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Introduction

Welcome to the Bob Dwyer Rugby Workshops Coaching Manual The structure of the manual is based on my belief that all quality play in rugby derives from quality execution of quality technique. Insistence on quality technique, executed under the pressure of game-related practice sessions, is therefore essential if we are to achieve our goal of successful performance. This manual will give you the direction to enable you to achieve this. An American Football coach once said, “You can’t win without good players, but you can sure lose with them. This is where the good coach comes in!” I believe that a good coach is one who has the enthusiasm, the determination and the courage to insist on quality execution of quality technique at all times. It’s a Bob Dwyer quote which says, “Practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice makes perfect.” It will require all of these qualities, all of the time, to achieve perfection. Don’t let your players down!


BOB DWYER RUGBY WORKSHOPS | Coaching Manual

Each Practice in the manual – there are 77 of them – lists the Key Principles of quality technique which are essential for quality execution. These lists must become an intrinsic part of every coach’s work. My advice is that you must never allow faulty technique to go uncorrected at any practice session. This will require vigilance! As you progress through the manual, constant reference back to the Essential Level section will be required. I recommend that you design warm-up sessions which contain groupings of all of the basic elements of the game. These basic elements are the tools of trade which every player needs – properly sharpened and ready for use. Adherence to this philosophy will prove most rewarding. Quality preparation for the game of rugby requires a number of separate elements. The most important is quality, game-related rugby practice and I am confident that the bobdwyerrugby.com website will provide that. Other elements are physical preparation – fitness, strength and speed-agility-quickness (SAQ®) – and mental preparation. Detailed information can be found in Links for SAQ®, and in Coaching Support/Psychological Skills for mental preparation.

© Bob Dwyer’s Rugby Workshops Pty Ltd

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How to use this manual

COMMON STRUCTURE TO EACH PRACTICE The Practices that make up each Session in this Manual are presented in a common format, which includes: • Key Principles, which outlines the fundamental objectives and important considerations of the Practice. • A Practice Diagram which shows the set-up positioning of players, equipment and, where applicable, the coach and also indicates the movement required by the players in the execution of the practice. The Diagram Legend on page 7 shows a key to the graphics used throughout this Manual. • A script of Instructions which, when read in conjunction with the diagram, describes the set-up, positioning, play and outcomes of the practice. • Links to our website, where further information and videos can be found.

For more information, visit us at www.bobdwyerrugby.com

“After our very first practice session, with the ‘new’ bobdwyerrugby philosophy and detail, players came up to me and said, ‘I have been playing rugby for years and only now do I know where to go and my role in the game.’ The players loved it, the coaches loved it and the crowd loved it. It brought instant and sustained success. It was an amazing transition that the players bought into. I’m hoping to do the same at the Queensland Reds.” Jim McKay, Assistant Coach, Queensland Reds, Australia


BOB DWYER RUGBY WORKSHOPS | Coaching Manual

LEGEND TO DIAGRAMS

11 F 11 F

11

Attacker

Attacker with ball

Attacking Forward

Resulting position

Defender

Defender’s Resulting position

Defending Forward

Scrum

Lineout

Cone

Target Zone

Tackle shield

Ball

Tackle bag

Pass Running Line Kicking Line

Coach

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Direction of Play

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ESSENTIAL LEVEL SESSIONS 1 – 9


ESSENTIAL LEVEL Introduction

Dedication and Commitment As a coach, you must: Be a good communicator Have courage and enthusiasm Invest in your development Always prepare thoroughly Be a good role model.


ESSENTIAL LEVEL | Introduction

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE ESSENTIAL LEVEL The Essential Level Section provides you with the building blocks which are fundamental and “essential” for the accurate execution of all and any play in the game of Rugby. As you move forward through the Intermediate Level and Advanced Level Sections, a revision of each of these building blocks should form part of each of your practice sessions. You may perhaps design warm-up sessions which contain various combinations of each of the practices detailed in this section.

A WORD OF WARNING: DON’T MISTAKE “ESSENTIAL” FOR “SIMPLE”. My experience is that many elite teams cannot accurately, let alone perfectly, execute many of the exercises listed in this section. This does not mean that they are not winning teams, but it does mean that they are not playing to their potential, surely a sad situation. Neglect these sessions at your peril.

