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SPECIAL FOCUS:

INVESTMENT

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www.pwc.com.na

Market research & surveys

Performance improvement

PwC Business School

PwC Remchannel salary survey Performance management Strategy

Accounting Tax PwC’s TaxTim

Problem solvers for Namibian businesses

Consulting New business set-up Corporate governance

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Expat services Board of directors services

We are more than auditors Our purpose is to build trust in the Namibian society and to solve important problems for the Namibian business community. Over more than 40 years we built a team of specialists with experience and expertise who have one goal in mind: helping you to work better while keeping your business at the competitive edge. With the backup of our diverse international network, our Namibian team is geared with solutions for a wide range of business problems including: • • • • • • • • • • •

Skills development and training through the PwC Business School People and HR solutions IT systems, advice and controls Improving business process efficiencies Strategic planning Identify and manage business risks Filings and consultations to help you comply with Namibian business laws Tax management covering VAT, Customs, Employee and Income Taxes Expatriate services (Immigration and Tax) Board of directors support - training, processes and advice Forensic investigations

Nangula Uaandja Country Senior Partner Tel: +264 61 284 1065 nangula.uaandja@na.pwc.com

Ansie Rossouw Partner in Charge - Walvis Bay Tel: +264 64 217 720 ansie.rossouw@na.pwc.com

© 2017 PricewaterhouseCoopers. All rights reserved. In this document, PwC refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers Namibia, which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity.

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FROM THE EDITOR The active promotion of economic growth (in line with the Government of Namibia’s Harambee Prosperity Plan, NDP4 and Vision 2030) is now more necessary than ever with the macro economy almost certainly facing daunting times. Pursuant to this the Namibian Trade Directory has taken the pro-active decision already at the start of 2016 to make 2017 a special focus edition on the promotion of much needed Investment.

ELMARIE VAN RENSBURG EDITOR JAQUELINE ANGULA WEBSITE & SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

We want to promote Namibia as the desireable investment destination it is, by linking the would be investor to a variety of sought after investment opportunities through accurate and trouble-free information sharing. In this regard we firmly believe that Social Media for business is no longer optional, and at the NTD, daily active engagement has become crucial.  We operate on multi-media platforms actively promoting and encouraging sustainable, local and foreign direct investment to our clients and to Namibia as a whole on a daily basis. This is aimed at ensuring minimal frustration in the disseminating of crucial information and few missed opportunities. The past year also saw the Namibia Trade Directory celebrating 25 years of reputable & credible information sharing on the valued Namibian Business Portfolio. NTD has been at the forefront of the Namibian Government’s information campaign to market Namibia and its products to the potential investor since Independence and has never failed to deliver. Looking into the future the Namibia Trade Directory strives to continue its importance as a vehicle for circulating information and showcasing the condusive business environment in Namibia.  We wish to remain at the forefront as the undisputed, well-established source of accurate information on Namibian businesses and manufacturers pushing our clients onto new frontiers well beyond the borders of our much beloved country. On the home front we remain committed to boosting local business and enhancing its contribution to the achievement of the national development goals of industrial development and higher economic growth. As many of our longstanding patrons will recognise we are extremely excited about the transformation of our publication from its well-established character into a means of taking our clients and Namibia into the future with much confidence.  The new identity is designed to satisfy all existing expectations, while simultaneously making the publication internationally relevant to the current times.   It is therefore my pleasure to present to you the 2017 Investment Edition of the NTD.   We acknowledge that information, addresses and contact persons may change from time to time - the information provided is what the publisher had available at the time of going to print. We appreciate being advised of any changes, omissions, updates and improvements. Amendments for the purposes of the Namibia Trade Directory can be forwarded to info@namibiatradedirectory.com.

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ABOUT VENTURE ABOUT VENTURE

VENTURE MEDIA

Venture Media is the pioneer of Namibia tourism promotion. We are the leader in spreading the tourism word around the world. We distribute accurate, credible, up-to-date and regular tourism-related information on paper, in social media, on the World Wide Web, and on mobile apps. We have reached hundreds of thousands over more than two decades. Be part of our community and let’s do it together. WWW.TRAVELNEWSNAMIBIA.COM

TNN online is home to more than 20 years worth of content. We’ve been online since 1995, keeping readers across the world up-to-date with what’s happening in Namibia! Visit us today for the most amazing photos, enticing stories and comprehensive information on all things Namibia!

WE'RE A SOCIAL BUNCH

VENTURE PUBLICATIONS PTY LTD

PRINTING

reproduced, copied or transmitted in any form whatsoever without

T/A NAMIBIA TRADE DIRECTORY

John Meinert Printing (Pty) Ltd

written consent of the editor. It is a criminal offence to reproduce

P O Box 21593, Windhoek, Namibia

Tel +264 61 22 5411 | jmp@afol.com.na

copyright material.

Tel +264 61 42 0520

Cover photograph courtesy of Ohorongo Cement

www.namibiatradedirectory.com

Whilst every care has been taken in the preparation of the Unless otherwise stated, all photographs on the editorial pages were

publication, no liability can be accepted by the publishers for any

EDITOR/PROJECT MANAGER – Elmarie van Rensburg

provided by clients or the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting.

errors or omissions that may have occurred.

COPY EDITOR - Christina Rockstroh

This publication is the exclusive property of the publishers. All

To advertise in this publication, contact us at +264 61 42 0520 or

ONLINE & SOCIAL MEDIA - Jacqueline Angula

rights are reserved. No article or picture in the publication may be

info@namibiatradedirectory.com.

www.namibiatradedirectory.com

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MESSAGE FROM THE MINISTER

MINISTER OF INDUSTRIALISATION TRADE AND SME DEVELOPMENT dynamic economy and pro-business climate which offers an abundance of investment opportunities across all sectors including energy, agriculture, infrastructure, finance, manufacturing, tourism and housing. The conference marked the new approach of this government towards a more inclusive civil dialogue regarding the objectives of the country. By putting “inclusive growth” to the forefront it highlights the importance of strengthening the social dimension of Namibia in all its facets, by • alleviating poverty • building societies that are more cohesive • modernizing social protection and promoting social investment • improving employment opportunities Our ambition for the Invest in Namibia conference was to foster a greater level of engagement and deeper dialogue with all stakeholders in order to ensure that Namibia immediately comes to mind when considering foreign direct investment in the region. Last but not least, Namibia has always been a country that is friendly to foreign direct investment. For example, Namibia has stipulated and implemented large amounts of investment incentives through our Economic Development Incentives Program (EDI). The new Investment Promotion Act, which was recently enacted, aims to improve Namibia’s ability to attract and retain meaningful foreign direct investment for long-term sustainable development. The Honourable Immanuel Ngatjizeko The Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade & SME Development's partnership with the Namibia Trade Directory (NTD) dates back to independence. The NTD has rendered a commendable service to the people of Namibia ever since. During March 2016 the publication celebrated its 25th birthday and I had the opportunity to congratulate the company on reaching this milestone. The Namibia Trade Directory provides a service to the business sector and to potential investors world-wide. It continues to gain popularity as a source of business information for local and international business entities, especially as it is electronically available and active on various social media platforms. Namibia’s human and natural resources, political and economic stability, substantial infrastructure and advantageous geographic location offer limitless potential as a vibrant commerce hub and gateway to the southern African region with a market volume of upwards of 500 million people. During November 2016 the international Invest in Namibia conference was held in Windhoek in an effort to promote investment for inclusive growth and industrialization. The conference provided senior executives and private investors with an insight into Namibia’s

The discerning investor, who is looking for attractive fiscal benefits and an appropriate enabling environment, surely cannot afford to miss the opportunities that Namibia offers. On behalf of my ministry I hereby take the opportunity to invite potential investors to come and invest in Namibia. Against this background the focus of the 2017 edition of the Namibia Trade Directory is investment, to highlight the importance of promoting and encouraging sustainable local and foreign investment. I believe that potential investors and other readers will find the 2017 edition a useful source of information on Namibia’s investment environment and Namibian companies. I appreciate the partnership role played by private institutions such as the Namibia Trade Directory over the years, in support of Government’s effort to promote business linkages and to increase private sector investment activity. I have no doubt that the Namibia Trade Directory will continue to empower investors and business operators in the years to come.

The Honourable Immanuel Ngatjizeko

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CONTENTS Message from the Editor 1 Venture Media 2 Message from the Minister – Minister of Industrialisation Trade and SME Development 3 About Namibia 5 Government Pages 10 Investment Centre 16

TRADE AND INVESTMENT

RMB Namibia Sanlam Namibia Holdings Standard Bank

ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

Introduction Advantage One Africa Television Multichoice

71 72 74

76 78 79 80

Team Namibia 21 Electoral Commission of Namibia 22 Namibia’s Investment Record 24 Guide to Namibian Economy by R Sherbourne 28 Namibia in 2017 and Beyond by Rowland Brown 30

AGRICULTURE

FINANCE

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

Introduction 32 Allan Gray 34 Bank Bic Namibia 36 Bank of Namibia 38 Bank Windhoek 40 Deloitte 42 Development Bank of Namibia 44 EMHPrescient Investment Management 46 Ernst & Young 48 FNB Namibia 50 GIPF 52 Hollard Namibia 54 Konigstein Capital 56 Namfisa 58 Namibia Asset Management 60 NMG Benefits 62 Prudential 63 Namibia Mineworkers Investment Holdings Company (Pty) Ltd 64 Nedbank 66 Old Mutual Namibia 68 PwC Namibia 70

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Introduction 82 Agribank 84 Kaap Agri 86 Meat Board of Namibia 88 Meatco 90 Namib Poultry 92 Feedmaster 93

Introduction 94 Francois Erasmus and Partners Attorneys 96 Dr Weder, Kauta & Hoveka Inc 98 Geocarta – Cartography for Namibia 100 Lewcor Group 102 Namibia Qualifications Authority 104 Southern African Customs Union 106 Rennies Travel 108 The Document Warehouse 109 Therapeutic Informatics 110

EDUCATION

Introduction 112 African Leadership Institute 114 NTA 116 Namibia University of Science and Technology 118 NIPAM 120 PWC Namibia Business School 121

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University of Namibia (UNAM) 122

MANUFACTURING

Introduction 124 E.power Consulting and Construction 126 MPP Civils Namibia 128 Namibia Construction (Pty) Ltd. 130

Introduction Guans Packaging Namibia Breweries Limited Namibia Dairies Namib Mills Nederburg Walvis Bay Salt Holdings Ohorongo Cement

FISHING

MINING AND ENERGY

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

Introduction 132 Namibia Fish Consumption Promotion Trust 134 Namsov 136

GROUP COMPANIES

Introduction Kalahari Holdings (Pty) Ltd. Bidvest Namibia The Frans Indongo Group MMI Holdings Namibia Ohlthaver & List Group The Pupkewitz Group of Companies The Harold & Ethel Pupkewitz Heart Research Foundation

138 141 142 144 146 148 150 152

ICT

Introduction 154 The Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia 156 Green Enterprise Solutions (Pty) Ltd 158 Powercom (Pty) Ltd 159 Nampost 160 Schoemans Office 162 Telecom Namibia 164 Schoemans Data Card 166 Business Connexion 167

LOCAL AUTHORITIES Introduction City of Windhoek Municipality of Walvis Bay

168 170 172

174 176 178 180 181 182 183 184

Introduction 186 Debmarine Namibia 188 Dundee Precious Metals Tsumeb 190 Erongo Red 192 NAMCOR 194 NAMDEB 196 Namibia Power Corporation NAMPOWER 198 Oshakati Premier Electric 200

TOURISM

Introduction Namibia Wildlife Resorts

202 204

TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

Introduction 206 Autohaus Truck & Bus 208 Logistics Support Services (Pty) Ltd 209 FP du Toit Group 210 Manica Group Namibia 212 MVA Fund 214 Namibia Airports Company 216 NAMPORT 218 The National Road Safety Council 220 Transnamib Holdings Ltd 222 Walvis Bay Corridor Group 224 WestAir 226 Vital Contacts 228 Index 236 Namibia Trade Directory in Pictures 240


ABOUT NAMIBIA IN NAMIBIA’S QUEST TO BECOME AN INDUSTRIALIZED AND PROSPEROUS NATION - AS OUTLINED IN THE “GROWTH AT HOME” STRATEGY, THE “HARAMBEE PROSPERITY PLAN” (HPP) AND VISION 2030 - THE GOVERNMENT ENCOURAGES FOREIGN COMPANIES TO ENGAGE IN WIN-WIN PARTNERSHIPS THAT ADD VALUE TO PRODUCTS AND STIMULATE ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION. Namibia is a boutique investment destination and seeks foreign direct investment in the value addition and beneficiation of natural resources (diamonds, copper, zinc and phosphate), goods manufacturing and export of value-added products. Namibia offers other significant opportunities for investment in sectors such as manufacturing, agriculture (agro-processing), transport and logistics, tourism and film making, to name but a few.

SADC MARKET ACCESS

(see map) SADC +/- 280 million people SACU +/- 57 million people The SADC & CMA markets combined: +/- 280 million people

SELECTED RATINGS & RANKINGS

Transparency International: 1st in Africa for freedom of press Fraser Institute: 2nd most favourable destination for mining and exploration in Africa World Economic Forum: 2nd best transport infrastructure in Africa Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa: 4th best tourism destination in Africa Mo Ibrahim Foundation: 6th for Good Governance Heritage Foundation: 8th in Sub-Saharan Africa ranking World Economic Forum: 22nd for banking institutions

REASONS TO INVEST IN NAMIBIA

Sound Democratic Governance Architecture Namibia, a multi-party democracy, has enjoyed a high degree of political stability since its independence from South Africa in 1990. Stability is maintained by strict adherence to the constitution.

SOUND MACROECONOMIC ARCHITECTURE

Namibia’s economy is stable and has successfully weathered international financial crises. It continues to develop in order to grow and meet its challenges.

ENTERPRISE OPPORTUNITY

Namibia offers opportunities for investment in infrastructure through public-private partnerships (PPPs) or foreign direct investment (FDI). Due to its location Namibia also facilitates access for manufacturers and exporters to 15 SADC countries with a total population of +/- 280 million. Namibia values long-term relationships with foreign investors. An

enabling environment is in place to assist with the identification of opportunities, syndicate financing, operating and tax incentives in certain sectors, particularly manufacturing, and one-stop bureau services for establishing the local operations of international companies.

INVESTMENT ENVIRONMENT

The Namibian government sees foreign direct investment (FDI) as a key component of economic development and therefore proactively legislates and nurtures an environment that is equitable and attractive for FDI. Legislation ensures an enabling environment for foreign investors as much as for Namibian companies, which includes international arbitration of disputes, the right to remit profits and access to foreign exchange. Investment incentives and special tax incentives are available for certain sectors.

ESTABLISHMENT AND REGULATION

The Registrar of Companies manages, regulates and facilitates the formation of businesses. Investors are encouraged to seek

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ABOUT NAMIBIA

assistance from legal practitioners, auditors, accounting or secretarial firms for the process of registration. The Namibia Investment Centre offers services that range from early inquiries to operational phases. It informs on investment opportunities, incentives and procedures. It assists investors by streamlining and coordinating with ministries and regulatory bodies.

FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT AND GOVERNANCE

Namibia’s financial environment is well developed and robust. This has ensured that Namibia enjoys a high degree of financial stability and investment grade ratings. Namibia is part of the Common Monetary Area (CMA) with South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland. The Namibian dollar is pegged to the SA rand. The financial sector is sophisticated and consists of a number of commercial banks with international ties to facilitate international banking, as well as commercial and governmental sources of finance geared to enterprise financing. Equity finance, local equity holdings and financing for infrastructure may be provided by various individual and syndicated sources.

PARTNERSHIPS AND LOCAL EQUITY

AGRICULTURE

To prepare for climate variability and mitigate drought, climate change adaptive technologies are required for crop production.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

Namibia values private social engagement, particularly specialists in health and education, to augment public provision of social services.

TOURISM

Namibia is a popular travel destination and investment in tourism is welcomed, especially in accommodation facilities. Further opportunities exist for PPPs in community conservancies. Source economic snapshot (2015 est) world factbook 2016 2017 Forecast Population 2.25 million (2014 est) GDP (Nominal): N$146.5 billion N$161.3 billion GDP Growth Rate (Real): 1.6% 3.4% Inflation: 6.7% 6.5%

Namibia encourages partnerships with local enterprises or through equity holdings. Local equity finance is provided by commercial banks and/or other financial institutions.

KEY INVESTOR SERVICE AGENCIES

A BLUEPRINT FOR INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The Namibia Investment Centre provides general information and advice on investment opportunities, incentives and procedures. It also assists by streamlining and coordinating with government ministries and regulatory bodies.

Namibia provides numerous opportunities for international investors seeking a foothold and growth on the African continent.

THE NAMIBIA INVESTMENT CENTRE

INFRASTRUCTURE AND LOGISTICS

Namibia has embarked on a large-scale programme of renewing and developing its infrastructure. Investment opportunities may take the form of public-private partnerships (PPPs) either on a per project basis or with equity holdings. Certain utilities may be wholly owned by investors. Current focal areas are the development of water infrastructure, power generation and transmission infrastructure, as well as the transport and logistics infrastructure, notably road, rail and port with an emphasis on corridors to SADC states.

SERVICED LAND AND HOUSING

Namibia currently has a deficit of affordable serviced land and housing. Accordingly there are opportunities for investment and operations in this field.

MANUFACTURING AND MARKET ACCESS

Namibia provides preferential incentives to manufacturing enterprises, particularly those that add value to local commodities. It facilitates access to the other 14 SADC member states. The SADC region has an estimated population of +/- 280 million. Physical trade is managed by the Walvis Bay Corridor Group which oversees transport corridors to SADC markets. Namibia also has duty and quota-free access to the Southern African Customs Union (SACU). A wide range of trade agreements has been signed with various blocs and nations of the African continent. Chief among these are AGOA with the USA, the EU-EPA and the Cotonou Agreement between the EU and ACP states.

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Contact Details: Bernadette Artivor Deputy Permanent Secretary Tel: +264 61 283 7335/7254 Email: investinnamibia@mti.gov.na

WALVIS BAY CORRIDOR GROUP

The Walvis Bay Corridor Group is a facilitation centre and one-stop shop coordinating trade along the Walvis Bay Corridors which link Namibia and its ports to the rest of the SADC trading partners. Contact Details: Johny M. Smith Chief Executive Officer Tel: +264 61 251 669 Email: marketing@wbcg.com.na


ABOUT NAMIBIA

The Capital - Windhoek

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF NAMIBIA

A broad range of financial products, as well as financing for PPPs engaged in developing infrastructure, is made available by the Development Bank of Namibia for projects that have a high development impact. Contact Details: Martin Inkumbi Chief Executive Officer Tel: +264 61 290 8000 Email: minkumbi@dbn.com.na

NAMIBIA/ZIMBABWE PREFERENTIAL TRADE AGREEMENT

This agreement, governed by rules of origin, came into force on 17 August 1992. Goods grown, produced or manufactured in Namibia may be imported into Zimbabwe free of customs duty, and vice versa, if they are wholly produced/obtained in the country of origin. For Namibian exports to qualify for such preferential treatment, registration with the Ministry of Finance is required. A certificate of origin must accompany the goods and they must be transported directly without passing through a third country’s commercial zone.

SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION (SACU)

TRADE

Namibia is a member of the following international trade organisations:

AFRICA GROWTH AND OPPORTUNITY ACT (AGOA)

AGOA was signed into law in May 2000. It provides duty-free and quota-free access to United States markets for all products (excluding products from the textile and apparel markets) that originate from eligible beneficiary Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Namibia was designated as eligible for AGOA benefits and has been certified for the textile and apparel benefits after establishing the required visa system.

Namibia became a member of SACU in 1990. The other members are Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and South Africa. In terms of the SACU agreement there is free movement of goods among the members. Article 2 of the agreement prevents members from imposing duties or quantitative restrictions on goods grown, produced or manufactured in the common customs area. Duties are levied on goods upon entry into the common customs area, but once inside it, no further duties are charged.

WORLD TRADE ORGANISATION (WTO)

The WTO serves as a forum for trade negotiations and the settlement of trade disputes among nations. WTO rules on international trade are contained in three main legal instruments: the general agreements on tariffs and trade (GATT), the general agreement on trade in services (GATS) and the agreement on traderelated aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS).

SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY (SADC)

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ABOUT NAMIBIA

regional economic block. Member states are: Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. In the past Namibia was responsible for coordinating marine fisheries and resources but since the restructuring of the SADC Secretariat these responsibilities are now centralised. A Free Trade Area was established in 2008, but some members are not yet part of it.

Groundwater (borehole drilling) Pipeline construction to transport water over large distances

GENERALISED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES (GSP)

THE CONSTITUTION

Namibia has preferential market access for some of its products to the markets of certain developed countries under various GSP schemes. Mainly manufactured/processed goods and agricultural products are involved. Eligible products can enter these markets duty-free or at reduced rates. GSP schemes are non-contractual, and can be terminated unilaterally by any preference at any time. *(Source: Website of the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development at www.mti.gov.na)

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN NAMIBIA Port-related services Railway development & linkage Cargo handling facility Warehousing & distribution Corridor projects Truck stop facilities Value adding projects Flood and rainwater harvesting Seawater desalination plants

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POLITICAL SYSTEM

Head of state Namibia gained independence in 1990 under President Sam Nujoma, now referred to as the founding father. The current president, His Excellency Hage Geingob, took office in 2015.

A multiparty democracy and fundamental rights and freedoms are enshrined in Namibia’s constitution. The executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of Government are independent and autonomous. The president is head of the executive branch. National and presidential elections are conducted freely and fairly and are held every five years. The next elections are scheduled for November 2019. Regional and municipal elections also take place at regular intervals.

CAPITAL

Windhoek has a population of approximately 365 000. The capital is situated in the central highlands at 1 650 metres above sea level and has a moderate climate.

CURRENCY

Namibian Dollar (NAD) on par with the South African Rand (ZAR).

BUSINESS HOURS

Office hours are from 08:00–17:00 from Mondays to Fridays, while


ABOUT NAMIBIA

banks are open for business from 9:00–15:30 on weekdays and from 8:30–12:00 on Saturdays.

various San languages are also spoken by different groups of the population.

GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION AND CLIMATE

Religion: Freedom of religion was adopted through Namibia’s Bill of Fundamental Rights. About 90% of the population is Christian.

Namibia is situated on Africa’s south-western seaboard. Its neighbouring countries are Angola to the north, Botswana and Zimbabwe to the east and South Africa to the south, with the Atlantic Ocean forming its western border. The country covers 824 268 square kilometres and is divided into 13 regions as determined by the Delimitation Commission. Namibia consists of arid and desert regions in the south and southwest, changing to lush fertile areas in the far north and northeast, while the eastern part of the country is semi-arid. The hottest time of the year is from November to February, when average temperatures range from 20–36°C. In the cooler months, from May to August, temperatures vary from 3–6°C in the morning and often rise to 18–22°C by midday.

POPULATION AND LANGUAGES

Namibia is the second most sparsely populated country in the world. The average population density is approximately 2.6 people per square kilometre. The total population is estimated at 2.2 million, of which around 15% reside in the capital, Windhoek. Approximately 37% of the population live in urban areas. English is the official language, while Oshiwambo, Afrikaans, Herero, KhoeKhoegowab, German, Lozi, Rukwangali, Tswana and

ELECTRIC CURRENT 220 VAC 50 Hz

TIME

Namibia is in the GMT+2 time zone but changes to wintertime on the first Sunday in April until the first Sunday in September. Wintertime is set at GMT+1.

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS 2017

New Year’s Day: Sunday, 1 January New Year’s Day Holiday: Monday, 2 January Independence Day: Tuesday, 21 March Good Friday: Friday, 14 April Easter Monday: Monday, 17 April Workers’ Day: Monday, 1 May Cassinga Day: Thursday, 4 May Ascension Day: Thursday, 25 May Africa Day: Thursday, 25 May Hero’s Day: Saturday, 26 August International Human Rights Day: Sunday, 10 December Public Holiday: Monday, 11 December Christmas Day: Monday, 25 December Family Day: Tuesday, 26 December

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G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT HE President Dr Hage Geingob Tel: +264 61 270 74 27 www.op.gov.na

Permanent Secretary of Office of the President Mr Samuel /Goagoseb Auasblick, State House Private Bag 13339 Windhoek Tel: +264 270 7787 Fax: +264 22 1780 sgoagoseb@op.gov.na

Department of Veteran Affairs Minister Hon. Dr Nickey Iyambo VICE PRESIDENT HON DR NICKEY IYAMBO

MINISTER OF PRESIDENTIAL AFFAIRS HON FRANS KAPOFI

Old State House, Robert Mugabe Avenue Tel: +264 61 270 7202 Fax: +264 61 24 0312 www.mova.gov.na

Deputy Minister in Presidency Disability Affairs Hon Alexia Manombe-Ncube Tel: +264 61 296 3112 Fax: +264 61 245 414 psec.da@mova.gov.na philedephia.muheua@mova.gov.na

Deputy Minister in Presidency Marginalised Communities Hon Royal /Ui/o/oo Tel: +264 61 296 3110 Fax: +264 61 30 5935 psec.sood@mova.gov.na defend.taly@mova.gov.na

State House 1, Engelbrecht Str, Auasblick Tel: +264 61 270 7828 Fax: +264 61 24 5989 fkapofi@op.gov.na

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER Deputy Minister of the Office of the Prime Minister Hon. Christine //Hoebes

PRIME MINISTER HON SAARA KUUGONGELWA-AMADHILA Private Bag 13338 Robert Mugabe Avenue Parliament Gardens Tel: +264 61 287 2002 Fax: +264 61 24 9564 eveline.shoongo@opm.gov.na salome.DuPlessis@opm.gov.na www.opm.gov.na

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Tel: +264 61 287 2192 Fax: +264 61 23 0648 Magdalena.Oais@opm.gov.na

Permanent Secretary of the Office of the Prime Minister Advocate Nangula Mbako Private Bag 13338 Windhoek Tel: +264 61 287 2004 Fax: +264 61 23 4296 nangula.mbako@opm.gov.na heidi.isaac@opm.gov.na

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DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER HON NETUMBO NANDI-NDAITWAH Robert Mugabe Avenue Tel: +264 61 282 2146 Fax: +264 61 23 8528 headquarters@mfa.gov.na headquarters@mirco.gov.na

Secretary to Cabinet Mr George Simata Tel: +264 61 270 7814 Fax: +264 61 22 6189 gsimata@op.gov.nwa


G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

MINISTRY OF ECONOMIC PLANNING & NATIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION Minister of Economic Planning Deputy Minister Economic & Director General of NPC Planning Hon Tom Alweendo Hon Lucia Lipumbu Government Office Park, Luther Str Private Bag 13356 Tel: +264 61 283 4223 Fax: +264 61 25 0751 tomalweendo@npc.gov.na cvanwyk@npc.gov.na www.npc.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 283 4221 Fax: +264 25 0751 Liipumbu@npc.gov.na isubaubani@npc.gov.na

Deputy Prime Minister & Minister Hon Netumbo NandiNdaitwah

Deputy Ministers Hon Peya Mushelenga

Permanent Secretary of National Planning Commission Mr Andries Leevi Hungamo Tel: +264 61 283 4225 Fax: +264 61 23 6794 cfrans@npc.gov.na

MINISTRY OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & COOPERATIONS

Robert Mugabe Avenue, GRN Office Park Private Bag 13347, Windhoek Tel: +264 61 282 2146 Fax: +264 61 238528 ppaulus@mirco.gov.na www.mfa.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Amb Selma AshipalaMusavyi

Tel: +264 61 282 2140 Fax: +264 61 23 6367 eswartz@mirco.gov.na pmushelenga@mirco.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 282 2152 Fax: 264 61 22 3937 lstrauss@mirco.gov.na

Hon Maureen Hinda Tel: +264 61 282 2349 Fax: +264 61 22 3937 mhinda@mirco.gov.na

MINISTRY OF INDUSTRIALISATION, TRADE & SME DEVELOPMENT Minister Hon Immanuel Ngatjizeko Block B, Brendan Simbwaye Square, Goethe Str Private Bag 13340, Windhoek Tel: +264 61 283 7334 Fax: 264 61 22 0148 kachele@mti.gov.na www.mti.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Pieter van den Walt

Permanet Secretary Mr Gabriel Sinimbo

Deputy Minister Hon Natangue Ithete

Permanent Secretary Ms Ericah Shafudah

Deputy Minister Hon Daniel Kashikola

Permanent Secretary Ms Commissioner (Rtd) Trephine Kamati

Tel: +264 61 283 7329 Fax: +264 61 283 7329 kotze@mti.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 283 7332 Fax: +264 61 22 0227 ashaanda@mti.gov.na

MINISTRY OF FINANCE Minister Hon Calle Schlettwein

Moltke Str, Head Office Private Bag 13295, Windhoek Tel: +264 61 209 2930 Fax: +264 61 22 7702 calle.schlettwein@gov.mof.na suanita.bezuidenhout@gov.mof.na www.mof.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 209 2933 Fax: +264 61 23 8283 natangue.ithete@mof.gov.na anna.hamalwa@mof.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 209 2928 Fax: +264 61 23 0179 erica.shafudah@gov.mof.na

MINISTRY OF SAFETY & SECURITY Minister - Hon Major Gen (Rtd) Charles Namoloh

Private Bag 13281, Windhoek Brendan Simwaye Square, Goethe Str - Tre Str Tel: 264 61 284 6209 Fax: +264 61 27 2487 martha.kaanduka@mss.gov.na charles.namoloh@mss.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 284 6201 Fax: +264 61 23 3879 rpohamba@mss.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 284 6205 Fax: +264 61 27 2487 sara.nathaniel@mss.gov.na

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G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

MINISTRY OF JUSTICE

Minister Hon Dr Albert Kawana

Private Bag 13302, Windhoek Justitia Building; Independence Ave Tel: +264 61 280 5262 Fax: +264 61 22 8090 sherero@gmail.com gregentia.shikongo@moj.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Lidwina Shapwa

Tel: +264 61 280 5332 Fax: +264 61 24 8268 lshapwa@moj.gov.na jacobina.anghuwo@moj.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr Isaaskar Ndjoze

Tel: +264 61 280 5344 Fax: +264 61 25 0868 fransisca.vanwyk@moj.gov.na psecretary@moj.gov.na

MINISTRY OF URBAN & RURAL DEVELOPMENT Minister Hon Sophia Shaningwa

Private Bag 13289, Windhoek Government Office Park, Block D, Luther Str Tel: +264 61 297 5215 Fax: +264 61 25 9906 galcock@murd.gov.na www.murd.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Silvia Makgone

Tel: +264 61 297 5212 Fax: +264 61 22 5712 depminsec@murd.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Derek Klazen

Permanent Secretary Mr Nghidinua Daniel

Tel: +264 61 297 5180 Fax: +264 61 258 131 ndaniel@murd.gov.na akhamupembe@murd.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 22 5712 Fax: +264 61 25 8131 dklazen@murd.gov.na

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISES Minister - Hon Leon Jooste

Private Bag 13408 Independence Avenue btw FNB Bank 4th Floor Executive Office 5th Floor, Frans Indongo Gardens, Dr Frans Indongo Str, Windhoek Tel: +264 61 202 3602 Fax: +264 88 655 6931 sholale.peters@mope.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Engelbrecht Nawatiseb

Tel: +264 61 202 3607 Fax: +264 61 25 5401 getrude.molongela@mope.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Hon Frans Sheehama

Tel: +264 61 202 3605 Fax: +264 61 24 2826 Sylvia.kalenga@mope.gov.na Private Bag 13408 Windhoek

MINISTRY OF POVERTY ERADICATION & SOCIAL WELFARE Minister Hon Bishop Emeritus Zephania Kameeta

Mutual Platz Building, Post Street Mall Tel: +264 22 2313 Fax: +264 61 24 1062 serinna.stephanus@mpesw.gov.na sserinna@yahoo.com

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT & TOURISM Minister Hon Pohamba Shifeta

Private Bag 13306, Windhoek Cnr + Robert Mugabe Tel: +264 61 284 2335 Fax: +264 61 23 2057 pshifeta@met.na www.met.gov.na

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Deputy Minister Hon Aino Kapewangolo

Tel: +264 61 22 7374 Fax: +264 61 25 0952 martha.gorases@mpesw.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Priscilla Beukes

Tel: +264 61 24 4047 Fax: +264 61 25 0966 boois@mpesw.gov.na rentia.links@mpesw.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr I Ben Nashandi

Deputy Minster Hon Tommy Nambahu Tel: +264 61 284 2332 Fax: +264 61 22 6380 dmsecretary@met.na

Permanent Secretary Dr Malan Lindique

Tel: +264 61 284 2233 Fax: +264 61 22 9936 mlindeque@met.na


G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

MINISTRY OF MINES & ENERGY Minister Hon Obeth Kandjoze

Private Bag 13297, Windhoek Mines & Energy Building 6 Aviation Road Tel: +264 61 284 8411 Fax: +264 61 284 8363 info@mme.gov.na www.mme.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Kornelia Shilunga

Permanent Secretary Mr Simeon Negumbo

Deputy Minister Hon Juliet Kavetuna

Permanent Secretary Dr Andreas Mwoombola

Deputy Minister Hon Saknas James Sankwasa

Permanent Secretary Mr Willem Goeiemann

Tel: +264 61 284 8314 Fax: +264 61 284 8363 lshivute@mme.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 284 8219 Fax: +264 61 284 8176 simeon.negumbo@mme.gov.na

MINISTRY OF HEALTH & SOCIAL SERVICES Minister Hon Dr Bernard Haufiku

Private Bag 13198 Windhoek Old State Hospital, Harvey Str Windhoek West Tel: +264 61 203 2003 Fax: +264 61 23 1784 minister.secretary@mhss.gov.na www.mhss.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 203 2010 Fax: +264 61 304 145 D.Minsterpa@mhss.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 203 2019 Fax: +264 61 30 1415 psoffice@mhss.gov.na

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT Minister Hon Alpheus !Naruseb

6719 Bell Str, Snyman Circle, Rehobother Road Tel: +264 61 20 88812 Fax: +264 61 22 4381 !naurseb@mwtc.gov.na sshaningwa@mwtc.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 208 8823 jsankwasa@mwtc.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 208 8822 Fax: +264 61 22 8560 willem.goeiemann@mwt.gov.na

MINISTRY OF HIGHER EDUCATION, TRAINING & INNOVATION Minister Hon Dr Itha Kandjii-Murangi Private Bag 13186, Windhoek Government Office Park Luther Str Tel: +264 61 293 3351 Fax: +264 61 25 3672 secretary.minister@mheti.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Dr Becky R.K. Ndjoze-Ojo

Tel: +264 61 293 3556 Fax: +264 61 25 3672

Permanent Secretary Dr Alfred Van Kent

Tel: +264 61 293 3507 Fax: +264 61 24 5144 alfred.vankent@mheti.gov.na

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY Minister Hon Tjekero Tweya

Private Bag 13344, Windhoek 2nd Floor, West Wing Government Offices, Robert Mugabe Avenue Tel: +264 61 283 2388 Fax: +264 61 22 2343 tjekero.tweya@mict.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Stanley Simataa

Tel: +264 61 283 2346 Fax: +264 25 83 98 stately.simataa@mict.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr Mbeuta Ua- Ndjarakana Tel: +264 61 283 2387 Fax: +264 61 25 1297 info@mict.gov.na

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G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, ARTS & CULTURE Minister Hon Katrina Hanse-Himarwa

Private Bag 13186, Windhoek Government Office Park, Luther Str Tel: +264 61 293 3369 Fax: +264 61 22 4277 sec.minister@moe.gov.na www.moe.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Ester Anna Nghipondoka

Tel: +264 61 293 3307 Fax: +264 61 22 4277 aamadhila@gmail.com

Permanent Secretary Ms Sanet Steenkamp

Tel: +264 61 293 3524 Fax: +264 61 25 3671 sanet.steenkamp@moe.gov.na

MINISTRY OF HOME AFFAIRS & IMMIGRATION Minister Hon Pendukeni Iivula-Ithana Cohen Building, Kasino Str Tel: +264 61 292 2015 Fax: +264 61 24 3766 vvisaacs@gmail.com www.mha.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Erastus Uutoni

Tel: +264 61 292 2016 Fax: +264 61 24 3766 euutoni@mha.gov.na aharadoeb@mha.gov.na

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, WATER & FORESTRY Minister Hon John Mutorwa

Private Bag 13184 Government Office Park, Luther Str Tel: +264 61 208 7643 Fax: +264 61 22 9961 meyerm@mawf.gov.na www.mawf.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Anna Shiweda

Tel: +264 61 208 7644 Fax: +264 61 208 7729 mbambuss@mawf.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Amb Patrick Nandago Tel: +264 61 292 2017 Fax: +264 61 24 3766 dtitus@mha.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Ms Sophy Kasheeta (Acting PS)

Tel: +264 61 208 7690 Fax: +264 61 208 7692 shikongov@mawrd.gov.na

MINISTRY OF GENDER EQUALITY & CHILD WELFARE Minister Hon Doreen Sioka

Private Bag 13359, Windhoek Juvenis Building Independence Avenue Tel: +264 61 283 3206 Fax: +264 61 22 3545 doreen.sioka@mgecw.gov.na www.mgecw.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Lucia Witbooi

Tel: +264 61 283 3208 Fax: +264 61 22 0528 lucia.witbooi@mgecw.gov.na

Permanent Secretary (Acting PS) Ms Wilhencia Uiras

Tel: +264 61 283 3202 Fax: +264 61 23 8941 genderequality@mgecw.gov.na

MINISTRY OF LAND REFORM Minister Hon Utoni Nujoma

Private Bag 13343, Windhoek 45 Robert Mugabe Avenue Tel: +264 61 296 5370 Fax: +264 61 25 4737 toni.nuujoma@mlr.gov.na www.mlr.gov.na

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Deputy Minister Hon Priscilla Boois

Tel: +264 61 296 5366 Fax: +264 30 5696 priscilla.boois@mlr.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr Peter Amutenya

Tel: +264 61 296 5310 Fax: +264 61 22 8240 peter.amutenya@mlr.gov.na


G O V E R N M E N T PA G E S

MINISTRY OF SPORT, YOUTH & NATIONAL SERVICE Minister Hon Jerry Ekandjo

Private Bag 13391, Windhoek NDC Building Goethe Str Tel: +264 61 270 6510 Fax: +264 61 22 2479 min.secretary@msyns.gov.na www.mynssc.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Agnes Tjongarero

Tel: +264 61 270 6535 Fax: +264 61 22 2213 dmin.secretary@msyns.gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr Alfred Iilukena

Tel: +264 61 270 6528 Fax: +264 61 24 5764 ps.secretary@mynssc.gov.na

MINISTRY OF FISHERIES & MARINE RESOURCES Minister Hon Bernhard Esau

Private Bag 1335, Windhoek Brendan Simbwaye Square Cnr Upland and Goethe Str Tel: +264 61 205 3101 Fax: +264 61 23 3286 besau@mfMrgov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Chief Samuel Ankama

Permanent Secretary Dr Moses Maurihungirire

Deputy Minister Hon Billy Mwaningange

Permanent Secretary Mr Petrus Shivute

Tel: +264 61 205 3104 Fax: +264 61 24 0547 cankama@yahoo.com

Tel: +264 61 205 3007 Fax: +264 61 22 4566 mmaurihungirire@gmail.com

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE Minister Hon Penda Ya Ndakolo

Private Bag 13307, Windhoek Bastion 1, Sam Nujoma Drive Tel: +264 61 204 2005 Fax: +264 61 23 2518 elizabeth.nghendeval@ namdefence.org www.mod.gov.na

Tel: +264 61 204 2003 Fax: +264 61 204 2226 wbmwaningange@gmail.com

Tel: +264 61 204 2056 Fax: +264 22 0523 ps@namdefence.org

MINISTRY OF LABOUR, INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS & EMPLOYMENT CREATION Minister Hon Erkki Nghimtina

Private Bag 19005, Windhoek 32 Merceds Str, Khomasdale Tel: +264 61 206 6321 Fax: +264 61 21 0047 elizabeth.amutenya@mol.gov.na

Deputy Minister Hon Alpheus Muheua

Tel: +264 206 6327 amuheua@gov.na

Permanent Secretary Mr Bro-Matthew Shinguadja

bro.matthewshinguadja@mol.gov.na

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NAMIBIA INVESTMENT CENTER THE MINISTRY OF INDUSTRIALISATION, TRADE AND SME DEVELOPMENT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF NAMIBIA’S ECONOMIC REGULATORY REGIME, ON THE BASIS OF WHICH THE COUNTRY’S DOMESTIC AND EXTERNAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS ARE CONDUCTED. IT IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR PROMOTING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE ECONOMY THROUGH THE FORMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF APPROPRIATE POLICIES TO ATTRACT INVESTMENT, INCREASE TRADE, AND DEVELOP AND EXPAND THE COUNTRY’S INDUSTRIAL BASE.

The Ministry’s efforts are directed at four key activities: • Investment promotion • Promotion of manufacturing activity • Growth and diversification of Namibia’s exports and export markets • Promotion of growth and development of small and medium-sized enterprises Recognising the critical role of the private sector as the engine of economic growth, the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development strives to facilitate development of this sector through the creation of a business-friendly environment and stimulation of private-sector investment. Its work in this regard includes the formulation of appropriate legislative instruments and institutions for the effective provision of industrial infrastructure, enterprise development, export and investment promotion, export services and facilities. The four main divisions of the Ministry are the Namibia Investment Centre, the Directorate of Industrial Development, and the Department of Trade and Commerce comprising the Directorate of International Trade and the Directorate of Commerce and Directorate of Administration.

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Mr Gabriel P Sinimbo Permanent Secretary Tel +264 61 283 7332 Fax +264 61 22 0227 www.mti.gov.na

NAMIBIA INVESTMENT CENTRE

NIC is the country’s official investment promotion agency and first port of call for investors. Created under the Foreign Investment Act of 1990, the overall objective of the NIC is to attract and retain foreign and domestic investment to stimulate economic growth and expedite industrial transformation in Namibia. The attainment of this objective will undoubtedly contribute to the noble goals of Vision 2030. The responsibility of creating policies and strategies conducive to investment lies with the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME development, specifically with the Namibia Investment Centre. NIC offers a variety of services to existing and potential investors, including the provision of information on incentives, investment opportunities and the country’s regulatory regime. It is closely linked to key ministries and service bodies, and can therefore help minimise

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bureaucratic obstacles to project implementation. NIC works closely with the Offshore Development Company (ODC), the flagship of Namibia’s tax-free export processing zone regime, to promote foreign direct investment in exportoriented manufacturing activities. NIC has overseas investment promotion representatives in strategic located countries such as Germany (Berlin), India (New Delhi), South Africa (Pretoria) and USA (Washington DC). Plans are underway to set up commercial offices in other identified locations of economic importance elsewhere in the world. Namibia has a competitive incentive and fiscal regime complemented by a low cost and conducive business environment that adds to its appeal as the most ideal location for domestic and foreign investors. The cornerstones of this environment are the Namibia Investment Promotion Act, 2016.

