. Since this past April, I have followed the fight for clean water for future generations through daily posts by the “rogue” indigenous media with great interest. And I admire the digital smoke signals in the form of educated posts and real-time videos on Facebook and elsewhere. Even more interesting, both the Hopi and the Lakota Sioux have prophecies carved in rock from ancient times that seem to portend this very struggle. But people have fought back. Each warrior in the fight to protect Native lands and resources, whether indigenous or non-Native, has demonstrated the

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TREND Lookbook 2017

patience, fortitude, depth of character, foresight, and wisdom that is needed when corporate interests infringe on individual rights. Their dedication feels raw and true and to me, and I have never understood why North Dakota has not honored their rights to peaceably protest. An oil pipeline beneath the Missouri River near their water source has the potential to negatively impact a vital resource for millions of people. But the larger question is, why is this black snake being zigzagged across our country at all? Oil is becoming too costly to our environment, causing irreversible damage to the earth and its climate. There are alternatives, and America must begin to embrace them before it’s too late. As for what we at Trend can do to ensure that the media remains a source of both objective information and entertainment, I vow to remain an independent source guided by editorial standards of the utmost integrity while I still own it. Not only is there no collusion between our advertisers and our editorial, we clearly mark the difference between advertising and editorial. Furthermore, we hire writers dedicated to seeking out the facts and meticulously sourcing their work. Then we fact-check again with all available resources. For summer and fall 2017, we will return to our editorial-style magazine featuring full-length stories (versus the photo essays of our Lookbooks, like the one you are holding) with even more depth, inspiration, and dedication to media excellence. We are proud to be a voice of light in the dark, a reflection of the creative spirits behind the art, design, architecture, and cuisine of our region that serves as a source of interest and inspiration—something worth reading, worth collecting, worth passing along. Cynthia Canyon Founder and Publisher

JESSIKA LE CORRE; RIMA KRISST

FROM THE PUBLISHER


David Michael Kennedy Photographic Studio and Gallery

Master of the Platinum Palladium Printing Process 1179 Highway 554 El Rito, New Mexico 87530 open by appointment 575-581-9504 www.davidmichaelkennedy.com


daniel quat eric swanson michael holmquist

pen densham robert reck christina procter

rima krisst peter ogilvie

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30 TREND Lookbook 2017

DANIEL QUAT, ERIC SWANSON, MICHAEL HOLMQUIST, PEN DENSHAM, ROBERT RECK, ASH HAYWOOD, RIMA KRISST, PETER OGILVIE

Contributors


Daniel Quat has been a professional photographer for more than 40 years. He loves to capture the essence of his subjects, whether artists, dancers, landscapes, or horses. He began his career in New York City in 1971 as an advertising, still life, annual report, and magazine photographer, and has been published in Architectural Digest, Interior Design, Metropolitan Home, New York, and Museum. Over the past decade, Quat has specialized in environmental, dance, and equine portraiture.

Pen Densham’s love of cameras started at age four while riding a live alligator in one of his parents’ theatrical movies. He has worked as a writer and/or producer on more than 16 feature films and television shows, which together have grossed more than a billion dollars and won him several Oscar nominations. Yearning to “cast spells that enchant the eye,” his personal journey as a photographic artist has been to go beyond the conventional and use his camera like a paintbrush, not a gun.

Eric Swanson is a freelance

Robert Reck’s photography is

photographer based in Santa Fe. He collaborates with a wide variety of magazines, advertising agencies, and publishers, and his broad range of professional projects reflects a constantly evolving creative approach to his art. Over the past two decades, he has amassed a diverse portfolio of images, capturing moments with a highly refined sense of light and composition and revealing the essence of a given place, product, or person.

distinguished by a masterful use of light, strong composition, and a passion for the designs found in nature and the built environment. He holds a master’s degree in art from the University of New Mexico, where he studied with such renowned artists and historians as Thomas F. Barrow, Van Deren Coke, Betty Hahn, Rod Lazorik, and Beaumont Newhall. Reck was a staff photographer for Architectural Digest and has contributed to dozens of publications globally. He was the lead photographer for Santa Fe Style, published by Rizzoli International.

Michael Holmquist graduated from New Mexico State University with an emphasis in graphic design and photography. He moved to Taos Ski Valley 25 years ago as an extreme skier riding for K2. A passionate photographer, he pushes the envelope in capturing extreme sports and adventure travel. He and his brother Ken run their vacation rental and real estate company, Adventure Taos, helping people live the dream. “Holmy” celebrates perfect powder days on worldrenowned terrain and enjoys rocking souls with his harmonica groove.

Christina Procter is a writer and photographer based in Santa Fe. An editor with Trend magazine, she’s a former New York City highschool teacher and has co-authored research on restorative justice. Procter writes about the arts and partners with documentary videographers to spin a yarn.

Rima Krisst is a lifelong student of the ancestral landscape of the Southwest. Her love of documenting the living traditions of Native American tribes in the region guides her travels and inspires her passion for exploring this rich cultural history. She regularly attends seasonal tribal celebrations, which open up new horizons and inform her perspective. Krisst is a photographer, writer, and an Indian Affairs communications and community outreach professional, and she presently serves as Tourism Tribal Liaison for the City of Santa Fe.

Peter Ogilvie was raised in Southern California and studied art and architecture at Berkeley. He then moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, and started making documentary films. Filmmaking led to still photography, both fine art and commercial. Pursuing his career in advertising, fashion, and fine art, he’s lived in San Francisco, Milan, Paris, New York, and New Mexico. He has traveled the world on assignment and won numerous awards for his work with clients like Saks Fifth Avenue, The Gap, AT&T, Sony, Macy’s, Vogue, Marie Claire, and GQ. His work shows at galleries in New York, Santa Fe, and Ohio. R

trendmagazineglobal.com

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RAILYARD

ARTS © SHoP

DISTRICT BLUE RAIN GALLERY Representing Fine Contemporary Artists of Diverse Backgrounds 544 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.954.9902 / blueraingallery.com

CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART American & European Contemporary Art 554 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.989.8688 / charlottejackson.com

EVOKE CONTEMPORARY Provocative + Compelling Contemporary Art 550 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.995.9902 / evokecontemporary.com

FORM & CONCEPT Art, Craft & Design 435 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.982.8111 / formandconcept.center

LEWALLEN GALLERIES Contemporary & Modern Art 1613 Paseo de Peralta / 505.988.3250 / lewallengalleries.com

PHOTO-EYE GALLERY Contemporary Photography 541 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.988.5152 x202 / photoeye.com/gallery

TAI MODERN Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art & Modern American Art 1601 Paseo de Peralta / 505.984.1387 / taimodern.com

WILLIAM SIEGAL GALLERY Ancient Textiles & Objects + Contemporary Art 540 S. Guadalupe Street / 505.820.3300 / williamsiegal.com

SITE SANTA FE Contemporary Art Museum 1606 Paseo de Peralta / 505.989.1199 / sitesantafe.org

SANTAFERAILYARDARTSDISTRICT.COM

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART IN SANTA FE’S HISTORIC RAILYARD


CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART 554 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.989.8688 | www.charlottejackson.com William Metcalf: Cube Installation


Now representing Ilene Dunn W I L L I A M S I E G A L G A L L E RY A N C I E N T C O N T E M P O R A RY

RAILYARD DISTRICT 540 S. GUADALUPE STREET SANTA FE, NM 87501 505.820.3300 WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM


B R A D OV E R TO N Obsidian Buerfly Oil on canvas, 80" h x 52" w

544 South Guadalupe Street Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 505.954.9902 www.blueraingallery.com


TOMORROW COMING IN LATE 2017: – Santa Fe’s newest architectural destination in the Railyard! – Expanded Galleries – New Indoor and Outdoor Event and Gathering Spaces – A New Auditorium – An Education Lab

DESIGN ARCHITECT SHoP Architects, New York ARCHITECT OF RECORD Allegretti Architects, Santa Fe GENERAL CONTRACTOR Sarcon Construction, Santa Fe sitesantafe.org

© 2015 SHoP Architects PC. All Rights Reserved


Celebrating our Railyard Non-profits & Restaurants Non-profits & Foundations

Creative Santa Fe Lannan Foundation El Museo Cultural Encaustic Art Institute Railyard Performance Center Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Institute SITE Santa Fe Warehouse 21

Restaurants

401 Amaya at the Hotel Santa Fe Andiamo! Boxcar Cafe Fresh Cafe Sonder Caveman Coffee Cowgirl BBQ Indulge Cafe Joseph’s Kohnami Pizza Centro Pranzo Raaga Radish & Rye Second Street Brewery at the Railyard Santa Fe Spirits Saveur Bistro State Capital Kitchen Tomasitas

Aqua Fria

Aztec

ilia

Read

Gu

ad

alu

pe

S a n d ova l

la F am de Cam

ino

St. Francis

M

ar

ke

tS

t

Montezuma

Paseo de Peralta

Ce

Find out more:

creativesantafe.org

l rri

lo

s


An innovative approach to affordable housing

Affordable live/work housing for Santa Fe’s creative talent and their families. Shared resource space for the entire creative community Projected to be built in 2018 Lead Partners: Creative Santa Fe, New Mexico Inter-Faith Housing, City of Santa Fe Design Team: AOS Architects, Trey Jordan Architecture, da Silva Architecture, Surroundings, Onion Flats, PBI Construction Consulting, Wilson and Company. This project is funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Find out more:

artsandcreativity.org

Generously Sponsored by Eileen Wells and Adobe Rose Theatre


THE RAILYARD


A Center of Hispanic Culture and Learning

20 YEARS IN THE RAILYARD

UPCOMING EVENTS EL MUSEO’S WINTER MARKET

Every weekend – October 1, 2016 to May 28, 2017; Saturday 8-3PM; Sunday 9-4PM; Art, Antiques, Jewelry, Books, Textiles, Furniture – More than 50 vendors

THEATER & COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES • The Tempest – Upstart Crows of Santa Fe January 20-22, 27-29

THEATER & COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES

• Almost Maine – Red Thread Santa Fe February 10-12, 17-19, 24-26

ARTS EVENTS & EXPOSITIONS • Anri Tsutsumi, Wasabi Salsa Rhapsody art installation – June 2 – July 30 • Currents 2017 – June 9 - 25 • Miranda & Lois Viscoli, Cuban collection exhibit – July/August • Objects of Art/Antique American Indian Art – Expositions – August 10-13, 15-18

ARTS EVENTS & EXPOSITIONS

CELEBRATING CULTURE • Santa Fe Fiber Crawl – Fiber arts festival May 12-14

El Museo produces/hosts exhibits, activities, and events that celebrate and promote local culture and traditions. We are creating a library, present Spanish language learning, and host community events, such as building Zozobra, & youth classes with Pandemonium Productions.

CELEBRATING CULTURE

Gateway Partner with the Northern Rio Grande National Heritage Area 555 Camino de la Familia, Santa Fe

505.992.0591

elmuseocultural.org


THE RAILYARD


MOSS COLLECTION 530 SOUTH GUADALUPE ST, SANTA FE

505.989.7300


the art of living and living with art 530 SOUTH GUADELUPE

IN THE HISTORIC RAILYARD DISTRICT

CASANOVAGALLERY.COM

505 983 8558


IMAGES COURTESY OF PICHULIK AND PHOTOGRAPHER KOPE|FIGGINS

ADVERTISEMENT

INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART, FASHION & HOME DECOR ~ ALL YEAR ROUND ~

Situated in the heart of Santa Fe’s historic Railyard district is Casa Nova, a dynamic, up-market shop highly regarded for its unique blend of art, craft, living and contemporary design. A medley of cultural fusion, owner Natalie Fitz-Gerald describes her approach as “the art of living and living with art. The style is urban, ethnic, edgy and vibrant with echoes of traditional forms. The cornerstone of Casa Nova’s trading ethos is the support and nurturing of local artists, craftspeople and designers. The store’s wonderful displays showcase some of the best of Africa’s artistic talents and many cooperatives

for whom these sales represent a sustainable income and financial independence. Other regions of the world are also represented with work from minority hill tribes in China, weavers and ceramists in Mexico, craftspeople in the Phillipines and Thailand and many others. Casa Nova is considered a “must-see” for locals to bring their out-of-town visitors, and the perfect place to find that truly unusual gift. Fitz-Gerald’s amazing eye for fine design and craftsmanship creates an ever-changing range of inventory in Casa Nova which includes bedding, kitchenware, home decor, jewelry, fashion, ethnic and folk art.


THE RAILYARD

LAURA MARTURANO/DANIELLA CLOTHING.JEWELRY.ACCESSORIES


360 Cashmere AG Jeans AMO Alice + Olivia Cosabella Equipment Frame Free City James Perse Joie LoveHeals NSF RtA Rag & Bone Rebecca Taylor Vince ...and more! exclusively at daniella

500 Market Street Market Station at the Railyard 505.988.2399 Mon–Sat 10-6 www.shopdaniella.com


THE RAILYARD


328 GUADALUPE STATION SHOPS

ADORN adornsantafe.com • 505-820-2367 Adorn is a fun, stylish boutique known for its unique and artistic fashions. It offers a frequently refreshed inventory of clothing, jewelry, and accessories in a relaxed and friendly environment, where you are encouraged to express your personal style.

JANINE CONTEMPORARY janinecontemporary.com • 505-989-9339 The new location across from the Jean Cocteau Cinema features a sophisticated and contemporary collection of photography, painting, mixed-media work, and marble, stainless steel, ceramic, and bronze sculpture.

ARRAY arrayhome.com • 505-699-2760 Array is a modern-day mercantile that offers an ever-changing collection of objects for the home and for gifting. Artisanal pottery, home fragrances, bath and body products, and paper goods are just a few of the treasures that make shopping at Array an adventurous experience.