For tips on Effective Coaching, see “Coaching Support” at www.bobdwyerrugby.com

© Bob Dwyer’s Rugby Workshops Pty Ltd

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ESSENTIAL LEVEL

ATTACK – GENERAL

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SESSION 1 1. Catch and Pass...................................................................................................... 20 2. Straight Running ................................................................................................... 22 3. Clearing Pass ......................................................................................................... 24 4. Taking the Overlap – Man-on-man Defence ............................................ 26 SESSION 2 5. Dummy Pass ......................................................................................................... 28 6. Straight Running...................................................................................................30 7. Unders Run ............................................................................................................ 32 8. Circle Ball................................................................................................................ 34 9. Taking the Overlap/Gap – Drift Defence ................................................... 36 SESSION 3 10. Support Play ........................................................................................................ 38 11. Realignment .........................................................................................................40 12. Tackle Contest Options ...................................................................................44 13. Continuous Play .................................................................................................48 Summary of Essential Level Attack....................................................................50 ATTACK FROM SET PIECES SESSION 4 51 14. Individual Roles .................................................................................................. 52 15. Attack from Scrums .......................................................................................... 56 SESSION 5 16. Attack from Lineouts ........................................................................................ 58


ESSENTIAL LEVEL | Table of Contents

ATTACK – COUNTER-ATTACK

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SESSION 6 61 17. Take the Overlap – Man-on-man Defence .............................................. 62 18. Take the Gap – Drift Defence ...................................................................... 64 19. Beating the First Line ....................................................................................... 66 DEFENCE SESSION 7 – Positioning Attackers and Making the Tackle 20. Defensive Footwork ......................................................................................... 70 21. Positioning the Attacker .................................................................................. 72 22. Upper Body Driving Tackle............................................................................ 73 23. Lower Body Driving Tackle ............................................................................ 74 24. Tackle Channel ................................................................................................... 75 SESSION 8 – Front-On Tackle and Chasing/Covering Tackle 25. Front-on Driving Tackle ................................................................................... 76 26. Front-on Passive Tackle .................................................................................. 78 27. Narrow Tackle Channel ...................................................................................80 28. Chasing/Covering Tackle ............................................................................... 82 KICKING SESSION 9 – Types of Kick Practices 29. Spiral Punt ........................................................................................................... 84 30. Grubber ................................................................................................................ 88 31. Chip Kick ...............................................................................................................90 32. Drop Punt ............................................................................................................ 92 33. Place Kick ............................................................................................................. 94 34. Drop Kick ............................................................................................................. 96 35. Banana Kick ........................................................................................................ 98

© Bob Dwyer’s Rugby Workshops Pty Ltd

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SESSION 3 Practice 10: Support Play KEY PRINCIPLES Do not interfere with the intentions of the ball-carrier. Stay on hand but with enough width and depth to allow you to stay with the ball-carrier as he changes his line or pace. When you observe the ballcarrier moving into a tackle/ contact situation, you should move closer to give active support. NOTE: More on the options available in this situation is given in the next session. The aim of the support player at the tackle/contact situation is to help the ball-carrier to stay on his feet and to keep driving forward. If you want the ball, you must call for it clearly and urgently, and then move into position to receive the pass. NOTE: Once called for, the pass must be delivered or a dummy pass executed.


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 10

PRACTICE 10: SUPPORT PLAY

• With groups of five in backline formation, revise the Clearing Pass, Catch and Pass and Straight Running described previously. • Now use the player in the scrum-half position to support the ball as it is transferred along the line. • If the ball is dropped, the support player must be immediately on hand to secure the ball. • If the ball reaches the end of the line, the last ball-carrier executes a circle ball transfer to the supporting player. • Vary the roles to ensure each player takes the scrum-half/support role in turn.

© Bob Dwyer’s Rugby Workshops Pty Ltd

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Practice 11: Realignment

KEY PRINCIPLES Players inside the ball, chase the ball, as per our Key Principles in Practice 10. Players outside the tackle zone, stop, run backwards and outwards as described in Practice 8. Do not wait for the looping players to carry the ball forward for you. Run backwards with urgency to take immediate advantage of the quickest possible recycle. NOTE: Y You must strive to be always behind the ball. It is a basic principle of the game of rugby that you cannot benefit from being in front of the ball.


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 11

NOTES FOR COACH The session is executed without any “forwards” participating. The aim is to educate players in the urgency required in moving from a totally ineffective position in front of the ball, to a most effective position behind the ball.