PURPOSE OF THE ACT:

Provide for the promotion of sustainable economic development and growth through the mobilisation and attraction of foreign and domestic investment to enhance economic development, reduce unemployment, accelerate growth and diversify the economy; to provide for reservation of certain

economic sectors and business activities to certain categories of investors; to provide for dispute resolution mechanisms involving investment; and to provide for incidental matters. Incentives for registered manufacturers and exporters of Namibian manufactured goods are provided. In comparison to EPZ incentives which require a beneficiary’s target market to be outside the Southern African Customs Union (SACU ) market, registered manufactures and exporters of Namibian manufactured goods can also benefit entrepreneurs whose main target market is SACU. To benefit from the scheme, an investor must register with the Ministry of Finance as a manufacturer or an exporter of Namibian manufactured goods. The Namibian Investment Centre assists investors with this registration process. Namibianbased entrepreneurs who export their products outside this market are also entitled to benefits under the scheme. Investment promotion services encompass: • Facilitating inward and outward business missions • Facilitating of international


INVESTMENT PROMOTION

• • • •

investment fairs and seminars Business matching with prospective foreign investors with locals Profiling and promoting investment projects Providing advisory services on available incentive packages Investor admission Assisting investors to obtain work permits and business visas Facilitating investor aftercare

Ms Bernadette Artivor Deputy Permanent Secretary Tel +264 61 283 7335 Email: investinnamibia@mti.gov.na

DIRECTORATE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

The Directorate of Industrial Development is responsible for evaluating and appraising industrial projects. It sponsors feasibility studies, research and surveys of potential development areas and renders support and advice to potential developers and investors. The Directorate is also engaged in the production of industrial statistics, and conducts regular censuses of the manufacturing sector. It furthermore collates information on appropriate industrial technology. The Directorate oversees and coordinates the development of small and medium enterprises. This includes input into the six areas that comprise the Government’s SME development programme, namely: • Facilitation of access to finance • Construction of sites and premises • Technology transfer • Purchasing of raw materials • Marketing • Entrepreneurial training

The Directorate’s primary role is to facilitate: • Diversification of the economy through accelerated growth of the country’s industrial sector • Increased value-added manufacturing activities • Stimulation of export-oriented production • Creation of productive employment opportunities and increased income opportunities for Namibians, especially those from previously disadvantaged communities • Improvement in the geographical distribution of industrial activities and infrastructure • Ongoing research into the manufacturing sector to identify new areas for expansion and potential bottlenecks The Directorate also coordinates the work of the Ministry’s six regional offices. These are situated in Katima Mulilo, Keetmanshoop, Opuwo, Ondangwa, Otjiwarongo and Rundu, and serve as advisory centres at local level. Dr Michael Humavindu Deputy Permanent Secretary Tel +264 61 283 7328 Fax +264 61 25 9676 Email: humavindu@mti.gov.na

DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE

The Department of Trade and Commerce is responsible for national policies and programmes geared towards the management, regulation, promotion, development and facilitation of internal trade, commercial and business activities and international trade activities such as bilateral, regional and multilateral trade relations. The Department consists

of two directorates, namely the Directorate of International Trade and the Directorate of Commerce. Ms Annascy Mwanyangapo Deputy Permanent Secretary Tel +264 61 283 7331 Email: mwanyangapo@mti.gov.na

DIRECTORATE OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

The Directorate of International Trade is the national focal point of Namibia’s trade and external trade relations. Its main activities are geared towards the formulation and management of Namibia’s foreign-trade policy, and towards increasing the country’s exports through trade promotion. The Directorate oversees Namibia’s membership of regional and international trade bodies, assists and facilitates the participation of Namibian companies and Small Medium Enterprises in trade fairs, exhibitions and trade missions, coordinates import and export procedures, and provides information on trade-related issues. The Directorate currently has representative trade offices in Angola (Luanda), Belgium (Brussels) and Switzerland (Geneva), and plans to open new offices in other countries such as Brazil, Ethiopia (African Union) and Congo Brazzaville. The Directorate performs the following functions: • Formulating and analysing trade policy • Serving as a focal point for Namibia’s bilateral and multi-lateral trade relations, such as with the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Southern African Development

Community (SADC), the African, Caribbean and PacificEuropean Union (ACP-EU), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) Formulating and implementing Namibia’s export promotion and market development policy and strategies Providing trade-related information and support to the business community Importing and exporting management

Mr Ben Katjipuka Director Tel +264 61 283 7288 Email: katjipuka@mti.gov.na

DIRECTORATE OF COMMERCE

The mandate of the Directorate is to create an enabling environment required for the functioning and operation of businesses in the country, for both domestic and foreign companies alike, and especially emerging small businesses led by entrepreneurs entering the formal sector business for the first time. In support of creating such an environment, MITSD has a program on domestic market competitiveness. This program aims at enabling Namibian enterprises to increase in efficiency and competitiveness in both the domestic and external markets. This in turn would help to improve Namibia’s global competitive ranking and ability to attract investments needed for expansion of business activities and employment creation. Ensuring fair trade through competition, the establishment of standards and quality

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INVESTMENT PROMOTION

infrastructures, and safeguarding consumer interests are important requirements for achieving and maintaining a competitive and predictable business environment.

• To meet these needs, specialised regulatory and service agencies were established such as the Namibia Standards Institution, the Namibia Estates Agents Board and the Namibia Competition Commission (and principle approval has been granted for a Business and Intellectual Property Authority). Functions are to: • Develop the policy and legal framework for the management of quality, standards, company registration, liquor licensing, intellectual property rights, traditional knowledge, and domestic market regulations. • Contribute to the overall government effort of effective revenue collection. • Provide effective and efficient services in the area of company registration, intellectual property rights protection. • Consumer protection and business trade facilitation. • Ensure that the Intellectual Property (IP) office provides efficient patent information services and promotes local creations and inventions. • Provide acquisition and distribution of franchising and technology licensing. • Administer international treaties and conventions in the area of IP, standards, legal and trade metrology, to which Namibia is a signatory in order to ensure compliance. • Provide guidelines and support to the Competition Commission. • Promote and coordinate research and development in the area of the Ministry’s competence. • Implement a user-friendly system to facilitate and enhance the registration of companies, close corporations and the protecting industrial property (IP) rights. • Promote and protect designs, traditional knowledge, inventions and technological

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development. Undertake registration of companies, close corporations, patents and trademarks. Provide guidelines and support to the Namibian Standards Institute (NSI) and accreditation bodies. Provide guidelines and support to the Company Registration Authority and the intellectual property rights (IPR) body.

Ms Maria Pogisho Acting Director Tel +264 61 283 7262 Email: pogisho@mti.gov.na

DIRECTORATE OF ADMINISTRATION

The Directorat of Administration is responsible for the rendering of supportive services to the entire Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME development. The Directorate performs the following functions: • To ensure compliance with the human resouces, procurement, financial and stock control laws and regulations. • Provide, deploy, develop and retain required human resources for the implementation of the Ministry’s objectives and efficient service delivery. • Manage and control all the financial resources at the disposal of the Ministry in comformity with the applicable laws and reguations. • Produce goods and services required for the effective operation and functioninig of the Ministry and the proper disposal thereof. • Acquire, manage and control of pool vehicles and the Ministry’s own transport fleet. • Accounting fo all stock and annual stock taking. • Acquire and maintain office accommodation, render commitee, typing and secretarial registry, cleaning and security services. • Provide and manage information technology systems for the Ministry.

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• •

Create and manage a modern documentation and cummunications centre for the Ministry. Provice internal audit services. Render all logistical, security, cleaninig and other auxiliary services tot he Ministry.

Mr Munu Kuyonisa Director Tel +264 61 283 7337 Email: kuyonisa@mti.gov.na

BUSINESS AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AUTHORITY (BIPA) In an effort to improve service delivery and ensure the effective administration of business and intellectual property rights (IPRs) registration, the Business and Intellectual Property Authority (BIPA) has been established under the auspices of the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development. BIPA is an autonomous entity established in terms of Section 21 of the Companies Act. Functions are to: To be the central focal point for the registration, administration and protection of businesses, commercial and industrial properties rights; and To be the legal depository of information, documents and data required to be lodged under the applicable legislations. BIPA will further be tasked with the provision of general advisory services and information dissemination on business registration and IPRs. Mr Tileinge Andima Chief Executive Officer Tel: +264 299 4400 Email: andima@bipa.na

OFFSHORE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY (ODC) (PTY) LTD

ODC was established in 1996, following the promulgation of the Export Processing Zone (EPZ) Act (Act No 9 of 1995) as an agency responsible for marketing, promoting and facilitating investments under the EPZ

regime. The EPZ is an industrial development instrument of the Government, aimed at attracting export-oriented manufacturing and value addition activities. As a policy instrument, the regime is intended to: Facilitate imports of foreign productive capital and technology and the transfer of technical skills to the local workforce Promote the diversification of the local economy Increase the share contribution of the manufacturing sector to job creation and the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) ODC Core functions consist of: • Promoting and marketing the EPZ as a competitively attractive incentive regime and industrial policy for encouraging investment in export-oriented manufacturing operations • Screening applications and facilitating admission of qualifying investors under the EPZ • Managing and monitoring the performance of the EPZ enterprises and the programme in general • Advising the Minister responsible on the performance and any constraints to the effective development of the programme in Namibia The ODC provides the following investor services: • Information on investment opportunities under the EPZ and in the country in general • Information on the incentives offered by Government through the EPZ and other similar investment-incentive regimes • Evaluation and recommendation of qualifying applications for EPZ status to the EPZ Committee and the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME development for approval • Provision of affordable factory shells or warehouses at established industrial parks • Facilitation of linkages between investors and relevant central, regional and


INVESTMENT PROMOTION

local government authorities and other service providers for the provision of basic services required for the establishment of businesses Matchmaking and joint venture facilitation between local and foreign investors After-care services to investors and periodic surveys to determine investor satisfaction Expediting issuance of work permits to approved EPZ investors in collaboration with the Namibia Investment Centre

EXPORT PROCESSING ZONE INCENTIVES AND BONDED WAREHOUSING

The EPZ incentives are designed to give both foreign investors and Namibian-based entrepreneurs a competitive advantage when investing in export-oriented manufacturing or value-addition activities. The local and foreign investors who meet the conditions for admission under the EPZ enjoy equal treatment and eligibility to the applicable EPZ incentives, such as zero corporate tax and exemptions from duties and VAT on imported productive machinery and inputs. Applications for registration of an EPZ status are facilitated by the ODC and the Walvis Bay EPZ Management Company. The ODC has constructed and manages export-oriented business parks that are leased principally to exporters. These are at Oshikango and Katwitwi on the northern and north-eastern Angolan-Namibian borders respectively. There is also a multi-purpose industrial park at Katima Mulilo in the north-east of the country, close to the borders with Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana. Mr Phillip Namundjebo Acting Chief Executive Officer Tel + 264 61 283 7360 Email: odc@odc.com.na

NAMIBIAN COMPETITION COMMISSION (NACC) The Commission was established in terms of the Competition Act (Act No 2 of 2003). It is tasked with promoting competitive market conditions through

investigation and prosecution of anti-competitive activities, reviewing and approving mergers and acquisition applications, and disseminating information to businesses, consumers and other stakeholders on competition matters. Namibia’s competition law covers the three major competition concerns, which are anticompetitive agreements, abuse of dominance, and anti-competitive mergers. It takes into account public interest provisions for protecting consumers by safeguarding competitive prices and product choices, and by promoting employment and advancing the social and economic welfare of Namibians. It also promotes special needs of the economy, such as the protection and promotion of small undertakings and the promotion of a greater spread of ownership among historically disadvantaged persons. The Commission is currently carrying out studies on the retail sector for development on behalf of the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME development.

nationally and internationally •

Promoting and encouraging training and productivity

Promoting ecological sound development

Promoting importsubstitution where economically viable

Promoting economic activities which add value to local and imported resources

• •

Promoting forward and backward linkages between all sectors of the economy

Promoting Namibian entrepreneurship through the stimulation of small and informal economic activities Developing, with the participation of the private sector, commercially viable enterprises or projects Acting as agent for the Government and its institutions in promotion of enterprises or the implementation of development schemes Co-ordination with other development agencies and institutions in order to facilitate co-operation and encouragement of an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach.

Mr Vitalis Ndalikokule Acting Chief Executive Officer Tel +264 61 22 4622 Email: vitalis.ndalikokule@nacc. com.na

NAMIBIA DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

NDC was established under the Namibia Development Corporation Act, Act 18 of 1993. The mandate, as stipulated in the NDC Act, is to act as Government’s imemphasis on Industrial and Agricultural development initiatives. The objective of the NDC is to promote, develop and support all sectors of the Namibian economy for sustained economic growth and economic empowerment in conformity with the development strategies and policies of the Government of Namibia. • Promoting of employment creation in both the formal and informal sectors • Promoting and encouraging sustainable local and foreign investment • Promoting trade, both

As per Government’s directives a repositioning process has been initiated in order for the NDC to The objectives of the restructured NDC to be based on the following two principles: •

It must play a developmental role within the framework of Government policies

It must be operated on a self-sustainable basis over the medium to long term.

It is envisaged that the NDC should play an active developmental role in various sectors such as mining, tourism, etc. Industrial and Agriculture development activities will however remain the main Based on stakeholder’s

expectations, the following strategic objectives have been formulated for the NDC: • Contributing to development needs in accordance with the objects and powers of the NDC Act. • Achieving financial sustainability over the medium term through income optimisation of current operations • and the establishment of a pro-active development catalyst role. Pro-actively focusing on contributing to the Namibian development gap in the areas of industrial benefaction, commercialisation, Public Private agency role for the achievement of Line Ministerial development objectives and priorities in accordance with economic empowerment, development impact and sustainability criteria. The NDC is actively involved with implementation of various developmental projects and programmes that contribute towards stimulation of the Namibian economy. Activities include the following: • Construction and management of Business Estates, Community Markets, Trade & Industrial Estates, • Technology Centres, Tourist Centres and Regional • Development of Trade Facilities outside Namibia (Angola, Congo, DRC, etc.) • Textile and Garment Industry development • Entrepreneurship Development Initiatives (Training in gemstone cutting, equipment aid programme as • well as sup- port and organising of SME’s in the textile industry) • Development of agriculture production schemes • Development of agro industrial facilities • Facilitate initiatives aimed at production in Namibia Mr Pieter de Wet Acting Managing Director Tel: +264 61 206-2294  Email: pieter.dewet@ndc.org.na

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INVESTMENT PROMOTION NAMIBIA STANDARDS INSTITUTION

The NSI acts as Namibia’s national standards body (NSB), established to promote the Government’s Strategic Development Plans (NDPs) towards the realisation of Vision 2030, and provides for the NSI to render effective services in the area of standards development and coordination, metrology (legal and scientific), quality assurance and the administration of the National Quality Policy. With the ever decreasing role of tariffs in international trade, standards are often used as non-tariff barriers, making standardisation an important focus of inter-statetrade. The NSI, through its services can contribute by ensuring that the majority of the Namibian businesses, including small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) meet at least the minimum required standards for their products to be certified, not only for the local market, but also for the international markets. NSI is responsible for the development and coordination of standards. Therefore nine technical committees (TCs) for the development and adoption of standards in compliance with the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Agreement. These TCs are: TC 1: Renewable Energy TC 2: Quality Management Systems TC3: Food Safety Management Systems TC 4: Electrotechnical systems TC 5: Environmental Management Systems TC 6: Building Construction, Cement and Concrete Technologies TC 7: Halaal TC 8: Occupational Health and Safety TC 9: Metrology The NSI is designated by the Government of Namibia as the Competent Authority that inspects and certifies fish and fishery products. It has established a fully functional Fishery Inspectorate in Walvis Bay and Lüderitz as well as a Food Laboratory in Walvis Bay consisting of the microbiology and chemistry testing sections.

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The NSI Food Laboratory is accredited by the South Africa National Accreditation System (SANAS) to the international standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. The NSI Metrology Laboratory based in Windhoek serves as the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Namibia. The NMI is responsible for the establishment of a national measurement traceability system through maintenance of national measurement standards The facility also houses the legal metrology function and is responsible for the administration of the Trade Metrology Act No. 77 of 1973, as amended, and the Metrology Amendment Act No. 17 of 2005. The NSI is convinced that all its efforts and hard work will be rewarded by Namibia achieving Vision 2030 and that every Namibian will benefit from safe products and services.

• •

Ms Chie Wasserfall Chief Executive Officer Tel +264 61 38 6400 Email: wasserfall@nsi.com.na

NAMIBIA ESTATE AGENTS BOARD The Namibia Estate Agents Board is a State Owned Enterprise resorting under the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development responsible for regulating the real estate agents in Namibia. Its mandate is to regulate, promote, guide and enhance the professional integrity of real estate agents in Namibia whilst having due regard to public and stakeholder interest. The objectives are to: • Improve compliance of estate agents to the prescribed standard of training of prospective agents, their education and continued professional development; • Issue Fidelity Fund Certificates to qualifying estate agents adhering to annual licensing and registration requirements in terms of the Estate Agents Act 112 of 1976; • Ensure responsible accounting principles on business accounts and accountable

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handling of public money in trust accounts; Ensure professional conduct through the implementation of the Code of Conduct as determined by the Act and general ethics by investigating claims against agents and institute disciplinary proceedings against offending estate agents; Increase stakeholder awareness and capacity building which includes: a. the general public as buyers/sellers and lessors/tenants; b. financial institutions; c. conveyancers and lawyers; d. auditors; e. the Association of Estate Agents Namibia; f. other State Owned Enterprises; and g. the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME development Manage and control the Fidelity Fund; As a Regulatory Body in terms of the provisions of the Financial Intelligence Act 13 of 2012, to take all steps required in preventing, alternatively identifying and reporting on money laundering and terroristfunding activities.

The Board consists of 7 nonexecutive members as appointed by Cabinet of which 4 are practicing estate agents. The activities of the Board and its executive personnel require responsible Corporate Governance and are guided by the Estate Agents Act 112 of 1976 and the State Owned Enterprise Governance Act 13 of 2012. The Board is assisted by the Executive Committee and Disciplinary Committee. Ms Anna Thandeka Chairperson Tel +264 61 249885 Email: neab@iway.na

NAMIBIA TRADE FORUM

The Namibia Trade Forum (NTF) is an agency of the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development whose main mandate is to institutionalise public-private dialogue and

cooperation with emphasis on international and domestic trade and investment policies as stipulated by the Fourth National Development Plan (NDP4). The role of the NTF is to act as the main consultative body representing the private sector views to the government. It thus serves as the highest public private partnership on international and domestic trade and investment matters of government through workshops, seminars, trade negotiations, meetings and media release. Ms Ndiitah Nghipondioka- Robiati Chief Executive Officer Tel: +264 61 235327 Email: nrobiati@ntf.org.na

WALVIS BAY EXPORT PROCESSING ZONE MANAGEMENT COMPANY

The Walvis Bay Export Processing Zone Management Company is a private limited company established in terms of the EPZ Act, of 1995 (Act No 9 of 1995).  Since the inception of the Walvis Bay EPZ Management Company in 1996, the idea of expanding the industrial base of Walvis Bay has rapidly gained momentum and the zone is growing fast into one of the world’s newest EPZ success stories. The achievements of the WBEPZMC in institutional and image building and the implementation of goals have marked an era for global trade. The WBEPZMC’s key purpose is to market Walvis Bay as the safe destination for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) as a means of fast-tracking the industrialisation programme of the Namibian government. Its mandate therefore is to: • Attain the status of a soughtafter and safe destination for foreign and local investment; • Create a solid foundation for job creation and economic growth in Walvis Bay and • Diversify the industrial base of Walvis Bay Mr Jan Kruger EPZ Manager Tel: +264 64 205 095  Email: wbepzmc@iway.na


TRADE AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION

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ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF NAMIBIA CONSOLIDATING NAMIBIA’S DEMOCRACY

The Electoral Commission of Namibia was established as per the Electoral Act, (Act 5 of 2014) to organize, direct, supervise, manage and control the conduct of elections and referenda in a free, fair, independent, credible, transparent and impartial manner as well as to strengthen constitutional democracy and to promote democratic electoral and referenda processes.

OBJECTIVES OF THE COMMISSION

VISION

POWERS AND FUNCTIONS OF COMMISSION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ACT 22 OF 2014

To be an excellent and independent election management institution committed to credible elections.

The objectives of the Commission are to organize, direct, supervise, manage and control the conduct of elections and referenda in a free, fair, independent, credible, transparent and impartial manner as well as to strengthen constitutional democracy and to promote democratic electoral and referenda processes.

MISSION

(a) is the exclusive authority to direct, supervise, manage and control in a fair and impartial manner and without fear, favour or prejudice any elections and referenda under this Act; and

THE CORE VALUES

(b) must exercise and perform its powers and functions, independent of any direction or interference by any other authority or any person.

To promote and deliver free, fair and credible elections, managed in a transparent, innovative and participatory manner to the Namibians.

The Core Values are aimed at achieving the Vision and Mission of the institution. The Electoral Commission of Namibia is guided by the following principles, which are deeply entrenched within the Commission and demonstrated through the day to day behaviors of all staff members:

ACCOUNTABILITY

To account to the electorate, Parliament and the Namibian nation.

NON-PARTISANSHIP

To maintain political neutrality and refrain from deliberately advancing or prejudicing the interest of a given political party and other stakeholders.

PROFESSIONALISM

To demonstrate through collective efforts the highest level of competence, skills and acumen in the delivery of our mandate.

SECRECY (OF THE VOTE)

THE COMMISSION HAS FURTHER FUNCTIONS TO: (a) Supervise, direct and control the registration of voters for the purposes of any election or referendum (b) Supervise the preparation, publication and maintenance of a national voters’ register and local authority voters’ register; (c) Supervise, direct and control the registration of political parties and organisations; (d) Supervise, direct and control the conduct of elections and referenda (e) Supervise, direct, control and promote voter and civic education in respect of elections and referenda, including the cooperation with educational or other bodies or institutions with a view to the provision of instruction to or the training of persons in electoral and related matters;

Adhere to the secrecy of the vote thereby instill confidence in the process and outcome.

(f) Supervise, direct and control electoral observers;

INTEGRITY

(g) Establish and maintain liaison and cooperation with political parties, the media and the public;

Uphold honesty and transparency in the electoral process.

(h) Undertake and promote research into electoral matters; (i) Develop and promote the development of electoral expertise and technology in all spheres of government; (j) Promote knowledge of sound and democratic electoral processes; (k) Issue and enforce any code of conduct provided for in this Act; (l) Supervise and control the disclosure and dissemination of information regarding electoral matters and establish and maintain the necessary facilities for collecting and disseminating the information;

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TRADE AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION

ECN Commissioners with Judge President Petrus Damaseb. From left: Elisie Nghikembua, Ulrich Freyer, Notemba Tjipueja, Judge President Petrus Damaseb, Albertina Nangola and Barney Karuuombe.

(m) Secure in the electoral and referenda processes the representation of the diverse social and cultural groups in Namibia and seek their cooperation; (n) Create its own organisational structure, to allow its leadership to take full control of all its operations to strengthen areas where operational effectiveness is lacking; and (o) Exercise and perform any other powers and functions conferred and imposed upon it by or under this Act or any other law or which are necessary or expedient for purposes of achieving the objects of this Act.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

The strategic objectives of the ECN are linked to a number of themes key amongst them being democracy building, operation excellence, capacity building and legal framework. These strategic objectives intend to guide the Commission and Management to: • Improve coordination and communication technology • Ensure responsive electoral legal framework • Deliver free, fair and credible elections • Improve voter education activities • Mainstream gender, disability and ensure compliance with relevant policies at national level • Ensure highly skilled and competent personnel.

TYPES OF ELECTIONS

The Electoral Commission supervises the following Elections: • Presidential and National Assembly Elections • Regional Council Elections • Local Authority Elections

Namibia has held four (5) locally supervised free and fair Presidential and National Assembly elections since the first democratic elections were held under the auspices of the United Nations to elect a Constituent assembly in 1989.

NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTIONS

The Electoral Commission of Namibia adopted the following technologies to improve the Electoral process A Biometric Voter Registration was employed during the 2014 General Registration of Voters. This system was used to improve the accuracy of the National Voters Register and improve the efficiency of the registration process. The Namibian 2014 Presidential and National Assembly elections were a historic first, not only for Namibia, but also for the entire African Continent. For the first time, an African country conducted national elections using Electronic Voting Machines (EVMs). It was also the first in Africa to incorporate paperless balloting into the voting process, replacing the cumbersome process of manual voting and thereby minimizing challenges associated with the normal voting process.

COMPOSITION

The Electoral Commission of Namibia consists of a Chairperson and four Commissioners. The members of the ECN are appointed by the President from a shortlist compiled by a Selection Committee which consists of a judge nominated by the Chief Justice, a lawyer nominated by the Law Society and a nominee of the Ombudsman. The administrative work of the Electoral Commission of Namibia including the overall day-to-day running of the election related operations are the prerogative of the Electoral Commission Secretariat. The Secretariat is headed by the Chief Electoral Officer (CEO).

ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF NAMIBIA Vikitoria Hango +264 61 376 200 info@ecn.na www.ecn.na w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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INVESTMENT FOCUS

NAMIBIA’S INVESTMENT RECORD 1990 - OFF TO A GOOD START BY STEVE GALLOWAY

FORMER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NAMIBIA INVESTMENT CENTRE AND INVESTMENT BANKER

Independent Namibia did not waste much time in setting the scene for foreign direct investment in this new country in 1990. The Constitution created the platform for investment and the Foreign Investment Act was one of the first major pieces of legislation adopted by the new Parliament.

second and third decades of independence. The large but footloose Ramatex Malaysian garment manufacturer was soon to be overtaken by significant Indian (Vedanta) and large, long-dated Chinese investments in mining and infrastructure and a flurry of construction and trading interests.

The Act provides for a competitive, investor-friendly environment in which foreign investors are treated equally with local investors. In addition, foreign investors can be awarded Status Investment Certificates to ensure favourable remittance and provide additional safeguards and benefits.

President Hage Geingob has taken economic diplomacy to a new level and has hosted a number of trade and investment openhouses in the USA, UK, and South Africa and mobilised hundreds of investors to attend the Invest Namibia Conference in Windhoek in early November 2016. This renewed momentum created needs to be followed through with practical project facilitation, match-making and honest investor support and monitoring. The proof of the pudding will be in the translation of promises and MOUs to tangible investments creating jobs, earnings and contributions to development and to the fiscus.

This early enabling legislation got Namibia out of the starting blocks quickly, the first Status Investment Certificate being awarded to Novanam for their major fisheries investment in Luderitz, announced on 21 March, 1990. They have since made substantial investments in Walvis Bay too and remain a stalwart of the demersal fisheries sector. The new Namibia began to attract significant investments across various sectors of the economy. Fears of nationalisation and of radical policy shifts subsided as a very modern and balanced Constitution, devised by a conciliatory and pragmatic government, built confidence in a new nation.

THE POTENTIAL OF THE “GREEN” AND “BLUE” ECONOMIES.

Namibia has developed strong competitive advantages in its “green economy” through prioritisation of the environment and its unique eco-systems. It is here that we can attract substantially more responsible investors, local and foreign.

An early investment conference was followed by a land conference in 1991 and a mining investment conference in 1993. The preindependence concerns of multinational divestiture, especially in the mining sector, were soon allayed.

The “blue economy” of fisheries, logistics, processing, offshore services and responsible offshore mining, can also add a new dimension to the Namibian economy, if maximised in a regional context.

Domestic investors too took comfort from the Government’s accommodating approach and soon committed to expansion of the local economy. Local brands invested increasingly in retail, engineering and construction, fishing, tourism, manufacturing, agriculture, financial services, logistics and trade to build what soon became a vibrant and medium-high growth economy. Government became a strong investor in infrastructure, social-, health- and educational services and in redressing the imbalances of the past.

Integrated thinking and socially responsible investment can take the Namibian nation to a new level of investment and growth for all.

Namibia was squarely on the investor map for enabling policy and welcoming attitude, and built some strong competitive advantages in resources and infrastructure sectors. The small sizes of the economy and local market, and the relatively cumbersome regulatory environment inherited, were constraints to investment. While Namibia has provided a peaceful and relatively predictable environment “Ease of Doing Business” has never been a competitive advantage, notably not against countries which have adopted strong reform agendas, albeit off low bases in some cases. Economic diplomacy became the key theme for Namibia when Hidipo Hamutenya became trade minister in 1993 and commercial councillors were placed at foreign embassies to embed this model. Major trade and investment drives were launched in successful Asian economies with slow take-up initially but more traction in the

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CELEBRATING INVESTMENT SUCCESSES SINCE INDEPENDENCE

Mining, the back-bone of the pre-independence economy, continued to attract major investment in the new Namibia, even despite the Global Financial Crisis and the subsequent resources slump globally. Namibia is possibly the single example of a mining sector which has weathered the storm almost unscathed. But will the centre hold?

“DIAMONDS ARE A NATION’S BEST FRIEND”

Since the discovery of diamonds near Luderitz in 1908, these shiny gems have been a major pillar of the economy. In 1994 Namdeb was created as a 50/50 equity partnership between DeBeers and the Namibian government, a partnership which has continued to deliver a win-win, and which was subsequently expanded to include Debmarine Namibia’s sea operations. Investments of several billion Namibian dollars haves ensured that Debmarine remains the global leader of sea mining and the largest contributor, by far, to the fiscus. Several other investors in the diamond mining sector have had, at best, partial success. Government policies have achieved success in stimulating local value addition in establishing local cutting capacity for the equivalent of


INVESTMENT FOCUS

10% of rough diamond production. The jury is still out on the recent creation of a state entity, Namdia, to add further value for Namibia by establishing alternative sales channels for 15% of Namibia’s rough diamond production.

SKORPION ZINC/NAMZINC- MINING COMPANY OR EPZ, OR BOTH?

The processing innovation of an entrepreneurial company, Reunion Mining, led to the development of the Skorpion Zinc mine and refinery, commissioned by Anglo Base Metals in 2004, now owned by Vedanta. As it nears the end of its mine-life it seems likely that the refinery will be expanded to accommodate zinc concentrates from Vedanta’s Northern Cape deposits. The successful expansion of the world-class Namibian SX-EW refinery could finally justify the award of EPZ status given to Namzinc in 2004, and queried by many.

LANGER HEINRICH URANIUM-SETTING NEW RECORDS

Paladin stumbled upon the Acclaim Uranium EPL over the previously discovered Langer Heinrich deposit in 2004, bought the company for a song, and proceeded to develop Namibia’s second uranium mine in record time both in a Namibian and global context. This was possibly the first large mining project to access significant local funding for mine development through a consortium of local and international banks. Langer Heinrich has recently seen investment to 25% shareholding by China National Nuclear Corporation, and a second investment of 24% is being advanced.

HUSAB- “THE ONE WHICH OTHERS LEFT BEHIND” Australian and UK juniors, West Africa Gold Exploration, and Kalahari Minerals did extensive, mainly base metals exploration in Namibia from 2005 onwards. When the uranium price ticked up in 2006/7 they applied to include uranium in their “Rossing South” EPLs. The rest is history, with the discovery of the world class Husab deposit in 2008, just 6 km from Rossing in an area explored by various companies in the 1970s and 80s.

Restructuring of the companies and inclusion of the uranium licences under Swakop Uranium (Extract Resources) was followed by an intensive exploration phase in which Extract invested more than N$ 1bn over three years to Definitive Feasibility stage. China Guandong Nuclear Power Company purchased the operations in early 2012 and is on track for first production early in 2017 from what will be the world’s second largest uranium producer at 15m lbs per annum at full production. The total investment will be in excess of N$ 40bn, Namibia’s biggest-ever investment.

OHORONGO CEMENT, DRIVING NAMIBIA’S INDUSTRIALISATION

The epitome of Namibia’s “Growth at Home Strategy”, Namibia’s

Steve Galloway

only cement factory produces more than the country’s total needs, to the highest global quality and environmental standards. German cement producer Schwenk and its European and South African funders invested more than N$ 34bn into this state-of- the- art plant 20 km north of Otavi. The Development Bank of Namibia took up just under 10% of the equity at an early stage and RMB has subsequently re-financed a significant portion of the foreign debt. In addition to these financial contributions from “home” sources, all the resources inputs to the plant are Namibian

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OTJIKOTO GOLD, A NEW WORLD-CLASS MINE

After the discovery of gold 40km south of Otavi by Anglovaal geologists in 1997 it took a while and four successive mineral rights owners to realise the full potential of the deposit. Canadian junior, B2Gold took over in 2012 and wasted no time in accelerating the development of the N$ 3bn-plus Otjikoto mine, more than tripling Namibia’s gold production. Despite the relatively modest grades, Otjikoto is currently the lowest cost gold producer in the world and Namibia’s second largest foreign exchange generator.

DUNDEE- A TRUE EPZ INVESTOR

Dundee Precious Metals, another Canadian company, has shown great confidence in Namibia. After purchasing Namibia Custom Smelters from Weatherly in 2010, Dundee has significantly upgraded the smelter and has built a sulphuric acid plant which supplies acid to Rössing Uranium. Dundee has invested more than N$ 3bn in Namibia and plans to expand the plant further to accommodate further imports of copper concentrates from mines around the world.

BUT WILL THE CENTRE HOLD?

Not only has the mining industry seen investments in excess of N$ 60 bn over the past 8 years, since the Global Financial Crisis and resources down-turn, the sector has continued to contribute the lion’s share to the fiscus and to lead Corporate Social Investment(CSI) across Namibia’s social and environmental economies. Mining punches way above its weight in GDP-, export earnings-, infrastructure spend and CSI contributions. Continued depressed commodity prices have had an impact and will weigh on Namibia’s over-reliance on mining going forward. Uranium prices are of particular concern and could have a significant fall-out for the Namibian economy if prices do not recover in the shortmedium term. Any attempts to increase government-take from mining or to artificially tilt the sector towards unrealistic local ownership or value addition will result in reduced outputs and declining contributions to the economy.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Government has carried the bulk of infrastructure investments, building on a solid base inherited at Independence. Namibia does well in infrastructure rankings, in some categories the best on the continent. The solutions going forward, however, are to be found in mobilising greater private funding both directly and through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). A growing back-log of infrastructure policy measures and overdue projects in energy, water, transport and in land and social infrastructure delivery need to be addressed collaboratively, with urgency, if Namibia is to retain its competitive rankings.

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TELECOMMUNICATIONS

The Telecoms sector has perhaps led the way in opening up to private investors. MTC, the first mobile operator, was established by Swedish interests, Telia and Swedfund as a 49/51 partnership with government. In 2004 Government purchased the 49% shareholding, subsequently selling a 34% interest to Portugal Telecom as the new technical partner. This has always been a very successful operation, enjoying monopolistic or at least market-dominance benefits. It has returned handsome returns to government in the form of taxes and dividends and a sizeable capital gain in the sale of the 34% shareholding. A second cellular operator, with 39% interest by Norwegian group Telecom Management Partner (TMP) in Powercom, operating as Cell One and then Leo, did not have the same success as the first-mover, MTC. In 2009 the company was bought by Telecelglobe, part of Egypt’s Orascom Group, a deal funded by two South African banks. A subsequent deal with the banks saw Telecom Namibia take over Leo and brand it as TN Mobile, now fully state-owned.

ENERGY

The Energy Sector has seen significant investor interest over the past decade. While the larger energy generation projects (Kudu Gas, Xaris, Arandis Power) have generated more promise than delivery by foreign investors to date, the Renewable Energy sector has begun to yield results. French investors, through Innosun, have implemented two 5MW PV plants and a Swiss investor two 5MW plants for Cenored through Hopsol. A number of additional 5 to 37 MW PV plants involving several foreign investors of various origins are currently being advanced with Namibian partners. Several medium to large wind generation projects are also being advanced in the south of Namibia, while invader-bush generation projects are being formulated for the central-north of the country. A large energy financing gap of as much as N$ 20-30bn over the next 4-5 years will need to be closed through private funding and via PPP arrangements. In order to do this the energy policy framework needs to be brought up to date, to international best practice and finalised. This could unlock significant foreign and local investment, and the resultant energy-infrastructure will restore Namibia’s currently declining competitiveness in access to electricity.

WATER

The water sector has historically been the preserve of government but has seen one substantial investment by French governmentowned Areva in a USD 200m desalination plant to supply its own Trekkopje uranium mine. When the mine development was aborted this plant became available to supply other off-takers subject to government approvals. An offer to sell the plant to government was recently declined and upcoming tenders were announced. Several tenders have already been held for private interests to deliver desalinated water, none of which have been awarded to


INVESTMENT FOCUS

date. Considerable potential exists for delivery of competitive water provision under various PPP models involving foreign expertise and equity and local and international funding, given an appropriate regulatory and policy framework.

TRANSPORT

The transport sector has also been dominated by state-owned interests, especially the road, rail and port segments. Self-imposed sovereign debt ceilings and fiscal consolidation necessitate that government opens up the sector to private funding and PPPs. Considerable foreign and local interest exists to upgrade and operate some of these transport modes under the appropriate policy framework.

HOW OTHERS SEE US- WHAT CAN WE DO BETTER?

Namibia has done itself proud as a young adult nation entering its second quarter century. We have done much better than many in the neighbourhood and even globally. We have been recognised as above average, having grown the economy steadily since Independence and at just under 6% annually for the period 20102015. At the same time we have redressed some of the extreme imbalances of the past. We have also attracted significant foreign investment to certain sectors and have provided confidence to local businesses to invest across all sectors of the economy. This translates into further confidence by foreign investors and stimulates partnerships. Of late there has been serious concern expressed regarding recent policy statements, frameworks and legislation which is seen to be restrictive, discretionary and over-prescriptive. These concerns relate specifically to the NEEEF Bill, the Investment Promotion Act and to subjective conditionality around licencing, particularly resource licencing. While there is appreciation for the historical context of poverty, inequality and skewed participation in the economy, successful transformation economies teach us that the way out of this is through pro-investment, pro-growth policies and shared vision. Public Private Partnerships are the only way, involving local and foreign investors and a level playing field.

associated with these factors. We have theoretical access to much bigger markets, but our competitiveness rankings, some of which pertain to cross-border factors as well as local efficiencies, have slipped over the past five years as others have reformed faster. The most influential comparators include the various World Economic Forum’s and World Bank reports as well as several “Doing Business” comparisons. While Namibia ranks reasonably well in most competitiveness rankings, there has been deterioration in rankings over the past five years. The “Doing Business” reports are of greater concern, with factors such as “starting a business”, “number of procedures and time to start a business”, ”getting electricity”, “trading across borders”, ”innovation”, “labour issues” and “education issues” being highlighted as vulnerabilities which are not improving. The over-complex processes in the recently approved Investment Promotion Act will create new barriers unless significantly refined. Our critical mining sector competitiveness, as reflected by the Fraser Institute rankings, has oscillated between 25th globally (1st in Africa 2014), currently down to 37th globally (4th in Africa), and has been as low as 69th(10th in Africa). This is a perception index based on a survey of mining companies and is greatly influenced by policy pronouncements, even those which are not implemented. Uncertainty around recent NEEEF pronouncements, “additional conditions” on mineral licencing and processes around the Investment Promotion Act, have already influenced the rating negatively. The overall competitiveness, while still good in a regional and African context, has shifted sideways and downwards in various parameters. The noble objectives for competitiveness as outlined in Namibia’s national development plans and quantified in the Harambee Prosperity Plan are achievable. Namibia could indeed be the most competitive economy in SADC in five years if we all “Harambee” and pull together, in the same direction, leaving no-one out. “Enterprise Namibia” needs to rise to this challenge.

When inviting foreign, and for that matter local investors, to the game we must remember that we compete on a global field and there are those nations competing for investments that appear more hungry- ready to reform, simplify and transform faster. Some come off much lower bases and have some way to go to match the stability, predictability and favourable “climate” that Namibia has ensured for 26 years. What we should consider, however, is that we are a small economy with a small market, with reasonable resources and with social-, equity- and educational backlogs, and some real disadvantages

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ONE GENERATION ON

GUIDE TO THE NAMIBIAN ECONOMY 2017 BY ROBIN SHERBOURNE

THE GUIDE TO THE NAMIBIAN ECONOMY, PUBLISHED IN 2016 IS A UNIQUE PUBLICATION ON THE NAMIBIAN ECONOMY. THE BOOK BRINGS A HUGE AMOUNT OF DATA ON THE ECONOMY TOGETHER WITH HISTORICAL INFORMATION ABOUT NAMIBIA’S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INCISIVE ANALYSIS ON RECENT DEVELOPMENTS. IT IS NOT A DRY AND DUSTY TOME ON ECONOMICS - BUT RATHER AN ENGAGING SOURCE OF INFORMATION AND INSIGHT ABOUT THE NAMIBIAN ECONOMY. The fourth edition is published a full generation after Independence and ever closer to the year 2030, the year chosen by Namibia’s SWAPO Government as the date by which Namibia should have caught up economically with the industrialised world in terms of income per head. As the book lays out, there is no doubt that many successes have been achieved in these first twenty-five years. In broad economic terms, the economy has grown almost every year since 1990, perhaps by an average of 4% a year. With the population growing by 1.4 percent a year, on average Namibians have become better off. Two or three percent a year compounded over 25 years represents a significant improvement in average living standards. Other official statistics documented in later chapters appear to bear this out. However one juggles the figures (and the IPPR has been in the forefront of scrutinising the data that exists), it does look as if poverty and extreme poverty have declined – even though inequality may not have changed as much as first believed. Furthermore, poverty has declined during a period when the young nation was dealt a severe early test in the form of HIV/AIDS, the impact of which has been painful and protracted and has been the main reason for the reduction in life expectancy since 1990. The number of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa which can boast such a track record of economic success – especially those emerging from long and bloody struggles to rid themselves of the colonial yoke – are limited if they exist at all. This alone makes Namibia a very special case. Added to the fact that Namibia has successfully held five democratic elections deemed by most observers to be generally free and fair and that the ruling party has successfully engineered a handover of power not only from a popular Founding Father to a unifying successor but also then to a third President who does not come from Namibia’s majority ethnic group (and who chose to leave Cabinet after a disagreement with the Founding Father) only adds to Namibia’s record. Hage Geingob won the presidency with 87 percent of the popular vote after 25 years of SWAPO Government. And this was achieved while Namibia is consistently ranked highly not only by African but by international standards for standards of media freedom. On the face of it then, a remarkable economic and political success. And yet, for those who believe in the power of good economic policy, it is hard to pretend that all is well. Despite steady economic growth, poverty and inequality remain firmly entrenched primarily because the economy has failed to create enough jobs. Namibia’s record on employment and perhaps especially formal employment lags far behind what is required to make a significant dent in the twin ills of poverty and inequality.

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Part of this is because time and again Government has introduced policies which have not been based on rigorous research and analysis and therefore not been properly thought through. After 25 years it is hard to say where the critical analytical thinking takes place within Government and which analysts or researchers ministers consult before agreeing to new policies, laws and regulations. Politicians seem to continue to believe that everything is political. As a result policies are often badly designed and therefore fail to achieve their objectives or end up being reconsidered but only after a long period of uncertainty during which economic agents are unsure about what is likely to happen. Fortunately, Government has shown that it is still willing to listen to criticism when the stakes are high enough. This is Namibia’s saving grace. However, considerable amounts of time and energy (not to mention credibility) could be saved by better analysis and consultation before new policies are launched. The Employment Services Act and the National Equitable Economic Empowerment Bill are two recent examples of policies that have the potential to seriously dent the economy’s ability to create jobs – surely Government’s number one priority. The public sector remains an enormous part of the economy yet its cost is huge and its effectiveness questionable. Its size alone means that the national budget takes on even greater importance than it does in other countries. Yet public spending is subject to no consistent cost benefit analysis and meaningful public sector reform is not on the agenda. Membership of SACU continues to allow Namibia to maintain this situation but that means these precious revenues go towards keeping the country locked into dependence and also effectively block wider goals such as SACU enlargement and greater regional integration. Furthermore, after 25 years Government continues to show extraordinary faith in its own ability to successfully intervene in the economy and seems to believe that Government committees can deliver economic change despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary. The President’s Economic Advisory Council, the StateOwned Enterprises Governance Council, the National Planning Commission, the Employment Equity Commission, the Value Addition Committee and others are clear examples which have added little to the country’s economy. Government continues to prefer to establish new bureaucratic structures and institutions rather than reforming or eliminating existing ones. The economy has grown primarily because FDI continues to take place on a significant scale but this has come about generally despite rather than because of Government intervention.