KLOVER SALON kloversalon.com • 505-780-8382 A new full-service salon in the heart of the Railyard dedicated to beauty, Klover provides its clientele with an unparalleled experience in total relaxation and renewal.

BOBBY’S COSMETICS 505-982-1645 Excellent products created by women and made in the USA. Excellent customer service provided by a professional make-up artist on staff. Bobby’s has everything you need to make you look and feel your best.

LE BON VOYAGE lbvbags.com • 505-986-1260 Providing quality travel goods to Santa Fe since 1987, Le Bon Voyage offers a huge selection of luggage, shoulder bags, totes, duffels, backpacks, computer bags, briefcases, garments bags, and travel accessories. You book the trip, they’ll have the bags.

CAFÉ SONDER cafesonder.com • 505-982-9170 Committed to providing a menu of locally driven contemporary American Cuisine, Café Sonder features food prepared simply, letting the ingredients speak for themselves.

MARC HOWARD CUSTOM JEWELRY DESIGN marc-howard.com • 505-820-1080 Exquisite design and exceptional quality define this highly regarded master goldsmith with more than 40 years of experience. Marc Howard specializes in custom jewelry design, fine craftsmanship, and stellar customer service.

CHICO’S stores.chicos.com/en/guadalupe-station • 505-984-1132 Chico’s Guadalupe Station has been connecting with locals and tourists since June 1, 1987. Its chic prints, artisan jackets, and wrinkle-free Travelers Collection have built quite a following, and the combination of great style, one-of-a-kind details, and warm personal service has captured the hearts of women nationwide.

PERUVIAN CONNECTION peruvianconnection.com • 505-438-8198 Since 1976, Peruvian Connection has made ethnographic textiles the point of reference for its artisan-made, luxury fiber collections, which include a line of signature knitwear and a range of romantic dresses, superbly tailored outerwear, and unique handcrafted accessories.

CURIOSA 505-988-2420 Curiosa is an entirely original jewel of a shop offering handselected precious jewelry, poetic paper goods, whimsical home decor, and imaginative gifts. Artful displays and an inspirational atmosphere make for a magical shopping experience.

WHOLE HOG CAFÉ wholehogcafenm.com • 505-474-3375 Serving Memphis-style barbecue since 2006, Whole Hog Café competes in the Memphis-in-May and Kansas City Barbecue Championship circuits. The same award-winning recipes are prepared for lunch and dinner daily at the restaurant.


briggs-riley.com

E N G I N E E R E D F O R R E A L I T Y . G U A R A N T E E D F O R L I F E .™

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A H E A D , PA C K A N E X T R A S H I R T . E X T R A PA N T S . E X T R A S H O E S . AND ANOTHER EXTRA SHIRT. • The Baseline Collection •

Our CX expansion system adds capacity, then compresses your belongings securely in place.

328 S. Guadalupe Santa Fe, NM (505) 986-1260 lbvbags.com


R ESTAU RANTS AT TH E RAI LYAR D

Indulge Café

Saveur Bistro

Boxcar

Cowgirl BBQ Patio


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TREND Lookbook 2017


designer genes

C

laire Kahn may have the curiosity of a child, but she operates with the insight of an engineer. For the past 30 years, this designer, artist, and, most recently, jeweler—labels she’d consider redundant—has been known for designing some of the world’s most astonishing fountains. Recently she’s added a new skill to her repertoire, using her fascination for pattern-making to crochet necklaces that contain several thousand glass beads per snakelike strand. Colors and shapes have always grabbed Kahn’s interest; she’s like a conductor who can elicit exquisite sound from a choir whose members have never met before. Despite decades of specialization in the design of water features, she was in fact trained to work in a variety of media, creating everything from architectural interior treatments to acrylic paintings, ink and graphite drawings, and cutpaper topographical designs. She’s a designer’s designer who doesn’t repeat herself, always chasing something functional, alluring, new. Kahn grew up amid the sound of the clacking of her mother Lyda’s loom, and in fact many of her own pieces, she says, directly reference the abstract color geometrics of Lyda’s wall hangings. “She would use thistle, wood, all different materials,” Kahn recalls. Taught to weave by her Dutch grandmother as well as her mother, who emigrated from Holland via Israel to New York prior to World War II, Kahn learned early about color and how to play with it. Though she is not enamored with weaving, it is interesting, notes art historian Nancy Owen James, that she has taken up another highly specialized craft form traditionally pursued by women. “I see her as part of that ’70s art movement that included artists like Eva Hesse, Louise Bourgeois, and Miriam Schapiro, who used craft techniques for fine art,” says James, articulating why, beyond straight aesthetic appeal, she is so drawn to Kahn’s beaded work. Interestingly, Kahn’s grandmother was an interior architect who studied at Der Stijl, the Dutch equivalent of the Bauhaus school in Germany, which, before the Nazis shut it down, promulgated the inseparability of craft and high art and defined the century’s modern style.

Jeweler Claire Kahn

celebrates the intersection of pattern and color BY CHRISTINA PROCTER | PHOTOGRAPHS BY PETER OGILVIE

In addition to this matrilineal artistic heritage, Kahn’s father, Matt, was also an artist and designer. A workingclass kid who grew up in Queens, he was the first in his family to pursue art, and he met Lyda at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. The two settled in Palo Alto, California, where Matt taught at Stanford for the next 63 years. Reverently remembered for a design curriculum that bridged the arts and engineering departments, Matt influenced legions of designers. As one of his former students, sculptor and Stanford design lecturer John Edmark, says, “Claire got to be raised by this person. I just got to have a class with him, but she just got simmered in this brilliance. She inherited the seriousness, [the notion] that aesthetics matter. If you’re going to do something, you do it well—even things that won’t last, like giving a party. You take it to the hilt.” Often, Matt would hold seminars at the family’s home in Palo Alto, design lessons filled with artifacts of art history, her father’s sculptural paintings, and her parents’ collection of African tribal art—intriguing, she notes, because they are pieces from cultures that do not differentiate between the design of daily objects and the significance of their aesthetics, making the word “art” redundant. Built in 1957, Kahn’s childhood home was a product of her parents’ collaboration with developer Joseph Eichler, who was responsible for the open-plan, glass-atrium homes that sprang up around a Bauhaus-bedazzled California in mid-century. The home featured the “eavesdroppers” Matt designed for Eichler, glass installations that serve as window shades and send luminous colors cascading through the rooms. Claire and her brother, Ira, an abstract photographer, grew up in an atmosphere of trendmagazineglobal.com

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“She’s a designer’s designer who doesn’t repeat herself, always chasing something functional, alluring, new.”

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Kahn’s pieces often reference wall hangings crocheted by her mother, Lyda. Top: Kahn in her studio. Opposite: Jewelry making occupies half of Kahn’s studio, where custom-sized drawers store colorful beads. Previous spread: A Kahn necklace featuring faceted sapphires. The background is a concept sketch for upholstery fabric.