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Practice 11: Realignment

PRACTICE 11: REALIGNMENT – Part 1

TACKLE 12 10

13

15

11 11

15

13

12

10

9

14

• Groups of seven aligned in backline formation. • The ball is moved from the scrum-half and along the backline. • Coach calls “Tackle!” Ball-carrier stops and turns, facing scrum-half. Inside players loop into their re-formed backline positions. Outside players retreat backwards and outwards to re-form a backline. • Ball is fed from the tackled player to the scrum-half and along the new backline.


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 11

PRACTICE 11: REALIGNMENT – Part 2

11

12 9

11

15

13

10

14

• Exercise is repeated with the coach calling a new “Tackle!” The original ball-carrier in Part 1 of this Practice has now resumed a position in the reformed backline. • The “Tackle!” call continues in the same manner until the backline runs out of space, whereupon the backs realign again on the open side of the “tackle”. The exercise continues from the halfway line to the goal line.

For the latest commentary and opinion, read “Dwyer’s View” at www.bobdwyerrugby.com

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Practice 12: Tackle Contest Options

KEY PRINCIPLES As stated previously in Support Play, the prime aim of the Play arriving player(s) should be to continue the advance of the ball towards the tryline. Support for the ball carrier, a secure “sealing-off” of the ball, and strong leg-drive are all essential. Although our intention should be to stay on our feet and continue our drive forward – and thereby attract as many defenders as possible – it is possible that the bound players go to ground with the ball. This is not a problem. Recycle the ball without delay.


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 12

The arriving player can then make a decision whether to: a) continue the drive bound together, or b) continue the drive, rip the ball and continue the forward run, or c) continue the drive, rip the ball and transfer to another arriving player. NOTE: This could be a transfer to another forward arriving at pace, or to the scrum-half. These actions must be completed without hesitation. We must not have a stop-start attack. Key Principles of Practices 10 and 11 must still be stressed.

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© Bob Dwyer’s Rugby Workshops Pty Ltd

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Practice 12: Tackle Contest Options

PRACTICE 12: TACKLE CONTEST OPTIONS – Part 1

11

12 9

11

15

13

10

14

• Groups of seven aligned in backline formation, but with three or four “forwards” providing support for the attack. • When coach calls “Tackle” “Tackle”, the first arriving forward will attach and drive, rip and feed the scrum-half and the attack will continue.

Improve your skills with Bob’s “Coaching Tip of the Week” at www.bobdwyerrugby.com


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 12

PRACTICE 12: TACKLE CONTEST OPTIONS – Part 2

12

12 7

12 7

7

9

OPTION A

OPTION B

OPTION C

• The practice should be extended to achieve any one of the three possibilities described in the Key Principles: a) continue the drive bound together, or b) continue the drive, rip the ball and continue the forward run, or c) continue the drive, rip the ball and transfer to another arriving player. • Realignment of player(s) outside the tackle zone is essential to keeping the attack going. • Extend the practice to include defenders with tackle shields/suits.

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Practice 13: Continuous Play

KEY PRINCIPLES The Practice is really a combination of everything previously covered in Session 1 though to Session 3. All of the Key Principles contained therein should be in evidence. Remember, “only perfect practice makes perfect!”

“Let the players explore the practice. This will give them ownership.”


ESSENTIAL LEVEL ATTACK | Session 3 | Practice 13

PRACTICE 13: CONTINUOUS PLAY • The group should be something resembling a team, with some opposition. If possible, say, a group of twelve in attack – six forwards and six backs – with possibly nine or ten in defence. • Proceed as in Practice 12, with the defence now becoming involved at the tackle contest. Arriving support players continue driving forward and/or recycling, as in Practice 12. • Look for: a) the attacking team forcing more and more defenders into the tackle contest, and b) urgency in continuity of the attack and in realignment of the backs. • Play should proceed without any delay delay, but with no panic. Speed in everything – drive at the tackle, speed of foot, speed of recycle – is our aim. • If a back can be effective on the ball at the tackle contest, he should go in and be effective. If not, he must realign with urgency. • Continuous play from halfway to the goal line. Score the try! Continue play even if there is a minor infringement. • We are looking for action with no hesitation!

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Bob Dwyer Rugby Workshops Coaching Manual  

The definitive rugby coaching program - a working curriculum for coaches at all levels. Here are a few sample pages of Bob Dwyer's comprehen...

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