INVESTMENT FOCUS

the National Planning Commission, NEPRU, UNAM, and the Bank of Namibia Research Department as well as ad hoc initiatives such as the President’s Economic Advisory Council have failed to provoke the hard thinking necessary for improvement. In policy terms then, Namibia’s first 25 years leave much to be desired. Indeed, Namibia appears to be living proof that an economy can grow and even prosper in the absence of economic input into policy-making and effective public institutions. Certainly, interest by foreign investors in Namibia through the years since the Global Economic Crisis has held up well, which has been the foundation upon which growth in the wider economy has taken place. Yet policymakers should not fool themselves. Namibia has continued to attract FDI because it has not yet permanently damaged international investor confidence (despite coming perilously close on several occasions). Yet this success should not be confused with more deep-seated structural transformation of the economy. Indeed, as Namibia completes a generation of sovereignty it looks set to become ever more dependent on its much maligned mining sector.

Linked to this is the almost universally poor performance of Namibia’s public enterprises, the most important of which have generally been poorly managed and suffered from endless political interference. Given that these are the institutions responsible for much of the nation’s critical infrastructure, this does not bode well for long-term growth. In agriculture, fishing, mining, water, electricity, tourism, transport, and banking, public enterprises have, with possible limited exceptions, at best contributed little to development and at worst held it back altogether. To these areas of concern can be added that of corruption. Thirteen years after its founding legislation has been passed, the AntiCorruption Commission has yet to successfully prosecute anyone in Government much higher than a school teacher. No one believes this is because Namibian public servants are somehow different to every other country. Everyone knows it is much easier to stop the slide into endemic corruption than to rectify it once corruption is rife. Black Economic Empowerment rightly seems to have created a class of rent seekers who line their own pockets rather than genuine entrepreneurs who create thriving businesses and thereby create jobs. More disturbing, perhaps, is the breath-taking lack of debate on some of the most important economic policies. Aside from the fact that ministers’ fortunes rarely (if ever) depend on performance, Parliament, with its almost built-in executive majority, looks unlikely to play this role in the foreseeable future. Opposition parties meanwhile remain weak and divided and incapable of holding the executive to account. Parliamentary committees add very little to Parliament’s teeth while the reports of the Auditor General (which have often been so late as to be irrelevant) go almost unnoticed. Public institutions such as

As stated above, Namibia has already achieved something historic. Many politicians still like to dwell on the country’s inheritance of racial strife. Yes, the poisonous legacy of apartheid remains a massive obstacle in the way of progress and keeps the country from looking forward rather than back but it must not be allowed to be the reason why progress is derailed. The reality is that Namibia enjoys a host of advantages which many other countries would envy: a long coastline, a great climate, abundant natural resources, stunning landscapes, good infrastructure, reasonable levels of public debt, a functioning civil service, a sophisticated legal and business infrastructure, friendly neighbours, and the goodwill of virtually every other country in the world. The ruling SWAPO party has enjoyed a generation in power and this looks set to continue into the distant future. Yet continuing on the same path as the last twenty-five years for the next twenty-five years is unlikely to yield anything very different: modest growth based on a vibrant mining sector that benefits the fortunate few. It could be worse. But policymakers should surely be asking: shouldn’t it be so much better? The Guide is Published by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR). It covers the following areas relating to the Macro economy: Macroeconomic performance, Fiscal policy, Budget trends, Monetary policy, Employment, Poverty and Inequality. The Guide also covers the following sectors of the economy - Agriculture, Fishing, Mining, Oil and Gas, Diamond Cutting and Polishing, Manufacturing, Construction, Electricity, Water, Tourism, Transport, Telecommunications, and Banking. Other cross-sectoral issues are also addressed in the Guide are Downstream Petroleum, State-Owned Enterprises, Commercial Land Reform, the Namibian Stock Exchange and Domestic Asset Requirements, International Trade, and Black Economic Empowerment. The Guide to the Namibian Economy is available from the IPPR at the House of Democracy, 70-72 Dr Frans Indongo Street, Windhoek. Price: N$250 (N$150 to students with student cards). Further details: Salmi Shiguedha on +264 61 240514 or info@ippr.org.na

HOUSE OF DEMOCRACY Salmi Shiguedha +264 61 240514 info@ippr.org.na

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INVESTMENT FOCUS

NAMIBIA IN 2017 AND BEYOND. BY ROWLAND BROWN

NAMIBIAN ECONOMIST, CO-FOUNDER OF CIRRUS FINANCIAL SERVICES

As we enter 2017, the global economy remains on a knife edge, with downward revisions to growth expectations becoming the norm, rather than the exception. Global growth is expected to have slowed to 3.1 percent in 2016 before recovering to 3.4 percent in 2017. The IMF October 2016 forecast, revised down by 0.1 percentage point for 2016 and 2017 relative to April, reflects a more subdued outlook for developed economies. Many advanced economies are struggling to regain their pre-global crisis growth and employment rates, while several emerging economies have seen major and painful short term adjustment over the past two years. The US economy remains relatively robust, with employment levels and growth slowly returning to long term trend levels. Europe remains fragile, with uncertainty much increased due to the vote by Britain to leave the European Union. Although the market reaction to the Brexit shock was reassuringly orderly, the ultimate impact remains very unclear, as the fate of institutional and trade arrangements between the United Kingdom and the European Union is uncertain. Between 2009 and 2015, Namibia posted some of its strongest ever growth, with consecutive growth of between 5.1 and 6.3 percent, compounding each year over the six-year period. As such, the economy grew from a N$77.9 billion economy to a N$108.3 billion economy in real terms. This abnormally strong growth was driven by three key factors. Firstly, Namibia has been

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through a prolonged period of historically low interest rates, which drove unprecedented uptake of credit by the private sector; secondly, major fiscal expansion from 2011 until early 2016, drove money into the pockets of the public, as well as major civil works programmes; finally, unprecedented levels of foreign direct investment into the country, driven by the consecutive construction of three foreign funded mines. These factors resulted in a consumption and construction boom, which saw a major expansion in the local economy. However, subsequently, the macroeconomic environment in Namibia has started to deteriorate, as a combination of factors have come together to dampen growth and drive imbalances within the local economy. The unwinding of historically low interest rates, less foreign investment into the economy, a weaker external environment – particularly in Angola and South Africa, weakening commodity prices, regional drought, concerning government policy and a high base all had a negative impact on the economy directly. The most worrying factor however, has been the falling government revenues and the strong slowdown seen in government expenditure as a result, particularly through 2016. The year 2017 promises to remain challenging for Namibia (as for much of the world), as the fiscal constraints of government will force the continuation of fiscal contraction at a time that the external environment remains challenging. In this

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regard, the fiscal position of the state appears to be a lagging indicator of the general economic slowdown, as the revenue take by the fiscus falls away at a time that the institution expected continued revenue growth. Through 2016, Government cut spending twice, first in the February budget, by 1.6%, and thereafter in October by a further 6.8%. As such, the period of April 2016 to March 2017 will see a total of 8.3% less expenditure than the same period of 2015 to 2016. This reflects a nominal decline in expenditure of N$5.6 billion – close to four percent of 2015/16 GDP. Moreover, a further decline in expenditure of 2.7% is expected in 2017/18, and downward revisions in the February budget are at present, expected. The bottom line, therefore, is that even before multiplier effects, major fiscal withdrawals have been seen through 2016 and are to continue through 2017. However, the effects of the 2016 withdrawal have not yet been witnessed in full, and are only expected to be seen in the first half of 2017. This includes a major slow-down in construction activity, with the sector expected to undertake wholesale shedding of jobs; a further slowdown in wholesale and retail trade, as consumers come under further pressure and government demand for goods and services tails off; and a further slowdown in government revenue receipts as a contractionary fiscal cycle commences. That this can permeate through other parts of the economy, no doubt can exist.

That said, the magnitude of the current and upcoming slowdown remains to be seen, and perspective must be maintained. Should Namibia see two years of contraction, it is unlikely that the economy will shrink to the point where the level of value adding economic activity falls below that of 2013/14. Moreover, the extent of the slowdown will depend on the decisions taken by the government during the year, as well as a number of exogenous factors, particularly influential in the primary industries of the country. Most notable amongst these are whether the on-going agricultural and hydrological droughts are to be broken, and whether we see any notable recovery in commodity prices, most notably that of uranium. Similarly, much of the tertiary sector is dependent of the state of our regional neighbors, most notably the health of the Angolan economy and her consumers, as largely determined by the oil price. Should we see recovery in any of these factors, and should we see sensible monetary and fiscal policy decisions going forward, the magnitude of the economic slowdown can be expected to be severely reduced. Thus, it is possible that towards the end of 2017, some recovery in the economy is possible. However, risks remain heightened and largely to the downside, and should the policy response be incorrect, and the external environment remain weak, Namibia could face a number of challenging years. In this regard, policies that disincentivize investment in the economy, whether domestic or foreign, will add fuel to the fire of contracting domestic


INVESTMENT FOCUS

consumption, and thus cause further long term damage to the economy. Despite the current challenges, a number of short term initiatives have been considered and are likely to be implemented within coming years, that should help to right the ship, at least in the short term. Most notable amongst these is the expected and on-going change in local asset requirements for Namibian pension funds and life insurance companies. Namibia has a sizable contractual savings pool (in excess of national GDP), much of which is invested outside of the country, largely due to the relatively nascent and relatively shallow nature of the local financial system. From 2017 through 2020, we expect to see the local asset requirement for these funds raised from 35% to 50% in incremental increases. This forced return of funds to Namibia is likely to improve the country’s economic conditions, with the hope being that the external and domestic real sectors will improve thereafter. Thus, it could be said that these contractual savings are to be used as a counter-cyclical policy measure. It should be noted, however, that this is but a short-term solution to the country’s problems, and if not extremely cautiously implemented, will likely cause more problems than it solves in the longer term. The reason for this is that the capital being forced back into the country is, primarily, pension fund assets. Despite their collective status as the contractual savings of the

country, they are the capital of individuals, who are reliant on their secure investment and growth in order to provide future income to the said individuals during their retirement. Thus, if not returned to the country and sensibly deployed, a long-term liability for the country is likely to be created, and much long term damage done. At the current point in time, the Namibian economy is precariously positioned, due to the aforementioned factors. However, when compared to much of the rest of the region and the world, the situation is perhaps less dire than it otherwise appears. Generally speaking, Namibia has maintained a reasonable investor climate and continues to focus on improving such, despite some egregious policy and policy proposals over recent months, which may undo much of the good work done to date. Nevertheless, it is hard to imagine that the intentions of policy makers in the country is anything but good, and as a result, poor policy proposals are generally rolled back or withdrawn with minimal damage done. Despite the currently trying times, the government response has, to date, been generally correct, with concerted efforts being seen to reduce the budget deficit and to encourage foreign investment into the economy, amongst others. Should we continue to see a pro-business policy agenda and a withdrawal of some of the less well thought through policies currently on the table, Namibia’s medium to long term future remains bright. However, like many countries,

Rowland Brown the year 2017 and possibly years thereafter, depending on this policy stance, will present more economic challenges. For Namibia, the decisions taken over the next two years will do much to determine what the next 25 years hold, and whether the commendable economic and social progress seen to date is to continue.

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FINANCE NAMIBIA HAS SOLID FOUNDATIONS FOR DEMOCRACY, GOOD GOVERNANCE, PEACE AND STABILITY. THE FOREIGN INVESTMENT ACT PROVIDES SPECIFIC PROTECTION FOR FOREIGN INVESTORS IN NAMIBIA. AFRICA AND NAMIBIA’S POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING GROWTH REMAINS. NAMIBIA CAN BECOME A FUTURE HUB OF REGIONAL AND CONTINENTAL GROWTH.

The government as well as the private sector continuously strives to enhance Namibia’s attraction as an investment destination. Well-established business professionals in the finance sector have a thorough understanding of the Namibian business environment, whether it is financial management, tax and advisory services, investment management companies, banks that offer highly sophisticated banking systems or insurance.

government finances – including coordination of the central government budget, forecasts and analyses – tax issues, the management and administration of central government activities as well as financial markets and consumer legislation.

VISION

To be a dynamic and reputable institution excelling in fiscal and financial management.

The importance of the financial sector to the general economic growth of a country is well documented. Where financial services are supplied broadly and effectively they accelerate economic growth, increase the efficiency of resource allocation and improve the distribution of wealth, in line with Namibia’s 2030 vision.

MISSION

The overall objective of the Namibian Financial Sector Strategy (NFSS) is to develop a more resilient, competitive and dynamic financial system with best practices so that the sector can realise its full potential in respect of its contribution to economic growth and achieving the socio-economic objectives of poverty reduction and wealth creation. Furthermore, the strategy envisions the emergence of strong and innovative domestic financial institutions that are more technology driven and ready to face the challenges of globalisation.

Integrity, Loyalty, Accountability, Competency

The strategy focuses on reforms in the following key areas: • Deepening financial markets and developing a financial safety net • Financial inclusion through ➤ Consumer financial literacy and protection ➤ Access to financial services and products ➤ Localisation of the Namibian financial sector ➤ Skills development in the financial sector By the end of year 2021 the following should have been achieved: • a deeper and more efficient financial system • respected, world-class regulators • a stable, well-regulated and competitive financial sector • significant local ownership of financial institutions • an inclusive financial sector • financially literate and protected consumers of financial services and products.

THE MINISTRY OF FINANCE

The Ministry of Finance is responsible for matters concerning central

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We develop and administer fiscal and financial policies that ensure macro-economic stability, sustainable and equitable socio-economic development.

VALUES

The Ministry of Finance Molkte Street, Windhoek, Private Bag 13295, Windhoek +264-61-2099111, www.mof.gov.na Office

Telephone Numbers, country & city code +264 61

Minister

209 9111

Deputy Minister

209 9111

Permanent Secretary

209 2929

Director: Expenditure and Financial Management

209 2705

Director: Administration

209 2925

Director: Customs and Excise

209 2811

Director: EPAS

209 2131

State Accounts

209 9111

Tender Board Secretariat

209 2136

Auxiliary Services

209 9261

Inland Revenue Management

209 9111


FINANCE

THE BANK OF NAMIBIA

The Bank of Namibia is the central bank. It is the foreign exchange authority and as the banker for the government and commercial banks acts as the supervisory authority on financial institutions and monetary matters in the country. It also issues bank notes and coins. The Agribank of Namibia assists the domestic agricultural sector, while the Development Bank of Namibia assists small and medium-size enterprises. The SME Bank gives special attention to projects of small and mediumsize enterprises (SMEs), and those catering to rural communities, micro-enterprises and previously disadvantaged individuals (PDIs). The SME Bank holds a commercial banking license and can thus offer full banking services – personal banking (retail), corporate banking as well as treasury and investment management – to individuals and companies that are not necessarily SMEs.

COMMERCIAL BANKS

The following commercial banks operate in Namibia: BANK BIC +264 83 330 9000 www.bankbic.na BANK WINDHOEK +264 61 299 1200 www.bankwindhoek.com.na FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NAMIBIA LTD +264 61 299 2111 callcentre1@fnbnamibia.com.na www.fnbnamibia.com.na NEDBANK OF NAMIBIA LTD +264 61 295 2222 serviceplus@nedbank.com.na www.nedbank.com.na/home SME BANK +264 61 430 1000 info@smebank.com.na www.smebank.com.na STANDARD BANK OF NAMIBIA LTD +264 61 294 2126 / +264 61 294 2136 / MTC 0819286 info@standardbank.com.na www.standardbank.com.na All Namibian banks are connected to major international communication networks, ensuring fast and efficient transfers of funds to and from other centres in the world. In September 1993 Namibia introduced its own currency, the Namibia Dollar (N$), divided into 100 cents. The Namibia Dollar is linked to the South African Rand (ZAR), which is also legal tender in Namibia.

KNOW YOUR CURRENCY Inspect security features NEW BANKNOTE FAMILY Both the old and upgraded banknotes will run concurrently and will be accepted as legal tender in the payment for goods and services in Namibia.

VITAL CONTACTS EAN – THE ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION OF NAMIBIA +264 81 1559775 info@ean.org.na www.ean.org.na The EAN strives to further the economic development of Namibia by bridging the apparent gap between private and public sector players, and to open channels for improved dialogue, support and cooperation. ICAN – THE INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS OF NAMIBIA +264 61 22 02181 secretariat@icanpaab.com www.icancpd.net NIPA – THE NAMIBIA INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS +264 61 38 2700 office@nipa.com.na www.nipa.com.na PAAB – THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS BOARD +264 61 285 8467 secretariat@paap.com.na NAMIBIA STOCK EXCHANGE +264 61 227 647 info@nsx.com.na www.nsx.com.na w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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FINANCE

ALLAN GRAY NAMIBIA

MANAGING CLIENTS’ ASSETS SINCE 1984 ORBIS - OUR OFFSHORE INVESTMENT PARTNER Dr Allan WB Gray founded both Allan Gray and Orbis, a global asset manager based in Bermuda. The relationship we have with Orbis extends to a sharing of global investment ideas and the management of certain portfolios. Together with Orbis, we offer African investors a coherent global investment product range.

THE ALLAN GRAY ORBIS FOUNDATION

The Allan Gray Orbis Foundation was founded in 2005 by Dr Gray and Allan Gray Proprietary Limited to make a sustainable long-term contribution to nation-building and economic transformation in Africa. The Foundation in Namibia is funded by a 15% equity interest in Allan Gray Namibia. It also receives 5% of Allan Gray Namibia’s pre-tax profits in perpetuity.

James Mnyupe - Managing Director

ABOUT US

Allan Gray Namibia is part of the broader Allan Gray Group. Established in South Africa and investing on behalf of clients since 1974, the Allan Gray Group has grown to become Africa’s largest privately owned investment management company. While its headquarters are in Cape Town, it has a presence in several African countries, including an office in Windhoek. Allan Gray caters for individuals and institutions, retirement funds, insurers, trusts, companies and foundations. Allan Gray has been managing assets for Namibian clients since it won its first client mandate in 1984, a client who is still with the Group. Allan Gray Namibia was founded in 1996 as an independent investment management company to service Namibian clients and to harness domestic investment opportunities. In addition to sharing the broader Group’s purpose of helping its clients build wealth over the long term, Allan Gray Namibia also aims to:  Encourage the development of investment management skills within Namibia  Play a role in the development of the Namibian investment management industry

OUR APPROACH

Allan Gray Namibia shares the investment philosophy of the Group. We take a long-term view to managing investments and have consistently applied the same tried and tested investment philosophy, guiding principles and values since 1974. We pride ourselves on having achieved superior investment performance for our clients over the long term at lower-than-average risk of loss. Our future success depends on our continuing ability to help clients to achieve their investment objectives. While we are not licenced to provide financial advice, we believe in the merits of good, independent investment advice for those who lack the knowledge and skill to make investment decisions unaided.

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Through its Fellowship opportunity, the Foundation identifies, selects and invests in Namibian individuals who it believes have the potential for greatness over the long term. The Foundation offers Allan Gray Fellowships to promising students who are about to attend university (known as Allan Gray Candidate Fellows). Students are given access to comprehensive financial support alongside exposure to thought leaders, mentorship and entrepreneurial mind-set development. There is further access to postgraduate funding, available to those who have excelled in the Fellowship. Additionally, the Foundation provides funding to start a business to any Namibian Allan Gray Fellow who presents an attractive, high-impact proposition.

STAFF PROFILES

We have a team of professionals performing investment management and research, trading, compliance, portfolio accounting, client service and investor administration within the same group. We take great pride in providing an efficient, personalised service, which we continually strive to improve. We have a team of people on the ground in Namibia, available to service local clients. James Mnyupe, our Managing Director, joined the firm in March 2010, having previously worked for PwC Windhoek since 2007. He is a graduate of Rhodes University, a qualified chartered accountant and a CFA charter holder. James is responsible for running the business and servicing institutional clients, local brokers and financial advisers.

ALLAN GRAY NAMIBIA James Mnyupe - Managing Director +264 61 22 1103 info@allangray.com.na www.allangray.com.na


FINANCE

IT DOESN’T TAKE 2 HOURS 30 MINUTES

91730-210x267 91730 - Namibia - FEE- Swan Lake V5.indd 1

TO PERFORM SWAN LAKE IT TAKES 20 YEARS

Margot Fonteyn is regarded as one of the greatest ballerinas of all time. By the time she was twenty years old, she had performed Swan Lake as the prima ballerina. For her it was a lifetime of sore feet, straight backs and lifted chins. Sticking to a goal, day in and day out. At Allan Gray we value this kind of commitment. It’s the same philosophy we apply to investing and it has worked well for our clients for 42 years. Call Allan Gray on (061) 22 11 03 or your financial adviser, or visit www.allangray.com.na

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FINANCE

BANK BIC NAMIBIA GROWING TOGETHER

Mr. Fernado Teles Chairman of Bank BIC Namibia Banco BIC began its activity in Angola in May 2005 with a strategy based on retail banking, corporate banking and private banking. In 2015 we celebrated our tenth anniversary. These first ten years represent years of growth and extraordinary results which have allowed us to secure a top position in the banking sector, not only in Africa but also in other continents. Our Bank has 220 branches across Angola, 2100 staff members and over one million customers. Throughout our history, internationalisation has constituted an important feature of our growth over these last ten years. Expansion began in 2008, with the opening of Banco BIC Portugal, for which our main goal was to foster economic relations between Angola and Portugal, with a particular commitment to supporting Small and Medium Companies. Additionally, within the scope of its export activity, Banco BIC Portugal has already established itself as a key correspondent Bank of other Angolan banks.

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Our priority has been to cement relationships with communities through the creation of a favorable environment for investment and growth. We are committed to actively providing quality support not only to small and medium companies, but also to large corporate groups. To this end, we rely on a specialized team of professionals who are driven to employing their dedication and knowledge in both the domestic and international markets. Today, we are already established in five countries, namely Angola, Portugal, Cape Verde (IFI), South Africa (Rep. Office), and now the Republic of Namibia.

This is what has boosted the growth of our Baobab root, our symbol and inspiration, making it stronger with the passing of each day.

The strategic action and business plan of Bank BIC Namibia is geared towards generating value and providing a quality service to BIC clients, in close connection with the other banks belonging to the “BIC Universe”. Our common goal is to offer a constant daily service of excellence to our clients, in all areas of the Bank, and to make them our esteemed partners with whom we can share our success. Initially Bank BIC will be represented in Windhoek and in the north of the country, close to the border with Angola. At a later stage we will broaden our network of branches to the main cities of the Republic of Namibia.

Being a solid, profitable, socially responsible, efficient, flexible bank, with national and international presence, driven by creation of value, a partner of companies and families, which is distinguished by the appreciation of its assets, by the satisfaction of its customers and by the accomplishment of its employees, always guided by behavior of high ethical and social responsibility.

Growing Together is our motto! We wish to grow in a sustainable and innovative manner, offering the best solutions to our clients. Indeed, these are the founding principles of BIC’s history of success in addition to the unequivocal dedication and support of our staff and clients, and the trust of our shareholders and other partners.

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Our sincere gratitude to all those who have chosen to join us. We will grow together! Fernando Mendes Teles

VISION

Being the best and largest private bank operating in Namibia, growing in a sustainable way, innovative and offering the best solutions to its customers, with a permanent capacity of renewal, actively contributing to the development and growth of Namibia.

MISSION

Our vision extols the dedication of all in our mission, through the work carried out based on our corporate values which are embodied in our slogan: Growing Together.

VALUES

BANK BIC CEO, Mr. Jorge Veiga +264 83 330 9000 info@bankbic.na www.bankbic.na


AF_ENG Cartaz International2 60x85cm+5mmBleed(NOV´16).pdf

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FINANCE

From angolan roots, we reached the world.

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11 years ago, we planted in Angola seeds of hope, credibility and security, which are now recognized. With your trust, our roots have become stronger and we are also now a reference in Africa. In the list of the 1,000 best banks in the world, where there appears only 3 Angolan banks, BIC leads this trio in respect of profits made. Now anywhere in the world, we are a reliable partner. The presence in Angola, Portugal, Cape Verde, Namibia and South Africa, is an example of internationalization in motion and sustained growth that we have accomplished.

www.bankbic.na

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FINANCE

Bank of Namibia Management team

Ipumbu Shiimi Governor

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Ebson Uanguta Deputy Governor

Romeo Nel Director: Banking Supervision

Nicholas Mukasa Director: Financial Markets

Leonie Dunn Director: Financial Intelligence Centre

Barbara Gowaseb Director: Payment & Settlement Systems

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Emile van Zyl Technical Advisor to the Governor

Magreth Tjongarero Head: Risk Management & Assurance

Kuruvilla Mathew Director: Finance & Administration

Florette Nakusera Director: Research

Lea Namoloh Director: Human Resources

Samuel Shivute Emma Haiyambo Director: Banking Services Director: Strategic Communications & Financial Sector Development

Marsorry Ickua Director: Information Technology

Brian Eiseb Director: Exchange Control And Legal services


FINANCE

OUR VISION Our Vision is to be a centre of excellence, a professional and credible institution, working in the public interest and supporting the achievement of national economic development goals.

OUR MISSION To support economic growth and development in Namibia, we • Act as fiscal advisor and banker to Government • Promote price stability • Manage reserves and currency • Ensure sound financial system and • Conduct economic research

OUR VALUES • We value high performance impact and excellence. • We uphold open communication, diversity, integrity and teamwork. • We care for each other’s well-being.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES The Bank’s strategic objectives (strategic plan 2017-2021) are aligned to its functional priorities. Eight principal objectives were derived from the Mission and Vision, and reflect the Bank’s desire to meet its statutory mandate. The strategic objectives which essentially refer to what the Bank aspires to achieve are as follows: • Safeguard and enhance financial stability • Promote price stability • Manage reserves prudently • Provision of currency, government debt insurance and banking services • Promote a positive reputation • Promote financial sector development • Enhance contribution towards sustainable economic growth • Optimise organisational efficiency and cost-effectiveness Measurable strategies are designed with clear outcomes in order to achieve these strategic objectives. To ensure successful implementation, the strategic objectives were transformed into areas of concentration with clear, measurable targets. Twice a year the Directors of the various Departments report on progress in their areas of concentration and the achievement of their targets. The entire plan is reviewed and refreshed once a year. To promote ownership of the strategic plan and attain performance excellence, the strategic plan is rolled out across the board through the Bank’s Performance Management System. Individual performance goals are crafted for each employee, and performance progress is evaluated by means of performance appraisals.

Strategic Communication and Financial Sector Development, Tel +264 61 283 5111, info@bon.com.na, www.bon.com.na

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FINANCE

BANK WINDHOEK

WHY SAVE, OR INVEST, AND NOT SPEND?

T HE V E R D I C T IS S TILL OUT ON WHET HER T O SAVE, INVEST, O R RAT HER S P EN D Y O U R M ON E Y. E CON OMIST S A RE NO T IN A GREEMENT A BO U T THIS, AS S OM E F E E L THAT THE E CON O MY IS ST IMU LAT ED BY SPENDING MO RE , W H I L E S O M E AR GUE TH AT IT IS BET T ER T O SAVE O R INVEST W ISELY..

At Bank Windhoek we agree that it is better to save or invest wisely, than to spend your hard-earned cash. Saving under difficult economic circumstances is not easy. Just as one makes staying in shape, or losing and maintaining a healthy weight, a habit, saving should become a habit. The financial and investment guru, Warren Buffet, said: “Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving.” Think of the consequences of over-spending, compared to the challenge of saving. Once you have over-spent, you have taken the first step into the debt trap. Debt is a vicious cycle and very difficult to get out of. If you did not have enough money to make it through month one (1), where will the money come from in month two (2) and month three (3), and before you know it, you are so deep in debt that drastic measures need to be taken. Saving does not mean that you have to save enormous amounts of money, but if you have the discipline to save even a small amount, it will prevent you from entering into the debt trap. Just think about it – if you think you have enough money to repay a loan, why not save the installments and then buy what you want to buy cash. In that way you save the interest that will be charged on the loan, plus you can bargain for a cash discount. The rewards are so much greater. So, what about the economy then? Well, it is complicated, but think about it in this way; charity begins at home. First make sure that you and your family are taken care of, before you want to kick-start the economy by spending. Saving is always a good idea, whether times are bad or whether times are good. You need a nest egg for those unexpected incidences in life and you will be thankful that you had some resources on hand when one of those incidences occurs. At Bank Windhoek we have a range of saving and investment products that can help you to save and take the road to financial freedom. Talk to any of the sales personnel at Bank Windhoek to find out how ‘Together we do better’.

BANK WINDHOEK Jacquiline Pack +264 61 299 1267 PackJ@bankwindhoek.com.na www.bankwindhoek.com.na

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FINANCE

Navigate your financial

future Bank Windhoek’s wide range of Cheque Account and Investment products offer you a world of opportunity.

Invest in your financial wellbeing and start your investment by opening a Prime Linked Fixed Deposit, with a minimum of N$50 000 and grow your money over a term of between 12 to 60 months. For more information, please visit our website.

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FINANCE

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FINANCE

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FINANCE

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF NAMIBIA

GOOD BUSINESS IS GOOD FOR DEVELOPMENT Guided by robust governance and a comprehensive risk framework, and enabled by a deep pool of finance - from its own sources as well as from the private sector and other leading development finance institutions - the Bank’s twin focus is an engine of transformation. It transforms the private sector with finance for larger enterprises in the key sectors identified in the Fourth National Development Plan: manufacturing, transport & logistics and tourism. It has also developed a sound track record of large-scale and innovative financing for infrastructure, highlights of which include power generation and transmission, Namibia’s first independent photovoltaic power producer, financing of affordable land and housing, and provision of water.

DEVELOPMENT GOALS OF THE BANK The bank has multiple goals linked to various economic challenges and opportunities. The overriding priorities are to finance larger enterprises as sources of employment and to finance infrastructure that ensures the long-term sustainability of the Namibian economy. The Bank addresses imbalances in ownership by providing finance to previously disadvantaged Namibians, particularly those establishing larger enterprises, expanding enterprises through asset acquisition and operating capital, and engaging in management buyouts. In order to address imbalances in regional economic activity the Bank actively encourages financing applications from

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entities in regions which are under-served by commercial sources of finance. The Bank also has the transformational goal of providing finance for women and young entrepreneurs.

FINANCE FOR ENTERPRISE, PPPS AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES Finance is approved on the basis of congruence with the Bank’s development goals and the viability of the proposal. In terms of viability the bank considers cash flow forecasts, or revenue streams in the case of infrastructure, as well as business or project plans, suitable management skills, qualifications and experience and levels of collateral. The Bank is currently targeting stimuli for enterprises in the NDP4-identified sectors of manufacturing, transport & logistics and tourism. It provides financing for agro-processing enterprises but does not provide direct finance for agriculture. In order to address current longterm economic challenges, the Bank provides funds for financing serviced land and affordable housing, provision of water and electricity generation.

MICROFINANCE SUPPORT FRAMEWORK The Bank may open credit lines for microfinance institutions to use for on-lending. These institutions have to prove that their lending objectives and policies are in line with the development objectives of the

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Bank. In the past the Bank has provided bulk finance to onlenders for educational purposes, micro-enterprises and the procurement of SME contracts.

GOVERNANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY The Bank reports financial interventions in the interests of development, with commercial principles which ensure long-term sustainability of its operations and its pool of finance, as well as the viability and development impact of its borrowers. The Bank applies robust governance system that includes an impartial committee system that ensures that each application for finance is examined by three separate management committees that each consist of several individuals. The committees assess the viability of the proposal, credit standing and risk. Once the proposal has been accepted by each of the committees, final approval is subject to approval by the Board of the Bank. The Bank manages risk in the interest of its own sustainability as well as the security of its borrowers. The purpose of risk management is to understand existing risks faced by the Bank, and to proactively and effectively mitigate risk and adjust accordingly. Risk management does not reduce the Bank’s operational capacity and activities but empowers it to operate within acceptable levels of risk.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Since its inception the Bank has

been keenly aware of social and environmental sustainability. In the 2016 financial year it established an environmental and social management system (ESMS) to manage its commitments, assist in mitigation of associated risks posed by applicants for finance and satisfy stakeholder requirements. The ESMS complies with key legislation and regulations governing environmental and social matters, as well as international best practices.

OUTREACH AND CORPORATE SOCIAL INVESTMENT As an enterprise that closely engages with its borrowers, stakeholders and various subsets of the Namibian public, the Bank actively reaches out to potential and current borrowers, maintains productive contact with its stakeholders and in its communications gives expression to its integrity, transparency and accountability. In addition to the beneficial nature of its development finance the Bank takes social responsibility, primarily by providing funds to improve socio-economic conditions, and contributes to initiatives that complement its operational environment.

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF NAMIBIA Jerome Mutumba +264 61 290 8000 jmutumba@dbn.com.na www.dbn.com.na


FINANCE

Think bigger. Every enterprise begins with a big dream. We believe that the gap between a big dream and real growth can be bridged with your drive and Development Bank of Namibia finance. What’s your big dream? If you have plans to grow, we want to hear from you. Call 061 - 290 8000.

Good business is good for development. www.dbn.com.na

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FINANCE

EMHPrescient Investment Management

IN THE MARKET FOR MONEY Investors looking to park cash for immediate cash-flow requirements should strongly consider money market and enhanced cash funds.

in such long-dated floating rate notes. This can mean lower income yields, but much less risk.

There are four main sources of risk with a money market fund, but there are simple reprieves too.

fund to any interest rate moves. To illustrate: if the weighted average fund duration is 90 days and rates increase by 100 base points, the fund value will decline by N$2 465.75 or -0.2 per cent. On the other hand, a fund with a duration of one year would suffer a larger loss, i.e. 1 per cent for a 100 basis point increase in interest rates. The longer the duration of a cash fund, the larger the potential unrealised capital impact as a result of change in interest rates.

RISK MITIGATION

LIQUIDITY RISK

If a money market fund holds a large amount of credit, a default in any of the credit assets could result in capital losses in the fund. We have also seen companies like PPC and Eqstra being downgraded by seven notches from A to BB- and BBB+ to B respectively; cash funds that had exposure to these names would have some performance impact.

These investment vehicles aim to maximise income yield without placing undue risk on the capital invested so that investment capabilities aren’t compromised.

Generally, if a money market fund is a unit trust, the liquidity and spread risk is controlled by unit trust regulations which impose stringent limitations that restrict maximum fund duration to 90 days, maximum average term to 120 days and maximum instrument term to 13 months. For most money market unit trust funds the net asset value (NAV) is priced at N$1, but if the assets are re-priced to reflect the true replacement value the actual NAV may be higher or lower than N$1. A more flexible or enhanced cash fund would have wider limitations which do not exceed the maximum duration of nine months and the maximum asset term of three years, as in the case of the EMH Prescient Income Provider Fund. However, these funds are also generally valued relative to the market curve and can incur unrealised mark-tomarket gains and losses as the interest rate curve shifts. In this case, duration, liquidity and spread risk would have to be carefully managed by the asset manager.

DURATION RISK

The duration of a fund is an indicator of the sensitivity of the

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Investors in money market funds have a preference for this asset class due to the high liquidity that it offers. Treasury bills, SARB debentures and short-dated bank paper would offer high liquidity while longer-dated assets, lowrated or unrated corporates, securitisations and bank fixed deposits have much lower liquidity, but offer higher yields. The key is to balance the search for yield with liquidity. Money market funds can hold an allocation to higher yielding illiquid credits but they need to invest a sufficient amount in liquid assets to facilitate cash flows without incurring losses.

SPREAD RISK

The desire for higher yield has led those cash funds outside the money market category to bring in longer-dated floating rate deposits to lift yields. While the duration of these assets is essentially that of a three-month asset, there is significant risk embedded in the notes known as spread risk. For example, for a 1 per cent increase in spreads, 1-year assets will drop in value by 1 per cent whereas 7-year assets will drop by over 5 per cent. In managing cash funds, EMH Prescient is very aware of this risk and has tempered its investments

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CREDIT RISK

The desire for higher yields has also meant that some money market funds have increased their allocation to credit. A money market fund should never lose capital, and when chasing marginal increases in yield by investing lower down the credit spectrum, one increases the risk of capital loss in the fund.

The regulations do not impose any credit limits based on credit ratings on the investments in money market funds. As a result, money market funds can invest in assets with ratings that could be below investment grade. They can also invest in unrated credits but these credit decisions are left to the discretion of the asset manager and this poses the biggest risk in money market funds.

EMH Prescient Investment Management is a Namibian quantitative investment management house, jointly owned by EMH Capital (Pty) Ltd as the majority local shareholder, and Prescient Holdings, a global company with offices in Cape Town (South Africa), Dublin (Ireland) and Shanghai (China). Prescient Investment Management was the first institution in Africa to be granted a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (QFII) license by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC).

Melanie Allen - CEO

The key is to balance the search for yield with credit quality. To be prudent, a money market fund shouldn’t have excessive credit exposure. Article courtesy of Farzana Bayat - Head of cash and income management at Prescient Investment Management

EMHPrescient +264 61 402 092 info@emhprescient.com www.emhprescient.com


FINANCE

WHILE OTHERS ZIG AND ZAG, WE STAY IN FORMATION. Your money is safe at Prescient. That’s because our fund managers consistently follow a reliable process called QuantPlus®. It’s the proven way to reduce investment risk, and increase wealth. To know more about any of our products and services, visit www.emhprescient.com, email info@emhprescient.com or call us on +264 61 402092. EMHPRESCIENT OFFERING: LOCAL AND OFFSHORE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT / UNIT TRUSTS / ADMINISTRATION / INDIVIDUAL PORTFOLIOS PLATFORM SERVICES / GLOBAL EXECUTION SERVICES

The animal sculptures were created by visionary South African artist, Beth Armstrong. Never deviating from formation, geese always stick to their flight path. That way, they manage to migrate successfully year after year. Prescient doesn’t zig or zag either. When it comes to investing, we consistently work together, allowing our clients’ investments to grow successfully. Like geese, we also adhere to a team-based approach, working together to reach new heights in the most efficient streamlined way.

EMH Prescient A4 Goose Ad.indd 1

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FINANCE

ERNST & YOUNG

ACCELERATING GROWTH: FUELLED BY INSIGHTS, POWERED BY COLLABORATION THE SUCCESS OF GOVERNMENT’S HARAMBEE PROSPERITY PLAN DEPENDS ON THE CONTRIBUTION THAT EACH NAMIBIAN BUSINESS WILL MAKE. FOCUSING ON THE SAME GOALS WILL ENSURE THAT THE JOURNEY BECOMES JUST SO MUCH EASIER. EY is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. Worldwide, our people are united by shared values and an unwavering commitment to quality. The insights and services we deliver help to build trust and confidence in the capital markets and in economies the world over. We develop outstanding leaders who team up to deliver on our promises to all of our stakeholders. In doing so, we play a critical role in building a better working world for our people, for our clients and for our communities. EY has been operating in Africa for more than 165 years and in Namibia for 60 years. Our sub-Saharan footprint includes 28 countries, with 288 partners. Our African operations are managed by an African executive team, using a single, integrated business model. We can provide organisations with pan-African insights and strategy as well as on-the-ground assistance and insight, including expert advice on local taxes, customs and systems and introductions to influential local people.

OUR PURPOSE: COMMITTED TO BUILDING A BETTER WORKING WORLD At EY we are committed to building a better working world with increased trust and confidence in business, sustainable growth, development of talent in all its forms and greater collaboration. We want to build a better working world through our own actions and by engaging with like-minded organisations and individuals. This is our purpose and why we exist as an organisation.

market trends, identify implications and develop clear perspectives on relevant industry issues. Whatever your industry, our global network of professionals can provide highly responsive advice on your assurance, tax and transaction needs.

FIND OUT HOW WE CAN HELP YOU TO MEET YOUR GOALS AND COMPETE MORE EFFECTIVELY IN YOUR INDUSTRY: • • • • • • •

Oil and Gas / Power and Utilities Financial Services Government and Public Sector Health Mining and Metals Consumer Products Technology, Media & Telecommunications

Country Leader Cameron Kotzé: cameron.kotze@za.ey.com Assurance Services Deon van der Walt: deon.vanderwalt@za.ey.com Samuel Murwisi: samuel.murwisi@za.ey.com Jaco Coetzee: jaco.coetzee1@za.ey.com Fraud Investigation & Dispute Services Chris Moller: chris.moller@za.ey.com Advisory Services JG van Graan: jg.vangraan@za.ey.com Tax Services Friedel Janse van Rensburg: friedel.jansevanrensburg@za.ey.com Walvis Bay office + 264 64 205847 Partner Julia Engels: julia.engels@za.ey.com

Inherent to our organisation is a strong sense of obligation to serve a number of different stakeholders who count on us to deliver quality and excellence in everything we do. We want to use our global footprint and scale to convene the conversation about the challenges facing economies and the capital markets. When business works better, the world works better.

STAYING AHEAD IN YOUR INDUSTRY To stay competitive in today’s business world you need to strike the right balance between risk and reward.  To achieve your potential you need fast, easy access to the information and people that can help you make the right decisions. Our commitment of time and resources means that we can anticipate

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ERNST & YOUNG Cameron Kotze +264 61 289 1100 cameron.kotze@za.ey.com www.ey.com.na.


FINANCE

What is the right recipe to accelerate growth? Find out how EY Namibia can help your company accelerate growth.

EYNamibia@za.ey.com

@EY_Africa

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FINANCE

FNB NAMIBIA

INNOVATIVE FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR CONSUMERS & BUSINESSES

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Head Office - Windhoek Innovation at FNB is underpinned by a simple approach and FNB’s brand promise – “how can we help you?” – continues to position FNB as a supportive, value-adding partner to achieve wide-ranging individual, business and national goals. Providing accessible and affordable transactional banking and lending as well as expert support regarding investment and insurance, and taking time to understand what customers want and need, is core to FNB’s customer-centric approach. E-solutions, process solutions and mobile solutions do not only drive internal efficiencies, but more importantly also enable FNB to grow the wealth of our clients by assisting them to in turn assist their own clients and improve their own lives. While we always make it our business to partner client businesses in the best possible way, giving extra attention to our SME growth division has also increased our support successes in that area. Our guarantee scheme assists entrepreneurs with limited collateral, equity and banking records to obtain financing, and our countrywide business support system is competitive and comprehensive. Our consumer offering continues to show positive growth, and an updated customer complaints management system helps us to improve tracking and addressing service issues as they arise. As part of our strategy we encourage clients to make use of our affordable, user-friendly digital technology which is available 24 hours a day. Our bricks-to-clicks innovation, another first in the Namibian market, includes ATMs which take cash deposits in real time, even after hours and on Sundays and public holidays. Dedicated staff members are available in our branches to educate customers about what e-channels can do for them. Our digital platforms were notably extended in 2016 when we launched our e-wallet bulk send facility and an app specifically designed for businesses, to complement the individual customer app already enjoying great success in the market.

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FINANCE

FNB Namibia CEO: Sarel van Zyl

FNB Building - Windhoek

An extended ATM network allows us to bring affordable banking to everyone, even in the most remote corners of the country. Our current ATM footprint stands at 274 ATMs and 35 in-store ATMs. Further enhancements include touch screen ATMs and the option to enable cellphone banking functionality via ATMs. Our Premier Segment and wealth offering caters for the needs of high net worth customers. It includes various divisions, from Exclusive Banking and Private Clients to other business units that play a role in wealth creation and management, such as FNB Trust Services and FNB Unit Trusts. By aligning these businesses we have made big strides towards offering an integrated professional solution to the wealth sector, again including transactional banking, lending, investment and insurance services. Despite the challenges of increasing asset prices and extremely competitive interest rates the WesBank asset financing team continues to deliver great service to companies and individuals across Namibia. WesBank remains the market leader through focused relationships with dealerships and quick, efficient service delivery. Whether it is vehicle or equipment financing, the expertise and experience of the Wesbank team as well as competitive pricing continues to create value for individuals and companies alike. As a responsible business, with a proven commitment to the goals of Namibia’s national Harambee Prosperity Plan, our own activities with regard to corporate social responsibility (CSR) cover the whole spectrum of contributing time, effort, skills and funding to the support pillars of the house called Namibia. Delivering on our partnership promise, our socio-economic and transformational planet strategy and the application of our people’s expert and willing assistance with issues of national concern, keeps us productively and meaningfully engaged in our operating environment. From infrastructural and public sector initiatives to community volunteerism across our core support areas of education, healthcare, skills development, environmental guardianship, arts and culture as well as sports development, our commitment as a Namibian company to create a better world, stands out as clearly pronounced as ever.