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Left and right: Pieces from Kahn’s Window Wall series (2004), ink on paper with a cut-vellum overlay. Center: Kahn’s Our House (2004), ink on paper. Top: In both pieces, Kahn uses what she calls the “Lyda pattern,” named after her mother. The bracelet comes from her Opposites series, which combines opposing and complementary colors that the eye mixes to form a neutral result. Opposite: Allison Buchsbaum Barnett, co-owner of Patina Gallery, examines recent pieces by Kahn at her home north of Santa Fe. The “story scroll” displays designs for architectural interiors and fountains.

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“It’s all pattern-making of a kind . . . There’s always

design-driven headiness bolstered by frequent visits to northern California’s coast, where rugged cliffs drop to a screen of endless blue. Along with family trips to Holland, there were spells in Italy every four years, where Kahn attended school while her father taught, and the country’s wealth of art and architecture left an indelible mark. Fresh out of college and inexperienced, at first she couldn’t find a job. But when she took her portfolio of Stanford projects to San Francisco–based Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill, she was hired on the spot and set to work designing interiors for the Bank of America Data Center and other corporations. Kahn would take a large roll of paper and start sketching, creating what she called “story scrolls” by drawing one option after another. “It just sort of happened that I was not cutting between drawings, like a stream of consciousness.” Kahn was swiftly recognized in fields that tend to be maledominated. Jeffry Weisman, a designer and former colleague at Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill, summarizes her work in three 60

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words: “Ingenious, disciplined, and masterful.” Weisman recalls Kahn’s skill with pattern design and color progression. “She tackles public works of monumental scale and a beaded necklace with the same facility and dexterity,” he says. “Her attention to detail is unmatched and unmistakable, yet it always serves a supporting role in achieving the success of her work. She is extraordinary in every way.” In her late 20s, Kahn left for WET, what was then a mom-andpop company, where founder Matt Fuller, another Stanford graduate, was creating water features with technologies that had never been seen before. Kahn was one of the early designers for WET, and she helped create such wonders as the Bellagio Fountain in Las Vegas, Nevada, and the world’s largest performing fountain in Dubai—a spectacle of synchronized light, color projection, and jets programmed to music. “Fuller was doing really weird things with water,” Kahn says. “He was more of an explorer, a crazy scientist. He was coming up

IRA KAHN; OPPOSITE: IRA KAHN

Jet spray patterns designed by Kahn for the Bellagio Fountain in Las Vegas, Nevada.


pattern, textile-making, in the back of my mind.”

Kahn married her keen eye for pattern weaving with cutting-edge technologies to make the Bellagio Fountain a synchronized dance of water and light.

with techniques people had never seen before, and now much of it is ubiquitous.” Fuller’s feats include the Larimer stream, which makes an arc of water look as if it’s suspended in space, as well as the technologies used for the Bellagio: a shooter jet that uses compressed air instead of conventional horsepower to shoot water hundreds of feet, and the oarsmen jet that can move 360 degrees. “They can weave and bow in any degree or quarter-degree you want,” Kahn marvels. WET hired artists from outside the industry who, like Kahn, specialized in textile pattern. The result was fresh and new, and Kahn went on to work for the company for 30 years. One of her colleagues at WET, JoAnn Matyas, was also a student of Matt Kahn and had first met Claire during a seminar at her childhood home. She recalls working with her on Seattle’s World’s Fair fountain in 1962: “She’d throw in some amazing ideas and help you see things in a different way.” Furthermore, says Matyas, “Claire led the design effort there at WET. Her design sense came from her father, and that informed all of us. We learned what she was doing

and followed along in the same mode.” During that time, Kahn remained in San Francisco and traveled the world for the Los Angeles–based company. Only this year did she move to the Santa Fe area, lured by her relationship with Ivan and Allison Buchsbaum Barnett of Patina Gallery, which has exclusively represented Kahn and her jewelry since 2010. She was further motivated to make the move by an open-plan contemporary house. Startlingly similar to the one her parents designed with Eichler, the house has subtle Southwest references, including a master bedroom built from a sheep barn that was trucked in from Española. Outside is a bucolic scene featuring a pond that attracts critters and birds, while her neighbors’ horses graze nearby. Ivan has dubbed it Kahn’s “Peaceable Kingdom” after an Edward Hicks painting of a curious gathering of creatures. This became the theme for Kahn’s new show at Patina, which opens December 16 and runs through January 15, 2017, exhibiting her latest line of necklaces and bracelets, some of which are influenced trendmagazineglobal.com

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Kahn (left) and Allison Buchsbaum Barnett hold one of Kahn’s cut-paper pieces, Wood Grain (1993), cut vellum and rag board. Opposite top: Kahn’s open-plan home displays several of her father Matt Kahn’s structural paintings, including the circular Headdress (circa 1980), acrylic on canvas. Opposite bottom: Hanging in Kahn’s living room above her parents’ collection of heddle pulleys—used by many North African weavers to create a loom structure hanging from a tree branch—is another Matt Kahn painting, Mirage (1983), acrylic on canvas.

by New Mexico’s well-known treasures, like the brilliant colors of aspens in fall. In her studio, Kahn pulls out sketches from her early designs, which resemble the patterns that might adorn the ceiling of a mosque. “It’s all pattern-making of a kind,” Kahn says. “There’s always pattern, textile-making, in the back of my mind.” She notes that she frequently uses the Fibonacci sequence, employing its proportions to create different currents within a piece. She takes a similar approach with her crocheted jewelry. To create a 43-inch necklace, for example, Kahn first strings carefully numbered beads into a single four-foot strand that, when crocheted, forms new relationships between the beads and fibers. Each necklace takes a week to complete, and Kahn is known to unstring a piece that doesn’t work and start over. The final product pulses with color, like her mother’s weavings. “Sometimes they’re very linear, and sometimes more of a flow,” explains Allison. “She has pieces with what she calls pools of light, where there is this darkness that then gets light, almost like a heartbeat. Where it gets light, often she’ll put a charm, like a diamond or sapphire that’s emitting light, and then it gets quiet again.” Surprisingly flexible, the necklaces transition strategically between colors. Allison has also devised 12 different ways to knot or twist the pieces into necklaces of varying length, so depending on

the wearer’s whim, any part of the color scheme can be emphasized. “My father used to say that design is the art form that’s incomplete until it’s engaged,” says Kahn, wrapping one of the necklaces six times around her wrist and transforming it into a bracelet of newly undulating color. “These pieces are intended to be inviting and lovely, and I think some people might define that as decoration. They’re ornamental, and I’m okay with that.” As Edmark points out, Kahn builds abstract patterns with transitions, subtle and sharp, between hues. It makes for an endless interplay, because, as he notes, “We never see a color for what it is. We always see it in relationship to the colors around it.” A box of the same shade of green, for instance, looks entirely different over a yellow background as opposed to a blue one. Interestingly, Kahn does not attribute emotional value to colors, as many color theorists do. “I can’t stand the pigeonholing of color,” she says. “Sometimes blue is calming and sometimes it’s frightening. For me, color is this completely innocent, neutral thing that gets its own character in your work.” Bold, decisive, and a firm believer in the power of the abstract to enthrall, Kahn is a deft communicator of her own sense of wonder. There is no telling where her curiosity will lead, but the results will likely be just as pleasing and complex as a thousand tiny beads or a whirling fountain’s hypnotic motion. R trendmagazineglobal.com