FNB Tracy Eagles - Chief Marketing Officer +264 61 299 2101 teagles@fnbnamibia.com.na www.fnbnamibia.com.na

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FINANCE www.gipf.com.na

To guard and to grow

tbwa.com.na

Life tends to throw a few curve balls every now and then, and sometimes it’s good to have the reassurance that you will be helped back up when you are knocked down. We get that, which is why GIPF is committed to reassuring you that we are here for you-in both the best and the worst of times-telling you tirelessly that we’re here for you, our family, to guard and to grow.

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FINANCE

Regional Offices

Katima Mulilo

Oshakati

Ondangwa

Rundu

Otjiwarongo

Windhoek Gobabis Swakopmund

Keetmanshoop

The GIPF has regional offices in Windhoek, Otjiwarongo, Ondangwa, Oshakati, Katima Mulilo, Gobabis, Swakopmund, Keetmanshoop and Rundu that were established to bring sevices nearer to our members The regional offices are connected to our administration system (GIMIS) that facilitates the coordination and exchange of member inormation

GIPF Regional Office Contact Numbers Windhoek Ondangwa Swakopmund Katima Mulilo Otjiwarongo Gobabis Rundu Keetmanshoop Oshakati

061 - 205 1000 065 - 241 381/ 2 064 - 461 735 066 - 254 589/ 254 223 067 - 307 078/ 9 062 - 5564 098 066 - 256 820/ 1 063 - 226 021 065 - 220 587/ 42 w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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FINANCE

HOLLARD NAMIBIA

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION INSURANCE: THE SMART WAY TO PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT Far too many Namibian businesses operate without giving a thought to what would happen if they were forced to close – and stay closed for an extended period of time – following a major loss. While it is common practice (and common sense) for a business to insure properties, stock and equipment against unpredictable events like fires, natural disasters, burglaries and malicious damage, many business owners don’t give the same consideration to their profits. However, you (or your shareholders) have probably invested significant funds into your business, hoping to see a return over time. So if your business was forced to shut down for an indefinite period, not only would it halt the growth of your investment, it could actually put you out of business for good. Enter business interruption insurance. While there are some conflicting opinions around the value of business interruption (BI) insurance, one thing is certain: up to 40% of businesses without BI never reopen after major losses due to a disaster, and 25% of the ones that do, fail within 12 months. The problem is, business owners see insurance in general as an expense, and BI insurance is often viewed as an unnecessary add-on to existing premiums. Small business owners in particular tend to want to keep their premiums at a minimum. Yet, ironically, it is small business owners who tend to be wiped out after a significant loss because they are underinsured. In fact, according to a recent

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survey, 95% of small business owners are underinsured, some by as much as 30%. Which means: if those businesses were ever struck by disaster, their operating capacity (and the livelihoods of their employees) would be destroyed.

ARE YOU PUTTING YOUR PROFITS AT RISK? Business interruption insurance is probably one of the most misunderstood insurance products on the market. This is not because the concept itself is difficult to understand, but rather because the effectiveness (and thus the value) of BI comes down to how risk factors for specific kinds of businesses are assessed. For instance, BI cover can be calculated in several ways but is most commonly calculated by valuing a business in terms of gross profit and then setting an indemnity period during which the business will be covered while it returns to a point of preloss profitability. However, this is an area where business owners and brokers often butt heads. One of the most persistent issues when valuing a business for BI insurance is the disagreement about what constitutes gross profit for a business, because accounting gross profit doesn’t necessarily equal insurable gross profit. It is therefore essential that you, as a business owner, get an accurate calculation of your gross profit, carried out from the perspective of insurance.

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As much as the type of cover, another important factor when choosing BI insurance is considering a realistic indemnity period. While the typically recommended period is 12 months, many businesses take far longer to fully recover. Claims take time to be processed, damaged equipment has to be ordered and delivered, new temporary premises have to be found and leased, and damaged buildings have to be rebuilt. All of these factors can take significantly longer to complete than expected, during which time a business cannot operate and thus no profits can be generated. Another factor to keep in mind, but which is rarely considered carefully enough by business owners, is winning back customers. Even if a business becomes fully operational within the indemnity period, it may still take a while for turnover to return to normal.

HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT Managing expenses and cash flow is a constant challenge. However, taking the view that your business is an investment, purchasing BI insurance is a way to protect your profits in the long term, no matter what stage of growth you are in. Here are a few things you can do to ensure your business gets the cover it needs: •

Be realistic about your risk exposure – While it is difficult to assess your risk exposure yourself, identifying the kinds of factors your business is exposed to can go a long way to protecting your

investment. Consider the kind of business you are in (e.g. a small manufacturer needs different cover than a large retailer), your location (e.g. are you in a disasterprone area or an area with high levels of crime), the safety and security of the building you are in (e.g. do the sprinklers work, is it well protected and secure) etc. •

Get a risk assessment – One of the reasons why business owners who should have BI insurance don’t have it is because they are not fully aware of the risks to their business. Getting a formal risk assessment can help you decide what kind of cover is right for you, and it will also give your broker something concrete to work with when advising you on the right kind of cover to protect your profits.

Talk to your broker and ask questions – Once it is clear that your business needs some form of BI insurance, you have to be absolutely sure about which aspects of your business will be covered by your policy. This is especially critical not only when it comes to calculating insurable gross profits for your business, but also when considering extensions and add-ons to your policy.

HOLLARD NAMIBIA Leon Koch +264 61 422 313 lkoch@hollardnam.com www.hollard.com.na


FINANCE

If it’s worth investing in, it’s worth insuring. Speak to your broker or visit www.hollard.com.na/business-insurance

home •  car •  business •  life

www.hollard.com.na

Hollard Life Namibia Ltd. (Reg No 2008/0229) is an authorised Financial Services Provider

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FINANCE

KÖNIGSTEIN CAPITAL

INDEPENDENT UNLISTED INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS

The Königstein Capital Group was established in 2009 as an independent unlisted investment manager that focuses on private equity and venture capital fund management in the Namibian market. The management team has extensive experience in various sectors of the economy gained over the last 35 years. Königstein offers the following features that will unlock value for investors, entrepreneurs and developers: • Extensive experience in and knowledge of the Namibian business environment • Successful track record • Superior proven financial deal making abilities • A network of key players in various industries to ensure deal flow • Good corporate governance structures • Strict risk management • The ability to take part in the management of portfolio investment company if require Through its current funds under management, Königstein Capital has already invested more than N$350 million in projects and investments with an economical value in excess of N$900 million. Königstein has the necessary fund structures in place to offer investment alternatives to pension funds, institutional and other investors.

UNLISTED INVESTMENT FUNDS PROPERTY AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Königstein Capital Property Investment Fund The Königstein Capital Property Investment Fund (“KCPIF”), with the Government Institutions Pension Fund as principal investor, was established to invest in the development of immovable property and infrastructure projects. This fund has a mandate to invest in the development of the following projects: • Retail property; • Commercial property; • Industrial property; • Affordable & low cost housing projects; • Infrastructure development. The fund has invested in a number of very successful property development projects which resulted in nearly 700 individual property units developed. There are various new property development transactions in the pipeline.

Spitz Capital Spitz Capital (Pty) Ltd is the latest established fund. It is a Regulation 29 compliant unlisted investment vehicle, with the Government Institutions Pension Fund as principal investor. Investment sector focus: • Agribusiness and agriculture • Health Care • Manufacturing, Industry and Services • General Business • Media, and • Financial Services

GENERAL

Our investment objective is to provide sustainable investment returns for our investors from a diversified portfolio in profitable businesses and investments are generally made in existing businesses with a good growth potential or start-up ventures with a unique value proposition. Normally material equity positions in portfolio companies will be acquired and our approach is to partner with management, play an active role in the decision making processes and together grow the value of the business. We follow a proper investment process that includes due diligence, negotiations, deal structuring and final recommendation by an investment committee that includes independent, non-executive trustees or directors. Once an investment is made, we involve ourselves in the strategic decisions of the portfolio company or to the extent necessary. We structure our investments in the underlying portfolio companies in such a way as to maximize return and to contain risk. We may use any of the following mechanisms to invest: • The subscription in ordinary shares, preference shares and/or debentures • Advancing of loans • Any combination of the above

OUR PEOPLE

The individuals involved are Albie Basson, Jacques Maree, Arno Louw, Albert Basson and Vidette Rickerts who have extensive business, investment management, deal structuring and corporate finance experience.

GENERAL PRIVATE EQUITY AND VENTURE CAPITAL Spitz Investments Spitz Investments (Pty) Ltd is a closed fund with existing investments in a diverse portfolio of businesses that include healthcare (i.e. the Namibian Oncology Centre), property and biomass investments.

KÖNIGSTEIN CAPITAL Albie Basson +264 61 303 227 info@konigsteincapital.com

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YOUR NAMIBIAN CAPITAL PARTNER F O C U S E D I N U N L I S T E D I N V E S T M E N T S A N D P R I VAT E E Q U I T Y

Managed by Kรถnigste in Capital

PROPERTY & INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT FUND

U NLOCKING NAMIBIAN OPPORT U NIT IE S SIN CE 201 1

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NAMIFSA

FOSTERING A STABLE AND SAFE FINANCIAL SYSTEM CONTRIBUTING TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN NAMIBIA that would prevent the country’s financial system from being heavily impacted by financial turbulences and calamities taking place offshore. NAMFISA’s role therefore goes beyond ensuring mere compliance by financial institutions of the laws, regulations and standards to include the promotion of confidence in the financial system, ensuring financial stability and protecting consumers of financial services. With such a heavy responsibility on its shoulders, it cannot be over emphasized enough that NAMFISA is central to the economic success of Namibia. Established by an Act of Parliament, the NAMFISA Act, in 2001, NAMFISA exists to supervise financial institutions and financial services and to advise the Minister of Finance on matters relating to financial institutions and financial services. This includes institutions and activities such as pension funds, medical aid funds, friendly societies, long- and short-term insurance, investment managers, unit trusts, stock brokers and sponsors, the Stock Exchange and micro-lenders. In executing its legislative mandate, NAMFISA is responsible for licensing, compliance and enforcement in terms of relevant legislative instruments Our strategic goal is to become a respected regulator that fosters the soundness of financial institutions, ensure market integrity, maintain financial stability and protect consumers as well as maintain confidence in the financial system. In support of that goal, we initiated several reform initiatives anchored by a three- year rolling strategy.

Chief Executive Officer - Kenneth Matomola

NAMFISA PROFILE

The soundness and safety of a country’s financial system is undoubtedly the bedrock on which the success or failure of its economy rests. Consequently regulators of financial entities play a crucial role to ensure economic growth by applying regulatory principles and supervisory approaches that give regulated entities the space to thrive while at the same time safeguarding interests of other stakeholders such as consumers of financial services and policy makers, chiefly the Government. With poor regulatory and supervisory systems, countries cannot attract investment or create the confidence in system that is required if investors, both local and foreign, are to be encouraged to become part of their long-term future. Examples abound of countries whose financial systems have collapsed and whose citizens are bow bearing the brunt for the lack of sound regulatory and supervisory regimes. With the benefit of history and case studies from the financial crisis of 2008, the Namibia Financial Institutions Supervisory Authority (NAMFISA) has not sat idle to wait for the financial tsunami to strike its shores but it has responded proactively by putting in motion a strategy

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The Board and Management are driving the reform process from a difficult past to a future filled with promise and expectation which is ultimately to create an environment of financial safety and stability and to offer protection to the users of financial products and services. Our expectation is that all these actions and activities should cumulatively result in economic development and prosperity for our people through deliberate financial inclusion initiatives. Very importantly, as the financial industry develops new products and services, it becomes cardinally important that Namibians are exposed to education on those financial products and services. This will not only protect consumers from manipulation and abuse but it should enable them to also become owners of financial entities. One of NAMFISA’s main strategic occupations is the drafting of Regulations and Standards to support the implementation of the Financial Institutions and Markets (FIM) Bill, NAMFISA Bill and the Financial Services Adjudicator (FSA) Bill, when these Bills are promulgated by Parliament. The legal drafting work done so far underscored the importance of accelerating the completion of the process related to the FIM, NAMFISA and FSA Bills, and accompanying subordinate legislation. This is vital in giving the financial environment a different, positive complexion that addresses the needs of present day Namibia. In addition, these modern laws will also give impetus to the implementation of the Namibia Financial Sector Strategy (NFSS), the country’s long-term development strategy for the Namibian financial sector.


This long-term development strategy has numerous objectives, such as devising appropriate safety nets to protect depositors, promoting financial stability, implementing a consumer protection framework that guarantees transparency and disclosure and designing mechanisms for consumer complaints and redress.

FINANCE

Consumers of financial services are crippled by huge amounts of debt which leads to various social challenges. This invariably behooves NAMFISA to take the lead in inculcating a savings and investment oriented approach in the country. We are under constant scrutiny from our various stakeholders who expect nothing else from us than to meet their expectations consistently and sustainably. We are measured on the effective and efficient supervision of financial institutions, financial prudence, employee engagement, impact of our work on consumers and society and stakeholder satisfaction. Stakeholder expectations are aiding the Authority in marching fast forward towards attaining the strategic targets and making NAMFISA a respected regulator that fosters confidence in the financial industry, highest standards of conducts of business by financial institutions and intermediaries, fairness, efficiency and orderliness of the financial sector, reduction and deterrence of financial crime, and offers protection for consumers. NAMFISA has continued to strengthen its regulatory and supervisory approaches, using advanced technology and human resources, based on a thorough self-assessment of current policies and practices. The Authority has engaged in a deliberate process to enhance its capacity to fulfill its mandate of supervising the businesses of financial institutions - approximately 3500 entities and individuals conducting financial businesses in Namibia - and to advise the Minister of Finance on matters related to financial institutions and financial service. Ongoing supervision of regulated entities was strengthened through the issuance of directives to correct anomalies in the market, and by continuing the gradual transition from rule-based to riskbased supervision. Through all these, the Authority continued its zero tolerance for non-compliance as supported by relentless implementation of its Ladder of Supervisory Intervention. Our goal is excellence in everything we do, from hiring the most suitable candidates to equipping them to be the best through focused training, from implementing the best systems and processes

Boni Paulino - Assistant CEO: Support Functions to consistently refining them for greater efficiencies and constantly keeping our finger on the pulse of our stakeholders’ requirements. Our stakeholders occupy the leading position in the list of priorities. We are very conscious of the fact that a stable and solid reputation is built and nurtured by the way in which we engage with our stakeholders so we set a high premium on building relationships of trust and confidence. As a result, NAMFISA is unwavering in its commitment to a rigorous code of ethics, with ethical conduct mainstreamed into every facet of business. In this we also nurture strong relationships with international industry organisations which share common values and work together to share experiences and achievements. We are able to learn and adapt good practices from elsewhere while also avoiding the mistakes of others and avoid potential challenges. NAMFISA strives to develop a strong culture which is based on conducting themselves with integrity; being responsive and respectful; taking pride in our achievements; being open and friendly and encouraging diversity; building relationships based on trust; and fostering great teams. Ultimately NAMFISA, and by extension the stakeholders we serve, must be equipped with a highly skilled and innovative workforce.

NAMFISA Mr Christopher Swart - Corporate Communications +264 61 290 5000 info@namfisa.com.na Assistant CEO Supervision - Erna Motinga

www.namfisa.com.na

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What’s the point of investing? We found our answer in the Welwitschia. It outlasts and it survives, but for us, more importantly, it blooms where others falter and shows growth over time. It’s about consistency and putting you on an investment journey to

WEATHERMEN & CO

NAMIBIA ASSET MANAGEMENT

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NAMIBIA ASSET MANAGEMENT

NAMIBIA ASSET MANAGEMENT

BOARD OF DIRECTORS We provide investment products to both institutional and personal investors, with exposure to domestic and global equity as well as fixed interest and listed property. We currently look after assets on behalf of multiple pension and provident funds, medical aid schemes, insurance companies and trusts. Many of these clients have been part of the Namibia Asset Management Limited family for over 20 years.

At Namibia Asset Management Limited we have been making sense of money matters since 1996 by looking after your investments as if it were our own. We take pride in the fact that we are one of the largest asset management companies in Namibia and the only pure asset manager listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX), so we can truly say that we understand the local market. Our investment philosophy is rooted in the two pillars of being valuation driven and having a long time horizon to investments. As a result, we are renowned for our strong and consistent investment performance, over all meaningful periods and exceptional client service.

Tarah Shaanika

Aimee Rhoda

Gordon Young

Eino Emvula

In strategic partnership with

Our fund range consists of the following product offering: NAM Coronation Strategic Income Fund

NAM Coronation Balanced Defensive Fund

Our lowest risk fund that aims to provide a higher level of income than fixed deposits and call accounts.

Asset allocation across the yielding asset classes. An intelligent alternative to cash or bank deposits over periods from 12 to 36 months.

Risk rating

1/10

Time horizon

1 month +

Fund Name

Fund Description

NAM Coronation Money-Market Fund

NAM Coronation Capital Plus Fund

NAM Coronation Balanced Plus Fund

A lower risk alternative to Capital Plus for investors requiring a growing regular income.

Focused on providing a growing regular income.

Best investment views across all asset classes for retirement savers.

2/10

3/10

4/10

6/10

1 – 3 years

2 years +

3 years +

5 years +

Elize Angula

Ulrich Eiseb

Anton Pillay

Schalk Walters

Birgit Rossouw

T +264 61 275 700 F +264 61 249 444 Unit 5, Tenbergen Village, Cnr. Lazarett Street & Robert Mugabe Avenue • PO Box 23329 • Windhoek • Namibia • www.namasset.com.na

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NMG BENEFITS

OUR PEOPLE, YOUR ASSET

The NMG Group was founded in Singapore by three South African Actuaries in 1991 and has become one of the pioneers in financial services in Asia and Africa. NMG Benefits, a leading provider of employee benefits advice and services in Southern Africa, is the South African subsidiary of the NMG Group. The actuarial heritage of NMG Benefits, combined with the experience and competencies of our healthcare, employee benefits and personal financial planning teams, has positioned NMG Benefits as a leader in the financial services market, capable of providing a depth of analytical and timely intelligence to clients. Our approach is to help clients take a complete view of their employee benefits programme to ensure that the relationship between the employer and the employee encourages greater productivity and loyalty, whilst at the same time protecting the future financial security of the business.

VALUE PROPOSITION Independence A differentiating factor of the NMG Benefits service offering is total transparency and objectivity. NMG Benefits has no financial interest in any other service provider outside the NMG Group and we pride ourselves on our independent advice. Sustainability NMG Benefits understands the value of human capital and believes people are our greatest asset in the delivery of our clients’ requirements. Our people are critical contributing factors to our sustainability. In addition to our clients’ Service Level Agreements, we have internal protocols and procedures in place to ensure our clients’ requirements are met. These are reviewed quarterly and progress reports are generated monthly to monitor and manage client accounts. Experienced team with a proven track record NMG Benefits has approximately 50 actuarial resources spread across the following cities: Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban, and Windhoek. This places us in the unique position of having access to a diversity of experience and knowledge, thereby allowing us to provide a superior service. Best in Class Investment Consulting NMG Benefits is the largest independent investment consultants in Namibia, with 22 clients and R40 billion in assets and consulting to a large number of corporations.

NMG Consultants and Actuaries (Pty) Ltd Gert Grobler +264 61 23 7841/2/3 nmginfo@nmg.com.na www.nmg.co.za

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FINANCE

PRUDENTIAL

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

WE’RE ABOUT PROTECTING AND GROWING OUR CLIENTS’ SAVINGS

CELEBRATING TWO DECADES OF INVESTING IN NAMIBIA

In 2016, Prudential Portfolio Managers Namibia (Pty) Limited celebrated 20 years of investing in Namibia. Prudential Namibia, the very first international asset management company to establish an office in Windhoek, back in 1996, comes with a distinguished global parentage:

we’re part of the Prudential plc life assurance and financial services company – a global business founded over 160 years ago which now has more than 24 million insurance clients and over £550 billion under management. The company has close local ties: it is 15% owned by Horizon Investment, an indigenous Namibian empowerment company, 10% owned by the Prudential Portfolio Managers Staff Trust and 75% owned by Prudential Portfolio Managers South Africa (Pty) Limited.

ABOUT OUR NAMIBIAN UNIT TRUSTS

• • • •

Prudential Namibian Balanced Fund Prudential Namibian Inflation Plus Fund Prudential Namibian Enhanced Income Fund Prudential Namibian Money Market Fund

PRUDENTIAL Ben Bertolini

We offer four Namibian unit trust funds across a range of risk profiles:

+264 61 256 166 ben.bertolini@prudential.co.za www.prudential.co.za

18110

At Prudential Namibia we focus exclusively on investments, helping our clients achieve their financial goals. We consistently apply our prudent value-investing approach with the aim of protecting and growing their savings over time. In Namibia and South Africa we’re immensely proud that our clients have entrusted us to manage over R200 billion of their assets (as of 30 June 2016), making us one of South Africa’s 10 largest investment managers. Our investment team has over 150 years of experience, and has built up an enviable track record for consistently strong investment

performance. We actively manage our clients’ funds to produce steady outperformance over time, backed by sophisticated analytical systems and data. We also draw on our global Prudential affiliates for international expertise and best practice.

SUCCESS COMES FROM BEING CONSISTENT DAY AFTER DAY, MONTH AFTER MONTH.

If you aren’t already investing with us, contact us on +264 61 256 166 or our MD at ben.bertolini@prudential.co.za or visit prudential.co.za

To view our terms and conditions, please visit www.prudential.co.za/terms-and-conditions.

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NAMIBIA MINEWORKERS INVESTMENT HOLDINGS COMPANY (PTY) LTD

CREATING VALUE. GROWING YOUR FUTURE The beneficiaries of the Trust are defined as current and former mineworkers, energy workers, their dependents and the communities they hail from. The company has grown to be one of the leading broad-based organisations and strives to make a significant impact in the socioeconomic development of Namibia. It has also become a private equity partner of choice in the country.

OUR INVESTMENT PHILOSOPHY

The unlisted investments have proven to outperform traditional asset classes in the longer term because of diversification through low correlation with other assets. We have a straightforward investment strategy, i.e. long-term investments with a focus on quality and diversification. Our investment strategy seeks to achieve a reasonable level of diversification across a spread of sectors. To date we have made significant investments in property development, healthcare, mining, financial services and tourism. Under our 2015-2019 corporate strategy the company will also invest in fishing, education, manufacturing and retail.

OUR VISION, MISSION AND VALUES Vision To be the leading broad-based organisation, striving to make a significant impact on the socio-economic development of Namibia. Mission NAM-MIC optimizes shareholders value through diligent investments.

Joshua Kaitungwa - Chief Executive Officer

OUR HISTORY

The Namibia Mineworkers Investment Company Holdings (NAM-MIC Holdings) (Pty) Ltd was incorporated on the 7th of July 1997 when the National Executive Committee of the Mineworkers Union of Namibia (MUN) created the Namibia Miners Investment Trust (NAMIT). NAM-MIC was created to pursue investment opportunities and is wholly owned by NAMIT after MUN realized that there was a great need for its active participation in the development and restructuring of the Namibian economy. This resulted in the adoption of a congress resolution which led to the creation of NAM-MIC Holdings. NAM-MIC Holdings was created to enter into business joint ventures with credible and visionary partners to jointly service identified emerging markets and at the same time empowering the previously disadvantaged groups of the society by creating capacity that will enable them to develop new industries and broaden the economic base that will create new job opportunities.

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Values The company prides itself on maintaining a value system based on integrity, excellence, innovation, care and prosperity.

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

Today NAM-MIC Holdings holds a diverse portfolio of investments in financial services, property, infrastructure development, mining, health care, communication, transport and logistics and business services. Some of the assets owned by NAM-MIC include a significant shareholding in NAM-MIC Financial Services, which has investments in a number of local blue chip financial services entities: Bank Windhoek Holdings, Sanlam Namibia Holdings, and Santam Namibia. Other investments in the NAM-MIC Holdings portfolio include Crossroads Namibia, Avis fleet management, Avis Rent a Car and Zeda car sales as well as EVI Mining which is a partner in B2Gold Namibia (Otjikoto Gold Mine) with B2Gold Corporation, a listed Canadian mining company with a secondary listing on the Namibian Stock Exchange. With regard to value proposition as a holding company, NAM-MIC adds value to its investee companies in terms of:


FINANCE •

BBBEE Partner of Choice – current and potential investee companies’ first choice due to union support and because we add value to the growth of the Namibian economy. We offer excellent business network opportunities and provide access to a wider worker market. Strategic counsel – we use the strength of our team in management consulting, accounting and finance to assist the management of investee companies with strategic decisions. We also provide propositions in other areas where our executives feel they can contribute. Introductions to Key Organisations and Individuals - we leverage our strong, national relationships in the financial, media, union and corporate communities to create successful, sustainable and market-innovating businesses. Assistance with Operations and Process Improvement – we enhance business practices in such a way that our portfolio companies are highly efficient and competitive. We place special emphasis on stakeholder engagement. Assistance with Recruiting – We assist our portfolio companies in building their executive teams and Board of Directors.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR)

As an organisation NAM-MIC Holdings is committed to corporate social responsibility, i.e. providing assistance to previously disadvantaged communities and uplifting the living standards of our people. NAM-MIC will therefore continue to render assistance to social causes aimed at addressing economic and social imbalances in society or projects aimed at uplifting standards of living of previously disadvantaged communities.

CORPORATE STRATEGY

Joshua Kaitungwa, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Namibia Mineworkers Investment Holdings Company (Pty) Ltd, emphasizes that for the past five years the company has been focusing on and succeeding in creating a strong balance sheet to enable itself to meet funding requirements for its investment transactions. During the past five years the company has been focusing on building the business and profit model, developing the investment philosophy, portfolio research, profitability of existing investments, business intelligence on portfolios and the assessment of new investments, brand architecture, brand policy & stakeholder engagement, branding for reputation building and sustainability of relationships with stakeholders, skills development for directors and management, maximization of shareholder returns and growing value and organisational capacity. In order to achieve these strategic themes the Group commissioned three major projects with the assistance of experienced experts. The final result was the new organisational structure and various policies to guide the management team in the administration of the company. The company also held its corporate strategic workshop on 02 – 03 October 2015 to map out the strategic directive for the next five years. The workshop brought together the directors of the Holding company, directors of subsidiaries and associate companies and the trustees and management team of the Namibia Miners Investment Trust (NAM-MIT). The following strategic focus was adopted by the Board of Directors at its meeting in November 2015: • The strategic portfolio, which should be speculative or socially driven or a hybrid of both • Investment timing as it relates to investment in companies • Investment horizon (long or short-term) • Investment exit strategy • Property development was confirmed as a critical and priority investment area • New investment targets in the education sector (vocational training), retail, manufacturing and fishing As part of the brand building the Group will also continue to focus on their identity and who they are and what they stand for. We will

equally engage all relevant stakeholders to assist them in enhancing all communication. The CEO believes that by implementing the above initiatives the future of NAM-MIC Holding (Pty) Ltd will continue to remain bright and this underlines the company’s commitment to maximize the advancement of benefits to its beneficiaries. The future role and profitability of NAM-MIC and its attractiveness to a wide and diverse range of strategic partners will depend, to a large extent, on how it is perceived to be securing advantages for this challenge. If this potential is unlocked purposefully and responsibly, NAM-MIC has the capacity to grow into an industrial development corporation, creating wealth and employment for our country. Mr John M Shaetonhodi, founding Chairman of NAM-MIC Holding (Pty) Ltd, believes that “Together, as a team, we are committed to doing whatever it takes to build NAM-MIC to become a force to be reckoned with.”

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Corporate governance is at the centre of NAM-MIC Holding’s management and administration. The Board of Directors is wellbalanced, comprising directors from the shareholder’s structure and independent directors with legal and financial expertise. The Board is assisted by sub-committees which deal with relevant designated aspects. The purpose of the Audit and Investment Committee is to assist the Board of Directors in fulfilling its responsibility in terms of Corporate Governance and to ensure compliance with the financial requirements and risk management. The Remuneration Committee’s mandate is to deal and present recommendations on human resources issues to the Board. The Tender Committee is mandated by the Board to deal with procurement. The Sponsorship Committee is mandated by the Board to handle requests and applications for sponsorship. Charles Darwin once wrote, “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, or the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” The organisations and leaders that embrace change will not only survive, they’ll thrive.

Proudly Celebrating our 20th Anniversary

NAM-MIC Holdings (Pty) Ltd Elia Nailenge - Business Development Officer +264 61 44 4600 elia@nam-mic.com www.nam-mic.com w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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MEET OUR TEAM OF MONEY EXPERTS

CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING

Dr. Edward Turner

Christopher Leaf

EXECUTIVE: CORPORATE & INVESTMENT BANKING

SENIOR MANAGER : GLOBAL BUSINESS

Qualifications: B. Compt. Hons.; B. Compt.; D. Th.; M. Th.; B. Th.; B. A. Hons.; B. A.

Qualifications: Management Advancement Programme (USb); Senior Management Programme (USb)

Experience: 18 years

Experience: 30 years

HEAD: PROPERTY FINANCE Qualifications: Diploma Business Management Experience: 22 years

Derek Sansom

Eunice Katjimune

Harry Kharigub

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER: CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER: INSTITUTIONAL AND WHOLESALE FUNDING

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER: CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING

Qualifications: B. Com (Unisa)

Qualifications: Pursuing studies in Business Management; ACI dealing Certificate

Qualifications: CAIB (SA), Post Graduate Business Administration

Experience: 15 years

Experience: 16 years

Experience: 22 years

As Namibia’s economy grows and diversifies, its larger enterprises require a team of money experts, who proactively give them the capacity to expand, operate, invest, send and receive bulk sums across international borders. More and more of Namibia’s enterprises are turning to Nedbank Corporate and Investment Banking to pave the way for their business banking needs. Our team is known for its ability to deliver impactful solutions for the enduring success of our clients.

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We personalise banking to provide a tailored service to your enterprise, rather than expecting you to select from a narrow range of products. In addition to business banking services, we also provide advisory services, enabling you to make decisions with a clear eye on the outcomes of your choices and the best ways to benefit from banking.


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Gielie Lambrechts

Claus Schumacher

Neville Davids

SENIOR MANAGER: CORPORATE & INVESTMENT BANKING

SENIOR MANAGER: CORPORATE BANKING

MANAGER: GLOBAL BUSINESS (EXCHANGE CONTROL)

Qualifications: Certificates in Market Leadership, Credit Risk Management, Advanced Financial Principles, New Enterprise Banking, Financial Market Instruments

Qualifications: MDP, SMDP (USb) and currently in his final year BBA (Banking and Finance)(Unam)

Qualifications: SMP, M.Th., Leadership Programme Haggai Institute Singapore

Experience: 35 years

Yolande Slinger JUNIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER: PROPERTY FINANCE Experience: 12 years

Experience: 20 years

Experience: 26 years

TAILORED BANKING AND INVESTMENTS FOR NAMIBIAN CORPORATES

NEDBANK CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING TAKES TWO FORMS: Wholesale and transactional banking provides services that are key to operations. This includes day-to-day business banking, (including payroll), working capital and asset finance, foreign currency transactions and trade finance. nedbank.com.na

Investment banking is specifically geared to raising capital for project finance and debt equity structuring. This also includes raising of bonds, hedging to manage risks and corporate advisory services.

Nedbank Namibia Limited Reg No 73/04561. Authorised financial services and registered credit provider.

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ENABLING POSITIVE FUTURES FOR ALL. OldMutual, Mutual, the customer isthe at the heart of everything that we do. Wetoneed to understand At Old the customer is at heart of everything that we do. We need understand deeply deeply our customers’ every of their life. We them fairly, be our customers’ needs atneeds everyat stage of stage their life. We must treatmust themtreat fairly, be accessible accessible and transparent, deliver excellent and earn their trust and transparent, and deliverand excellent service and service outcomes to outcomes earn theirto trust and respect. and respect. For nearly 100 year, Old Mutual has been a leading Namibian financial services company offering customer-focused investment and

Our commitment to economic transformation is twofold. Our Old Mutual Foundation is funded with 1%

savings solutions to meet customer needs. These solutions comprise private wealth accumulation (including retirement savings, and risk

of Old Mutual’s profits after tax every year, and communities across Namibia are positively impacted

protection (life, disability and health and short-term insurance) and asset management (including unit trusts and portfolio management).

through our N$5m plus annual commitment to enhancing the nation’s core areas of Education, Sport, Community Development and Skills and Capacity

As a financial services champion, our Products are designed to provide superior value for money to customers, and we strive at all times to offer responsive and efficient service levels and sound financial advice. Through our own belief in training and ongoing educational development for our own employees, we continue to increase the intellectual content of our products and solutions, the results of which make real inP ourAcustomers’ F positive U Ldifferences L G Elives every day.

OVERVIEW

Building. Our broader economic transformation commitment also includes the management of our MIDINA Fund (Managing Infrastructure Development in Namibia), which provides debt financing for infrastructure development projects. The MIDINA Fund is a leader in Namibia, as a domestic infrastructure equity fund that has invested over N$1 billion in local projects since 2004.

We arefor passionate helping customers achieve their lifetime  Operating in Namibia over about 90 years financial goals; we offer easy access to financial education and

̶ Over 900 employees best financial advice, are supportive of the communities within

̶ 24 branch offices which countrywide we serve, and provide financial solutions most certain to deliver on the Management promises made to our customers. ̶ N$37 billion of Funds under

̶ Over 230 000 individual (Retail) clients ̶ Products:

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Alternatively you can visit our website at www.oldmutual.com.na.

INVESTMENTS | SAVINGS | INSURANCE

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 Operating in Namibia fo

̶ Insurance (Risk) EVERY ASPECT OF OLD MUTUAL’S ̶ Over 900 BUSINESS employees ̶ Pension Funds Administration TALKS TO THE CORE OF ENABLING ̶ 24 branchPOSITIVE offices country ̶ Savings & Investments ̶ N$37 billion of Funds und FUTURES FOR ALL NAMIBIAN CITIZENS. ̶ Micro-lending ̶ Over 230 000 individual (R ̶ Properties Management ̶ Products: us on (Risk) ̶ E Short-Term A DInsurance V EIndividuals R T I and S companies E M E can N contact T ̶ Insurance ̶ Pension Funds Administration nam-markinfo@oldmutual. ̶ Transactional Services com to continue the conversation.

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OVERVIEW

̶ Savings & AFRICA Investments ̶ Micro-lending 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 ̶ Properties Management ̶ Short-Term Insurance ̶ Transactional Services


FINANCE

OLDMUTUAL

NAMIBIA

KOSMAS EGUMBO Group CEO

EXCO TEAM 2016

BRIGITTE WEICHERT

NANGULA KAULUMA

BEN JACOBS

LIONEL KANNEMEYER

RIAAN SWIEGELAAR

NICO //HOABEB

Chief Financial Officer

MD: Short-Term Insurance

Operations Executive

CEO: Corporate

CEO Wealth & Retail Affluent Executive

Retail Mass Executive

HOW WE ADDED VALUE TO NAMIB NDANGI KATOMA

Marketing, Transformation & Customer Strategy Executive

LIONEL KANNEMEYER

PATRICIA OLIVIER

LOUIS DU TOIT

BRENDA ESTERHUYSE

Acting CEO: OMIGNAM

Human Resources Executive

Properties Executive

Corporate Governance Executive

HOW OLDMUTUAL ADDS VALUE TO NAMIBIA

or over 90 years

ywide der Management Retail) clients

n

AFRICA 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

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FINANCE

PWC NAMIBIA

A LEADING PROFESSIONAL SERVICES FIRM of its kind in Namibia. The firm currently has six candidates enrolled in a three-year tax articles programme while furthering their studies within various taxation fields. A total of 18 candidates have completed their training since 2007. Tax academy participants to date include 95% designated Namibians. We currently have eight trainee accountants, all of whom are from the previously disadvantaged group, undergoing traineeship contracts for the Certified Commercial and Financial Accountant qualification with our firm. In 2013 PwC Namibia took in its first internal audit trainees. The aim was to increase the number of certified internal auditors in Namibia by providing a structured internal audit articles programme, which over a period of three years would provide trainees with on the job training and the support to pass the International Institute of Internal Auditors exams towards their professional qualification.

COMMERCIAL EQUITY

Nangula Uaandja - Country Senior Partner

Commercial Equity is a focal point as we work towards the transformation of the ownership of our business and our procurement policies. PwC has six female partners of whom three are from previously disadvantaged groups

PWC NAMIBIA IS NAMIBIAN-OWNED AND MANAGED AND A MEMBER OF PWC AFRICA

CONTACT DETAILS

With over 240 emplyees in offices in Windhoek and Walvis Bay we are the largest professional services provider in Namibia. Our services are tailored to our clients’ audit, advisory and tax business needs. At PwC we develop our staff to provide high quality, in-depth solutions to our clients’ complex problems. Our focus is to deliver total solutions that give our clients’ leaders enduring peace of mind. We focus on creating value through local business knowledge combined with broad expertise from our global network. We have been helping our clients to build solid Namibian businesses for more than 40 years.

EMPLOYMENT EQUITY

We employ over 193 previously disadvantaged Namibians, representing 79% of the firm’s total number of employees. PwC is a certified equal opportunity employer. The creation, sharing and application of knowledge are central to everything we do. But knowledge does not grow on its own. It is created and nurtured by people coming together to share their individual ideas. And knowledge is further enriched by variety, an obvious reality in a country that boasts eleven (11) ethnic groups. At PwC we have a richness of experience and cultural diversity which enables us to assemble the perfect team to meet our clients’ needs.

Partner in Charge - Walvis Bay Ansie Rossouw Tel: +264 64 217 720 ansie.rossouw@pwc.com Assurance Leader Louis van der Riet Tel: +264 61 284 1018 louis.van.der.riet@pwc.com Tax Leader Stéfan Hugo Tel: +264 61 284 1102 stefan.hugo@pwc.com Advisory and Risk Assurance Leader Hans Hashagen Tel: +264 61 284 1063 hans.hashagen@pwc.com

PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT FOR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

At PwC we acknowledge the fundamental truth that education is critical for national development. We have more than 131 chartered accountants who qualified through PwC Namibia. We currently have 60 trainees in the process of completing the three-year chartered accountant articles. In the beginning of 2007 we launched the PwC Tax Academy, the first

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PwC Namibia Nangula Uaandja - Country Senior Partner +264 61 284 1000 nangula.uaandja@pwc.com www.pwc.com.na


FINANCE

RMB NAMIBIA

AN ALL-IN-ONE SOLUTION FOR CORPORATE CLIENTS

RMB NAMIBIA RMB Namibia is a leading corporate and investment bank encompassing investment banking, global markets, corporate banking and advisory services. RMB Namibia is part of the FNB Namibia Holdings Group, and in turn, that of the FirstRand Group.

RMB IS A LEADING NAMIBIAN CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANK. Rand Merchant Bank (RMB), a division of FirstRand Bank Limited, is a leading African corporate and investment bank and part of one of the largest financial services groups in Africa. We offer our clients innovative, value-added advisory, funding, trading, corporate banking and principal investing solutions. RMB Namibia has established itself as a market leader and fully fledged corporate and investment bank in Namibia. Offering a comprehensive suite of transactional, trade and working capital solutions to corporate clients as well as full global markets capability through foreign exchange, innovative financial instruments and a busy structuring desk, RMB has funded several infrastructure and resource finance projects, mergers and acquisitions, and infrastructure developments over the past decade. RMB Namibia serves a wide range of industries, ranging from renewable energy and manufacturing to mining, financial services, retail, construction and transport and has been involved in some major

infrastructure projects. In serving such a broad range of industries, RMB Namibia does not believe in a checklist approach to financing, but rather looks at each client individually and tailors a solution for a perfect fit. Our teams are experienced in structuring appropriate solutions for any project, be it through traditional project finance, leveraged finance, debt capital markets or asset-backed financing. As a part of FNB, RMB Namibia is also able to provide financing for smaller projects which require different solutions than more established and larger businesses. Our RMB Namibia Custody Services custodian mandates consist of institutional clients such as life insurance companies, pension funds, global custodians and unit trusts and consolidated (collective) investment schemes, all of which are regulated and registered with the Namibian Financial Institutional Supervisory Authority (NAMFISA). Our strategy does not live in files, but in our people Traditional values + Innovative ideas = Exceptional performance = RMB. We believe exceptional performance is only possible with exceptional people, which is why our strategy does not live in files, but in our people. RMB is a place where exceptional people can embrace our collaborative and owner-manager culture and drive their particular lines of business as though it’s their own.  At RMB we nurture and celebrate inspired thinkers and

Conrad Dempsey - Executive Officer of RMB Namibia entrepreneurs who challenge the boundaries, engage in vigorous debate, create their own opportunities and apply thinking that can change our world. We do not subscribe to businessas-usual practices — rather big thinking that requires our employees to stretch themselves, to push the boundaries, to think differently, have an entrepreneurial spirit and a desire to make a difference in the world.

and constantly challenge the norm, question existing models and develop innovative and bespoke products to grow our clients’ businesses.

We create sustainable value for our clients and shareholders Our primary business objective at RMB is to create sustainable value for our clients and shareholders. By placing our clients at the centre of our innovation, we unlock possibilities and opportunities for them to grow their investments and businesses. We nurture mutually rewarding relationships

RMB NAMIBIA Sepo Haihambo Head: Coverage +264 61 299 8101 sepo.haihambo@rmb.com.na www.rmb.com.na

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FINANCE

Sanlam Namibia Holdings A Namibian company with more than 80 years of business experience in Namibia. In carrying out our duties and responsibilities, we uphold the following corporate values: •

Accountability: We are responsible and answerable to stakeholders for decisions and actions.

Integrity: We walk our talk; our personal and professional conduct is consistent with the common public good; we are trustworthy (honest, sincere and ethical in all we do)

Passion: We employ people with a zest for life and work; who are fully engaged with work and life (excited and enthusiastic about what we do)

Innovation: We foster and encourage dynamic and creative contributions.

OUR BUSINESS WHO WE ARE In 2004 Sanlam, together with Regent Life Namibia, Capricorn Investment Holdings and Nam-mic, established a new services group called Consolidated Financial Services (CFS), later renamed Sanlam Namibia Holdings. Sanlam Life has a 54% stake in Sanlam Namibia Holdings, whilst Bank Windhoek Holdings and Nam-mic Financial Services own approximately 29% and 17% respectively. Nam-mic owns a further 3% indirectly via Bank Windhoek Holdings, bringing the total beneficial Broad-Based Economic Empowerment ownership to almost 20% thanks to Nam-mic’s wide representation of the larger union base in Namibia. Other black Namibian individuals currently hold 0.12% in Sanlam Namibia, resulting in a total black ownership of close to 20%. With both Bank Windhoek Holdings and Nam-mic Financial Services Holdings being 100% Namibian-owned companies, Namibian investment in Sanlam stands at 46%, making it a proudly Namibian company with links to a strong and trusted international financial services brand.

VISION, MISSION AND VALUES Sanlam Namibia Holdings wants to be the trusted and dynamic leader in wealth creation and financial solutions. The mission of Sanlam Namibia Holdings is to grow shareholder value and provide financial peace of mind to our stakeholders through: • • • • •

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Trusted advice Wealth creation Sustainable profitability Corporate social investment Empowered and motivated employees

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At present Sanlam operates under three main business clusters: •

The Investment cluster offers products to retail and corporates. This cluster provides clients with access to investments in all major asset classes.

The Short-term insurance cluster offers shortterm insurance products for personal, corporate, commercial and agricultural needs as well as specialised insurance for particular requirements.

The Life insurance cluster focusses on the entry level and affluent markets. This cluster offers risk insurance, savings and retirement provision. Under the Life cluster, Sanlam also offers group life products for SMEs, corporate bodies, unions and other organisations, as well as credit life.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND EMPLOYMENT EQUITY Sanlam Namibia Holdings recognises the business imperatives of employment equity and supports the goals and objectives thereof. By embarking on employment equity, Sanlam Namibia Holdings seeks to create a truly Namibian company, free from all forms of discrimination, with equal opportunities for all and where diversity is optimised to enhance productivity. An Affirmative Action Compliance Certificate has been issued to Sanlam Namibia Holdings for the past ten years.


KINGJAMES 33583

FINANCE

There’s a time to be bold. And a time to be cautious.

With 51 of his 63 wins coming from knockouts, Jack Dempsey’s bold boxing style had made him the most feared man in the sport. But when an outright underdog took his title by forcing him to go the full ten rounds, he learnt a valuable lesson. You can’t always rely on a bold approach to lead you to victory. Which is why, when it comes to investing, we never take anything as a given, and always utilise the power of restraint. Because knowing when to be bold, and when to be cautious, makes all the difference. And that’s what makes us Wealthsmiths™.

Investments www.sanlam.com.na Sanlam is an Authorised Financial Services Provider.

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FINANCE

“How do I get more from my local market?” “By investing more.” Our home team advantage and ability to stay one step ahead of our clients’ needs makes us your ideal partner for growth.

tbwa.com.na

We are committed to increasing value for our clients, whether local or international by delivering sophisticated and innovative investment solutions to meet your short and long term growth ambitions. We are committed to building this land. Let us be your partner for growth on this continent we call home.

www.standardbank.com.na

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@StandardBankNa

Standard Bank Namibia


FINANCE

AA reliable reliable partner partner in in Namibia’s Namibia’s economic economic growth growth Standard Bank has a long-standing track record of involvement in the Namibian market, which dates back to 1915 when Standard Bank opened its first branch in Lüderitz. This local knowledge and footprint is supported by a regional network that spans 20 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Due to Standard Bank’s strong local and regional footprint, as well as long operational history, it is a key economic player to promote smart partnerships that speak to boosting trade and investment.

• Acted as joint bookrunner for Namibia Water Corporation’s inaugural N$200 million bond issuance • Extending financing in excess of N$1 billion for various capital projects in the mining and metals, power and infrastructure, and FMCG sectors since 2014 • Appointed as sole commercial mandated lead arranger to the Kudu Gas project for N$11 billion

Standard Bank aims to be the banking partner of choice for market leaders in key sectors, including: • • • • • •

Power and Infrastructure Mining and Metals Oil and Gas Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (“FMCG”) Real Estate Telecommunications

Standard Bank is set apart by scale, strength of regional and international connections, and our ability to innovate. Over the years Standard Bank has shown a track record of success in building businesses across Namibia, especially in the natural resources, mining and power and infrastructure sectors. The Bank places particular focus on being involved in large infrastructure ventures that grow the economy through win-win partnerships with corporates, financial institutions and Government in multiple sectors and geographies. Recent deals successfully concluded by Standard Bank in the Namibian market include: • The successful issuance (joint lead manager, bookrunner and sponsor) for the International Finance Corporation’s inaugural N$180 million bond, listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange • Acted as joint lead manager and bookrunner for both of the Republic of Namibia’s Eurobond issuances. Standard Bank was the only Namibian Bank to be included in the deal team.

The diamond exploration and sampling vessel, the mv SS Nujoma co-financed by Standard Bank.

The achievements of Standard Bank in the Namibian market were recently recognised by EMEA, when the Bank was bestowed the Best Investment Bank in Namibia award. In this light, Namibia is destined for great infrastructural growth and expansion, particularly in sectors such as energy, trade and investment. With a population of 2.4 million people, the country has transformed into a peaceful, stable country with a robust economy led by a thriving private sector.

www.standardbank.com.na

@StandardBankNa

Standard Bank Namibia

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ADVERTISING & MEDIA FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND EXPRESSION, INCLUDING FREEDOM OF THE PRESS AND OTHER MEDIA, ARE AMONG THE BASIC RIGHTS ENSHRINED IN THE NAMIBIAN CONSTITUTION. THE WORLD PRESS FREEDOM INDEX RANKED NAMIBIA AS NUMBER 17 IN TERMS OF MEDIA FREEDOM LAST YEAR. MEDIA The Namibia Press Agency (NAMPA) was established in 1991 as a national news agency responsible for the distribution of local, regional and international news.

The filmmaking industry in Namibia has the potential to contribute to the country’s revenue in a major way, and if managed properly can create prosperity for all its participants in the future.

In spite of its small population, Namibia has a varied and lively press with 13 newspapers. Five of them, including the state-owned New Era, are dailies with a national distribution, another five are independent weeklies; there is one biweekly, and there are about a dozen monthly magazines.

Film is the only art form that combines multiple disciplines for the creation of one end product. It requires creative people to write and develop concepts and story lines, technical crews during production, service providers to facilitate, performing artists like actors and musicians to implement the vision and create sound landscapes, as well as visual artists to design the backdrops for the stories to be told.

The country’s oldest newspaper is the Allgemeine Zeitung, published daily in German. The weekend edition has a cultural section and once a month a tourism supplement. Die Republikein for the Afrikaans speaking population is also published daily. The most popular daily is The Namibian, published in English. It is appreciated for its well-balanced reporting and moderately critical commentary. The Windhoek Observer is a weekend tabloid style paper. The Namibia Economist is a weekly online publication. There are more than 20 private and community radio stations and five commercial television stations (MultiChoice Namibia, Downlink Namibia, Paragon Investment Holdings, Channel 4, and Digital Cable TV), most of them based in Windhoek. The state-owned Namibian Broadcasting Corporation NBC, with radio services in ten different languages plus three television channels, is the dominant player in the broadcasting sector. One Africa Television is a fully commercial, free-to-air station which receives no state subsidies. Private broadcasters and independent newspapers usually operate without official interference. There are numerous advertising agencies & services in Namibia, handling overall marketing and branding strategies and sales promotions for their clients. They offer advertising, media, brand consulting, design, corporate communication and digital services.

FILMMAKING Namibia is a gem for those in search of the unexplored and the wilderness. The bizarre desert scenery and savannah are spectacular backdrops for filmmaking.

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Film also fuels other sectors, e.g. the hospitality industry, catering, telecommunications, transport and tourism. Artists and related industries can thus benefit hugely from the film industry if they become fully aware of the opportunities presented by every product to be created. The Namibia Film Commission (NFC) is a statutory body that was established by Parliament (Act 6 in 2000) to support, encourage and promote film productions as well as the development of the film industry in Namibia. Friendly and competent staff is dedicated to manage any kind of inquiries and helps to put ideas into action. The NFC liaises between foreign and local production companies and assists in obtaining permits from government agencies, i.e. work permits or permits for filming in national parks, or in hiring security services. As for production service providers, who supply local crews and technical services, location scouts, aviation services, transport, accommodation, catering or telecommunications, the Commission provides visiting producers with a list of experienced and reputable companies. The NFC assists filmmakers to obtain the obligatory permits. Any commercial filming or photography in Namibia requires the permission by the NFC. The application form for a “Namibia Filming Permit” needs to be submitted to the NFC three weeks before the planned arrival. An administrative fee of N$ 500 applies. All foreign crews must have a valid temporary work permit to work on a film set in Namibia, even if it is for only one day. Application forms are available from the Ministry of Home Affairs and Immigration.


ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

VITAL CONTACTS NAMIBIA MEDIA HOLDINGS (NMH) +264 61 297 2000 ronny@nmh.com.na www.nmh.com.na

NEWSPAPERS The Namibian +264 61 279 600 info@namibian.com.na www.namibian.com.na Die Republikein +264 61 297 2171 republikein@republikein.com.na www.republikein.com.na/ Allgemeine Zeitung +264 61 297 2309 azinfo@az.com.na www.az.com.na/ New Era +264 61 273300

sales@nepc.com.na www.newera.com.na

+264 61 291 9111 www.nbc.com

Namibia Economist +264 61 221925 reception@economist.com.na www.economist.com.na

NAMPA, the NAMIBIA PRESS AGENCY www.nampa.org

The Namibian Sun +264 61 383 413 namibiansun@namibiansun.comhttp www.sun.com.na InformantĂŠ +264 61 275 4363 editor@tgi.na www.informante.web.na Windhoek Observer +264 61 411 800 editor@observ.com.na www.observer.com.na

OTHER CONTACTS NBC, the Corporation (NBC Television & Radio)

John Meinert Printing +264 61 225411 ulrike@johnmeinert.com www.johnmeinert.com Venture Media +264 61 420 500 bonn@venture.com.na www.travelnewsnamibia.com NFC, the Namibia Film Commission +264 61 381 900 info@nfc.na www.nfc.na FAN, the Filmmakers Association of Namibia filmmakersnamibia@gmail.com www.filmmakers-association-namibia.com

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ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

Artists: Saima & Shiimi

CREATIVE GENIUS REQUIRES BRAVERY We’re a full-service Advertising Agency, based in Windhoek. Our motivation is to allow our imagination and thinking to go where it needs to go, to create work that really works.

www.advantageyr.com info@advantage.com.na +264 (061) 250 277

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ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

ONE AFRICA TELEVISION

NAMIBIA’S MOST EFFECTIVE COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING MEDIUM

The best way to describe One Africa Television is: Namibia’s most popular privately owned commercial TV station. From small beginnings in 2004 with a broadcast footprint covering Windhoek, Rehoboth and Okahandja, One Africa Television has grown to become Namibia’s most popular commercial free-to-air TV station. This rapid growth has been realised through the high level of support from local, regional and international brands, which continue to benefit from the innovative and dynamic marketing platform offered by One Africa Television.

VIEWER POPULARITY Based on available census figures and the current broadcast footprint, One Africa Television provides access to more than 90% of television viewers in Namibia. One Africa Television is available on DSTV channel 284, and is also available on the GoTV bouquet for viewers in Windhoek, Swakopmund/Walvis Bay, Rundu, and Ondangwa/Oshakati. Viewers can also tune in nationally to One Africa Television via the National DTT/NBC set-top box.

PROGRAMMING Besides growing in reach and viewer numbers, the station has also grown in terms of its popular broadcast offering. Leading entertainment, reality and talk shows are obtained from across the world, based on their popularity. Ongoing soap operas ensure repeat viewers, particularly in the highly influential female market. One Africa is also the only television station in Namibia to air the very popular South African-produced Afrikaans soap, 7de Laan. Acknowledging the need for high quality local content, One Africa has established two fully equipped production studios, a fully equipped multicamera outside broadcast unit, and one of the most advanced post-production facilities in the country. Local productions prove that local content combined with proven international formats and excellent production values are feasible. Current local programmes cover areas of news/actuality and Namibian music.

ONE AFRICA M. Cosburn +264 61 289 1500 madryn@oneafrica.tv www.oneafrica.tv

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ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

MULTICHOICE NAMIBIA

ENRICHING LIVES BY MAKING GREAT ENTERTAINMENT MORE ACCESSIBLE MultiChoice Namibia (Pty) Ltd, a truly Namibian business, built a strong track record of Namibian operations.  MultiChoice Namibia (MCN) received its transmission license on 16 December 1991 and subsequently began broadcasting from Windhoek via terrestrial transmission, which soon expanded to 23 transmission sites across the country.   Entertainment is a powerful way to tell stories that open our minds, bring people together around shared passions, and connects us to new realities.  It makes us laugh and cry.  It informs, educates and inspires.  MultiChoice is a video entertainment company, and our role is to enrich lives.   Our mission is to deliver value to our customers by making great entertainment more accessible.  We find and develop the right mix of content and deliver it to millions of people across Africa – anytime, anywhere.  Whether it’s local telenovelas, the excitement of world-class sport or the latest global blockbusters, our investment in leading-edge content and technology systems deliver the shows that people love into their hands and their living rooms.   At MultiChoice, we listen to our customers to understand their changing lives, the pressures they face and what matters most to them.  We are committed to using that insight to put customers at the heart of all the decisions that each of us make every day.  And that’s how we’re reshaping our business to improve our customers’ experience, whenever and wherever they engage with us.   We are rooted in the communities in which we operate, and proud of the contribution we make.  Our business has grown hand-in-hand with local economies by forging long-term partnerships with governments, national broadcasters and entrepreneurs.  And as the continent’s leading funder of sport and local production, we’ve built skills and capacity to become the backbone of content that matters to our customers.  We also provide our employees with new opportunities.    Our core social investment is making learning available to educational institutions.  To date, over 300 Namibian schools are beneficiaries of the MultiChoice Resource Centre (MRC) programme through which schools receive a plasma screen and PVR decoder with educational programmes – for free.   In terms of our national footprint, MultiChoice Namibia currently operates from two offices in Windhoek as well as branches in Ongwediva and Swakopmund respectively.  The network is supported by 13 agents, 115 accredited installer companies and a robust network of Namibian retailers countrywide.   The operating landscape continues to change rapidly, the entertainment industry is ever more relevant.  We want to use our influence to play a positive role in Africa, helping to grow Africa’s

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Roger Gertze - General Manager creative industries into vibrant, economic powerhouses.  It’s by creating value to our customers, our employees and society that we’ll build a successful business for the future.

MULTICHOICE NAMIBIA Lizette Foot Corporate Affairs Manager Lizette.Foot@na.multichoice.com +264 61 270 5111


OUR NAMIBIAN FOOTPRINT Oshakati Ongwediva Okahao

Omusati

Katima Mulilo

Oshikango Ohangwena

Oshana

Ogilvy & Mather Namibia | www.ogilvy.com.na

ADVERTISING AND MEDIA

Eenhana

Caprivi

Rundu

Kavango

Ondangwa

Oshikoto Tsumeb

Kamanjab

Kunene

Grootfontein Otavi

Outjo

Khorixas

Otjiwarongo

Otjozondjupa Hentiesbaai Arandis Karibib Swakopmund

Erongo

Walvis Bay

Omaheke

Okahandja

Windhoek

Gobabis

Khomas

* MCN HEADQUARTERS MCN BRANCHES INSTALLERS AGENTS RETAILERS GOtv Availability 3 Branches 13 Agents & 120 Accredited Installers

Rehoboth

70 Formal Retailers

Mariental

Hardap

Keetmanshoop

Lüderitz

Karas

Karasburg

Rosh Pinah Oranjemund Noordoewer

For more information contact MultiChoice Namibia on 061 270 5222 or 081 988 (SMS). www.dstv.com | wwww.gotvafrica.com Terms and conditions apply.

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AGRICULTURE UNDER THE GOVERNMENT’S FOURTH NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (NDP4), AGRICULTURE IS AN ECONOMIC PRIORITY SECTOR DUE TO ITS POTENTIAL TO CONTRIBUTE TO ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION. THE SECTOR IS SEEN IN THE WIDER CONTEXT OF LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AGRIBUSINESS AND AGRO-INDUSTRY.

FARMING IN NAMIBIA Farming in Namibia centres around livestock and game, as the country’s arid conditions and poor soils are not well suited for crop production. Subsistence crop farming is common in the north, however, and grain is also grown commercially. Agriculture (excluding fishing) contributes ± 6.2% to Namibia’s Gross Domestic Product. Primary products include livestock and meat products, crop farming and forestry.   There are two main types of farming: commercial farming and subsistence farming. A large percentage of Namibians (25% to 40%) depend on agricultural activities to make a living, mostly in the subsistence sector. Subsistence farming is mainly confined to the “communal lands” of Namibia’s populous north, where roaming cattle is prevalent and the main crops are millet, sorghum, maize and peanuts. There are about 4000 commercial farms in Namibia. Cattle breeding is predominant in the central and northern regions, while karakul sheep and goats are typical for the more arid southern regions. The government encourages local sourcing of agricultural products. Retailers of fruits, vegetables and other crop products are obliged to purchase 27.5% of their stock from local farmers. Table grapes, grown mostly along the Orange River in the arid south, have become an increasingly important commercial crop and a significant source of income for seasonal labour.   Only 2% of Namibia receives sufficient rainfall to grow crops. All inland rivers are ephemeral, which means that they flow only after heavy rain. Irrigation is therefore limited to the valleys of the Orange, Kunene and Okavango rivers which form Namibia’s borders. The rainy season starts in October and ends in March or April. In 2015 Windhoek had a mere 197 mm of rainfall; the total at the end of 2016 was 273.2 mm. The Green Scheme Project, an initiative by the Minister of Agriculture, Water and Food, John Mutorwa, encourages the development of irrigation in the maize triangle (Grootfontein, Tsumeb and Otavi), as well as in the

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A G R I C U LT U R E

central northern and north-eastern regions with water from the Kunene, Kavango and Zambezi rivers. The Green Scheme also promotes agro-projects on the Orange River and at dams such as the Naute and Hardap dams in the south.    Farming in Namibia faces many challenges, whether insufficient rainfall or barren land. But there are systems in place that can help to deal with these challenges. If those resources are used responsibly we should see Namibia’s agricultural sector bloom in the near future.

NAMIBIA AGRICULTURAL UNION (NAU)

VITAL CONTACTS

SERVICES

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, WATER & FORESTRY

+264 61 208 711 www.mawf.gov.na

NAMIBIAN AGRONOMIC BOARD

+264 61 379 500 nabdesk@nab.com.na www.nab.com.na

+264 61 237838 nau@agrinamibia.com.na www.agrinamibia.com.na

NAMIBIA NATIONAL FARMERS UNION

+264 61 271 117 info@nnfu.org.na www.nnfu.org.na

AGRA AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRY RELATED PRODUCTS AND

+264 61 290 9111 www.agra.com.na

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE)

Historic breakthrough for Namibian beef in US and Chinese markets: Namibia is the first African country whose sought-after beef qualifies for the lucrative export markets of both China and the United States of America.

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A G R I C U LT U R E

Board of

Directors “Continuously preparing today for a prosperous tomorrow”

Terttu NT Uuyuni Chairperson

Oiva H Mahina Board Member

Michael N Humavindu Board Member

Dagmar Honsbein Board Member

Sakaria Nghikembua Chief Executive Officer

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w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m Agribank - Namibia Trade Directory 2017 - new page

Michael NC Iyambo Vice Chairperson


A G R I C U LT U R E

Value

Statement Vision

Focus

To be the catalyst in transforming the agricultural sector where every Namibian enjoys a quality life.

Agribank provides affordable financing to producers, in order to create business value in the agricultural sector and lead Namibia towards wealth creation, poverty reduction and food security. The bank takes responsibility to meet the needs of the farmers through providing innovative solutions.

Mission To provide affordable and sustainable innovative financial solutions towards socio-economic development in Namibia.

Core Values • Customer Service: Striving for service excellence • Accountability: Account for and take respon-sibility for actions taken in public office. • Professionalism: Striving to apply skills, competence and character expected of a highly trained professional in the conduct of business. • Fairness: Striving towards Equitable and equal treatment of stakeholders. • Integrity: Honesty and truthfulness in the conduct of business. • Transparency: Openness to public scrutiny.

The introduction of Emerging Retail Financing Product (ERFP) and Informal Sector Entrepreneur Credit Scheme (ISECS) is aimed at providing such solutions that will make affordable financing with limited collateral more accessible to the majority of the population. In this regard we are creating a power of scale with financial resources to provide smart solutions to the industry at large.

For further enquiries, contact the following Regional Branches Windhoek Head Office (061) 207 4111 Email: info@agribank.com.na Katima Mulilo (066) 252 060 E-mail: katima@agribank.com.na Mariental (063) 242 818 Email: southern@agribank.com.na Midland (061) 207 4202 Email: midland@agribank.com.na Otjiwarongo (067) 304 596 Email: otjeroku@agribank.com.na Oshakati (065) 221 358 Email: oshakati@agribank.com.na Rundu (066) 255 645 Email: kavango@agribank.com.na

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MEAT BOARD OF NAMIBIA NAMIBIA’S RED MEAT - AFRICA’S CHOICE MEAT NATURALLY PRODUCED, TASTY AND TENDER Namibia’s natural environment tells the story of its red meat. About 70,000 square kilometres of the country’s total surface area of 824 300 square kilometres are suited for agriculture; 52 per cent of that is utilised by cattle farmers and 33 per cent by small-stock farmers. Namibia’s red meat (beef, mutton, goat and game) is from animals that feed on natural vegetation, without any addition of growth stimulants, antibiotics or animal by-products. Safety, health and high quality are verified by tracing the product all the way from the farm of origin to the consumer. This is achieved through the implementation of Africa’s first comprehensive farm assurance scheme, the Farm Assured Namibian Meat Scheme (FANMeat), which is managed by the Meat Board. The use of the FANMeat logo confirms that Namibian export meat is produced according to standards laid down by our trading partners in a single scheme. Namibia’s excellent beef originates from top quality animals. The most popular breeds are the Brahman, Simmentaler and Bonsmara varieties as well as the indigenous Sanga. Crosses of these breeds are well adapted to Namibia’s environmental conditions. They are bred according to market requirements, i.e. taste and tenderness. The main breeds of sheep are Dorper and the indigenous Damara, which are also well adapted to Namibia’s sensitive grazing conditions. Namibia has several abattoirs which are certified to export to South Africa. Three abattoirs are also certified to export to the European Union. Meatco is the largest meat processor in Namibia with abattoirs and meat processing facilities as its core business. Other world-class facilities are situated at Witvlei

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near Gobabis, at the Farmers’ Meat Market near Mariental and at Brukkaros near Keetmanshoop. These facilities are certified to export beef and sheep meat to the European Union and Norway, respectively. Ultimately, Namibia is proud to serve retailers and consumers natural meat of the highest quality, which is traceable, safe, tasty and tender. The Meat Board of Namibia is a statutory body which came into existence in 1935 ad facilitates the export of livestock, meat and processed meat products to importing countries. The Meat Board regulates the meat industry through managing annual production of livestock and meat, as well as import and export control. It further implements projects on behalf of the industry, Meat Board and Government, with or without external financiers to develop the industry.

STRATEGIC CHARTER

The Strategic Charter of the Meat Board is based on the following building blocks: • A healthy, disease-free meat industry • Quality Namibian meat • Export growth and market diversification • A respected, world-class regulatory organisation • A profitable, advanced and cohesive meat industry • Active stakeholder engagement • An effective, autonomous and self-sustainable organisation. VISION The vision of the Meat Board of Namibia is to be an internationally recognised organisation that promotes a profitable, vibrant, quality-driven Namibian meat industry in local and international markets.

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MISSION The mission of the Meat Board of Namibia is to promote an environment conducive to sustainable livestock production, market growth and diversification of livestock, meat and meat products; and to maintain standards and quality assurance through appropriate regulatory intervention. CORE VALUES At the Meat Board we strive to uphold the core values of Integrity, Teamwork, Fairness, Independent Thinking, Proactivity and Accountability. KEY STRATEGIC ISSUES • The need to have sound regulatory systems in place to control mandated standards and quality assurance around production, processing and marketing • The need to promote export diversification by increasing market access to competitive markets • The need to strengthen relations with government and key stakeholders to achieve improved collaboration and partnerships • The need to ensure that the Meat Board remains a selfsustainable organisation • The need to advocate animal health and welfare as a first step in being globally competitive ENSURE A SUSTAINABLE ORGANISATION EXPECTED OUTCOMES - Sustainable financial position - Sound reputation nationally and internationally STRENGTHEN STAKEHOLDER RELATIONS EXPECTED OUTCOMES - Regular consultations between

Meat Board and stakeholders and vice versa on industry matters - Meat Board respected as the authority on meat matters in the industry MEAT MARKET ACCESS MAINTENANCE & DIVERSIFICATION EXPECTED OUTCOMES - Existing markets maintained - New markets developed REGULATORY CONTROL OF STANDARDS, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND IMPORT/ EXPORT CONTROL EXPECTED OUTCOMES - Improved compliance with regulations - More detailed management information on the Namibian meat industry PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND MARKETING EXPECTED OUTCOMES - Increased financial viability of livestock production - More informed and educated producers, processors and consumers - Better collaboration with the Directorate of Veterinary Services Improved animal health status in NCA to attain international recognition Maintain animal health status south of the Veterinary Cordon Fence

MEAT BOARD OF NAMIBIA +264 61 275 830 info@nammic.com.na www.namic.com.na


A G R I C U LT U R E

WE LOVE OUR MEAT Premium quality Namibian meat controlled and guaranteed by the Meat Board across the value chain according to highest quality and safety standards.

Tel. 061 275 830 • info@nammic.com.na • www.nammic.com.na

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ABOUT MEATCO What we do

Our vision is to have the most sought-after meat brands in selected markets in the long term interest of our stakeholders.

The Meat Corporation of Namibia (Meatco) is a meat processing and marketing entity. Meatco serves niche markets locally and internationally with premium quality products that are traceable from the farm all the way to the fork. We buy cattle from farmers engaged in extensive livestock farming conditions that lend unique characteristics to the corporation’s end-product, which, after being processed through the value chain, fetches a significant premium in carefully selected markets across the globe. No hormones or anti-biotics are allowed to be used on any cattle marketed to Meatco. We operate slaughter and processing facilities in Windhoek, Okahandja, Oshakati and Katima Mulilo and engages in related manufacturing and other production activities including the manufacture of wet blue hides at the Okapuka Tannery, producing canned food products through the Canning operation, and producing low cost, good value meat products through the MEATMA initiative. OUR VISION Our vision is to have the most sought-after meat brands in selected markets in the long term interest of our stakeholders. We aim to achieve this by creating added value for our customers through unique competencies as well as cost effective and innovative processes; sound social and environmental practices and motivated staff. This is driven by the Chief Executive Officer and our team of highly skilled Senior Managers under the guidance of the Board of Directors. Meatco is regulated by the Meat Corporation of Namibia Act, (Act 1 of 2001) with the purpose to serve, promote and co-ordinate the interests of livestock producers in Namibia. Membership to Meatco is only available to Namibian producers of livestock who sell at least one unit of livestock at any of Meatco’s facilities once every three years. Meatco members have the following rights which they can use to guide the organisation: • To vote on and deliberate organisational direction at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) • Pass motions and nominate directors to the Board OUR PRODUCTS We provide value-added products, cut to customer specifications to customers across the globe. Locally we sell whole carcasses, quarter carcasses, primal cuts and value added cuts through the Meatco Wholesale and the MEATMA outlet in Windhoek. At Meatco we slaughter approximately 120 000 cattle every year and produce more than 27 000 tons of beef annually. We also produce approximately 250 000 wet blue hides and 15.7 million canned food products every year. Our factories are independently inspected and audited to ensure that we meet all of the requirements of the customers and markets that we service. OUR QUALITY AND FOOD SAFETY STANDARDS We conduct our business in accordance with the highest technical, ethical, social and environmental practices. ISO accreditation, a fully employed HACCP system, and a dedicated technical team ensure that all of the recipes, processes and end products adhere to and exceed all relevant food safety and product quality requirements. In addition to being EU approved, our factories slaughter all animals according to Halaal standards. Meatco is also subject to various independent audits to verify our quality standards and practices annually, including audits by various clients. A critically important factor in our value chain is managing and maintaining the cold chain. Proper cold chain management is essential in ensuring that our products say fresher for longer. We have various critical control points along the slaughter and value adding process where product is inspected to verify that it is safe for human consumption. WHY SHOULD YOU BUY MEATCO’S PRODUCT? Meatco’s product is: •

Naturally produced

High quality

Produced in ISO and HACCP certified factories

Traceable from fork back to farm

Maintained in a cold chain throughout production

BRC certified

Halaal

Produced according to global Animal Welfare standards

Produced using ethical business practices

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MEAT CORPORATION Head Office: Sheffield Street, Northern Industrial Area, Windhoek Tel: (+264) 61 321 6400 (Switchboard) Tel: (+264) 61 321 6493 (Corporate Affairs) Fax: (+264) 61 321 6401 Email: CAffairs@meatco.com.na Website: www.meatco.com.na


A G R I C U LT U R E

ADV. VEKUII RUKORO

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

MR HEINER BÖHME

EXECUTIVE: LIVESTOCK PROCUREMENT

MR VEHAKA TJIMUNE

EXECUTIVE: STAKEHOLDER RELATIONS AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS

MR CYPRIANUS KHAISEB

EXECUTIVE: MARKETING AND SALES

MR JANNIE BREYTENBACH

MS ROSA KATJIVENA

EXECUTIVE: QUALITY ASSURANCE

EXECUTIVE: OPERATIONS

MR STANLEY HOVEKA-MBURA

EXECUTIVE: HUMAN RESOURCE

Our

MR KINGSLEY KWENANI

EXECUTIVE OFFICER: MEATCO FOUNDATION

INGO SCHNEIDER

Executive Team

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

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N thing but

the breast Mission To be a world class enterprise, by providing Poultry Products and adding value to the local economy.

Vision

To become the Preferred Poultry Supplier of first Choice.

Since its inception Namib Poultry has managed to create a relevant footprint throughout the country by supplying nourishment and contributing to the nation’s growth.

We believe that you deserve the best and continuously strive to deliver the freshest Namibian chicken through an efficient and rigorous production process.

As the only local supplier of fresh Namibian chicken we continually strive to meet current demand. With an expected per capita increase in consumption of our products, we aim to deliver more quality chicken one hatchling at a time.

With five distribution routes nationwide we keep our depots in Keetmanshoop, Otavi, Ondangwa, Katima Mulilo and Walvis Bay, stocked with only the freshest Namibian chicken.

With just over three years of experience our distribution channels ensure that our products are readily accessible to our consumers. Delivery every 48 hours, guarantees that only the freshest Namibian chicken reaches you through our numerous registered outlets.

Mass production of fresh quality chicken requires continuous financial investments. Our prices reflect the capital input that goes into the production process. We place quality over price and always see to it that only the best quality chicken is produced, simply because... You Deserve Better!

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A G R I C U LT U R E

Welcome to the future of farming. The Feedmaster Mobile Application is an advanced farming tool, which provides Namibian Farmers with the technology to manage and preserve their livelihoods, to calculate profits, and record resources. This is a technology that truly embodies the Farmer while providing environmentally specific information to help grow not just the business, but also the farmer’s economic standing.

The Feedmaster application offers a connection between the Feedmaster website, allowing farmer’s to upload information in real time and receive the farm management data for analyses, while enhancing the potential of all farmers and adapting to any individualised environment and region. The future of a self-sufficient and sustainable Africa has arrived.

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BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICES SERVICES PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN ALL MODERN ECONOMIES. INDEED, IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT FOR ANY ECONOMIC ACTIVITY TO TAKE PLACE WITHOUT SERVICES. AN EFFICIENT SERVICES SECTOR IS CRITICAL TO TRADE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH. ENCOURAGING GREATER TRADE IN SERVICES THROUGH OPEN MARKETS AND NONDISCRIMINATORY TREATMENT CAN LEAD TO HIGHER EMPLOYMENT LEVELS, HIGHER INCOMES AND HIGHER STANDARDS OF LIVING.

The mission of the Division for the Registration of Companies and Close Corporation in the Ministry of Trade and Industry is to manage, regulate and facilitate the formation of business entities and to encourage investment through an appropriate legal framework and a conducive environment that ensures the flourishing of businesses. In modern-day Namibia, business and public services - such as accounting services, legal services, financial services and health services - are well established and their importance to the country’s development cannot be underestimated.

INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS:

Foreign investors generally conduct business through a Namibian company or as a branch of their home corporation. Company formation is simple and inexpensive. Shell companies are available from accounting and legal firms. Close corporations are simpler to administer and are not subject to statutory audit obligations. Legal, tax and accounting advisers should be hired in the early planning stages of establishing a business entity. The choice of entity is of extreme importance when setting up a business. In Namibia an entrepreneur can choose from a variety of business forms. Business registration • Business may be conducted in a variety of forms: • Public company or private company • Branch of a foreign company • Close corporation • Partnership, including joint venture • Sole proprietor • Business trust Prior to commencing business it is necessary to obtain the appropriate registration certificate from the local municipal health

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department. Certain businesses, such as banks, insurers and pharmaceutical companies, may require additional special licences. It is also necessary to register with: • The Workmen’s Compensation Commissioner with regard to the government-operated workmen’s compensation insurance scheme • The appropriate industrial council governing the trade or industry in which the business proposes to operate • The Department of Inland Revenue with regard to value added tax and employment matters • The Receiver of Revenue • The Department of Social Security For more information visit www.pwc.com and download the Business and Investment Guide for Namibia 2016, published by PWC Namibia.

VITAL CONTACTS BIPA, the Business and Intellectual Property Authority +264 61 299 4400 andima@bipa.na www.bipa.na LEGAL ASSISTANCE CENTRE +264 61 223 356 info@lac.org.na www.lac.org.na The LAC’s main objective is to protect the human rights of all Namibians. It is funded primarily by national and international donor organisations. Its work is supervised by the Legal Assistance Trust, whose trustees include legal practitioners, other professionals and community leaders.


BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

It works in five broad areas: litigation, information and advice, education and training, research, law reform and advocacy The Law Society of Namibia (LSN) +264 61 230 263 / 088 www.lawsocietynamibia.org The Law Society of Namibia is a self-regulating body created in terms of the Legal Practitioners Act (1995) which serves the profession and the public by promoting justice, protecting the independence of the judiciary and upholding the rule of law.

Office of the Ombudsman +264 61 207 3111 www.ombudsman.org.na The Office of the Ombudsman of Namibia promotes and protects human rights and fair and effective administration, combats misappropriation or misuse of public resources and protects the environment and natural resources of Namibia through independent and impartial investigation and resolution of complaints and through raising public awareness.

Namibia Estate Agents Board +264 61 249 885 neab@iway.na

Public Service Commission of Namibia (PSC) +264 61 287 9111 www.psc.gov.na The purpose of the PSC is to ensure adherence to Government policies, directives, regulations and ethical standards, as well as fairness and transparency within the Public Service. It is furthermore aimed at providing objective, sound and professional advice to the government on the whole spectrum of human resources administration, in order to add value to the service and support the direction of the government. The key responsibilities of the Public Service Commission are: • Dealing with grievances and disciplinary matters of public servants • Exercise the powers, functions and duties delegated by the President in respect of the employment • Remuneration and other general conditions of service of persons in the employment of councils, boards, institutions or other bodies

Namibia Trade Forum +264 61 235 327 Chief Executive Officer www.ntf.org.na

Society of Advocates of Namibia +264 61 231 151 socadv@mweb.com.na www.namibianbar.org

Namibia Standards Institution (NSI) +264 61 386 400 Chief Executive Officer info@nsi.com.na

Walvis Bay Export Processing Zone Management Company (Pty) Limited +264 64 205 095 wbepzmc@iway.na www.wbepzmc.iway.na

Namibia Competition Commission (NACC) + 264 61 224 622 Chief Executive Officer mihe.gaomab@nacc.com.na www.nacc.com.na Namibia Development Corporation (NDC) +264 61 206 2294 www.ndc.org.na The NDC was established under the Namibia Development Corporation Act, Act 18 of 1993, and is 100% state-owned. NDC’s mission is to promote, develop and support economic growth and development in Namibia.

Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NCCI) +264 61 228 809 www.ncci.org.na With 2500 members, the Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry is the leading business representative and support organisation in Namibia. Membership comprises prominent large companies as well as hundreds of SMEs across all economic sectors. Offshore Development Company (ODC) +264 61 283 7360 Chief Executive Officer odc@odc.com.na

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BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

FRANCOIS ERASMUS AND PARTNERS ATTORNEYS BACKGROUND

Francois Erasmus and Partners is a small to medium-sized firm of attorneys, with special focus on the needs and expectations of its clients. The firm was established on 1 September 2008 as a one-man practice by Mr Francois Erasmus after he left Van der Merwe-Greeff Inc., where he was a partner and director from February 1990 until 31 August 2008.

SERVICE

The firm operates from its offices located centrally in Conradie Street, Windhoek and is widely recognized for its professionalism and for providing legal services of a high quality and standard to its clients. It is an energetic and dynamic legal firm at the forefront of its industry. At Francois Erasmus and Partners we are aware of the fact that a successful legal practice has to be precise and efficient. We therefore strive to solve and finalise the legal matters of clients as expeditiously and cost effectively as possible. Only the latest technology and software are used to ensure direct, quick and efficient communication with clients and suppliers. We subscribe to the Legal Perfect, Legalsuite and Softlog programmes to ensure accurate preparation of documents, reporting and accounting to its clients. The firm is 100% Namibian-owned and all employees at the firm are Namibian, have equal opportunity, are receiving the highest level of training and are exposed to the best resources and IT programmes to advance and become fully-edged professionals themselves.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Francois Erasmus and Partners trains Namibian candidate attorneys and also employs previously disadvantaged law students during university holidays to ensure that they undergo the necessary training and gain the required experience. We provide bursaries to students to complete their studies in law. Francois Erasmus and Partners is fully committed to the Namibian society and understands its obligation and social responsibility towards the upliftment of the community as a whole. The managing partner has over the years been involved as sponsor, committee member, chairperson, trustee, director and president of: Cricket Namibia, Eros Primary School, Windhoek High School, WHSOBCC, Santa Shoebox X-mas Project, A. Shipena High School, Christina Swart Opperman Aids Orphan Trust, Nossop Primary School Gobabis, Law Society of Namibia, Centre for Dementia Patients, Janine and Suzelle Davin Sport Trust, Board member of the International Cricket Council.

SPECIALIZED AREAS OF PRACTICE 1. Commercial and civil litigation – Supreme Court, High Court and Lower Courts 2. Conveyancing and Bond registration 3. Short term and Life Insurance Matters 4. Advice and assistance on commercial, civil, labour, banking and regulatory matters 5. Building industry and related matters 6. Registration of Companies, Close Corporations and Trusts 7. Contract law 8. Estate administration 9. Debt collection

FRANCOIS ERASMUS AND PARTNERS +264 61 38 8850 info@ferasmuslaw.com.na

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PHOTOGRAPH ©PAUL VAN SCHALKWYK

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

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BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

THE ART OF LAW INDUSTRY FOCUSED,

André Swanepoel

REL ATIONSHIP DRIVEN.

B. COMM LLB (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

Patrick Kauta

DIRECTORS

B. JURIS, LLB (UNIVERSITY OF DURBAN – WESTVILLE; UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL)

Gys Ligthelm BA, LLB (UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA)

Abe Naudé

B. JURIS, LLB (UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE)

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BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

At Slabber

B. COMM LLB (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

Frieda Kishi

Charmaine Tjihero

B PROC (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

B. JURIS LLB (UNIVERSITY OF NAMIBIA)

Magano Dambile Erkana LL.B (RHODES UNIVERSITY)

Etienne Yssel

B.A. LLB (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

Poenie van den Berg

Abe Malherbe

BLC. LLB (UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA)

B.A.LLB (RHODES UNIVERSITY)

ASSOCIATES

Veronica Hanongo-Haikali LLB (UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN CAPE)

Sarel Maritz

B. JURIS LLB (UNIVERSITY OF PORT ELIZABETH)

Ralph Strauss

Mekumbu Tjiteere

B. COMM LLB (UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA)

B. JURIS LLB (UNIVERSITY OF NAMIBIA)

Risa Dreyer

LLB (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

Christo Potgieter B. COMM LLB (UNIVERSITY OF POTCHEFSTROOM)

Paul Botha

B. COMM LLB (UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH)

Monica Angula

B. JURIS LLB (UNIVERSITY OF WITWATERSRAND)

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BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

GEOCARTA CARTOGRAPHY FOR NAMIBIA

GIS AND DATABASE CONSULTANCY SERVICES TO THE INDUSTRY

OUR PROFILE

Geocarta Namibia is a Black Empowerment Enterprise (BEE), founded in June 2004 to provide expert GIS and database consultancy services to the spatial industry. Geocarta Namibia is a certified Business Partner of ESRI, ESRI Southern Africa and ESRI South Africa. This certification entitles Geocarta to full support from both of these organisations and to resell the product range of ESRI.

OUR MANAGEMENT TEAM

Allan le Hané is the Managing Director of Geocarta and has held this position since its inception. Allan has worked as GIS project manager on various projects for sixteen years. He is also managing other businesses outside this industry for a number of years. Matthias Metz is a GIS specialist and the Technical Director of Geocarta. He holds a master’s degree in Geography. He has worked as an Advisor in the GIS field on various GIS projects in Southern Africa. His main area of interest and Expertise is GIS in spatial planning, infrastructure management, embedding GIS in organisations and spatial data management. In early 2006. Matthias joined the ESRI international teaching programme and obtained his authorization to teach ESRIdeveloped courses. Olaf von Plato is the ArcGIS Technical Product Manager. Olaf has worked on various topographic mapping and GIS projects for the past sixteen

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years. Olaf also has experience in remote sensing applications and geophysical exploration. The Management Team is supported by five qualified staff members.

OUR SERVICES AT A GLANCE

Sales We specialize in the sale and and supply of both hardware and software full product range of ESRI and ITT/ENVI. We specialize in the sale and supply of Mobile GIS Solutions on Trimble and Leica GPS Platforms. Consulting and Project Management • GIS Project Management • Total GIS Outsourced Solutions • Spatial Data Integration • Database Design, Development and Implementation • Geospatial Analysis • Metadata Implementation • Aerial Surveys, Orth photo Production, Intimate Sensing (Arpad Mobile GIS) Application Development • Customization of GIS applications for client requirements • Standalone and embedded GIS application development • Web-based mapping and web • Page development • Geodatabase design and development Data Services • Data Capture • Data Conversion • Data Compilation • Co-ordinate Transformation

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Training & Support Accredited ArcGIS (ESRIdeveloped courses and usercustomized courses) ArcView GIS (ESRI) ArcPad, ArcPad Application Builder (ArcPad Studio)

PROJECTS

Education Namibia University of Science and Tech. (NUST) 12/2008-09/2010 ESRI Spain, Central Bureau of Statistics & NUST: Technical Support - implementation of a Bachelor’s Degree in Geo-information Technology (BGIT). Including the review of educational material compiled by ESRI Spain; training of lecturers (NUST), delivering of courses developed by ESRI Spain to BGIT students, and general technical support with regard to running the established ESRI laboratory. This included technical support for the Central Bureau of Statistics with regard to Census Mapping Exercise in the preparation of the 2011 National Housing and Population Census, and coaching CBS GIS staff in the utilization of GIS and Mobile GIS Technology. Roads Authority – Ongoing • Technical support and road • Proclamations • GIS Maintenance on the Road Referencing System (RRS)

Ministry of Lands and Resettlement, Namibia & Botswana -Ongoing • ArcCadastre, ArcGIS and map production training to all sectors and divisions. • Land use planning (Karas, Hardap and Kavango regions). • Implementation of LUCIS mapping in the Kavango Integrated Regional Land Use Plan • Land use planning for Omaheke Region • .Monitoring and evaluation system to manage Land Reform Activities in Namibia (RDBMS Development). • Topographic Map Revision for the Omaheke Region. Notable projects with: •

Swede survey

Namibia Tourism Board (NTB)

Corridor Development Consultants

Rössing Uranium Mine

National Planning Commission,

Urban Dynamics/SDE

Namibia Statistics Agency

Local Authorities (Otjiwarongo, Tsumeb and Okahandja) – Ongoing Cadastral Management Systems Ministry of Mines & Energy – 2006 Off-Grid Electrification Plan, with Consulting Services Africa as the main contractor.

GEOCARTA Allan le Hané +264 61 24 7848 geocarta@iway.na


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BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

NAMIBIANS AR KNOWN FOR THEIR VERSATI LEWCOR IS NO DIFFERENT The LEWCOR Group has positioned itself as one of Namibia’s industry leaders and the most reliable operator and partner in the development of Namibia and its people. The LEWCOR Group is a 100% Namibian company, which employs close to 1200 Namibians countrywide. Specialising in all the service and plant hire equipment required in Namibia.

The LEWCOR CIVILS Division includes a wide array of services: from concrete works to gravel and surfaced roads, to bulk earthworks for a large-scale removal. The LEWCOR team also develops complexes, flat units and a number of residential developments. Services to all projects such as electricity, water, sewerage and storm water are also catered for.

LEWCOR MINING Division has a vast array of services available for any mining project no matter the scale. The division has dedicated teams for pit dewatering and water control in order to prevent work area flooding. Other activities include selective mining, bulk stripping and rehabilitation.