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Art is Everything Photographed by

Eric Swanson

W

Caption

Jim Vogel’s luminous, richly hued oil paintings convey affection and respect for the working-class heroes of Northern New Mexico. His depictions of the culture of work and family are both specific to the region and universal in their subtle social commentary.

hen times grow dark, we reach instinctively for a work of art to feed our souls, whether a song, poem, painting, or the soothing contours of a turned teakwood bowl. Artists play a central role in our collective wellbeing, not only because they create works of beauty—Nature itself gives us beauty in abundance—but because we recognize, in their impulse to create, a divine power that we share, usually buried beneath our frenetic industriousness. All day long we swell with human pride in our thinking and making, which sets us apart from the other animals and made us masters of the Earth. The work of art is not part of this. It serves no utilitarian purpose, often existing simply to delight. It thrives like nature’s extravagances, blooming in infinite variety in the poorest, darkest places, for no reason, like the imagination. Not every mind allows space for the divine, of course, but every heart finds a home in joy, and this is the closest we can come to naming the sublime recognition that has no name. Across time and space, the work of another’s hands and mind awakens our humanity. In their works of art, we see that we embody the genius of Nature that evolved to make—and also see and hear and feel what it made—and be delighted. As winter deepens around us, we invite you in the following pages to delve into the extravagant impracticality of these nine artistic sanctuaries. trendmagazineglobal.com

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Taos-based artist Richard Alan Nichols’s impressionistic works in oil, watercolor, and charcoal capture the undulating shadows and fleeting moments of pure beauty that animate the New Mexico landscape. Nichols calls these works “visual poems,” highlighting the emotional response they invoke.

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The exquisitely textured surfaces of RaphaÍlle Goethals’s abstract encaustics lead the viewer into an exploration of space. Subtle, layered markings are revealed like fragments of memory floating into consciousness, conveying a vague sense of longing and a deep appreciation of beauty in all its forms.

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Award-winning artist James Drake is a close observer of the human condition, and his work chronicles humanity’s feats and foibles with an incisive eye and a full heart. Equally adept in painting, video, photography, sculpture, drawing, and printmaking, he creates work that’s invariably fresh, provocative, compelling. trendmagazineglobal.com

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Using graphite as her medium, Susan York explores process and form to create her sculptures, drawings, and installations. She characterizes the act of viewing her work as akin to looking into a pond to see both the glassy surface and the depths below.

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Painter, writer, and graphic designer Patrick McFarlin defies categorization with work spanning a broad variety of subject matter and techniques. Incorporating text and images in some paintings and pure abstractions in others, his far-ranging talent invariably elicits unexpected insights.

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Colombia-born Guilloume has devised an artistic style he calls “bolismo” that examines human emotions and motivation via rounded, faceless forms that convey the essence of the subject’s personality. His minimalistic bronze sculptures and wall reliefs combine an introspective air with a buoyant celebration of our world’s diversity. trendmagazineglobal.com

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Using metal and other materials salvaged from scrap heaps, Ted Larsen fashions abstract sculptures that retain the essence of the found objects’ original function. As he creates new forms and an inventive visual language, he reduces the individual elements to their essence and rebuilds them in new and intriguing ways.

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Inspired by the natural world, Paula Roland pioneered the process of creating encaustic monotypes. Neither paintings nor prints, these thought-provoking works occupy a transitional space that speaks to the earth’s unity through abstraction, celebrating moments of beauty both natural and contrived.

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Photography by Robert Reck

Architecture has the capability to choreograph the ritual of human life and to inform the language of the spirit and the mind.

505.255.4033

dnca architects

www.dncarchitect.com


Celebration of Light Photographed by

Robert Reck


A

rchitecture is a complex discipline, but its underpinnings are really quite simple: it’s driven by the basic human need for shelter. The design of our shelters varies throughout the world according to available building materials, financial wherewithal, cultural aesthetics, and a building’s purpose, with all the infinite variations that these considerations imply. At DNCA Architects in Albuquerque, a diverse team led by principal architect Devendra Narayan Contractor addresses the shared values that connect the world’s multiplicity of building styles rather than dwelling on the more obvious differences. The resulting designs feature interiors and exteriors that incorporate seemingly disparate cultural predilections with subtlety and skill. For this home in Albuquerque’s North Valley, whose owners are from India, that meant marrying the vernacular architecture of their native land with that of New Mexico to produce a uniquely personal yet universally appealing family home that gives traditional elements a modern

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expression. The DNCA team took features like courtyards, trellises, and residential compounds—standard in both cultures—and worked to abstract them, using the interaction of light and shadow to forge an identity for the home. “A lot of abstract connections relate to traditional Indian architecture, and the home is informed by that, with an interplay of solid and void, planes and lines, reaching out into the landscape to create a sense of engagement,” Contractor says. “By introducing patterns of shadows we created a celebration of light, while a trough-like water feature evokes the vocabulary of water and acequias.” He notes that the water represents a symbolic cleansing upon arrival in the courtyard, just as entering the vestibule lined with aromatic cedar becomes an evocative, purifying experience. By creating a home that blends cultural imperatives with principles of modernity and minimalism, taking common elements and distilling them to their essence, DNCA shows us that what appears to separate us can in fact unite us. Our world needs more of that.


This page and opposite: The home’s exterior juxtaposes the fixed solidity of concrete with the mutable airiness of shadow and light. Previous spread: The house was positioned to allow the sunlight to create a moving tableau of geometric patterns.

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Inside, the abstracted style is informed by traditional Indian architecture. Features like floating walls (opposite), skylights (top and opposite), and clerestory windows (top and opposite) open up the space while leaving the rooms clearly delineated amid the interplay of shadow and void.

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Concrete walls become a canvas on which the intense New Mexico sun paints shadowy images. Opposite: As the newly established plants mature, their changing shapes will continue to alter the contours of the shadows.

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The unique configuration of walls and windows interacts with outdoor features to merge the design of interior and exterior, creating a seamless flow between the two. Opposite: Stylized trellises generate intricate shadow designs that change throughout the day in sync with the journey of the sun.

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Concrete, wood, and abundant sunlight come together like elements of a painting, combining to form a cohesive whole that enhances the flow of energy from room to room.