LEWCOR CRUSHERS and SCREENING Division owns and operates a crusher plant, which supplies materials for the building of railroads/roads.

The LEWCOR TRANSPORT Division has allocated units for abnormal loads and normal loads capable of transporting machinery and equipment anywhere in Namibia.

www.lewcor.com

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The LEWCOR DRILLING and BLASTING fleet consists of various types of drilling machines, equipped with modern technology, which are operated by competent staff and operators. LEWCOR has sufficient capacity to cover a wide range of open pit drilling activities. From open walk-along rigs to fully

air-conditioned cab drills: LEWCOR caters for any and all your drilling needs. The LEWCOR PLANT HIRE fleet offers a wide variety of all types and sizes of machinery. With over 540 units to choose from, you are sure to find what you need, no matter how large or small. For any queries or to request a quote please don’t hesitate to contact us on: Tel: +264 (0)62 500 991, or Fax: +264 (0)62 500 992.


RE

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICES

ILITY

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NAMIBIA QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY

EMPOWERING THE NAMIBIAN NATION THROUGH QUALITY EDUCATION

NQA Executive Management Team The Namibia Qualifications Authority (NQA) is a public enterprise established through the Namibia Qualifications Authority Act no. 29 of 1996. The NQA is mandated to perform ten statutory functions as stipulated in the Act, including but not limited to: • • •

• •

To set up and administer the National Qualifications Framework (NQF); Accrediting training providers to ensure that they have the capacity to deliver courses at the appropriate standard; Evaluate qualifications to determine the value of a qualification and give it a corresponding level on the National Qualifications Framework. Evaluation is also done to verify authenticity, legality and validity of the awarding body and qualification; Set up the occupational standards for any occupation, job, post or position in any career structure; Set the curriculum standards required for achieving the occupational standards for a given occupation, job, post, position in a career structure; Evaluate and recognize competencies learnt outside formal education.

VISION:

A globally reputable qualifications authority empowering people in Namibia.

MISSION:

To sustain a dynamic national framework that assures quality qualifications through credible recognition of quality learning attainments.

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VALUES:    

Transparency Innovation Integrity Accountability

 Excellence

ADDING VALUE TO THE TRAINING AND EDUCATION SECTOR The NQA is the national regulator in the training and education sector in terms of all matters pertaining to qualifications. It is tasked with the responsibility of ensuring that qualifications are quality assured and they are in line with the aspirations of the Namibian nation. The NQA thus monitors and advices on the standards and quality of training and education in Namibia. This not only ensures consumer protection for those investing in education, but also safeguards the country’s reputation. In addition to its statutory functions, the NQA serves as a gateway for everyone who aspires to study in Namibia, equally for Namibians who wish to study in foreign countries.

ACCREDITATION OF TRAINING PROVIDERS

Accreditation is confirmation by the NQA that an institution has the capacity to provide specified courses and assess the performance of


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persons enrolled in such courses. Accreditation applies to any person, institution or organisation offering training or educational services. Accreditation adds value to the education sector in a various ways. For training providers, they gain assurance that their courses are regarded as of high quality and will therefore be widely accepted. Additionally, with quality assured courses, they are likely to gain access to possible funding or learner subsidies. In terms of learners, primarily they are assured of a return on their investment firstly, in terms of the quality of the course they are enrolling in and secondly that the outcomes of that learning (the qualification) will likely be recognised by employers and other training providers. With a quality assured qualification, learners are also able to move more freely between accredited institutions and have their previous earning recognised or cross-credited. The NQA also assists prospective students to verify the accreditation status of institutions in Namibia and anywhere else in the world, thereby ensuring that they do not fall victim to bogus institutions.

EVALUATION OF QUALIFICATIONS In today’s knowledge based economy, qualifications may be regarded as currency which, for most people is traded for employment and the promise of a better future or standard of living. This status quo makes qualifications a sought after commodity, not only for Namibians but for people the world over. The link between qualifications and economic prosperity has given rise to unprecedented levels of fraud with people laying false claim to qualifications they have not legally attained.

The NQF is also used to organise qualifications in a way that makes them easy to understand and compare, and provides up-to-date information about all the relevant and legal qualifications in Namibia. The NQF has 10 levels, each with increasing complexity of learning and defined by a unique descriptor. It is made up of Unit Standards, Certificates, Diplomas and Degrees. The NQF provides various benefits to the Namibian nation, including but not limited to: •

Provides quality assured learning and qualifications.

Enable progression to learning at higher levels and in formal institutions.

Provide access to employees qualified to world class standards.

Enable formal utilisation of quality assured company learning programmes.

Through quality assurance in the training and education sector, the NQA plays a vital role in enhancing confidence in the quality of education and training courses offered in Namibia.

While the NQA is entrusted with ensuring that the nation’s skills and knowledge meet the national objectives, it is equally important to ensure the credibility of qualifications entering the country. This is done through the process of evaluation. Evaluation of qualifications by the NQA is the process of giving value to a qualification by comparing it to qualification types on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) for Namibia. Evaluation is also done to verify the legitimacy, credibility and validity of the awarding body and its qualifications. In this regard:  Legitimacy refers to the authenticity of the qualification  Validity refers to whether the qualification was issued in a legal manner and by a legal body  Credibility refers to whether the awarding body can be trusted

NQA Middle Management Team

The NQA only evaluates qualifications and Unit Standards based awards which are quality assured in the country of origin. The NQA does not evaluate certificates of attendance and thus advices prospective learners to verify the status of BOTH the institution and the programme before enrolling for studies.

THE NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS FRAMEWORK (NQF) The NQA is committed to promoting quality education and training through the development and management of a comprehensive and flexible National Qualifications Framework (NQF) in Namibia. The NQF is a powerful tool for promoting lifelong learning in Namibia and to ensure that qualifications are closely aligned with the economic, social and cultural needs of the country. In this regard, fitness of purpose and fitness for purpose of programmes is a critical responsibility of the NQA as it ensures that all qualifications awarded by education and training providers in Namibia are at a level that will help the nation advance towards the attainment of national objectives as set out in Vision 2030.

NAMIBIA QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY Catherine Shipushu +264 61 384107 marketing@namqa.org www.namqa.org

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SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION

THE IMPACT OF SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION IN OUR COMMUNITIES BACKGROUND OF SACU

The Southern African Customs Union (SACU), established in 1910, is the oldest and functional customs union in the world. The 1910 Agreement under which SACU originally operated was later renegotiated to become the 1969 Agreement. When all five Member States had gained their independence from colonialism, renegotiations led to a new Agreement in 2002, which sets out a broad framework for enhanced integration among the SACU Member States, that Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland.

2002 SACU AGREEMENT

The SACU Agreement 2002 ushered in clear mandates, objectives, transparent and democratic institutions and collective decision-making by the Member States. The key elements of the SACU Agreement 2002 are: • Free movement of goods between Member States • Common external tariffs on imports from third parties • Shared revenue from customs and excise duties • Harmonised customs and excise policies

SACU’S VISION AND MISSION

SACU’s vision is to be ‘an economic community with equitable and sustainable development, dedicated to the welfare of its people for a common future’.

SACU INSTITUTIONS

SACU operates through the following institutions: • The Summit of Heads of State and Government provides strategic and political direction to SACU. • The Council of Ministers is composed of Ministers responsible for finance, commerce and trade and industry in the Member States. The Council is responsible for the overall policy direction and functioning of SACU institutions. • The Commission comprises the Permanent/Principal Secretaries or Directors General from the Ministries of Finance, Commerce and Trade and Industry of each Member State. The Commission is responsible for the implementation of the SACU Agreement and for overseeing the work of the Secretariat. • Technical Liaison Committees (TLCs) covers the following sectors: agriculture, customs, trade and industry, transport as well as finance. The TLCs support the Commission in its work. • The Secretariat is responsible for the day-to-day operations of SACU and the coordination of SACU activities. It is based in Windhoek, Namibia. • The Tariff Board is mandated to make recommendations to the Council on the level and changing of tariffs, rebates and trade remedies in SACU. The Tariff Board is yet to become operational. • The ad hoc Tribunal is tasked with adjudicating any dispute regarding the interpretation or application of the SACU Agreement. The Tribunal is yet to become operational.

SACU’s mission is to: • Develop effective, transparent and democratic institutions and processes • Serve as an engine for regional integration and development, industrial and economic diversification, the expansion of intraregional trade and investment, and global competitiveness • Building economic policy coherence, harmonisation and convergence to meet the development needs of the region • Promote sustainable economic growth and development for employment creation and poverty reduction • Serve as a building block for an ever closer community among the peoples of Southern Africa • Develop common policies and strategies for areas such as trade facilitation, effective customs controls and competition

Decision-making and Chairing in SACU Decisions of the institutions of SACU are made by consensus, except for the Tribunal. Chairmanship of SACU institutions is for a term of 12 months, on a rotational basis and in alphabetical order. The change takes effect on 15 July each year. The current Chair (July 2016 - July 2017) is the Kingdom of Swaziland.

PRIORITY AREAS

SACU has a revenue sharing arrangement that outlines how customs, excise and additional duties levied by Member States are to be determined, collected and shared. As an interim measure South Africa has been delegated as the manager of the Common Revenue Pool (CRP).

SACU’s Work Programme is underpinned by the following priorities: •

Regional industrial development policy

Review of the revenue sharing arrangement

Trade facilitation

Development of SACU institutions

Unified engagement in trade negotiations

Trade in services

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COMMON EXTERNAL TARIFF

As a customs union SACU Member States must apply a Common External Tariff (CET) on imports into the Common Customs Area. According to the Agreement identical rebates should also be applied. In the absence of a Tariff Board and as an interim measure, the Council has delegated the responsibility for tariff and rebate determination to the International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa.

REVENUE SHARING ARRANGEMENT

The receipts in the CRP are shared through a Revenue Sharing Formula (RSF) as outlined in the 2002 SACU Agreement. The RSF has three components: • Customs component – allocated according to each country’s share of total intra-SACU trade, excluding re-exports.


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From left to right: H.E. Lt. General Dr. Seretse Khama Ian Khama, President of the Republic of Botswana, H.E Jacob Zuma, President of the Republic of South Africa, Ms. Paulina M. Elago (back), SACU Executive Secretary, H.E. Dr. Hage G. Geingob, President of the Republic of Namibia, Rt. Hon. Dr. Barnabas Sibusiso Dlamini, Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Swaziland, Honourable Mathetjoa Metsing (back), Deputy Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Lesotho (representing Rt. Hon. Pakalitha B. Mosisili, Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Lesotho), at the inauguration of the SACU Headquarters held in November 2015 in Windhoek, Namibia.

• •

Excise component – net of the 15% of the development component, allocated on the basis of GDP. Development component – fixed at 15% of the total excise pool and distributed to all SACU members according to the inverse of each country’s GDP/capita.

The revenue shares are determined annually and approved by the Council. Thereafter, payments are disbursed to Member States on a quarterly basis.The revenue shares are determined annually and approved by the Council. Thereafter, payments are disbursed to Member States on a quarterly basis.

alcohol, tobacco products and similar goods. The standard VAT rates of the SACU Member States are as follows: Botswana – 12%, Lesotho – 14%, Namibia – 15%, South Africa – 14%, Swaziland – 14 % Some customs administrations require the use of clearing agents or customs brokers. In those cases traders are advised to make sure to secure the services of clearing agents who will assist them with import/export or transit procedures. export or transit procedures.

IMPORT AND EXPORT DOCUMENTS FOR CROSSBORDER MOVEMENT OF GOODS IN SACU

Generally all cross-border movements of goods in SACU counties require the following documentation: • Customs declaration – SAD500 for import and export and SAD503 for transit. However, as a result of customs automation these forms are automated in each of the SACU customs administrations. As a result of technology upgrades SACU customs administrations offer electronic platforms for customs declarations and traders need to take advantage of these IT platforms to improve their turnaround times. • Basic supporting documents - invoices, transport documents (road manifests), certificates of origin (where verification is needed; NB: this is not required for intra-SACU trade), permits (in each case depending on the type of goods) and form F178 (international payment form, for export only). • For some goods an export permit is required; therefore traders are advised to seek information prior to exportation. • Payment of Value Added Tax (VAT) at the standard rate applicable in each SACU Member State. These rates differ from country to country, and the rates also differ for certain commodities such as

SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION +264 61 295 8000 info@sacu.int www.sacu.int

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THE DOCUMENT WAREHOUSE

The Document Warehouse is a paper and electronic data facility that archives paper documents and electronic information in a secure environment for retrieval by clients as and when required. Records are generally managed on a file level, entailing labourintensive indexing, thus providing employment for a large number of Namibians in a stimulating and eco-friendly work environment. The extensive scope of services offered by the company includes: • Paper archiving and management of active files, inclusive of secure end-oflife destruction; • Vault storage – storage of data-tape backups, data rotation services, 24-hour access, vault has a Pyroshield Fire Extinguishing system and temperature control; • Scanning – bulk scanning of documents; manual, barcode or OCR indexing; scanning of specialised drawings, books,

photographic images and slides; Enterprise Content Management solutions (M-Files) – Dynamic Content Management Software, version control, workflows, mobile compatibility, Email archiving, e-signatures; Consultancy services – records management, scanning, M-Files; Training – administrator training (M-Files), end-user training (M-Files), information and records management.

The Document Warehouse is a Namibian reseller and partner of M-Files, a world-renowned software solution developed in Finland by the M-Files Corporation that provides users with metadata-driven systems to organise and manage documents and other information through Enterprise Information Management Software. M-Files is available as a cloud-based service, on-premises software or

a hybrid of both, and can be used on all computers, tablets and smartphones. The M-Files system works with all Windows applications, can easily be integrated with other systems, and can be used to store an extensive range of information, including technical drawings, scanned documents, voice recordings of minutes, photographs and video material. The Document Warehouse operates from its Head Office in Windhoek, its Coastal Branch in Walvis Bay, and its Northern Branch in Ongwediva. Boxes are stored in dense, state-of-the-art storage facilities that cover a total floor area of 3600 m2. Since 99.9% of the activities at the Warehouse take place during office hours in a space efficiently lit with natural light entering via a skylight – with its concomitant positive effect on work performance and human health – no internal electric lighting other than on staircases and the vertical carousel-box movement

system is required. The carbon footprint of the structure is further reduced by the extremely low-energy demand of the enterprise in its entirety, by use of solar PV systems with the aim to make it a 100% energy-neutral business. The facilities at The Document Warehouse comply fully with the requirements of the Ministry of Labour, Industrial Relations and Employment Creation as well as the National Archives of Namibia, which issues a certificate of compliance every year. Furthermore, The Document Warehouse is an active participating member of The Recycle Namibia Forum. Recycling approximately 75 tons of paper per year, as well as large volumes of plastic and reusable filing products, in an effort of playing its role in environment preservation.

THE DOCUMENT WAREHOUSE Ray Vries +264 61 24 5588 info@documentwarehouse.com.na www.documentwarehouse.com.na

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THERAPEUTIC INFORMATICS SPECIALISING IN THE LECTURING AND APPLICATION OF BUSINESS ETHICS

ABOUT THERAPEUTIC INFORMATICS

Therapeutic Informatics was founded by Dr. Willem Moore in Windhoek, Namibia in 1997 and is a consulting company that amongst others, specialises in the lecturing and application of Business Ethics. The company recognises the severe ethical challenges faced by all types of organisations in the private and public sectors in Namibia and is driven by the mission to empower these entities in dealing with their challenges in a professional manner. Dr. Moore holds a DPhil in Ethics from Stellenbosch University and is a member and Certified Ethics Officer (Reg. No. EO 424) of the Ethics Institute of South Africa.

THE KING IV REPORT ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE FOR SOUTH AFRICA According to the King IV Report on Corporate Governance for South Africa released on 1 November 2016, the 21st Century has thus far been characterised by a host of new global realities and by accompanying fundamental changes in business.

To the new global realities that are testing the leadership of organisations belong issues as diverse as inequality, globalised trade, social tensions, climate change, population growth, ecological overshoot, geopolitical tensions, radical transparency, rapid technological and scientific advancement, financial instability and greater expectations from stakeholders than ever before.

With regard to the fundamental changes in business, King IV points out three connected paradigm shifts in the corporate world. The first of these was the shift from Financial to Inclusive Capitalism due to the recognition that Financial Capitalism with its focus on the employment, transformation and provision of financial capital only represents a fraction of an organisation’s activities and should instead be replaced by Inclusive Capitalism that takes account of the employment, transformation and provision of all sources of capital in order to reposition capitalism as the engine of shared prosperity. The second important shift that recently occurred in the corporate world was from Short-term to Long-term Sustainable Capital Markets and was brought about by the need to create value in a sustainable manner and by a growing sense that the financial crisis of 2008 was to a large extent due to a focus on short-term objectives with little or no consideration of the long-term effects on either the organisations concerned, or the economy as a whole. The third shift, namely from Siloed to Integrated Reporting is consistent with the concept of an inclusive, sustainable capital market system and has been given impetus by a growing awareness of doing business in an era of radical transparency, the inadequacies of the traditional financial reporting system and by an acceptance of the triple context in which organisations operate.

These global realities and fundamental changes are currently severely challenging business leaders in guiding their organisations in the creation of value in a sustainable manner and in achieving more with less. Corollaries of the latter are that the duty of care has become both more complex and necessary and that business judgements not considering the impacts of an organisation’s business model on the triple context in which business operates, could lead to a decrease in the organisation’s value. According to King IV, the well-known Milton Friedman’s epigram that ‘The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits’, thus now needs to be reconsidered in view of the fact that an organisation is part of society and can no longer be seen as only existing in its own universe of internal stakeholders and the resources needed to create value, but as operating in and forming part of society. The licensor of an organisation is therefore no longer those individuals and entities within its narrowly defined value chain, but society as a whole (IoDSA, 2016:3-7).

THE PROMINENCE OF ETHICS IN THE KING IV REPORT ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE FOR SOUTH AFRICA

Against this background, Ethics is even more prominent in the King IV than in the King III Report on Corporate governance for South Africa. While in King III, only 3 of its 75 governance principles dealt with ethics, 3 of the 16 governance principles of King IV are now specifically focussed on ethics. These 3 principles respectively deal with the elements of • ethical leadership, • an ethical organisational culture and • corporate citizenship or the ethical responsibilities of organisations with regard to the environment in which they operate.

ETHICAL LEADERSHIP

By stating that a governing body should lead an organisation in an ethical and effective manner, King IV emphasises the fact that

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good governance does not start with principles, rules and procedures, but with the character of those tasked with governance and that the ethical tone of the organisation should be set from the top and specifically in the governing body. Following from this, the Report retains the King III so-called RAFT values of Responsibility, Accountability, Fairness and Transparency, but adds the values of Integrity and Competence to form the ICRAFT values that should underpin and inform all good governance.

ETHICAL CULTURE

While King III indeed contained a principle dealing with the management of ethics, King IV goes further by indicating that the management of ethics in organisations remains insufficient, unless and until it results in the establishment of an ethical culture. The second principle of King IV, namely that the governing body should govern the ethics of the organisation in a way that supports the establishment of an ethical culture, thus provides governing bodies with a mandate to ensure that an ethical culture is developed and maintained in the organisation. With organisational ethics understood as ‘the way we do things around here’, this principle therefore suggests that ethics should become a normal part of ‘how things are being done in an organisation’. This emphasis on the establishment of an ethical culture in King IV does however not imply that the management of ethics in organisations has become less important. In order to ensure that ethics management neither remains a goal in itself, nor a mere box-ticking exercise, but should be approached and applied in a manner that will result in the cultivation and maintenance of an ethical organisational culture over time, King IV amongst others recommends ethics management actions such as the setting of ethical standards for the interaction of internal and external stakeholders, the formulation of an ethics strategy for the organisation and the provision of safe whistle-blowing mechanisms for the reporting of unethical conduct.

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP

King IV’s principle that the governing body

Dr. Willem Moore should ensure that the organisation is, and is seen to be, a responsible corporate citizen, focuses on the ethical responsibilities of organisations in the triple context of the economic, social and natural environment in which they operate. In this regard, King IV recommends that all organisations take responsibility for the governance of their social and ethics performance with regard to elements such as fair remuneration and transparent tax practices, since it will have an impact on their success and ultimately also on their sustainability (Rossouw, G J, The Ethics Institute).

it is the mission of Therapeutic Informatics to professionally empower Namibians in putting King IV into organisational practice through the lecturing and application of all 16 governance principles of the Report.

THERAPEUTIC INFORMATICS AND KING IV

The legal status of King IV, as with its predecessors, is that of a set of voluntary principles and leading practices (IoDSA, 2016:35) and since its emphasis on good leadership, underpinned by the principles of good governance, is equally valuable to all types of organisations in the private and public sectors and also Namibian organisations are in need of ethical leadership, deeply embedded ethical cultures and to be perceived as responsible corporate citizens in the societies in which they operate,

THERAPEUTIC INFORMATICS Dr. Willem Moore +264 61 237 666 +264 81 277 2565 wmoore@therapinfo.com.na www.therapinfo.com w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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EDUCATION THE MANDATE AND ACTIONS OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, ARTS AND CULTURE ARE INSPIRED AND GUIDED BY THE NATIONAL CONSTITUTION (ARTICLE 20) AND THE NATIONAL VISION STATEMENT, VISION 2030. THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME (ETSIP) REPRESENTS THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR’S RESPONSE TO THE CALL OF VISION 2030. THE MINISTRY CONTINUES TO STRIVE FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN QUALITY INCLUSIVE EDUCATION, TEACHING AND LEARNING, IMPROVED LEARNING OUTCOMES AND RAISING THE EDUCATED AND SKILLED WORKFORCE THAT IS NEEDED FOR A PRODUCTIVE AND COMPETITIVE NATION.

THE NAMIBIAN GOVERNMENT PROVIDES FREE EDUCATION FROM GRADE 1 TO GRADE 8. TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS, WHETHER PRIVATE OR PUBLIC, CHARGE TUITION FEES. THE MINISTRY PROVIDES EQUITABLE INCLUSIVE EDUCATION TO MORE THAN 690,618 LEARNERS OF WHOM 32,793 ARE IN THE PRE-PRIMARY, 454,027 IN THE PRIMARY AND 203,798 IN THE SECONDARY PHASE OF EDUCATION.  CURRENTLY THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, ARTS AND CULTURE EMPLOYS A TOTAL OF 37,627 TEACHING AND NON-TEACHING STAFF OUT OF THE STAFF CONTINGENT OF 39,000, MAKING IT ONE OF THE BIGGEST – IF NOT THE BIGGEST – EMPLOYER AMONG THE GOVERNMENT MINISTRIES.

Mandate: “To educate and train for sustainable national development & promote arts and culture.”  

Vision: “To be the ministry of excellence in providing quality inclusive education and promoting arts and culture for the prosperity of the nation.”  

Mission: “To provide accessible, equitable and inclusive quality

education for a tolerant, skilled, productive and competitive nation, to promote and preserve arts and culture for nationhood and unity in diversity.”

TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

There are numerous training institutions in the country. The need for quality vocational and technical training has recently been recognised as a vital factor in equipping Namibia with an adequately skilled labour force that will in turn strengthen socio-economic development and self-employment. The Namibia Training Authority (NTA) is the regulating body of the vocational education and training sector in Namibia. It is tasked with the responsibility to arrange an efficient, effective and sustainable vocational education and training system (VET) aligned with the current and future skill needs of the labour market. Therefore the NTA seeks to ensure access, equity and quality in vocational education and training throughout the country. Currently the NTA runs seven vocational education and training centres: Eenhana Vocational Training Centre (Ohangwena), Nakayale VTC (Omusati), Okakarara VTC (Otjozondupa), Rundu VTC (Kavango), Vaombola VTC (Oshana), Windhoek VTC (Khomas) and Zambezi VTC (Zambezi). The various trade/occupational training offerings include bricklaying and plastering, office administration, information and communication technology, joinery, plumbing, electrical general, welding and fabrication, fitting and turning and starting a business. The Windhoek Vocational Training Centre (WVTC) is the flagship institution in the vocational education and training system. Its facilities, equipment, competent staff and social ambience provide trainees with the necessary environment for success in their career development. Since the inception of the centre there has been a steady growth in the number of course participants as well as in the number of graduates entering the labour market. Supporting small and medium enterprise development (SMEs) is important to the centre and it endeavours to co-operate with institutions involved in this field. The Windhoek Vocational Training Centre is geared to make its contribution in this regard. FabLab Namibia (Fabrication Laboratory) assists entrepreneurs and industry with the tools to make almost anything. This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass

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E D U C AT I O N

Image by Namibia University of Science and Technology production. FABlab Namibia is the first advanced manufacturing, prototyping and design lab in Namibia. The lab was established in partnership with the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade and SME Development to enhance local product competitiveness, bridge the technological divide through access to information communication technology (ICT), new machinery, tools, knowledge, skills and equipment – ultimately to give rise to a technologically and creatively advanced local economy.  FABlab Namibia brings advanced vocational training to the country with the MIT FABfoundation-accredited FABacademy certificate and diploma course (starting in January 2017) as well as various other innovative activities; see the website for more details or call +264 61 207 2885.

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS Namibia’s two main public tertiary institutions of general education are the National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) and the University off Namibia (UNAM). In addition there are a number of specialised tertiary educational institutions such as the College of the Arts (Cota), The University Centre for Studies in Namibia (TUCSIN) in Windhoek, Oshakati,

Rundu and Rehoboth, the Namibian Maritime and Fisheries Institute (NAMFI) in Walvis Bay and the Namibian Institute of Mining and Technology (NIMT) in Arandis.

SCHOOL TERMS 2017 First Term First School Day: Wednesday, 11 January Midterm Break: Monday, 22 – Friday, 24 March Last School day: Wednesday, 26 April Second Term First School Day: Tuesday, 30 May Last School Day: Wednesday, 23 August Third Term First School Day: Tuesday, 5 September Last School Day: Tuesday, 5 December First Term 2018: Wednesday, 10 January 2018

VITAL CONTACTS MINISTRY OF EDUCATION +264 61 293 3358 info@moe.gov.na www.moe.gov.na NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (NIED) +264 62 50 9000

media@nied.edu.na www.nied.edu.na NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION (NCHE) info@nche.org.na www.nche.org.na NATIONAL EXAMINATIONS AND ASSESSMENT +264 61 2934437 or +264 61 2934435 www.dnea.gov.na WINDHOEK VOCATIONAL TRAINING CENTRE (WVTC) +264 61 211 742 info@wvtc.edu.na www.wvtc.edu.na NAMIBIA COLLEGE OF OPEN LEARNING (NAMCOL) + 264 61 320 5111 / toll free helpline: 0886 999 74 www.namcol.edu.na NAMCOL is a state-owned educational institution created by an Act of Parliament (Act 1, 1997) to provide learning opportunities for adults and out-of-school youth. THE UNIVERSITY CENTRE FOR STUDIES IN NAMIBIA (TUCSIN) +264 61 22 48 40 info@tucsin.org www.tucsin.org NAMIBIAN MARITIME AND FISHERIES INSTITUTE (NAMFI) +264 64 270 900 www.namfi.net

NAMIBIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND TECHNOLOGY (NIMT) IN ARANDIS +264 64 511 800 ho@nimtnamibia.com www.nimtnamibia.com NAMIBIA STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FUND (NSFAF) +264 61 420 600 studentsrelations@nsfaf.na www.nasfaf.na NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL OF NAMIBIA +264 61 293 33 63 / 33 nacn@iway.na COLLEGE OF THE ARTS +264 61 374 100

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE) EU DONATES N$400 MILLION FOR NAMIBIAN EDUCATION At the end of 2016 the government, through the National Planning Commission (NPC), and the European Union (EU) signed a N$400 million funding agreement for early childhood development (ECD) and pre-primary education in Namibia. The funds will be used for various programmes, including technical assistance, infrastructure development and capacity building, which will be conducted over a period of four years.

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E D U C AT I O N

AFRICAN LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

TO INSPIRE AND ENABLE LEADERS FOR POWERFUL TRANSFORMATION

NAMIBIA, OUR BELOVED LAND IS A • •

Land of Peace – The Legacy of our founding father, His excellency Dr Sam Nujoma Land of Stability – The Legacy of our former president, His excellency Hifikepunye Pohamba

NAMIBIA IS NOW MOVING TOWARDS BEING A •

Land of Prosperity – The Legacy which our current president, His excellency Dr Hage Geingob, has committed himself to

OUR CHALLENGE

Our challenge is that peace and stability alone is not enough. To reach prosperity we need everybody’s input. We need more people moving from passivity to productivity and more people moving from rights to responsibilities. We need more leaders!

WHO IS THE AFRICAN LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE? The African Leadership Institute was founded to equip and develop leaders to transform Africa. We believe that Africa should solve its own challenges (like corruption, crime, poverty, HIV/Aids, unemployment, lack of specialized skills, inferiority, passivity, economic freedom, etc.) and in doing so will become the hope and example to the rest of the world. The African Leadership Institute (ALI) exists to inspire and enable Africans to lead transformation, to equip leaders with the power to perform towards higher productivity and the power to transform communities. We at ALI understand the principles and the road towards prosperity. We offer value based leadership development programmes to

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Senior Hospital Administrators of the MoHSS at the completion of their training emerging and established leaders from the business, church and government sector. The programmes consist of three full weeks (Monday – Friday) of face-to-face training, spread out over an academic year plus one weekend. Extensive pre- and post-course reading as well as a mentorship program form an integral part of the leadership development process. The curriculum focuses on Servanthood, Influence, Truth and Results as four key leadership pillars throughout the training to ensure that transformational leadership development takes place. Our training takes place at the Rock Lodge (www.rocklodge.com. na), situated 82 km from Windhoek. This peaceful venue set in the Namibian bush allows the participants to disengage from other distractions and focus on who they are and where they are going. We believe that our combination of passionate facilitators, carefully selected influential teaching faculty, our tested and challenging curriculum, the transfer of skills for building teams & getting the job done and God’s grace & guidance is unique. We believe that this combination will continue to bring personal life change and sustainable community transformation. ALI is registered as a Private Higher Education Institution with the

National Council for Higher Education and accredited by the Namibian Qualifications Authority for a Certificate in Transformational Leadership (Level 5) and a Diploma in Transformational Leadership (Level 6). The training at ALI is also registered with the Namibian Training Authority (NTA). This means that companies who are responsible to pay NTA levies, can claim the training fees of ALI back from the NTA (conditions apply).


THE CURRICULUM AND OUTCOMES

The curriculum of ALI can be summarized as transformation of the individual (understanding yourself & defining your purpose), transformation of relationships, transformation of character and transformation of work ethics & productivity. The outcomes of the ALI Programmes will benefit the individual as well as the employer. Some of the outcomes are leaders who know themselves, their God given calling & responsibilities, leaders with soft hearts, tough minds, upright characters & skillful hands and leaders with the confidence to lead…Courageous/Brave leaders who say “Yes, I can and I will!” The training gives important leadership theory, but also the knowledge on how to apply it. Further outcomes of the training are accountability and ongoing development. Students understand the importance of relationships as well as planning and priorities, which help them to be result driven, while living a balanced lifestyle. Our training is based on truths of the Bible. We use Jesus as an example of a very successful leader. The training is available to people of all religious and spiritual backgrounds, as the focus of the training is “Leadership” and the “ability to transform”.

OUR HISTORY, PARTNERSHIPS & BOARD

ALI was founded in January 2005 by Dawie Fourie, former managing partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers Namibia. Since 2006 the African Leadership Institute has hosted many highly successful leadership training programs based on this conviction and trained thousands of leaders with stunning results. • • • • • • • •

Valued partnerships were established over the years: Partnership with Old Mutual and Ministry of Education to train 300 school principals. Partnership with FNB and Ministry of Education to train advisory teachers and inspectors of government schools. Partnership with Lithon Consulting Engineers to train leaders of Municipalities. Partnership with FNB & Ministry of Health & Social Services to train leaders in Public Health. Partnership with Pinnacle Metropolitan to train youth leaders. Partnership with various businesses, churches and Government ministries to train individual employees. The current board members are Nangula Uaandja, Dawie Fourie, Dixon Norval, Sakaria Nghikembua, Nick Klazen, Chrisna von Gericke, Shirley Magazi and Patricia Olivier. We are supported by highly skilled lecturers – all Namibian citizens – who teach in their area of expertise.

CERTIFICATE IN TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP (LEVEL 5) DIPLOMA IN TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP (LEVEL 6)

E D U C AT I O N

We inspire and enable leaders for powerful transformation! Training takes place at the Rock Lodge and is available for any individual who has a desire to make a difference – transforming yourself, your relationships, performance at the workplace and your community. COSTS OF N$ 18 000 INCLUDE: • Fifteen full days of face-toface training sessions • One seminar (single/ relationship/marriage) • Accommodation and meals at the Rock Lodge • Training notes • Six prescribed books TRAINING FOR 2017 STARTS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES: • J030: WEEK 1: 13 – 17 MARCH 2017 • J031: WEEK 1: 29 MAY – 02 JUNE 2017 • J032: WEEK 1: 31 JULY – 04 AUGUST 2017 • J033: WEEK 1: 30 OCTOBER – 03 NOVEMBER 2017

WE CHALLENGE YOU!

This is a challenge to individuals and employers to invest in human capital! Enrol for our Programmes. We will help you to develop leaders who are humble but brave. Leaders who can lead towards transformation. Transformation of the self, of relationships, results, performance and communities. Let us support our President’s drive towards prosperity, towards Vision 2030. Our Namibian dream can become true – that we are the example to the rest of Africa and Africa to the rest of the world! Come let us lead wisely, deliberately and diligently!

LEADERS WITH SOFT HEARTS, TOUGH MINDS, SKILLFUL HANDS AND UPRIGHT CHARACTERS - IN NAMIBIA FOR AFRICA -

AFRICAN LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE Tienie Johr +264 61 250 229 tienie@ali.com.na www.ali.com.na

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Namibia Training Authority

Raising the Bar in Vocational Education and Training

Vision

To be the national port of call for Vocational Education and Training skills.

To regulate and facilitate the sustainable delivery of quality Vocational Education and Training to the benefit of stakeholders.

Mission

Values

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Responsiveness

Accountability

Integrity

Service Delivery

Excellence

We will provide frank, impartial and timely feedback to the Government, stakeholders and partners.

We will work towards clear objectives in a transparent manner and accept responsibility for decisions and actions.

We will be honest, open and transparent in our dealings, using power responsibly while striving to earn and sustain a high level of public trust.

We will be focused and geared towards high levels of service delivery.

We will meet our mandate and deliver services in a manner that reects a high level of excellence.

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E D U C AT I O N STRATEGIC MANDATE AND CONTEXT The Vocational Education and Training (VET) Act, Act 1 of 2008, tasks the Namibia Training Authority(NTA) to establish an efficient, effective and sustainable VET system aligned with the current and future skills needs of the labour market. Vision 2030 also anticipates the formation of an industrialised and knowledge-based economy and challenges the country to implement an efficient and effective Vocational Education and Training (VET) system that will be able to equip the youth with the necessary skills required by the labour market. The importance of the development an efficient VET regime to unlock a trained, skilled, efficient, and qualified workforce is also encapsulated in the fourth National Development Plan (NDP4), Government’s fourth five-year plan (2012/13 - 2016/17) to achieve its development objectives set forth in Vision 2030. NDP4 pertinently highlights that “Vocational Education and Training needs strengthening and expansion to better serve the current and emerging needs of skilled human resources in the country”.

A STRATEGIC PLAN FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING Literally, a ‘port of call” is a port where ships can take on or discharge cargo. However, if one considers the more figurative meaning, there is more to this phrase than meets the eye. It also implies fitness-for-purpose, which equates quality with the fulfillment of a specification or stated outcomes. These outcomes are defined under the VET Act of 2008 as the development and implementation of a Strategic Plan for Vocational Education and Training and to increase access, equity and quality in Vocational Education and Training. This is NTA’s vision: To be the national port of call for Vocational Education and Training skills in Namibia. It is a vision under which our organisation appreciates that quality defines the purpose in our mission to regulate and facilitate the sustainable delivery of quality Vocational Education and Training to the benefit of stakeholders. Under this mission, quality is demonstrated by achieving these objectives.

STRATEGIC PILLARS Our rolling five-year Strategic Plan is aimed at securing fundamental change in current training and service delivery arrangements. It involves decisive and bold actions to re-engineer an organisational framework that clearly and unequivocally defines what, why and how matters must be dealt with and that sets the direction and tone for performance and accountability. It guides the NTA in the development of a capable and skilled national workforce to meet current and future industry needs, as well as developing entrepreneurs who will not only become self employed, but also create employment for others. It has six overarching strategic focus areas aimed at continuing the path of progress towards establishing a stable organisation and expand the provision of technical and vocational training opportunities to realise the objectives of Vision 2030. These strategic focus areas drive the Strategic Plan towards the realisation of specific and defined objectives, taking into consideration strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the NTA’s internal and external environments. Organisational Effectiveness An organisational structure aligned with the strategy and populated with competent staff and systems. Funding Sufficient and sustainable funding to ensure quality Vocational Education and Training. Regulation An effective regulatory framework in line with the VET Act and a continuously improved regulatory framework. Training and Related Services Provision Quality training and services in line with all identified needs of stakeholders and the industry at large through VET providers. Administration of the VET levy Effective collection and disbursement of VET levy in accordance with the VET Act. Stakeholder Engagement and Communication Effective stakeholder identification and engagement based on identified needs.

Jerry Beukes Chief Executive Officer For more information, contact: The Public Relations, Marketing and Stakeholder Engagement Division Namibia Training Authority | Tel: 061-2078 550 | Fax: 061-2078 551 | E-mail: info@nta.com.na

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E D U C AT I O N

An award-winning university

Developing Talent Contemporary Graduates building a competitive Economy

Accounting professionals provide a range of services that ensures that individuals comply with the tax laws and regulations, and businesses (e.g. companies and close corporations) are established and managed in compliance with national laws and regulations, as well as report on their financial performance accurately. Namibia experiences a shortage of skills in these areas that impacts negatively on productivity levels in all sectors of the economy, both public and private. In 2006, Namibia had one Chartered Accountant per 10 000 people in the country, one of the highest population to CA ratios in the world.

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This prompted the profession to embark on a purposeful programme of creating Namibian capacity in accounting and auditing. By then, NUST (then Polytechnic) was the first higher education institution to offer Computerised Accounting in its Accounting programme in 2000. In 2006, NUST entered into a partnership with the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Namibia (ICAN), which amongst other outcomes resulted in the establishment of the Namibia Graduate School of Accounting (NGSA). Support in this regard was also received from the Namibia Stocks Exchange (NSX).


E D U C AT I O N

NUST is an engaged, productive partner for the Accounting and Financial Services Sector

The NGSA became the main vehicle for offering the Advanced Diploma in the Theory of Accounting (ADTA), thereby enabling graduates to pursue higher level professional qualifications and access the relevant Board Examinations to become Chartered Accountants (CAs). Since inception, the NGSA, has enabled 17 young Namibians to achieve their dream of becoming CAs. NUST has produced not only more CAs, but also other accounting professionals such as business accountants and financial accountants. In the past five years, NUST has supplied 2 087 graduates to industry in these programmes. True to the ethos of a university of science and technology, these programmes have a strong

numerical orientation, are technologydriven and career-focused, internationallybenchmarked and industry-specific. High-level courses (NQF Level 9) in Accounting and Financial Management are offered as part of the Master’s degree programmes at the Harold Pupkewitz Graduate School of Business, thereby equipping business leaders and professionals to effectively manage and grow their practices and businesses. NUST also offers tailor-made accounting, finance and business management courses to individuals, SMEs, NGOs and corporations, through the Centre for Enterprise Development, for their better personal and economic performance.

The following qualifications are currently offered in Accounting and Economics: • Diploma in Accounting and Finance (NQF Level 6) • Bachelor of Accounting (NQF Level 7) • Bachelor of Accounting (Chartered Accountancy) (NQF Level 7) • Advanced Diploma in the Theory of Accounting (NQF Level 7) • Bachelor of Economics (NQF Level 7) • Bachelor of Economics Honours (NQF Level 8)

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E D U C AT I O N

Namibia is known the world over as the land of endless horizons. At the Namibia Institute of Public Administration and NIPAM Executive Director: Management (NIPAM) we Andrew Ndishishi move horizons every day. We pride ourselves in widening the perspective of our participants and helping them cross boundaries they never imagined possible. Established in 2010, NIPAM is responsible for the training of employees who work in all three branches of government and in public enterprises. Whether you are a clerk in a local municipality, an executive at a state-owned enterprise or a manager working at a government ministry, NIPAM helps you to do your work better. We offer a large variety of courses in many disciplines across the spectrum of the public sector with special emphasis on management and financial skills as well as governance at different levels of influence. Our programmes range from short courses focused on brushing up practical skills, to intensive modules that will prepare you for the next step in your career. With Namibia entering a new chapter in its post-colonial history, service delivery and performance management as set out in the Harambee Prosperity Plan have taken centre stage. As an expert in change management, NIPAM’s approach is aimed at bringing the idea of ‘service’ back into the civil service. At NIPAM we believe that working in the public sector can be inspiring and fulfilling. Through our learner-centred curriculum, we engage, challenge and excite our course participants, daring them to be efficient, results-oriented, transparent and citizen-centred in the execution of their tasks. We think the public sector can be a source of innovation and an agent for change provided the people working in it are equipped with the right mindset and skills. At our campus in Olympia, we build champions by exposing them to a syllabus that is continuously updated, partnering with the best in the fields of public administration and management and offering world class resources.

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For More Information Contact: Birgit Hoffmann Director Human Capital and Strategic Relations Tel: +264 61 296 4700 Email: bhoffmann@nipam.na 27 Paul Nash Street, Olympia Private Bag 13218, Windhoek, Namibia www.nipam.na


E D U C AT I O N

Developing Namibian Skills PwC Namibia Business School “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” - Nelson Mandela The PwC Business School provides a range of business training programmes for directors, executives, managers and employees. PwC Namibia Business School brings training solutions presented by Namibian experts with practical experience in the Namibian market: • Customised Training Programmes. • Public Training Programmes focused on developing local skills relating to Director’s Duties, Tax, Human Resource Services, Corporate Governance, Accounting and Compliance training. For more information please visit our website www.pwc.com/na/en/business-school or email us busschool@na.pwc.com Chantell Husselmann Partner Tel: +264 61 284 1327 chantell.husselmann@pwc.com

Daleen Small Manager Tel: +264 61 284 1021 daleen.small@pwc.com

Lorraine Holland-Muter Assistant Manager Tel: +264 61 284 1034 lorraine.holland-muter@pwc.com

© 2017 PricewaterhouseCoopers. All rights reserved. In this document, PwC refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers Namibia, which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35.

Marde van Dyk Kathy van Niekerk Aldrin Haruzivi Matti Kandjimi Jessica KirchnerFrankle Rachel Haludilu Tjamena Murangi Fransina Frans Elizabeth Nevonga AndrĂŤ de Jager Simon Antindi Rahischa Peters John Oyedele Minnie Kawana Alison Ferreira Filippus Moshana Phillipus Ndapandula Karolina Iishi Fenni Iyambo Ivor Orlam Pascal Walters Mirjam Josef Delwina Katjipu Jasmine Orlam Sofia Nepembe Imene Aina Grace Gama Nangula Angula Mareneta Koortzen Martha Shongolo Diana Shilomboleni Lempi Amutenya Ifeoln Oyedele Theo-Ben Kandetu Nathan Zulu

www.unam.edu.na

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E D U C AT I O N

PIONEERING DOCTORS - IN PURSUIT OF HEALTH FOR ALL At a time when access to quality health care in Namibia was a challenge, UNAM emerged to train medical doctors. A diverse group of quality medical doctors to cater for the broader health care system in Namibia. A first cohort of locally trained doctors to serve our nation!

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ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN NAMIBIA HAS A NUMBER OF

CHARACTERISTICS THAT MAKES IT PARTICULARLY INTERESTING.

CONSTRUCTION IS A LABOUR INTENSIVE ACTIVITY WITH THE POTENTIAL TO

EMPLOY LARGE NUMBERS OF UNSKILLED AND SEMI-SKILLED WORKERS. THE

INDUSTRY CONSISTS OF A WIDE RANGE

OF ENTERPRISES FROM SINGLE PERSON “MICRO ENTERPRISES’’ TO LARGE

MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES. BARRIERS TO ENTRY ARE RELATIVELY LOW AT THE SMALLER ENTERPRISE LEVEL. PUBLIC

SECTOR CONTRACTS, MOSTLY AWARDED THROUGH THE GOVERNMENT TENDER PROCESS, ARE A MAJOR SOURCE OF

BUSINESS AND CAN BE USED AS A POLICY TOOL TO STIMULATE DEVELOPMENT.

Images by Namibia Construction

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The construction sector is also one of the few industries in Namibia where there is both a minimum wage and an industry-wide pension arrangement. SME support, employment regulations and corruption are important policy issues for the sector. Sustained fixed investment by government, business and households has helped the industry grow. The industry’s contribution to the Gross Domestic Product has doubled over the last decade.

VITAL CONTACTS ENGINEERING COUNCIL OF NAMIBIA +264 61 233 264 ecnamibia@iway.na www.ecnamibia.org ASSOCIATION OF CONSULTING ENGINEERS OF NAMIBIA www.acen.org.na +264 61 227 672 acen@acen.org.na (general enquiries) CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES FEDERATION OF NAMIBIA (CIF) +264 61 417 300 secretary@cifnamibia.com / admin@cifnamibia.com www.cifnamibia.com The Construction Industries Federation is the national voice of Namibia’s construction industry. For more than 60 years the CIF has played a major role in contributing to the economic prosperity of the nation by providing the skills and infrastructure required to build a prosperous and competetive environment. The CIF is an autono-


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

mous, on-governmental and apolitical organisation and is governed by an Exucutive Committee. CIF Members are involved in this diverse industry and include multi-national building and civil contractors though the bulk consists of smaller contractors and SME’s. Members also include the retail and wholesale building material trade along with many other manufacturers and suppliers of construction materials and equipment, which serve this sector. It represents specialist trades such as electricians, joiners, plumbers, painters and steelworkers, among others.

ARCHITECTURE

There are many professional architectural firms in Namibia who act as both designers and advisors are able to translate clients’ requirements into reality. Expert advice and guidance are necessary to minimize risk and maximise investment potential to ensure a successful project venture. Turn-of-the century German architecture can be seen throughout the country, especially in the capital city of Windhoek. Some of the capital's modern buildings are still influenced by the German style. The Namibia Institute of Architects, N.I.A., is a non-profit, statutory institution established in 1952 as The Institute of South West Africa Architects. The N.I.A’s purpose is to promote architecture and sound architectural practice among the architectural profession and general public of Namibia. Currently the NIA has a membership of 111 registered professional architects, and it is a member of the African Union of Architects, The Commonwealth Association of Architects and the Union of Architects, ensuring an international representation.

Services currently rendered by the NIA are to: • Provide you with relevant practice documentation, such as contracts etc. • Organise CPD courses and other informative slide shows, lectures and exhibitions. • Organise Merit Awards. • Assist with publications showcasing the work of Namibian architects. The Namibian Institute of Architects presents a biannual Merit Award for modern architecture in Namibia and organises events to highlight the work of Namibian architects. NIA / NAMIBIA INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTS +264 61 231 559 nia@afol.com www.nia.org.na THE INSTITUTE OF NAMIBIAN QUANTITY SURVEYORS (INQS) +264 61 228970 inqs@iafrica.com.na www.inqs.org.na The Institute of Namibian Quantity Surveyors (INQS) statutory institution. The purpose of the Institute is to promote quantity surveying and sound practice among the Namibian quantity surveying professions and general public of Namibia. INQS is a member of the Africa Association of Quantity Surveyors (AAQS) and is in close affiliation with the Namibian Council for Architects and Quantity Surveyors (NCAQS).

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ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

e.power CONSULTING AND CONSTRUCTION

YOUR OFF-GRID POWER SPECIALIST The company e.power Consulting and Construction (Pty) Ltd (e.power) provides professional engineering, construction and consultancy services to the industry, including the building and installation of generator plants, building and rental to lodges of power packs in containers, and provision of solar systems.

E.POWER ALSO PROVIDES DIESEL GENERATOR POWER PLANTS

Its capabilities are enhanced through its affiliate, e.control and Panels CC, which specialises in the design and manufacture of low-voltage switching panels, generator and other control boards, motor drives, power-factor correction panels, and distribution boards. From its head office in Windhoek, Namibia, e.power services the whole SADC Region.

E.POWER FURTHERMORE PROVIDES PACKS FOR OFF-GRID POWER SOLUTIONS (LODGES AND CLINICS).

THE ADVANTAGES ARE THAT E.POWER GUARANTEES: • • •

24-hour power Annual electricity budgets that can be determined in advance Installations that are maintained by external technical experts

E.POWER PROVIDES DIESEL GENERATORS FROM 20 KVA–700 KVA • • • •

Design Manufacture Installation Full turnkey projects

• •

Large single-unit generating sets up to 1 500 kVA Multi-unit synchronised generator-set installations with up to 30 units in parallel

THE CONTAINERISED POWER PACKS CONSIST OF: • • • •

Diesel generator Battery storage PV Solar Wind turbine

E.POWER LEASES GENERATORS/ POWER PACKS •

Rental fleet consists of 25 kVA-600 kVA generators

E.POWER PROVIDES MAINTENANCE • • •

Annual contracts based on monthly visits Around-the-clock monitoring via GSM communication Stocks spare parts

e.power CONSULTING AND CONSTRUCTION Volker Trübenbach +261 254 813/276 volker@e-power.com.na

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NAMIBIA CONSTRUCTION (PTY) LTD. CORNERSTONE IN CONSTRUCTION

OUR DIVISIONS

BUILDING This division serves as the primary contractor on medium to large scale building projects. Our highly skilled management team has a proven track record in executing world class projects. Close relationships with Architects, Quantity Surveyors and Consulting Engineers ensure projects are completed according to plan and within expectations. The building division has performed projects across various disciplines which include, but are not limited to: Shopping Centres, Hotels and Hospitality, Industrial, Commercial, Residential and Institutional

NUST - Casting of concrete Namibia Construction’s rich history has been a journey of progress, transformation and change. The company was founded in 1949 by HansHeinz Schulz and initially traded under the name HH Schulz. In 1977, years before Namibia’s independence, the company changed its name to Namibia Construction. We have since evolved from our humble beginnings and are executing multi-million dollar projects, contributing to the nation’s infrastructure. There are many roads, towns, shopping centres, mines and other noteworthy projects throughout Namibia that have been constructed by our company. We are proud to consider ourselves pioneers and key players in the construction and development of this wonderful land of the brave. Our vision is one of upliftment and growth. In the words of our late director Karl-Heinz Schulz, Namibia Construction is a “cornerstone in construction”, a company that throughout the years has employed thousands of Namibians, developed their skills and affected their lives to better prosperity. This is our quest. To continue to be the contractor of choice in an environment where we can uplift Namibians through world class projects. We remain one of the few Namibian companies with no direct or indirect external shareholding. The company now operates regionally in Namibia with major of ces in Swakopmund and Windhoek, across various divisions which include: • Civil Engineering • Building Contractors • Crushing • Concrete (Ready-mix)

OUR VALUES

QUALITY INTEGRITY CONSISTENCY PROFESSIONALISM INNOVATION

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CIVIL Namibia Construction provides expert services in Civil Engineering to both the public and private sectors. This Division holds signi cant Plant and Equipment to ensure the capability to successfully execute large and multifaceted projects.The company has further developed strong leadership and highly skilled teams specialising in complex structures and services. Key disciplines in our civil division include the following: Bulk Earthworks, Road Construction, Infrastructure Services, Concrete Structures, Bridges, Drainage and Culverts CRUSHER Namibia Construction operates commercial crushers in Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. This division operates contract crushing and screening for various road projects throughout the country. Specialist crushing and consulting are available on request. CITY CONCRETE (READY-MIX) This Division, operating under the name City Concrete, is one of the largest ready- mix concrete suppliers in Namibia. With plants located in Windhoek and Swakopmund, City Concrete provides excellent service and quality for residential, commercial or other construction projects. The division utilises a state of the art batch plant which is capable of delivering 90 cubes an hour at optimal ef ciency. It utilises two 36m pumps and Namibia’s rst 42m pump supported by 12 ready mix trucks. Customised mix designs and consultation are available on request. SOME KEY PROJECTS Over the years Namibia Construction has been a major player in the development of Namibia’s infrastructure. Here are some of our outstanding projects: Okahandja Road, DR Sam Nujoma Staduim Katatura, Platz Am Meer - Swakopmund, Polytech 2013 - Windhoek, Walvisbay Salt Refiners

NAMIBIA CONSTRUCTION (PTY) LTD Tel +264 61 237 187 info@namibiaconstruction.com www.namibia-construction.com


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

CORNERSTONE IN CONSTRUCTION Namibia Construction is the contractor of choice in Namibia Our aim is to uplift Namibians through world class projects

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FISHING NAMIBIA HAS ONE OF THE MOST PRODUCTIVE FISHING GROUNDS IN THE WORLD, DUE PRIMARILY TO THE PRESENCE OF THE BENGUELA

CURRENT. UP-WELLING CAUSED BY THE CURRENT BRINGS NUTRIENT

RICH WATERS UP FROM THE DEPTHS THAT STIMULATE THE GROWTH OF MICROSCOPIC MARINE ORGANISMS. THESE IN TURN SUPPORT

RICH POPULATIONS OF FISH, WHICH FORM THE BASIS OF THE MARINE

FISHERIES SECTOR. NAMIBIA’S FISHING INDUSTRY IS WELL KNOWN FOR ITS WORLD CLASS CAPABILITIES IN HANDLING, DISTRIBUTING AND MARKETING MARINE PRODUCTS.

THE NAMIBIAN FISHING INDUSTRY

The Namibian coastline stretches for 1572 km from the Orange River in the south up to the Kunene River in the north. The marine fishing industry is conducted from Swakopmund, Walvis Bay and Lüderitz. Fishing quotas are strictly enforced to ensure the sustainability of this resource. According to the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MRMR), Namibia is Africa’s third largest capture fisheries nation after Morocco and South Africa and ranks among the top ten fish producing nations globally. The Namibian fisheries sector generated approximately N$10 billion in export revenue during the 2015/2016 season, a massive 43% increase from the N$7 billion in the 2014/2015 financial year. Growth in fish exports was mainly driven by increased exports of horse mackerel. Namibia’s major export destinations for fish are South Africa, Zambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique and Zimbabwe as well as Spain, Italy, Portugal. Namibia’s 200 nautical miles EEZ has a biomass containing about 20 different species. Out of the 20 species commercially exploited in Namibia, eight species are regulated through TACs set by the MFMR annually, in accordance with Namibia’s marine resource policy. These are pilchard, hake, horse mackerel, crab, rock lobster, juvenile horse mackerel, orange roughy and monk.

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The most important species for the local fisheries are hake and horse mackerel. Horse mackerel accounts for the largest catches in terms of volume. By contrast, hake is the most important fish species in terms of value and job generation. The local hake industry accounts for roughly 70% of the total employment created by the Namibian fisheries sector as a whole. Namibia has embarked on the development of aquaculture in order to create employment, reduce poverty and boost economic growth. Management of commercial fisheries is based on a system by which rights are granted, total allowable catches (TACs) are set based on research results and quotas are issued to rights holders.

According to the NMA, the following additional valueadding possibilities exist:

Additional processing of hake, especially by those companies that do not yet process their raw material • Processing of smaller catches such as kingklip, monkfish, tuna etc. to client specifications • Processing of products from the mariculture industry • Processing of seaweed and other marine resources • Processing of by-products of the fisheries and marine sector (fish meal, fish oil) • Production of inputs to be used in the fishing industry, such as rope, nets, hooks and cooling material Source: NMA – Manufacturing and processing directory •


FISHING

VITAL CONTACTS MINISTRY OF FISHERIES & MARINE RESOURCES +264 61 233 286 www.mfmr.gov.na Namibia’s fishing industry is well known for its world class capabilities in handling, distributing, and marketing of fish products. As the custodian of fisheries and marine resources the ministry encourages the fishing industry at large to share information and other newsworthy developments in the sector. NAMIBIAN MARITIME & FISHERIES INSTITUTE +264 64 203 114 www.namfi.net The primary responsibility of NAMFI is to provide maritime and fisheries training in order to enable students to take up qualified positions within the maritime and fisheries industries in Namibia and elsewhere. This builds capacity in the maritime and fisheries sectors in and around Namibia.

NAMIBIAN FISHING INDUSTRY www.namibianfishingindustry.com BENGUELA CURRENT COMMISSION www.benguelacc.org INLAND FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE NAMIBIA +264 61 205 3021 aquaculturenam@gmail.com http://aquaculturenamibia.blogspot.com/p/research.html

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE)

A crab processing facility was opened in Walvis Bay during November 2016. Red Spider crab is caught in limited quantities but is of such a high value that it attracted the attention of Japanese investment. The new facility, Amstai, is a joint venture between Amswohl and Taiyo Fishing.

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FISHING

Promoting

fish consumption, our mainstay

The Namibia Fish Consumption Promotion Trust (NFCPT) was established in March 2001 as per Cabinet resolution 38th/05 12:00/0.00. In terms of this resolution, the NFCPT aims at promoting fish consumption within Namibia by making fish more accessible and affordable. The NFCPT is mandated to educate the public on how to prepare and cook fish to retain its optimal nutritional value. At the NFCPT we are geared for the promotion of fish consumption whilst at the same time making fish accessible and affordable in Namibia, we are committed to being the preferred fish distributor. To this end, NFCPT has strategically embarked upon the dual role of promoting a fish consumption culture amongst our Namibian population, while at the same time imparting skills on how to prepare this delicacy through various cuisines. The NFCPT remains steadfastly committed to ensuring that our corporate governance processes conform to best practices. The Trust is duly cognisant of the need for decisions to be ethically sound but also to be in compliance with the relevant regulatory regime. The NFCPT is geared to respond to the aspirations as set out in the Harambee Prosperity Plan in redressing the scourge of poverty and hunger, and in fulfilling these tasks the NFCPT remains committed to ensuring that all our produce are sold at below market-related rates to ensure inclusivity and access to our fishing products. We are pleased to announce that during the 2014/15 financial period we distributed 6,274.19 metric tonnes of fish products to Namibians in our effort to ensure food security within the country. At the NFCPT, together with the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, the industry and stakeholders, we are tirelessly working on ensuring that the objectives of the Harambee Prosperity Plan on hunger and and malnutrition are realised and - I quote - that “no Namibian should die of hunger”. Our aim is to ensure that the world-class fishery products of Namibia are also available to our people in the villages and towns. The NFCPT in delivering on its mandate has guaranteed that our retail footprint covers 12 regions with 16 fish shops; of which 2 are in Windhoek with rest of our fish shops located in; Ondangwa, Swakopmund; Rundu; Ongwediva; Keetmanshoop; Lüderitz; Gobabis, Windhoek; Eenhana; Outapi; Opuwo; Omuthiya; Nkurenkuru; Mariental and Walvis Bay. Plans are to expand to the remaining 2 regions in the near future. We invite you to eat Namibian fish for life!!

Victor Peya

Chief Executive Officer Head Office John Ovenstone Street Walvis Bay Tel: +264 64 204 508 Fax: +264 64 204 494

P. O. Box 568 Swakopmund, Namibia info@nfcpt.com.na www.nfcpt.com.na

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FISHING nfcpt_16_02_16 nfcpt_16_02_16

Our OurFish Fishshops shops

across across Namibia Namibia Nkurenkuru Nkurenkuru

Eenhana Eenhana

Oshakati Oshakati Outapi Outapi

Ongwediva Ongwediva Ondangwa Ondangwa

Rundu Rundu

Omuthiya Omuthiya Opuwo Opuwo

Gobabis Gobabis Swakopmund Swakopmund

Windhoek Windhoek

Walvis WalvisBay Bay

Mariental Mariental

Keetmanshoop Keetmanshoop Lüderitz Lüderitz

Contact Contactour ourFish Fishshops: shops: Ondangwa Ondangwafish fishshop shop

Lüderitz Lüderitzfish fishshop shop

Tel: Tel:++264 264(65) (65)– –240 240445 445

Tel: Tel:++264 264(63) (63)– –204 204010 010

Mondesa MondesaFish FishShop Shop&&Take Takeaway, away, Swakopund Swakopund

Tel: Tel:++264 264(62) (62)– –564 564564 564

Tel: Tel:++264 264(64) (64)– –401 401054 054 Rundu Rundufish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:+264 +264(66) (66)– –256 256827 827 Coral CoralReef ReefRestaurant Restaurant&&Fish FishShop, Shop, Ongwediva Ongwediva Tel: Tel:++264 264(65) (65)– –230 230622 622 Keetmanshoop Keetmanshoopfish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(63) (63)– –225 225859 859

Gobabis Gobabisfish fishshop shop Tobias TobiasHainyeko Hainyekofish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(61) (61)– –401 401763 763 Oshetu Oshetumarket marketfish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(61) (61)– –211 211094 094 Eenhana Eenhanafish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(65) (65)– –263 263284 284

Opuwo Opuwofish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(65) (65)– –273 273548 548 Omuthiya Omuthiyafish fishshop shop Tele/fax: Tele/fax:++264 264(65) (65)– –247 247112 112 Nkurenkuru Nkurenkurufish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(66) (66)– –264 264988 988 Mariental Marientalfish fishshop shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(63) (63)– –244 244782 782 Walvis WalvisBay BayFish FishShop Shop Tel: Tel:++264 264(64) (64)– –204 204208/11 208/11

Outapi Outapifish fishshop shop

Head Headoffice: office:

Tel: Tel:++264 264(65) (65)– –251 251193 193

John JohnOvenstone OvenstoneStreet, Street,Walvis WalvisBay Bay PPOOBox Box568, 568,Swakopmund Swakopmund Tel: Tel:+264 +264(64) (64)204 204508 508 Fax: Fax:+264 +264(64) (64)204 204494 494 Email: Email:info@nfcpt.com.na info@nfcpt.com.na Website: Website:www.nfcpt.com.na www.nfcpt.com.na

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FISHING FISHING

THE BENEF ALWAYS EN NAMIBIAN Our Story Our story is one of humble beginnings. But it is a beautiful story of how we as Namibia can achieve true Namibian ownership and reap the socio-economic benefits of that status for our Nation. Beforeindependence of the Republic of Namibia, we were an agent and broker servicing foreign trawlers catching fish in Namibian waters. Our business model at the time was to service the foreign vessels with whatever they required from shore. Around that time our whole business was fully foreign owned.

Namibianisation Driven by the desire to Namibianise our business, we pioneered the Namibianisation of the industry by buying trawlers and engaging in harvesting the natural resource through the transshipment model. In order to learn the most we could from our skilled Russian counterparts successfully, we formed a joint venture and this is where the name Namsov came from. The success of this joint venture was in merging the possession of a local fishing quota and utility of foreign owned hardware and expertise to unlock that value. Both foreign contributions were effectively transferred to Namibians. By 1993 Namsov Fishing became more than 50% Namibian owned. Come 1996, we introduced our own vessel called the Sunfish and this established us as the main Namibian mid-water trawler operator. At this point, we didn’t have a cent advanced by any shareholders. We chartered vessels from Russia to catch our quotas to turn the profits we needed to grow our business. Over time we became better trained in the business. Amongst other industry leading moves, we made deliberate decisions to pay our crew the best in the industry and we also attracted the best clients. We furthermore allocated 10% shareholding in the company to the Namsov Community Trust as our contribution to the social-economic agenda of Namibians

Growth Through the steady re-investment of profits back into the business, we purchased an additional four vessels by 1998. This enabled a period of steady investment, technological improvement and growth. The culture of diligently reinvesting into the business made Namsov the leader in the industry. This is when our Namibianisation dreams started becoming a reality. We successfully managed to cease the foreign ownership and the chartering of foreign vessels permanently. At the time, legislation and regulations required Namibian shareholding, investment and Namibianisation in the industry. In 1994 already when the first rights were introduced, Namsov Fishing Enterprises was already

majority Namibian owned. We continued to excel through regulatory and legislative compliancy. As a result; we received long term rights and access to horse mackerel quotas. Our historical success was thus built and strengthened on these principles.

Today Fast forward to today. Namsov Fishing Enterprises now employs 649people . Our role as a responsible, efficient and honest company ensures that Namibians are employed, communities are empowered, and our industry value directly and indirectly benefits those within our ecosystem. Since, we have increased Namibian shareholding to 61%

How we share the value we create with Namibia The value we create is shared with the following identified stakeholders: • • • •

Our employees Providers of capital the Government Republic of Namibia and our business

This is how the total wealth of NFE is owned and distributed to our stakeholders. This is a model we have followed since 1991.

Value Added 2013 Namibian Employees

30%

31% 17%

22%

Providers of capital Employees     (61% Namibian) Providers  of  capital     Namibian Government Government     Re-invested into operations Re-­‐invested    

Value Added 2014 Namibian Employees

24%

40%

20% 16%

Providers   of capital Employees   (61% Namibian) Providers  of  capital     Namibian Government Government     Re-invested into operations Re-­‐invested    

We have truly been creating value for 25 years.

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FISHING FISHING

FITS OF OUR OPERATIONS END UP IN THE HANDS OF N PEOPLE.

1

Fish distribution • • • •

2

Canning •

3

Namsov Value Add Facility

Tetelestai Mariculture •

for

United Fishing Cannery

Value adding •

4

Ekwao Fish Distribution Project Oshivelelwa SPOTO Eenhana Fish Shop United Fishing Fish Shop

Oyster Farm

TODAY TOMORROW GOOD NAMIBIA

PO Box 4, 1 5th Street EastWalvis Bay, Namibia | Tel: +264 64 219900 | Fax: +264 64 219905 | Web: www.namsov.com.na

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NAMIBIA GROUP COMPANIES GROUP COMPANIES IN PICTURES

(Current Page) Top left: MMI Holdings - Methealth uniforms Middle left: O&L Broll Wernhill Parksmall Bottom: MMI House Above: O&L Hangana (Next Page) Top right: Pupkewitz Group - VW Opening Middle left: Andrea Barry, selfie moment with children Bottom left: O&L Pick-n-Pay Bottom right: O&L Kraatz Marine

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Top left: MB 70 Final Winners with Mr. Dougie Truter (Pupkewitz Group CEO) Second top left: O&L - Namibia Breweries Middle left and bottom: O&L Namibia Dairies Above: O&L - Namibia Breweries

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BIDVEST NAMIBIA

CREATING OPPORTUNITIES. GROWING PEOPLE. UNLOCKING POTENTIAL Bidvest Namibia prides itself on being a forward thinking, passionate and innovative company. We believe in doing things differently, empowering people and creating new business opportunities that nurture a sustainable environment and return on investment, while simultaneously uplifting our communities.

water, then let us make sure that these ripples are positive and create an environment for further growth,” says Bidvest Namibia CEO, Sebby Kankondi.

BUSINESS MODEL

Without our communities, staff, shareholders and customers, there would be no Bidvest. In line with our Government’s plans, we are committed to eradicating poverty and seeking entrepreneurial opportunities for women, disadvantaged groups and the promising youth.

With a portfolio that ranges from food distribution to commercial services, the Group has rooted itself firmly as a proudly Namibian company. Our fishing operations, Bidvest Namibia Fisheries Holdings (BidFish), include Namsov (horse mackerel), United Fishing Enterprises (pilchards, canning, fishmeal and fish oil processing), Tetelestai Mariculture (oyster cultivation), and other joint venture partnerships in Pesca Fresca (Angolan joint-venture focused on sardinella, frozen fish and fish mealprocessing), Twafika (Monk fish) and Carapau (joint-venture partnership with other operators). Bidfish is particularly proud that it feeds more than three million people daily in Sub Saharan Africa. Through partnerships with smaller rights holders, Bidfish creates opportunities that stimulate job creation and community involvement.

Each year, we support a myriad of programmes that translate into positive results in environmental and conservation efforts, education, sport, growing the small business sector and upskilling women and youth. Our CSI programmes provide bursaries and study aid grants to Namibians in various fields from maritime disciplines, to engineering and anthropology.

The Bidvest Namibia Commercial and Industrial Services and Products division comprises Bidvest Namibia Steiner, Cecil Nurse, Minolco, Kolok, HRG Rennies Travel, Voltex, Plumblink and Waltons. These business units supply everything from office automation and equipment to rental hygiene equipment and travel management services.

“Bidvest Namibia is more than just a business. It is a group of people who understand that every person is intricately linked to another; that no man is an island, and whatever we do affects everyone else around us. If we are to create ripples in the

The Food and Distribution division comprises Caterplus Namibia and Taueber & Corssen which provide FMCG warehousing, distribution, sales and merchandising services to the Namibian retail and wholesale markets.

We constantly seek innovative ways of growing and sustaining budding businesses. Our business model is decentralised yet synergetic. Growth is primarily achieved by expanding and diversifying the product and service offerings of our existing business entities. And we ensure that our human resource capacity and skills are continuously enhanced to provide growth potential for employees.

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The Freight and Logistics services division is run by Manica Group Namibia. Established in 1924, Manica’s business units provide the full scope of a onestop-logistics solutions shop for anything from clearing and forwarding to stevedoring, cargo handling, bunkering and lubricants. On the digital frontier, Bidvest Namibia Information Technology (BIT) provides complete information technology services including data management networking, servers and all IT related services to both the Group and external ccustomers. Bidvest Automotive Bidvest Namibia’s automotive division comprises the Novel Motor Company which sells aspirational vehicle brands, including Ford, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and Mazda. Namibia Bureau de Change is a recent acquisition, providing currency exchange and money transfer services. One such product is a secure currency debit card that allows travellers to conveniently and safely pre-load three different currencies (Dollar, British Pound and Euro) on to the currency card, thereby eliminating the need for currency exchanges overseas and a saving on exchange rates costs.

GROWTH AND SUSTAINABILITY

Bidvest Namibia has consistently grown through natural business expansion, new partnerships, streamlining and strategic acquisitions. We constantly seek to connect people in ways that will benefit the company, the community and the country,” says Kankondi. Our brand is not only a symbol of quality customer service but of our commitment to improving

the lives of our communities, creating opportunities for business to flourish, and unlocking the talents and potential of our people and resources. “We are proud to be part of Namibia’s socio-economic environment, ensuring sustainable and profitable investments, business operations and opportunities for Namibians to share in our successes.”

BIDVEST NAMIBIA FACTS • •

We employ over 2 637 people. We understand that people create wealth and companies only report it. We listed on the Namibia stock exchange on 26 October 2009. We transferred 15% of issued share capital to our BEE partners (Ovanhu) at listing. Namsov Fishing Enterprises provides high quality, affordable protein to more than 3 million people in Africa daily. Taeuber & Corrsen has been operating in the FMCG market since 1924. Founded in 1924, Manica Group Namibia is the oldest logistics company in Namibia. Namsov Community Trust has invested over N$80million in upliftment programmes across Namibia.

BIDVEST NAMIBIA Andrea Calitz Corporate Public Relations & Media Officer +264 61 41 7450 info@bidvest.com.na www.bidvestnamibia.com.na


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THE FRANS INDONGO GROUP SHAPE TODAY. OWN TOMORROW.

“DOING SOMETHING ONCE DOES NOT MAKE ONE AN EXPERT. TO EARN THAT TITLE, A REPEATED NUMBER OF SUCCESSES IS NECESSARY.” DR FRANS INDONGO The foundations of the Frans Indongo Group were established in the mid 1950’s by a then unknown and very poor entrepreneur. From humble beginnings, under the auspice of the ever-enterprising and now renowned Frans Aupa Indongo, the Group has grown to become a leading diversified investment company. Operating in the fishing, farming, property, automotive dealership, fuel, manufacturing and hospitality sectors, the Group has become notorious for its pioneering spirit, ability to see potential where others fear to look and a commitment to its clients, communities and country. The Group’s guiding principles are deeply embedded in the vision and values instilled by its founder, Frans Indongo: integrity, innovation, excellence, shared value, hard work, hard work and more hard work.

HISTORY

Since childhood, Indongo has advocated that “a little is the basis of a lot. Not much, the makings of many”. In the face of adversity, as a young black man, he stopped at nothing to generate income through various ventures, whether it was hunting, drying meat, cutting wood, selling goods, building huts or sewing. He saw prospects in everything and approached life with a sense of purpose and determination, synonymous with the great pioneers of old. In the late

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1950s, he worked for a brick maker whilst in Walvis Bay and used the money to buy sewing machines, believing you should never “squander your profits but rather invest it in your business to ensure your company has a future and the ability to reinvest in Namibia.” These combined initiatives ultimately paved the way for establishing today’s flourishing Namibian empire.

FRANS INDONGO GROUP TODAY

When Indongo founded his business, he primarily focused on the retail sector, with a vision to establish a network of shops, the magnitude of which was initially thought to be impossible. But with hard work and determination, he succeeded in doing just that. Since 2007, Frans Indongo Group’s focus has shifted from the retail industry to investment opportunities in the manufacturing, marketing and distribution of various products across the country through its investments in esteemed associated businesses: Bokomo Namibia, Tongaat Hulett Namibia, Wispeco Namibia and Grain Carriers Namibia. The Group’s appetite for the retail sector resulted in a strategic drive to expand its investments in the automotive industry. From a very insignificant market share position, Indongo Toyota has not only become the Toyota market leader in Namibia but a Toyota dealership grouping that is recognised for performing on par with the

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very best Toyota dealerships in Southern Africa. Customers can currently experience, and benefit from, the Indongo Toyota Passion for Excellence at dealerships in Windhoek, Walvis Bay, Okahandja and Otjiwarongo. Expanding its footprint across Namibia, a new state-of-theart Toyota dealership will be opening its doors in Ongwediva. And to complement the Group’s current offering, it has further invested in Hino Indongo, a successful truck dealership in Windhoek.

In the hospitality industry, the Group owns the strategically positioned hotel and conference facility, Protea Hotel Walvis Bay, as well as the epitome of luxury in the heart of nature, the Frans Indongo Lodge. With investments as its core focus, the company owns a carefully selected portfolio of a number of properties across Namibia’s major centres, including the Frans Indongo Group head office, situated in the heart of Windhoek’s CBD. As part of its approach to diversify its portfolio into other operations, the Group has also acquired interests in several other entities.

COMMITMENT TO CLIENTS, COUNTRY AND COMMUNITY

Symbolising Frans Indongo’s legacy, the Group is not only about the size of the organisation that originated from small beginnings, it is about the number of people it positively impacts, the contribution it

makes to the Namibian economy and the drive with which it pursues a life of purpose. Proving that with the right vision and motivation small opportunities can be transformed into conglomerates, Frans Indongo Group invests in companies that provide the potential for sustainable wealth creation through growth, by embodying critical mass, good governance and inspired leadership. As a purpose-driven brand, the Group’s vision has evolved to not just see profit in its business ventures, but also to create a positive impact on society by becoming a wealth creator and catalyst for continuous growth in Namibia. The Group purports that success is not only defined by how much money the company generates, but also by how much it contributes towards establishing an economically viable and independent Namibia; by making business more accessible to the people it serves and using every opportunity today to shape the way for a better and more prosperous tomorrow for all.

THE FRANS INDONGO GROUP Reception +264 61 22 2295/306 fig@indongogroup.com www.indongogroup.com


NTD 2016 - Frans Indongo Group Ad.pdf

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Financial Wellness:

The DNA that is MMI Holdings Namibia. To be the preferred lif

ellness partner with a reputa

or innova

tworthiness.

ETIE

Pinnacle/Metropolitan Empowerment Trust (0.7%), Metropolitan Staff Share Incentive Scheme (2.7%), MMI Holdings International (Pty) Ltd (87%), Grendada Investment (Pty) Ltd (9.6%). RM Mbetjiha [Chairman], J Nandago [Group Chief Ex [* South Africa], M Gebhardt (Company Secretary).

e Officer ], DJ Botes*, Adv. RV Rukoro, I Murangi, I Beytell*

MMI House,Cnr DR. Frans Indongo & Werner List Streets, 061-297 3000, proffice@mminamibia.com MMI Holdings Namibia was formed on the 1st July 2013 following the merger of Metropolitan Life Namibia Limited and Momen tum Life Assurance Namibia Limited. MMI Holdings Namibia consists of Metropolitan Swabou, Momentum, Momentum Asset Management and Methealth Namibia Administrastors. Metropolitan Swabou provides life assurance, investment and savings solutions, to lower to middle income market, while Momentum’s product range consists of employee benefits, retirement benefit solutions, life assurance, savings and investment products for the middle to higher income markets. Methealth Namibia Administrators provides healthcare fund administration, while Momentum Assset Management Namibia caters for the assset management needs of our clients. Methealth Namibia Administrators is the largest health administra in the country with a Share of over 74% of the Namibian Market. Methealth Namibia Administrators, administers three medical aid schemes: Bankmed, which is a closed scheme, NMC and PSEMAS, the Namibian governement medical aid scheme. MMI Holdings Namibia under its life assurance client facing brands, and medical aid administrator has a countrywide footprint of 15 and 12 branches respectively.

Your Lifetime Financial Wellness Partner

Underwritten by MMI Holdings Namibia Ltd.

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Underwritten by MMI Holdings Namibia Ltd.

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asset management

Dis


G R O U P C O M PA N I E S

:

ETIENNE BRITS CEO: Dis

INGAH EKANDJO General Manager: Group Services

GEORG GARRELS Chief Opera Officer: Life

LESLEY RUKORO CEO: Momentum Asset Management, Wealth & Unit Trust

VANESSA MARAIS Chief Financial Officer

MARGOT GEBHARDT Head: Group Legal and Company Secretary

FLORIAN AMULUNGU Chief Commercial Officer: Health

SIRK KRUGEL Chief Opera Officer: Health

Your Lifetime Financial Wellness Partner

Underwritten by MMI Holdings Namibia Ltd.

Underwritten by MMI Holdings Namibia Ltd.

asset management

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WE WE ARE ARE

OUR PURPOSE IS CLEAR.ISIN EVERYTHING WE DO, IT NEEDS BUILDTO ON TODAY OUR PURPOSE CLEAR. IN EVERYTHING WE DO, ITTO NEEDS BUILD ON TODAY FOR TOMORROW AND BE AND FOR THE BETTERMENT OF LIFE EVERYWHERE. FOR TOMORROW BE FOR THE BETTERMENT OF LIFE EVERYWHERE. WE WANT CELEBRATE THE SUMTHE OF SUM ALL PARTS MAKE UPMAKE OUR UP INSPIRING WETOWANT TO CELEBRATE OF ALLTHAT PARTS THAT OUR INSPIRING PURPOSE. WE BELIEVE THAT THE STORIES OF THE PEOPLE WHOSE LIVES WELIVES WE PURPOSE. WE BELIEVE THAT THE STORIES OF THE PEOPLE WHOSE HAVE IMPACTED IN VARIOUS WAYS IS WAYS WHAT IS DRIVES FUTURE. HAVE IMPACTED IN VARIOUS WHAT OUR DRIVES OUR FUTURE.

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Alexander Forbes House, 22-33 Fidel Castro Street

PO Box 16, Windhoek, Namibia

Telephone: +264 61 207 5111

www.ohlthaverlist.com

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THE PUPKEWITZ GROUP OF COMPANIES THE QUEST FOR EXCELLENCE

The Pupkewitz Group of Companies is a recognised contributor to key sectors of the Namibian economy, covering various retail segments through its trading divisions. The five well-established divisions Pupkewitz MegaBuild, Pupkewitz Catering, Pupkewitz Motors, Pupkewitz Megatech and Pupkewitz Foundation all operate under the umbrella of Pupkewitz Holdings. The group’s new Chief Executive Officer, Dougie Truter, has been tasked with the responsibility of steering an entity with a background as that of Pupkewitz. The company is a very diversified and decentralised entrepreneurial organisation and it is not very often that you find people who can achieve that. The late Harold Pupkewitz was one of the great personalities in Namibia and to replace such a person is not easy. Mr Truter was fortunate to come from a family business background, entrepreneurial and corporate, which gives him a good understanding of family dynamics. He believes in empowering people and he leads through others. He believes that by empowering people in an organisation one needs to decentralise and diversify. The group is uniquely positioned by its diverse and decentralised business outlets, with a national footprint in 15 towns and one village, creating exciting career opportunities and attractive benefits to its ± 1,600 employees. The experience and gravitas of its founders continues to be demonstrated by its management teams and as a proudly Namibian company, the Group cultivates a strong culture of business and family values. These are incorporated in the Group’s 10 Unifying Principles, which are considered an important ingredient for business progression and continued satisfaction for both clients and employees:

10 UNIFYING PRINCIPLES

1. COMMITMENT TO EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT 2. HAVE A THINKING CULTURE 3. CREATE & INSPIRE A PERFORMANCE CULTURE 4. SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE 5. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION 6. ASPIRE FOR SERVICE EXCELLENCE 7. GROUP BUSINESS LOYALTY 8. FINANCIALLY RESPONSIBLE & CAPITAL EFFICIENCY 9. ENCOURAGE ENTREPRENEURIAL INITIATIVES 10. PROVIDE EXCEPTIONAL SUPPORT, LOYALTY AND COMMITMENT TO THE PUPKEWITZ BRAND Characterised as the oldest and largest building material and hardware supplier in Namibia, Pupkewitz Megabuild and Builder’s Warehouse offer its clients professional service via its 16 branches, including the new retail branch Megabuild Lifestyle Centre. The Pupkewitz Motor Division (PMD) has been in the industry since 1954, selling passenger vehicles as well as light and heavy commercial vehicles through a vast network of dealerships country-wide. These include top quality brands such as Toyota, Nissan, Lexus, Honda, Volkswagen, GWM, Hino trucks and Nissan Forklifts.

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Dougie Truter Group CEO Pupkewitz Holdings Pupkewitz Megatech offers a wide range of quality brands and products for electrical and industrial contractors, mines, industries and municipalities. It has outlets in Windhoek, Oshakati, Walvis Bay, Gobabis and Rundu. The company employs industry specialists to ensure its customers receive the best service and quality technical advice that is available in the market. Based in the capital city, Pupkewitz Catering Supplies (PCS) provides the best selection of catering supplies to the hospitality sector countrywide. Its wholesale line is comprehensive, offering everything that any restaurant, caterer or kitchen could need. The Pupkewitz Foundation is the Corporate Social Investment unit of the Group with a national vision, aligning its goals to the National Development Plans of Namibia (NDP4) and the New Equitable Economic Empowerment Framework (NEEEF). It has affected the lives of more than one million Namibians through the support given to key development areas such as community care, education, old age homes, building and renovation assistance to educational institutions, sports, the environment, orphans and vulnerable children, health, culture and religion.

THE PUPKEWITZ GROUP OF COMPANIES Ronel Claassen Group Marketing Communications Manager +264 61 427 018 commsmanager@pupkewitz.com


G R O U P C O M PA N I E S

OSHAKATI ONDANGWA

RUNDU

KATIMA MULILO

TSUMEB GROOTFONTEIN OTJIWARONGO

GOBABIS SWAKOPMUND

MAP KEY ACCESSORY FITMENT CENTRE BUILDERS WAREHOUSE PUPKEWITZ AUTO PUPKEWITZ AUTOMARK PUPKEWITZ CATERING PUPKEWITZ DATSUN PUPKEWITZ FOUNDATION PUPKEWITZ GWM PUPKEWITZ HINO PUPKEWITZ HONDA PUPKEWITZ LEXUS PUPKEWITZ MEGABUILD PUPKEWITZ MEGATECH PUPKEWITZ MOTORS DIVISION PUPKEWITZ NISSAN PUPKEWITZ NISSAN FORKLIFT PUPKEWITZ TOYOTA VON BAUMS VOLKSWAGEN TODAY

WINDHOEK

WALVIS BAY

LÃœDERITZ

KEETMANSHOOP

ORANJEMUND

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G R O U P C O M PA N I E S

THE GREATEST WEALTH IS HEALTH We are involved in initiatives providing access to health in the remote regions, as well as sound mental development through improved nutrition in Early Childhood Development, addressing sanitation concern. Ÿ UNICEF/Ministry of Health and Social Service – N$ 350 000.00 Ÿ Harold & Ethel PUPKEWITZ Heart Research Foundation - N$ 400 000.00 Ÿ Total Budget: N$ 500 000.00

SPORT PLAYS A PIVOTAL ROLE IN THE MAKEUP OF A SOUND MIND The PUPKEWITZ Foundation remains committed to the development of Sport in the country through sponsorships of the annual PUPKEWITZ Jetty Mile now in its tenth year, the PUPKEWITZ Cross Country Marathon and the PUPKEWITZ Interschool Swimming Gala. Ÿ Total Budget: N$ 400 000.00

BIG FIVE OF FOUNDATION KEY DEVELOPMENTS

Key to PUPKEWITZ Foundation's strategy are deliberate partnerships with government and reputable non-profit organisations whose development goals are aimed at viable, innovative and sustainable solutions in response to national and global priorities. The Foundation's projects are therefore aimed at addressing social and economic disparities and respo nding to government's developmental priorities. Programmes are implemented within the following focus areas – Education; Health; Community Care, Environment Culture and Sport.

PROTECT THE EARTH TODAY FOR OUR CHILDREN TOMORROW COMMUNITY CARE: LOCALS SUPPORTING LOCALS The PUPKEWITZ Foundation partnered with two other private sector entities, each donating N$1 million to the Shack Dwellers' Federation, for the building of 91 houses countrywide in the 2016 financial year. Ÿ The Ethel PUPKEWITZ Feeding Scheme is a PUPKEWITZ Foundation run initiative promoting Early Childhood Development through nutritious feeding. Once a week, staff volunteers deliver milk, eggs and fruit to 3000 children in and around all towns where we have branches across the country. The Ethel PUPKEWITZ Feeding Scheme recently celebrated its 1st birthday! Ÿ Total Budget – N$ 2,000,000.00 Ÿ

In wildlife conservation we have made an impact in donations relating to our core business through all-terrain vehicles donations. Our sustainable environmental programmes involve not only 8 conservation organizations but also learners, especially in our conservancies. Ÿ Total Budget N$ 500 000.00

EDUCATION IS OUR PASSPORT TO THE FUTURE Annual Funding is targeted at improving teaching standards nationally in Science, Mathematics, maintaining education facilities and expanding the provision of opportunities for vocational education and training (VET). We believe in our ongoing strategies and solutions and their role in assisting the population to meet future demand for skills, supporting all forms of education as we do. Ÿ Total Budget: N$ 1, 000,000.00

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INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY TELECOM NAMIBIA LTD IS NAMIBIA’S NATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR. NAMIBIA BOASTS A 98% DIGITAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE. NAMIBIA’S CELLULAR NETWORK SERVICE PROVIDERS ARE MTC, OPERATIONAL SINCE 1995, AND TN MOBILE. NAMIBIA POST LTD OFFERS COURIER SERVICES. NAMPOST HAS MORE THAN 122 POST OFFICES AND 93 000 REGISTERED MAILBOX HOLDERS COUNTRYWIDE AND IS AFFILIATED TO THE UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION. INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE CODE +264 + AREA CODE + NUMBER

CRAN is the Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia. It regulates telecommunication services and networks, broadcasting services, postal services and the use and allocation of radio spectrums. Consumer protection and advocacy forms an integral part of CRAN’s mandate. The Regulator endeavours to ensure that consumers receive the full benefits of competitive electronic communication services and are protected against any exploitation or abuse.