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Sacred Land Words and photos by

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Shiprock in Clouds, Shiprock Monument, Navajo Nation, New Mexico. Opposite: Black Crow over White House, White House Ruin, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Navajo Nation, Arizona

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he dream spoke in whispers of days gone by and things to come. The branches of the trees swayed and the leaves fluttered in circles on the ground. The wind and coyotes howled in unison as spirits swooped through the canyons. If rocks could speak . . . they would tell us of worlds past and remembered, and of a million skies that offered light and water and the constant of the moon, a beacon to all souls. They would tell of rotations of the earth, and days and nights of longing and wonder. They would speak of mothers and sons and fathers and daughters, who prayed for rain and received blessings in showers of joy and the clapping of thunder and bolts of lightning. They would talk of the harvests of seasons, some bountiful, some lean, bringing joy and suffering. They would speak of gusts that blew dust and feathers and seeds through the canyons, and of shadows that danced in relief through cracks and wrinkles in time. They would tell of storms that brought spirits, and clouds that told the future. They would speak of crackling fires that melted into dreams and flowing rivers that etched memories into stones and forged mesas. They would tell of death and sorrow and stars that gave birth to visions of destiny. They would talk of trees with infinite roots that connect all things with strength and fortitude, and birds that fly, reaching toward the sun. They would tell of winters and darkness and cold and stillness that melted into spring, where the soil breathed richness and offered itself as fertile ground. They would speak of animals that roamed in packs and herds and left tracks in the blood and mud, and footprints of generations that walk from past to present to future as one.

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Caption

Ancestral Indian Dwellings, First Ruin, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Navajo Nation, Arizona

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Red Mesa Sunrise, Navajo Nation, Arizona

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Medicine Horse and Rider in Winter, Clayson Benally and his horse, Chico, with Doko’oosliid (Abalone Shell) Sacred Mountain in the background, Navajo Nation, Arizona. Opposite: Ledge Ruin at Canyon of the Dead, Canyon del Muerto, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Navajo Nation, Arizona

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Twin Spirits, Sentinel Mesa and West Mitten Butte, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Navajo Nation, Arizona

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On the Rocks Santa Fe designers bring a worldview to the high-desert aesthetic with flowing fabrics, intriguing textures, and colors both subtle and vibrant

Photographed by

Peter Ogilvie Styled by

Christina Alarcon of Passementrie Susan Hull Walker of Ibu Hair and makeup by

Kate Douthit Isabel Harkins Models:

Michaela Klinkmann Sachiko Leilani


Michaela Klinkmann in a Santa Fe dress with a white Encanto skirt and black medallion from Passementrie. Opposite: Sachiko Leilani in a Marrakesh caftan from Passementrie. Previous spread: Klinkmann in a turquoise and orange-rose Santa Fe dress with a white Dominga skirt.

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Leilani with Ibu felted wool on silk Cocoon wraps by New Mexico artisan Kathryn Roth.

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Artists in Motion Photo Essay by Daniel

Quat

This spread and next: Randy Miller and Bonnie Bennett. Miller is a Soul Motion instructor and Nia Black Belt teacher who works in Santa Monica, California, and Santa Fe. Opposite: Miller is wearing jewelry by Susan Green.

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Above and opposite: La Emi (Emmy Grimm) of EmiArteFlamenco Company, photographed in a traditional flamenco pose at the Colonnade at La Mesita Ranch, Santa Fe.

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Artist and yoga instructor Viktoria Shushan (above and next spread) photographed at Tent Rocks, Cochiti Pueblo. Opposite: Shushan at the Cornell Rose Garden on Galisteo Street in Santa Fe.

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Water is Life Communities Merge in a Common Cause


CREDIT

Reflection on the Cannonball River as it threads its way through prairie and grasslands to reach the sacred Missouri, which is the primary water source for the Standing Rock Reservation. Photo by Noreen O’Brien


Mne Wiconi

Water is the life blood of our earth, the source of all things, and essential to survival. It nourishes us and the land we inhabit; access to clean water should be a fundamental human right. Just as the oceans, rivers, and streams on our planet are all connected, so are the hundreds of tribes and nations from around the world who are answering the call to join the Standing Rock Sioux and rally around that right. Honoring and protecting the sanctity of water has united millions of people in a common cause. Conversely, the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) project has emerged as the Machiavellian corporate villain, the proverbial head of the Black Snake (oil pipeline), willing to compromise, if not sacrifice, human and civil rights in the relentless and merciless pursuit of oil and money. Militarized police and the National Guard, in concert with local law enforcement, launched warlike tactics and employed “less-than-lethal� weaponry like rubber bullets, ice-cold water, and concussion grenades on peaceful, prayerful Water Protectors, guardians of the earth and Native American ancestral cultural sites. There seems to be no limit to this insatiable greed, and the fierce moral battle that has emerged is nothing short of an epic confrontation between corporatocracy and humanity. The gathering of nations at Standing Rock is unprecedented in its magnitude and importance as a pivotal moment in the history of environmental stewardship and the future of our natural resources. —Rima Krisst

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The day after bulldozers desecrated sacred grounds, Water Protectors chained themselves to several bulldozers while others in the group lit cedar boughs and prayed in solidarity. Opposite: An assembly of intertribal warriors. Photos by Tony Abeyta trendmagazineglobal.com

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While waiting to drive across the Bay Bridge to a protest in front of the federal building in San Francisco, artist Tony Abeyta grabbed some paint and poster board to create this image. Even though it got soggy in the light rain, the poster held up. Abeyta later auctioned it off to raise funds and awareness for Standing Rock. He believes it was blessed by the rains, and he was reminded that water is, indeed, life. Photo by Zoe Urness

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Military veterans arrived at the Oceti Sakowin Camp in December 2016 to march with the warriors in support of the Water Protectors. Photo by Zoe Urness trendmagazineglobal.com

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I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole earth will become One Circle again. —Crazy Horse

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This page and opposite: The Water Protectors, organized by Taos Pueblo, stand with the Standing Rock Sioux in a peaceful demonstration at the New Mexico State Capitol in Santa Fe. This page, bottom left: Christopher Lujan from Taos Pueblo has been active from the very beginning of the protests. He worked at the camp school, hauled firewood, and built winter shelters, and was sprayed by water cannons and tear gas. Photos by Rima Krisst

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Young warriors on their horses and other peaceful Protectors gather for prayers in the face of the forces on the hill. Top: The Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806, north of the Oceti Sakowin Camp, now quiet after a barrage of bullets, tear gas, and water was sent into the crowds by law enforcement. Photos by Noreen O’Brien 126

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Bottom left: Hundreds of flags, representing more than 300 nations, fly as they outline the camp of Oceti Sakowin. Bottom right: The world is represented. Top: A view of Oceti Sakowin Camp. Oceti Sakowin means Seven Council Fires, the original name of the the Great Sioux Nation. Photos by Noreen O’Brien trendmagazineglobal.com

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Sacred wood Photo by Noreen OBrien

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Dawn’s early glow warms morning prayer on the Cannonball. Photo by Noreen O’Brien

Warriors are not what you think of as warriors. The warrior is not someone who fights, because no one has the right to take another life. The warrior, for us, is one who sacrifices himself for the good of others. His task is to take care of the elderly, the defenseless, those who can not provide for themselves, and above all, the children, the future of humanity. —Chief Sitting Bull

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RICH IN ART AND HERITAGE

RIMA KRISST

TAOS


Ski Steep Photographed by

Michael Holmquist Taos Ski Valley’s challenging slopes have made it a favorite among expert skiers from around the world. Big skies, abundant sun, and perfect powder are also powerful attractions, but it’s the Black Diamond runs and stunning vistas that keep ’em coming back.


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Andrea Krejci at Hidden Chute, one of Taos Ski Valley’s popular challenges. Opposite: Josh Carlson at Donkey Serenade. Previous pages: Marty Lucero at Highline Ridge. trendmagazineglobal.com 135


Josh Carlson launches from The Kitchen Wall. Opposite: Marty Lucero at Twin Trees 136 TREND Summer / Fall Lookbook 2016


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“Magic Hour” in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Taos, New Mexico. 138 TREND Summer / Fall Lookbook 2016


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Aquatica Immersive Photography by Pen

Densham


It is like hunting a dream, An intuition as fragile as a flying ember, A knowing that something can be kindled, But only as I stand receptive, Waiting beside a writhing, sun-smashed mountain stream in Hawaii. I want to pull everything in the world through my lens To transform souls, with water, the ultimate blessing of life. A crazy man? I have no defined target. Just trust—hard to learn that trust. When my breath stutters, when my heart hurts. In that good way like love I give up consciousness—my arms wave, my finger pulses I free the shutter on my camera—inches from the throbbing, constantly transforming liquid. All my life I have wanted to cast spells with a camera. I never expected by letting go. The images would find me. —Pen Densham

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From the Streamlines series, images taken at Waimea Falls Park, Oahu, Hawaii. Opposite: Koifusion, from Exploring the Dragon’s Gate. Previous spread: From the Wavelife series, which captures the constantly transforming liquid sculptures of wave forms taken on visits to the North Shore area of Oahu. trendmagazineglobal.com 145


CAPTIONS

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trendmagazineglobal.com 147


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From the Streamlines series, images taken at Waimea Falls Park, Oahu. Opposite: from the Wavelife series. Previous spread: Meditations #1 trendmagazineglobal.com 149


Passion of the Palate

Chef Mark Kiffin’s Alaskan halibut, mussels, clams, calamari, braised fennel, and bouillabaisse broth

KATE RUSSELL

NEW MEXICO’S CULINARY INSPIRATION


SIMPLE INGREDIENTS. HONEST COOKING. FRESH THINKING.

At El Nido, our menus follow classic Italian cooking with intelligent innovation. Best-of-season vegetables, wood-fired meats, and homemade pastas are the basis of our food, succulent and modern. Elegant, rustic, refined, honest, delicious food, in a fine-dining atmosphere without pretense.

Old. New. Good. 1577 Bishops Lodge Rd.Tesuque, NM (505) 954-1272 elnidosantafe.comelnido1922@gmail.com


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The Compound

I

n the 16 years since chef-owner Mark Kiffin took over the venerable Canyon Road institution, The Compound has shed its outdated ambience and re-established itself as one of Santa Fe’s prime destinations for fine dining. Blending the classic appeal of traditional Santa Fe architecture with a sleekly minimalist aesthetic, Kiffin has managed to honor the city’s past while reflecting its hipper, more accessible present. In keeping with this intention, he has also fashioned a menu that pays homage to classic Continental cooking while fusing fresh ingredients and flawless technique, yielding an updated take on contemporary American cuisine that has garnered some of the culinary world’s highest awards. Expect favorites to be prepared with innovative flourishes, like Scottish salmon with bacon-glazed Brussels sprout leaves, or braised lamb with flageolets and tomato jam alongside mint chimichurri. The wine list pairs especially well with the food, so don’t miss the opportunity to sample a new vintage.

TOP AND BOTTOM: BONCRATIOUS. OPPOSITE: KATE RUSSELL

653 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 505-982-4353 | compoundrestaurant.com


Desserts are inventive as well, ranging from decadent to refreshing—or a mixture of both, such as apple galette with apple sorbet and Granny Smith–fennel salad, or crème brûlée tart with mulled wine–poached pears. Outside the elegant dining room are a flowerfilled patio and a smaller garden patio for private parties. All private dining rooms can be reserved for groups of 10 to 200 people, with special tasting menus available. Last year The Compound celebrated 50 years in Santa Fe, and the tradition continues. Open daily from 12 to 2 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. (except Sunday, which offers dinner only).

Slow-cooked seared polenta triangles with wild mushrooms sauteed with shallots, white wine, herbs, and butter and accompanied by black truffle relish, shaved Parmesan, and watercress. Opposite: The interior of the Compound. Chef Mark Kiffin.


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Saveur Bistro 204 Montezuma Ave, Santa Fe, New Mexico 505-989-4200

KATE RUSSELL

S

aveur Bistro owners Dee and Bernie Rusanowski have created a delightful restaurant in the heart of Santa Fe that caters to carnivores, vegetarians, and vegans alike. Established more than 14 years ago on the corner of Montezuma Avenue and Cerrillos Road, Saveur offers a wide selection of dishes made daily from the freshest ingredients. Quality matters, so eggs are all free-range and organic, salmon is flown in daily from Alaska, and everything, including soups and salad dressings, is made from scratch. Furthermore, all fresh produce is treated to an anti-bacterial wash before use. With its rustic tiled floors and gleaming copper plates, the restaurant has a French country charm that is cozy and inviting. Saveur is open daily from 7:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and in case you don’t have time to relax over breakfast or lunch, the restaurant also offers take-out.


French Bistro cuisine with an Italian accent.

Covered Patio Dining • Extensive Wine List • Bread Baked Daily • Relaxed Atmosphere ,

451 W Alameda St. Santa Fe, NM bouchebistro.com Open Tues to Sat 5:30-9:30 505-982-6297 for reservations


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Museum Hill Café

N

estled among four world-class museums on Camino Lejo, the Museum Hill Café is a favorite destination for locals and visitors who appreciate the well-prepared dishes and the panoramic views of Santa Fe and the mountains beyond. Owner Weldon Fulton describes the menu as “simple food, done well, from New Mexican to pastrami and time-honored soups and salads.” Gluten-free and vegetarian options as well as an additional Sunday menu are available. The restaurant, which has the second largest wine-by-the-glass list in town and a nice selection of beers, also celebrates signature events at the International Folk Art Museum and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and will occasionally offer a prix fixe menu for those special exhibits. The café serves lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and coffee and pastries from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily except Mondays. Evenings are reserved for private parties and special events. Handicapped accessible, with free parking.

ROBERT MEZA

710 Camino Lejo Santa Fe, New Mexico 505-984-8900 | museumhillcafe.net


Executive Chef Cristian Pontiggia creates Italian cuisine using fresh local Farmer’s Market ingredients, flown in daily seafood, natural locally raised meats, and gluten-free pasta dishes.

g

Photos left and top right: Kate Russell

osteriadassisi.com

Osteria D’Assisi Restaurant & Piano Lounge Tuesday–Saturday 6pm to close Happy Hour 4:30–6:30 Daily

58 South Federal Place, Santa Fe, NM (505) 986-5858 Piano lounge featuring local favorites like Tucker Binkley


Inspired creativity worth reading SANTA FE SANTA FE TREND LOOKBOOK 2017

LOOKBOOK

architecture+ art+design+cuisine

ADVERTISERS ANTIQUES, HOME FURNISHINGS, RUGS, & ACCENTS

VOLUME 17 ISSUE 4

Array arrayhome.com 505-699-2760..........................................50

trendmagazineglobal.com

Casa Nova casanovagallery.com 505-983-8558....................................44–45 HoCoFab Furniture hocofab.com 505-603-7181........................................116 Hunt Modern huntmodern.com 505-930-5321........................................160

WINTER SPRING ISSUE

Display through April 2017 U.S. $7.95 Can. $9.95

Moss Outdoor/Dedon mossoutdoor.com 505-989-7300....................................42–43 Samuel Design Group samueldesigngroup.com 505-820-0239............................................9 Violante & Rochford Interiors vrinteriors.com 505-983-3912........................................2–3 ARCHITECTS & DESIGNERS THE NAMINGHA FAMILY LEGACY connects the past to the present

DNCA Architects dncaarchitect.com 505-255-4033 .........................................77

PAULA CASTILLO’S

abstractions in metal

ARCHITECTS OF SPIRIT

and their sacred spaces

Dudley Design dondudleydesign.com 505-243-8100.........................................IFC

FALL 2016FALL 16 $9.95through CDN $9.95 US 2016 Display Dec. U.S./Can. $9.95 63

0

McCormick Architects mccormickarchitects.com 505-699-6199.........................................IFC

8

LOOKBOOK summer 2016

Samuel Design Group samueldesigngroup.com 505-820-0239............................................9 Violante & Rochford Interiors vrinteriors.com 505-983-3912........................................2–3

HOPI POTTERY in a New Light TOM JOYCE fuses the art and science of metal making PETER SARKISIAN’S sculptural enigmas

SUM 16 $9.95 CDN $9.95 US

US/CAN $9.95

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Art, design, architecture, cuisine, and style

Subscribe and advertise to a magazine that matters

Wiseman Gale Duncan Interiors wgdinteriors.com 505-984-8544..........................................11 ARTISTS & GALLERIES

Chasm Fine Art chasmfineart.com 720-938-6430.........................................19 Christopher Thomson christopherthomsonironworks.com 505-470-3140.........................................13 Colin & Kristine Poole colinpoole.com; kristinepoole.com 505-983-8008; 505-660-3485................27 David Michael Kennedy davidmichaelkennedy.com 575-581-9504.........................................29 Dick Evans rameyart.com 760-341-3800 ..........................................7 Diego J. Velázquez / Santa Fe Metal Design santafemetal.com diegojvelazquez.com 505-438-3857.........................................16 Janine Contemporary janinecontemporary.com 505-989-9330.........................................50 Kevin and Jennifer Box origamiinthegarden.com.........................17 La Mesa of Santa Fe lamesaofsantafe.com 505-984-1688.........................................12 Niman Fine Art namingha.com 505-988-5091...........................................1 Patina Gallery patina-gallery.com 505-986-3432.........................................25 Siri Hollander / Hollander Gallery sirihollander.com 505-927-2072.........................................18 Site Santa Fe sitesantafe.org 505-989-1199.........................................36 William Siegal Gallery / Paula Castillo williamsiegal.com 505-820-3300.........................................34

EDUCATION, EVENTS & ART DISTRICTS Creative Santa Fe creativesantafe.org...........................38–39 El Museo Cultural elmuseocultural.org 505-992-0591.........................................41 Santa Fe Railyard Arts District santaferailyardartsdistrict.com...............32 EYEWEAR, BEAUTY, & HEALTH The Beauty Bar jessevans.com 505-983-6241.........................................53 Christus Health Plan christushealthplan.org...........................BC Feather Eagle Sky feathereaglesky.com.........................22–23 FASHION, JEWELRY, & ACCESSORIES Adorn Clothing and Accessories adornsantafe.com 505-820-2367.........................................50 Beeman Jewelry Design beemanjewelrydesign.com 425-422-3990...........................................8 Bobby’s Cosmetics 505-982-1645.........................................50 Curiosa 505-988-2420.........................................50 Chico’s stores.chicos.com/en/guadalupe-station 505-984-1132.........................................50 Daniela shopdaniella.com 505-988-2399.........................................47 The Golden Eye goldeneyesantafe.com 505-984-0040.........................................26 Marc Howard Custum Jewelry Design marc-howard.com 505-820-1080........................................50 Montecristi Hats montecristihats.com 505-983-9598.........................................14

BUILDERS, LIGHTING, FIXTURES, & MATERIALS

Peruvian Connection peruvianconnection.com 505-438-8198.........................................50

Allbright & Lockwood allbrightlockwood.com 505-986-1715........................................IFC

Spirit of the Earth spiritoftheearth.com 505-988-9558.........................................10

Barbara Meikle Fine Art meiklefineart.com 505-992-0400..........................................20

Statements in Tile / Lighting/Kitchens / Flooring statementsinsantafe.com 505-988-4440.........................................15

REAL ESTATE

Blue Rain Gallery blueraingallery.com 505-954-9902..........................................35

Woods Design Builders woodsbuilders.com 505-988-2413..........................................6

Allan Houser Gallery allanhouser.com 505-982-4705........................................4–5 Barbara Fuentes barbarafuentes.com...............................139

505-988-5007 trendmagazineglobal.com From top: Robert Reck, Michael Namingha, Kate Russell

Charlotte Jackson Fine Art charlottejackson.com 505-989-8688.........................................33

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Mallard Motorplex collectorcarssantafe.com 505-660-3039........................................21


RESTAURANTS, FOOD, DRINK, & LODGING Bouche Bistro bouchebistro.com 505-982-6297......................................................155 Café Sonder cafesonder.com 505-982-9170.................................................49, 50 The Compound Restaurant compoundrestaurant.com 505-982-4353.............................................152–153 El Nido elnidosantafe..com 505-231-9386......................................................151 Hotel Chaco hotelchaco.com 866-505-7828........................................................76 Heritage Hotels and Resorts hhandr.com 877-901-7666........................................................76 KGB Spirits kgbspirits.com 505-404-6101.............................................140–141 Museum Hill Café museumhillcafe.net 505-984-8900......................................................156 Osteria d’Assisi osteriadassisi.com 505-986-5858......................................................157 Saveur Bistro 505-989-4200......................................................154 Sazón sazonsantafe.com 505-983-8604......................................................IBC State Capital Kitchen statecapitalkitchen.com 505-467-8237........................................................37 Whole Hog Café wholehogcafenm.com 505-474-3375........................................................50 Zia Energia ziaenergia.com....................................................159 SOCIAL MEDIA & SOFTWARE Loka Creative lokacreative.com 505-603-7190......................................................117 TRAVEL & ACCESSORIES Le Bon Voyage lbvbags.com 505-986-1260.................................................50–51


open tues-sat 11-5 · 428 sandoval · huntmodern.com · 505.930.5321

underex po sed st udio s.c om

Clam Chair / Philip Arc tander / D enmar k 1944


An Adventure in Flavor

221 Shelby Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505-983-8604 | sazonsantafe.com


CHRISTUS Health Plan Generations™ HMO and New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange

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