RESPONSIBILITIES: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ensure compliance with legislation and regulations Grant, renew, amend, transfer, suspend and revoke licences Implement a transparent and fair pricing regime Respond to consumer complaints Protect consumers in respect of prices, quality, variety of services and user equipment supplied Promote competition amongst service providers Manage spectrum planning and allocation Ensure that telecommunications services are operated in a manner best suited to the economic and social development of Namibia Establish procedures for ensuring safety and quality of services Regulate interconnection Facilitate the negotiation of rights of way Manage numbering, planning and allocation Facilitate universal service and attract foreign direct investment

ICT AND IDI DEVELOPMENTS IN NAMIBIA

Namibia improved its ID score from 3.20 in 2015 to 3.64 in 2016, making it the second most dynamic country in Africa in terms of IDI value after Côte d’Ivoire. The main reason for this improvement was

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substantial growth in the number of mobile-broadband subscriptions, pushing up Namibia’s use sub-index value from 1.73 to 2.91, the largest increase in the use sub-index. The growth was stimulated primarily by reductions in tariffs and packages aimed at low-income users.   In 2015, Namibia’s mobile-broadband penetration stood at 62 subscriptions per 100 inhabitants, the fourth highest in Africa after Cape Verde, Botswana and Ghana.   Namibia’s overall IDI (ICT Development Index) score would have improved further had it not been for a drop in its access sub-index value caused by a 9 per cent reduction in the number of mobile subscriptions, the result of a decrease in the use of multiple SIM cards following a merger between two operators. Namibia’s score on the access sub-index fell from 4.35 to 4.25.   Namibia is one of the frontrunners in Africa in ICT development, as the government has encouraged modernisation of the country’s telecom network. In 2014, Telecom Namibia started to construct a fibre-based network to connect the central government to the administrative capitals of all 14 regions in the country. The project aims to support government efforts towards decentralisation and make effective e-government available to the wider public. Mobile Telecommunications (MTC), the largest operator in Namibia, was also one of the first operators in Africa to launch both commercial 3G and 4G networks (in 2006 and 2012 respectively). In April 2016, MTC, in cooperation with Huawei, also announced the first commercial use of a (LTE-A) network in Africa, making Namibia the first country in Africa to reach speeds of 1 Gbit/s.  Source: MICT Namibia: Measuring the Information Society Report 2016


ICT

Image by CRAN

VITAL CONTACTS MINISTRY OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY +264 61 283 9111 www.mict.gov.na The Ministry of ICT is responsible for information technology sectors, telecommunications, broadcasting, the media and postal services in Namibia.

COMMUNICATIONS REGULATORY AUTHORITY OF NAMIBIA (CRAN) +264 61 222 666 www.cran.na

ICT PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OF NAMIBIA info@ictpan.org.na www.ictpan.org.na MTN BUSINESS +264 61 209 8000 www.mtnbusiness.co.na MTC (MOBILE TELECOMMUNICATIONS NAMIBIA) +264 61 280 2000 www.mtc.com.na TN MOBILE +264 61 201 9211 www.telecom.na

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ICT

Solutions Provider

green

Green Enterprise Solutions (Pty) Ltd Holistic ICT Solutions Provider

tel: +264 (0)61 416 300 | email: info@green.com.na | web: www.green.com.na Follow Us On:

Empowering Investments through ICT Data Center Technologies Analytics and Business Intelligence

Microsoft SQL Server Big Data and Analytics, IBM Cognos & SPSS

Collaborative & Social LoB Apps Development Office365, Intranet Platform with SharePoint, Workflow

Automation with SharePoint, Content Management System (CMS) based Websites, Management Information System (MIS)

Mobile Apps Development Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Solutions Microsoft Dynamics (AX, NAV, GP, CRM) ERP Solutions

Data Center Technologies Virtualization, Storage & Server Solutions, Enterprise Backups, Network & Security, Managed Services, Hosted Services

LoB Apps Development Custom Line of Business software development (Microsoft .Net) for your specific business needs

Mobile Apps Development Android, iOS, Windows

(Education, Enterprise & Social Apps)

Our Partners:

Authorized Warranty Service Provider for Lenovo and IBM

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POWERCOM PTY LTD

ICT INFRASTRUCTURE AND EQUIPMENT PROVIDER PowerCom (Pty) Ltd is an infrastructure and ICT provider since 2013 following a 100% acquisition by Telecom Namibia Limited. The company has been in existence since 2007 and previously traded as a mobile operator under Cell one, Leo and TN mobile brands respectively. PowerCom offers a wide range of infrastructure services and boasts an asset portfolio of over 300 telecommunication towers. PowerCom’s infrastructure asset base is powering the industries and servicing a clientele base across a spectrum of industries; representing 500 leaseholds across the board. The clientele ranges from mobile network operators such as Telecom Namibia Limited, MTC, Paratus and internet providers such as Africa Online. TV broadcasters such as NBC, MultiChoice and One Africa TV, as well as radio stations are also among the key clients. In addition, PowerCom is servicing other players in a transmission space ranging from rail and aviation to security.

OUR MISSION AND VISION

To become the market leader in passive infrastructure by providing a unified one-stop solution for telecommunications towers and other ICT infrastructure in the market.

OUR PROMISE • • • • • •

We are an innovative leader that are people and customer-centric. Strategic shift to focus on service innovation and improving customer experiences. We focus on service innovation and improving customer experiences through a strategic shift We encourage innovative ideas among our employees and instil a spirit of entrepreneurship to generate a strong business return. We make maximum productive use of infrastructure and capacity. We adopt disruptive technology spawning in a new era of digital business transformation to better satisfy customer needs.

Chief Executive Officer - Alisa Amupolo

SERVICES

Site Acquisition We acquire or lease land to build new tower sites for two or more operators or tenants to lease. Site Construction Through sound partnership, we build tower sites that comprise of civil works, electricity and erecting of a tower structure. Site Share & Co-location Leasing We lease infrastructure to mobile and broadcasting operators as well as other clients in the transmission business on a medium to long-term basis. Site Maintenance We provided fully-fledged maintenance on all our infrastructure to ensure operational efficiency.

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Going the extra mile to deliver more for you NamPost - The Total Service Package Namibia Post Ltd (NamPost) is the national postal operator in Namibia providing service solutions through its postal, banking, courier, philately, agency and money transfer products. At NamPost, we strive for logistical services that enrich and simplify the lives of our customers, stakeholders and employees on a daily basis. With over 140 post offices nationwide, we ensure that customers come first and that they are well taken care of while attending to their postal, banking, courier, philatety and agency needs. By introducing new innovative electronic communication and financial services over the years NamPost has managed to move with the times.

Vision To always be the best at what we do.

Mission We provide postal, financial and logistics solutions to keep people in touch and to enhance their quality of life.

Values Integrity, Accountability, Caring and Teamwork (I-ACT).

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ICT Our Products and Services Postal Services With more than 98 million pieces of mail handled annually, our mail services are designed for speedy and reliable services in a highly competitive industry. We provide the following: • Domestic & International Mail • Parcel Services - Domestic and International • Hybrid Mail Services (bulk and re-mailing for large corporations) • Express Mail Services Internationally (EMS) • Rental of Post Boxes or Postal Address • Philately Services: Philately means stamp collecting. We involve our community by requesting interesting themes or suggestions, historical events and /or anniversaries that we can depict on our stamps. We design the artworks, print the stamps and market them. We advertise our beautiful country by depicting only Namibian themes on our stamps, hence we are saying stamps are little ambassadors for our country. Apart from collecting them, stamps are very suitable for school projects beacause with the images, we can supply all the relevant information. Agency Services NamPost’s expensive network covers most parts of Namibia, thus offering a secure business environment to provide services on behalf of businesses and the Government to communities. Using our expansive network, NamPost has collected premiums, council rates and service levies on behalf of third parties. Through it’s vast network, NamPost collects premiums on behalf of third parties such as Telecom Namibia, MTC, Avbob, MOSSINETS and AVON/Justine and we can do the same for your organization. This service is available throughout the entire postal network or, if needed, can be limited to a few selected Post Offices. Payments NamPost makes Old Age Pension payments on behalf of the Ministry of Poverty Eradication & Social Welfare.

NamPost Savings Bank (NSB) • SmartCards (Biometric finger reading savings card)

• Salary Payments into Accounts

• Savings Accounts

• Money Orders

• Transaction Accounts

• Postal Orders

• Savings Certificates • Fixed-Term Deposits • Save-As-You-Earn Investment Accounts

• Electronic Money Transfer Services • My Choice Investment Account • Call Accounts • Notice Accounts

Treasury Services Since the official establishment of the NamPost Treasury Department, it has become a competitive service force in the financial market. Through the Treasury Department, clients have the opportunity to invest their funds in a flexible range of products, suited to a large variety of customers and businesses.

Courier Services NamPost courier is the largest domestic courier company covering over 60 overnight destinations in Namibia. Our fleet of more than 70 vehicles enables us to service 141 destinations across the country. We move about 2 million parcels while covering four million kilometers in Namibia. Our partnerships with various courier service providers, both regionally and internationally, allows us to constantly benchmark against the best in the industry. As a result, we introduced our international courier collection and delivery service in 2009, which has now become one of the most competitive international courier services. We cover over 200 destinations globally.

Namibia Post Limited, General Manager: Corporate Marketing & Communication P.O. Box 287, Windhoek. Telephone: +264 (0) 61 201 3044, Fax: +264 (0) 61 249 445, www.nampost.com.na

We Deliver More.

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TELECOM INVESTING IN ICT INNOVATION AND GROWTH

The development of ICT infrastructure and provision of broadband services is a high priority in the Government’s Harambee Prosperity Plan (HPP). Being the incumbent national ICT operator, Telecom Namibia is duty-bound to play a critical role to drive ICT innovation and growth to facilitate sustainable socio-economic growth and development in the country. During the period up until 2020, the HPP proposes that Namibia needs to focus on three strategies and actions, namely: broadband infrastructure development, ensuring accessibility and affordability of broadband and promo­ ting e-services and innovations. Telecom Namibia prides itself on seeking innovative ways of implementing new technology to continually enhance its product offerings and better serve its customers across all segments.

vest another N$777 million in network infrastructure over the next five years, focusing on network maintenance, replacements and capacity upgrades. “Network optimisation, upgrade, capacity expansion and legacy system replacement will remain the key focus areas across various network domains,” Klein said. “The specific focus for the financial year 2016/2017 will build on the ‘Definition of Victory’ initiatives identified at the Strategic Workshop of 2016. It will further focus on operational efficiency, replacement of legacy systems, introducing tools, automating processes in the service fulfilment and network monitoring, improving network quality and customer service,” he said.

As part of its strategy to move toward an all IP infrastructure, Telecom Namibia is implementing access and transport technologies that would provide significant improvements in agility and cost-efficiencies, as well as in operational efficiencies, network quality and customer service.

The capital programme for 2016/17 directly supports customer demand, government and corporates, broadband and HSB (high-speed broadband) expansion, legacy system replacement and targeted GSM expansion. “Capex projects will be aligned to growth and sustaining service delivery capability of the network to focus on the strategic pillar of Quality Network and Customer Service,” he noted.

CAPITAL INVESTMENTS

BROADBAND

Over the past five years Telecom Namibia invested about N$1.35 billion in its infrastructure network to ultimately support Namibia’s broadband ecosystem at large. “There is much happening behind the scenes with investment in transport, aggregation and access networks supporting the broadband ecosystem,” said Theo Klein, MD of Telecom Namibia. Telecom Namibia will in-

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Telecom Namibia has invested in new generation broadband access technologies such TD/LTE, WiMAX, ADSL2+, VDSL2, Optical fibre, Active Ethernet, Carriergrade Wi-Fi and mobile 3G/4G LTE technologies. The deployment of Fibre to the Home and Multi-Service Access Nodes initiatives is aimed at delivering even higher speeds to the industry. This will ultimately

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drive the demand of rich media content and will enable ISPs to compete with mobile broadband offerings via LTE. New investment in transport and aggregation technology, Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing and Broadband Network Gateway deployment in the network contribute to the broadband ecosystem by providing a world class IP Network that will support the drive of rich media content bundled with high speed DSL Access offerings. Klein said Telecom Namibia will continue with the process of investment which requires a renewal, modernisation, and expansion of ICT infrastructure. ”Ultimately, our ICT investment can contribute to and enhance innovation by providing the essential digital infrastructure required for the exchange of ideas and data essential to innovation,” he said. Telecom Namibia was committed to playing a positive and substantial role in transforming the eco­nomy and society through improved connectivity, strengthening public service delivery and eliminating the digital divide.

MOBILE COVERAGE

The primary focus for TN Mobile is to improve the quality of service in the urban areas by ensuring adequate 3G and 4G coverage, while also expediting the deployment of Internet services where no physical infrastructure is available. This will be achieved by the deployment of some 141 base stations for urban and road coverage across the country. TN Mobile will pursue the strategy of having adequate 3G and 4G coverage to drive its data growth strategy.

TARGET NETWORK 

“Our strategy is to move towards an all-IP infrastructure in due course,” Klein said. The extension of the network by having points of presence (PoPs) in London, Frankfurt, Cape Town and Johannesburg was a major milestone and a key enabler for Telecom Namibia’s envisaged positioning in the market place and for exploiting market opportunities. Telecom Namibia is also preparing itself by deploying new optical infrastructure to improve the reach, quality, capacity, and resilience of its network. “This investment will enable Telecom to provide the wholesale bac haul and connectivity necessary for the next generation of mobile networks as well as for all other domestic operators and certainly for own products and services,” Klein points out.

CONCLUSION

The evolution of the Telecom Namibia network is ongoing, and the impact of the company’s deployed infrastructure has done much to grow the adoption of broadband in Namibia. As the country’s foremost supplier of wholesale network products and services, Telecom Namibia has been committed to enabling its customers to deliver on the connectivity demands that Namibians have come to expect.

TELECOM Oiva Angula Head: Corporate Communication & PR +264 61 201 2448 CommPR@telecom.na www.telecom.na


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Business Connexion Namibia

Your trusted ICT service provider. Business Connexion Namibia, is a leading provider of ICT solutions and a trusted partner in delivering a full spectrum of technology and consulting services to support high performance businesses, from desktop to data centre.

We pride ourselves on service delivery and dependability and our

We bring our vision of Connective Intelligence™ to life for our clients

experience spans across the telecoms, financial, mining, retail, and

with our skilled technical and administrative personnel and through

construction and health sectors with focus on ICT service excellence,

our partnerships with the world’s leading technology vendors.

which allows clients to focus on their core business. Business Connexion Namibia’s headquarters are in the capital city Business Connexion Namibia creates technology-based business

of Windhoek with additional offices in Swakopmund and Oshakati

solutions that meet the information management needs of today

covering the coastal and northern areas respectively.

and the future.

Our purpose is to provide increasingly simple, content-rich and affordable knowledge solutions to Namibia and Africa.

To find out more about Business Connexion Namibia and the services we provide, contact us:

130 Jan Jonker Road, Windhoek, Namibia. Tel: +264 61 204 0000, Fax: +264 61 204 0009, www.bcx.com.na

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LOCAL AUTHORITIES LOCAL AUTHORITIES IN NAMIBIA ARE CLASSIFIED INTO THREE CATEGORIES ACCORDING TO THEIR DEGREE OF AUTONOMY: • MUNICIPALITIES (PART 1 & PART 2) • TOWNS

• VILLAGES

The only three “Part 1” municipalities in the country are Windhoek, Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. Local Authorities are the third tier of Government, responsible for service delivery in urban areas. The governing body of a Local Authority is a council which consists of office bearers elected in accordance with party lists at a general municipal election. The minimum number of female candidates on a party list is governed by law. The term of office for a Local Authority councillor is five years. In a municipal or town council the Mayor serves as the head of such council. A Mayor’s term of office expires annually, exactly one year after the date of election. A Local Authority council is obliged by law to meet at least 10 times per calendar year and in intervals of no more than 10 weeks.

THE CAPITAL - WINDHOEK The charm of the City of Windhoek lies in its harmonious blend of African and European cultures and the friendliness of its people. It is a peaceful and relaxed city in a country with a proud record of political stability, and it is known as one the cleanest cities on the African Continent. Windhoek is the seat of central government and the country’s economic and financial hub. The head offices of state-owned enterprises and most multi-national companies, which are active in Namibia and in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) at large, are based in Windhoek; the Bank of Namibia, the Namibian Stock Exchange and the head offices of commercial banks and insurance companies are all located in the city centre. All foreign diplomatic missions are resident in Windhoek. The total area of Windhoek is 645 square kilometres. The capital has about 380,000 inhabitants, accounting for almost 17% of the country’s total population of 2.2 million.

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LOCAL AUTHORITIES

New COW building

VITAL CONTACTS ASSOCIATION FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES IN NAMIBIA

WALVIS BAY MUNICIPALITY +264 64 201 3111 pr@walvisbaycc.org.na www.walvisbaycc.org.na

(ALAN) +264 61 24 0915 alan@iway.org.na www.alan.org.na

SWAKOPMUND MUNICIPALITY +264 64 410 4111 swkmun@swkmun.com.na www.swkmun.com.na

NAMIBIAN ASSOCIATION OF

PART 2 MUNICIPALITIES:

LOCAL AUTHORITY OFFICERS (NALAO) +264 61 290 2624 www.nalao.org

PART 1 MUNICIPALITIES: WINDHOEK MUNICIPALITY +264 61 290 2321 communications@windhoekcc. org.na

OTJIWARONGO

MUNICIPALITY +264 67 30 2231 enquiries@otjimun.org.na GROOTFONTEIN

MUNICIPALITY +264 67 243 100 townengineer@grootfonteinmun. com.na www.grootfonteinmun.com.na

OKAHANDJA MUNICIPALITY +264 62 505 100 www.okahandja.org.na KARIBIB MUNICIPALITY +264 64 55 0016 karibib@iway.na

ceogomun@africa.com.na OMARURU MUNICIPALITY +264 67 313 013 outmun@mweb.com.na

KEETMANSHOOP

RUNDU MUNICIPALITY +264 66 266 400 www.runducity.iway.na

www.keetmansmunicipality.org.na

HENTIES BAY MUNICIPALITY +264 64 50 2000 hbaytc@iway.na

MUNICIPALITY + 264 63 22 3818 ceo@keetmansmunicipality.org.na

USAKOS MUNICIPALITY +264 64 53 0023 klassu@iway.na

TSUMEB MUNICIPALITY +264 67 22 1056 MARIENTAL MUNICIPALITY +264 63 24 5600 marmun@africa.com.na

For more information on the various town and village council visit www.alan.org.na or refer to vital contacts on page 234.

GOBABIS MUNICIPALITY +264 62 57 7300

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PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURE FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES CAN THIS BE SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTED?

PIERRE VAN RENSBURG - STRAT. EXECUTIVE: INFRASTRUCTURE, WATER & TECHNICAL SERVICES - CITY OF WINDHOEK INTRODUCTION Basic infrastructure is a key determinant of the growth potential in any economy. The City of Windhoek (CoW) as primary facilitator and host to the biggest economy in the country understands this, hence has underscored this in its core values and strategic drivers e.g. Provide basic services and maintain infrastructure. Despite showing these noble objectives the CoW, not unlike other local authorities in the country, has been struggling in recent years to finance infrastructure projects, in the water, sanitation and transport sectors where large capital outlay is urgently required. Dwindling land sales, a large and growing debt book and other cash flow difficulties has hampered this process to the point where there is a dire need for creative alternatives. Greater involvement of private investors through the design of economically sensible financing structures and projects can be viewed as one way to mitigate the above problems. The key however is to design investable projects with a sound contractual arrangement which implies a distribution of risks and returns that creates the right incentives for the various partners. Sound project design in most cases also improves the efficiency and chances of success of these infrastructure projects.

Prosperity Plan and Vision 2030, overcoming the infrastructure bottleneck is seen as an absolute necessity to boost much needed long-term economic growth and creating future investment in the region. It is an undisputed fact that key infrastructure as an input to a wide range of industries is an irreplaceable driver of sustainable economic development in any country. On the other hand, delays in the realisation of crucial infrastructure projects pose potentially enormous economic and immeasurable social costs. This is particularly applicable to the development of basic municipal infrastructure in strategic cities and towns where investment opportunities are otherwise bountiful. For the CoW and other local authorities in the country this challenge rings particularly true with the limited internal funding that has to be weighed against the acute need for urgent investment in the sector.

A major challenge therefore lies in the appropriate re-structuring of existing vehicles used for the delivery of projects into something that can tap into existing private sector resources. This could potentially significantly boost infrastructure finance while creating exciting new investment opportunities.

Given the lack of public sector funding as an inhibitory factor to key infrastructure development; the reasons for the lack of infrastructure finance by the private sector needs some serious consideration. For starters the potential supply of long-term financing is ample. Pension funds (considerable opportunity in GIPF), insurance companies and other long-term institutional investors have very large and growing long-term liabilities and are obliged by recent legislation to increase investment within Namibia. Hence they need long-term assets. However, very little of their financial resources is allocated to infrastructure. Another opportunity lies in exploiting the vast financing potential of international capital markets which remains largely untapped.

INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCING Following on the arguments raised in the introduction the author believes that in Namibia specifically and the Southern Africa region in general a very real and tangible bottleneck in the development of key basic infrastructure exists. With the current economic situation and against the background of the Harambee

Following on the above it would therefore appear that funding from the private sector can be made available. However, matching the supply of finance from the private sector to investable projects can be a formidable obstacle. In this regard the following are examples of some of the impediments to the flow of more finances from the private sector

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to public infrastructure projects: Traditional methods of project delivery entailed the planning and design of infrastructure based on a needs assessment and the long-term structure plans of a public entity. Projects were then prioritised and budgeted for on an annual basis where after the project was technically developed and prepared to the required level of detail for execution. At this point public tenders for implementation were called and the project was subsequently delivered. All need and tidy provided that internal funding for such project can be made available. With funding in short supply many projects, in particular large capital projects, never proceed past the planning and design stage as the budgets are never approved and the executing official does not have the necessary skills or level of creativity to come up with an alternative method of financing; Regardless of whether the direct payoffs to an owner of an infrastructure project cover its costs, the indirect externalities can still be hugely beneficial for the economy and the society on a holistic scale. Such externalities include the benefits of infrastructure services to a wide range of other sectors as well as the general upliftment of society. The inherent problem is that such benefits are fundamentally difficult or sometimes impossible to accurately quantify and even if they can be measured, charging for them may not be necessarily feasible or desirable. This can be a huge stumbling block that halts many projects at the feasibility stage; Infrastructure projects are more often than not complex involving numerous entities outside of the public sector. In addition, infrastructure projects often creates natural monopolies as a result of the particular service delivery such as toll roads, power supply projects or water supply schemes, hence local governments want to retain the ultimate control to prevent an abuse of monopoly power. This requires complex legal arrangements to ensure proper distribution of payoffs and risk-sharing to align the

incentives of all parties involved. This in addition to slow and bureaucratic decision making processes can lead to detrimentally long negotiations which often sink the project prior to implementation. Typically infrastructure investments generate cash flows only after many years while the initial phases of the project are subject to high risks. Moreover, the uniqueness of infrastructure projects in terms of the services they provide (often essential services delivered to users at cost) makes infrastructure investments less liquid. These three elements – the time profile of cash flows, high initial risks and illiquidity – can make purely private investment difficult and/or costly and therefore unattractive to any potential investor(s). CONCLUSION Despite these daunting prospects private sector financing in infrastructure projects is very possible given the establishment of a robust framework within which this can take place. Generally local governments which have established proven mechanisms for infrastructure projects e.g. frameworks for public private partnerships (PPPs) tend to be more successful in closing infrastructure projects. In the end the promotion of private sector infrastructure finance hinges above all on a sensible transfer of risks and returns. If done properly, the involvement of the private sector can also elevate the efficiency of service delivery and it should not be seen merely as a source of financing. As returns from projects are generated mostly over a long period of time the focus during project structuring should extend to the operational aspects as well and not merely its establishment. Finally, Namibia might arguably currently be in its worse financial position since Independence, but as far as infrastructure development is concerned this should be seen as an investment opportunity by the private sector to help economic growth and secure the future of this country and not Armageddon.


LOCAL AUTHORITIES

Walvis Bay Namibia’s industrial Hub - countless investment opportunities await you...

Walvis Bay (pop. 90,000*) Geography and location

Walvis Bay is geographically and internationally well situated. Located on the southwest coast of Africa (central coast of Namibia) along the Atlantic Ocean, the city is about 700 nautical miles from Cape Town, South Africa and 900 nautical miles from Luanda, Angola. The harbour city is well protected by the Pelican Peninsular with a desert climate and has great potential for expansion and growth. The expansive Walvis Bay Municipal area covers 1,124km² which includes some 60km of coastline. It is situated on the edge of the dynamic Namib Desert, which is the world’s oldest desert.

Climate

Walvis Bay enjoys a near-perfect climate thanks to the cold Benguella Current, which creates temperate conditions all year round and an obvious attractive choice for entrepreneurs, residents and tourists alike. Relative humidity is approximately 80% and rainfall is less than 20mm per annum. The city is surrounded by expansive and dynamic desert sands and regarded as friendly and appealing to the visitor.

Tourism

In order to diversify the economic base, the local authority and tourism establishments have joined forces to promote the city’s

tourist attractions. The success of this drive is illustrated in the fact that occupation figures at accommodation establishments range between 70% and 80% throughout the year. Tourism is active in the areas of: • Dune 4x4 tours • Catamaran sunset cruises • Exclusive Dolphin & Seal tours • Dune 7 challenge • Balloon rides • Angling trips • Dune sand boarding • Sandwich Harbour tours • Desert/Skeleton Coast charter • flights • Historic Kuiseb Delta tours • Dune quadbiking • Topnaar/Narra tours

Fishing industry

Traditionally, the economy of Walvis Bay has been based on the fishing industry, which is still the biggest employer of up to 13,000 people. Employment is dependent on the quotas allocated annually. The main species harvested are hake, horse mackerel and pilchard, whilst other species such as rock lobster, anchovy, tuna and sole also contribute to this sector.

Commercial port and fishing harbour

The Walvis Bay world class deep-sea port ensures that Regional and SADC countries

gain access to world markets, and acts as a hub port to the West Coast of Africa. It offers extensive services with a range of terminal facilities for containers, bulk and break bulk including frozen and dry cargo. Focus commodities are in the form of containers, bulk and break bulk goods and activities aligned to international ISPS, ISO 14001/9001and OHSAS standards. The adjoining fishing harbour is the hub of the Namibian fishing industry where factories operate and can their catches. The construction of a new container terminal for the existing commercial port is nearing completion, while the first phase of a new commercial port between the Kuisebmond and Afrodite Beach areas is under way. Other important areas of the local economy include Transport & Logistics, various types of Mining (particularly salt and granite), Ship Repair Industry, and Aquaculture. Environmental and Social Responsibility Walvis Bay’s remarkable progress has been the result of careful and responsible planning by the local authority and the business community, which includes the application of international best practices of protecting natural resources and upholding social responsibility. * Population projections based on the most recent surveys commissioned by the Municipality of Walvis Bay.

Municipality of Walvis Bay Public Relations Customer Service Division Tel: +264 64 201 3317/3381 Fax: +264 64 205 590 Email: pr@walvisbaycc.org.na

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MANUFACTURING THE MINISTRY OF INDUSTRIALIZATION, TRADE AND SME DEVELOPMENT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF

NAMIBIA’S ECONOMIC REGULATORY REGIME, ON THE BASIS OF WHICH DOMESTIC AND EXTERNAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS ARE CONDUCTED.

This Ministry is also responsible for promoting growth and development of the economy through the formulation and implementation of appropriate policies to attract investment, increase trade, develop and expand the country’s industrial base. The government of Namibia is fast-tracking legislation to promote Namibian manufacturing and exports through the following initiatives: The Growth at Home Strategy is the implementation arm of Namibia’s industrial policy. The strategy aims at industrialising Namibia over the next 20 years, and focuses on three central ideas: • Support value addition, upgrading and diversification for sustainable growth • Secure market access at home and abroad • Improve the investment climate and conditions New Procurement and the envisaged amendment of the Investment Bill will cover local and foreign investment and include a range of incentives to stimulate various industries. The Namibia Retail Charter aims at expanding the benefits of economic growth to a larger part of the population and to encourage local production. The charter will address the denial of retail space directly and assist producers with marketing and quality control. There is still significant potential for value-addition to products of the primary industry sectors and for manufacturing development in general. Among the projects are: • Fertiliser production (including the use of local phosphates) • Feedlotting in the cattle industry • Fish and pet food production • A game meat processing plant • A meat processing plant for northern Namibia • Processing of locally produced vegetables into sundried, canned or concentrated products • Processing of medicinal plants • Processing of skins and hides into leather products • Development of the Zambezi sugar and energy project • Edible oil and margarine production from sunflower and safflower • Production and processing of dates • Setting quality standards for products, packaging and labelling and introducing local certification. Source: NMA Manufacturing and Processing Directory 2015-16 edition

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THE NAMIBIAN MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

The association represents its members and is the watchdog and voice of Namibian manufacturers in general. The NMA enhances member visibility by assisting members with marketing functions through the NMA website, with business delegations and by dealing with direct inquiries. The association’s role also includes discussions and negotiations with Government, other sectors of the economy and foreign organisations, e.g. as part of foreign trade negotiations. The NMA continuously advocates better working relations and a dialogue between manufacturers and retailers.

NMA AWARDS

The Namibian Manufacturers Association (NMA) hosted its fourth Manufacturer of the Year Awards Gala Dinner on 20 October 2016 at the Safari Hotel and Conference Centre in Windhoek. During this prestigious event awards were presented to members of the NMA who are top achievers in the industry. The NMA Overall Winner, judges’ choice: GUAN’S PACKAGING Category 1: The NMA NEW Manufacturer of the Year 1st Place: Unleashed Design Category 2: The NMA SMALL Manufacturer of the Year 1st Place: Black Gold Compost Category 3: The NMA MEDIUM Manufacturer of the Year 1st Place: Ekango Salt Refiners Category 4: The NMA LARGE Manufacturer of the Year 1st Place: Guan’s Packaging Category 5: The NMA CORPORATE Manufacturer of the Year 1st Place: Namibia Breweries Limited Category 6: The NMA BEST AMBASSADOR for Manufacturing in Namibia 1st Place: United Fishing Enterprises


M A N U FA C T U R I N G

Image by Ohorongo Cement Category 7: The NMA MOST ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY award 1st Place: Etosha Fishing Corporation

As a fully independent private sector body, the NCCI identifies issues affecting the business environment and advocates a speedy resolution. The NCCI also offers enterprise development services. With 15 branches countrywide it is the ultimate business network.

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE)

VITAL CONTACTS

Walvis Bay Salt Holdings (Pty Ltd), through its various subsidiaries, is the largest producer of solar sea salt in sub-Saharan Africa. The group processes 50 million tons of seawater to produce more than 700 000 tons of high-quality salt per annum. The total operation covers an area of 4500 ha. The bulk production is shipped from Walvis Bay to South Africa and increasingly to countries in West Africa where it is mainly used by the chlor-alkali industry for producing chlorine and caustic soda as well as for table salt and as a feed supplement in agriculture. On 24 August 2016 the Vice-President of Namibia, Dr Nicky Iyambo, officially inaugurated the country’s first biomass boiler at Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) a subsidiary of the Ohlthaver & List Group (O&L). As part of NBL’s contribution to the O&L Group’s vision metrics of reducing its carbon footprint by 20 percent by the year 2019, the biomass boiler is intended to replace at least 80 percent of the current use of 3600 tonnes of heavy fuel oil (HFO) at the NBL plant in Windhoek with 7500 tonnes of woodchips. This in turn reduces carbon dioxide emissions by at least 8000 tonnes per annum. During 2016, Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) celebrated the 500-year anniversary of the Reinheitsgebot, the Beer Purity Law of 1516. With 2500 members the Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NCCI) is the leading business representative and support organisation in Namibia. Membership comprises companies across all economic sectors, including prominent large companies as well as hundreds of SMEs.

MINISTRY OF INDUSTRIALISATION, TRADE & SME DEVELOPMENT www.mti.gov.na DEPARTMENT: NAMIBIA INVESTMENT CENTRE +264 61 283 7517 jario@mti.gov.na www.mti.gov.na NAMIBIAN MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION +264 61 308 053 nma@nmanamibia.com www.nmanamibia.com NAMIBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE / NCCI AND INDUSTRY +264 61 22 8809 www.ncci.org.na NAMIBIA TRADE FORUM +264 61 235327 ntfadmin@ntf.org.na www.ntf.org.na TEAM NAMIBIA +264 61 307 246 admin@teamnamibia.com www.teamnamibia.com

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THERE’S NO STOPPIN G GUAN’S PACKAGING

Leading corrugated carton manufacturer continues its rise to of excellence INTRODUCTION Founded by successful Chinese entrepreneur Dianfu Guan, Guan’s Packaging has grown from strength to strength to become a prominent competitor in the corrugated packaging industry.

2015 - NMA Bronze Award - Most Environmentally Friendly Manufacturer of the Year - NMA Silver Award - Best Ambassador for Manufacturing in Namibia

Within a few short years of its launch in early 2010, this robust company has been awarded five prestigious awards that distinguish it from its competitors and ensure that it remains a leader in its industry.

OPERATIONS Guan’s Packaging remains at the forefront of the latest technology in the corrugated packaging industry. The company invested more than N$200 million in its factory, and continues its expansion drive to increase the factory capacity to 10 000 m2 of floor space.

The company continues to create jobs in Namibia through the expansion of its Walvis Bay based factory, and this investment further ensures that Namibia is able to export cartons to neighbouring countries through a network of clients. AWARDS Guan’s Packaging is the only manufacturer of corrugated packaging to receive recognition from the Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade & SME Development, as well as from associations such as NCCI and the NMA through multiple awards. 2013 - NMA Gold Award – SME Manufacturer of the Year Award 2014 - Gold Award – Sam Nujoma Innovation Enterprise Development - Platinum Award - Made in Namibia EXPO

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This, coupled with the latest equipment and technology as well as a well-trained and motivated team, ensures that Guan’s has less downtime, excellent equipment performance and superior printing ability. Guan’s Packaging is ISO 9001:2008 certified. CORPORATE CITIZEN The company supports various community activities throughout the year. Funding is given in cash, kind or time, but also with the donation of much-needed cardboard products. Guan’s Packaging bin boxes have become a feature at most local events, where they help keep Namibia clean. Recyclable material is also supplied to the food industry. while they also supply the food

industry. Guan’s regularly hosts educational institutions to assist with the development of Namibian youth and future leaders. In addition, the company invests in sports as well as the continuous development of its employees and the wellbeing of their families. OUR CREED We set the standard in the corrugated packaging industry.’ ‘We believe in the quality of our craftsmanship.’ ‘We are our product.’ ‘We believe in family.’ ‘We love our country.’ And ‘We live by our values: -Honesty -Integrity -Loyalty -Hard Work


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MATT ADVERTISING | NED112016A

M A N U FA C T U R I N G

In the velvety redness I taste fruit, cinnamon and rich tradition.

There’s always a story in Nederburg.

Enjoy Responsibly. Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18. NB3029 - Namibia FPFC - Trade Directory.indd 1

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M A N U FA C T U R I N G

OHORONGO CEMENT

CEMENTING TRUST, BUILDING FUTURES Ohorongo Cement has made great strides in the cement industry since its inception in 2009. The plant was built at Farm Sargberg near Otavi and the current investment amounts to more than N$3 billion. The plant is currently Namibia’s only cement factory and has a production capacity in excess of one million tons per annum.

NAMIBIAN QUALITY YOU CAN TRUST

Ohorongo Cement is a truly Namibian company, as all the raw materials for the cement production are sourced within the country and production, as well as processing of the final product, takes place at the Sargberg plant. The cement produced is of the highest international standards and is approved and certified by SABS. Ohorongo Cement takes pride in the fact that its operations are internationally certified by the Verband Deutscher Zeitschriftenverleger -VDZ in ISO 14001:2015 and ISO 9001:2015, in Environmental Management and Quality Standard. 144 samples are tested daily to ensure a product of consistent high quality, and thus consumers and building contractors can have peace of mind knowing they are receiving a product of international quality, supported by local service excellence.

PRODUCTS & PROJECTS

Currently the company offers five cement types for different applications. With a fully equipped SABS certified laboratory, the company offers technical support services to the local industry as required, and is actively involved in various projects within Namibia. Should volumes be substantial, the company can also assist in developing products for specific projects as required. Some of the major projects supplied by Ohorongo Cement includes the St Helena Island Airport and Wharf, B2Gold Mine, Neckartal

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Dam, Husab Mine, Namport’s Walvis Bay harbour extension project, Sioma Bridge in Zambia, and many others. In November 2016, Ohorongo Cement inaugurated a new production unit, the Special Composite Cement Plant which will enable the company to produce and pack various other types of consistent, high quality cement. The company continues to increase local shareholding and moved some foreign debt to local financial institutions.

PRODUCTION & EXPORTS

The company has managed to slowly increase its sales volumes and also export smaller volumes to neighboring countries, mainly to Southern Angola, Botswana, Zambia and in small quantities to the DRC. The Company’s main focus remains on supplying the Namibian market first before considering export markets. “The volumes for 2016 has improved in comparison with previous years, and we trust that the positive trend will continue. We can only hope that local manufacturing companies will be supported by planned private & government capital projects in line with the Governments’ Growth At Home Strategy, to assist with the Industrialization of Namibia,” says Hans-Wilhelm Schütte, M.D. of Ohorongo Cement.

TRAINING & STAFF COMPLEMENT

Transfer of knowledge and skills is a very important aspect to the company. Being a new industry within the country, the company invested huge amounts of money to train initial key staff in Germany. In a very short period the company accomplished a 98.7% Namibian staff complement. To add further value, Ohorongo Cement started a simulation training centre on site, focusing on control room training.

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It further supports education, not only for its employees to further their studies, but also allocated various bursaries to external individuals.

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY

The Ohorongo Cement plant is one of the most modern, energy efficient and environmentally friendly plants on the African continent. Some factors in this regard: • Reduced dust emission through bag house filter • The lowest CO2 emissions in Africa according to EU standards. • Equipped to replace the greater part of coal usage with alternative fields such as wood chips • Utilising excess heat from the kiln, savign time and energy in the burning process of raw materials to clinker • Recycling Oil / Installation of solar heaters The company has also won various awards over the past few years of which only a few can be mentioned: 2014: NMA Ambassador for Manufacturing in Namibia / NMA Corporate Manufacturer of the Year / Most Environmentally Friendly Manufacturer / Product/Service Excellence Award at the Made In Namibia Expo, and the Environmental Investment Fund (EIF) Award for Environmental Excellence Among Industry. It also won awards from the Namibian Standards Institute (NSI) for Product of the Year / Quality Company of the Year and Quality Service of the Year.

CORPORATE SOCIAL INVESTMENT

As a company and as individuals, Ohorongo Cement takes great pride in contributing towards the communities in which they live and work and family values apply. Hence, Ohorongo Otavi Community Trust (OOCT) in

collaboration with Support e.V., a health partner in Ulm, Germany, was established in 2008 by Ohorongo Cement (Pty) Ltd. For the purpose of assisting in the upliftment of communities and the general growth and development of Namibia, Ohorongo Cement committed itself to making an annual financial contribution towards the Trust. The focus remains on Infrastructure, Education and Healthcare. Some of the most recent projects includes supporting of housing for low income families through the Shack Dwellers’ Federation of Namibia, donation of hospital equipment & medical attire to various institutions, Renovation of Otavi Sports Facilities, the construction of a kindergarten and soup kitchen at Gam Settlement and the donation of 14 truckloads of cement, to all 14 regions in Namibia.

CONCLUSION

Ohorongo Cement recognizes that Namibia and the region need world class cement to set proper foundations for sustainable economic development, and to assist in attracting foreign investors for industrialisation purposes. The company fully supports Vision 2030, the Growth at Home Strategy as well as the Harambee Prosperity Plan.

OHORONGO CEMENT Esther Mbathera +264 61 38 9355 mbathera.esther@ohorongocement.com www.ohorongo-cement.com


M A N U FA C T U R I N G

匀伀 䴀唀䌀䠀 䴀伀刀䔀

吀䠀䄀一 䨀唀匀吀 䄀

一䄀䴀䤀䈀䤀䄀一 䌀䔀䴀䔀一吀

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MINING AND ENERGY THE NAMIBIAN ECONOMY IS BUILT ON ITS MINING INDUSTRY. NAMIBIA IS A ESTABLISHED PRODUCER OF GEM QUALITY ROUGH DIAMONDS, URANIUM

OXIDE, SPECIAL HIGH-GRADE ZINC, GOLD BULLION, BLISTER COPPER AND LEAD CONCENTRATE AS WELL AS SALT AND DIMENSION STONE. A number of world-class companies, which

coast of Namibia with the main land-based

Langer Heinrich Uranium (Pty) Ltd is a member

use state-of-the-art mining and processing

operations in Oranjemund and satellite

of the Paladin Energy Ltd group of companies

technologies, are members of the Chamber

mines near Lüderitz and on the Orange River.

and the corporate entity that holds the

of Mines (CoM). Namibia’s Chamber of Mines

Several types of innovative and specialised

group’s 100% interest in the Langer Heinrich

was formed in 1969 with the sole mandate

mining techniques such as vacuum

Mine. The mine is also located in the Namib

to protect the interests of its members while

extractors, dredgers, floating treatment

Desert, at the foot of the Langer Heinrich

promoting sustainable growth of mining and

plants and probe drilling platforms are used

Mountain and close to the Port of Walvis Bay

exploration in order to maximise economic

to extract diamonds from alluvial deposits of

and the seaside town of Swakopmund.

gain for Namibia as a whole.

ore bodies.

The not-for-profit organisation functions as

Debmarine Namibia launched its N$2.3 billion

world-class uranium mine, the Husab mine,

an advocacy body which acts as the mining

exploration vessel, the mv SS Nujoma, on 9

near Swakopmund. Once in full production,

industry’s voice towards government and

January 2016 in Norway. The new vessel is

Husab will be one of the largest uranium

other institutions. Based on its influence

scheduled for commissioning in Namibian

mines in the world.

and deliberations on policies affecting the

waters in the first half of 2017.

The Husab mine’s potential output is

Swakop Uranium is currently constructing a

sector, the Chamber aims at sustaining and maintaining a regulatory environment which attracts investment and promotes the growth of the Namibian mining industry.

URANIUM – THE METAL OF TOMORROW

Nuclear power accounts for 5.7% of the world’s energy consumption and 13% of the world’s

more than Namibia’s current total uranium production and will make Namibia the world’s number three uranium producer.

B2GOLD NAMIBIA (PTY) LTD.

Five major companies account for 95% of the

electricity. Uranium, the fuel for nuclear power,

mining income. Diamond and uranium mining

is a relatively clean source of energy that does

of B2Gold Corp. The remaining 10% is owned

are by far the two most vital industries in

not produce greenhouse emissions.

by EVI Mining, a Namibian broad-based

Namibia.

B2Gold Namibia is a 90% owned subsidiary

economic empowerment group. B2Gold Rio Tinto’s Rössing Uranium and Paladin’s

Namibia’s portfolio includes the Otjikoto Mine

Langer Heinrich are currently the only uranium

in north-central Namibia as well as extensive

Namdeb Holdings, which produces some of

producing mines in Namibia. Together they

base metal concessions in northern Namibia.

the finest gem diamonds, is jointly owned

contribute roughly 5 per cent to the world’s

Otjikoto is located east of the B1 highway

(50:50) by the Government of the Republic of

uranium oxide output. In 2015 Rössing Uranium

between the towns of Otavi and Otjiwarongo.

Namibia (GRN) and the world’s number one

produced 1,245 tons of uranium oxide, i.e. 2%

 

diamond producer, De Beers. Thanks to the

of the world’s total uranium output.

B2Gold runs a well-established Corporate

DIAMOND MINING

technical expertise of Debmarine Namibia,

Social Responsibility Programme that aims to

diamonds are increasingly mined on the ocean

The Rössing Mine is one of the largest and

promote responsible mining. The company

floor. Further value is added by about 11

oldest open pit uranium mines in the world. It

invests in projects that have a long-term,

diamond cutting and manufacturing factories

is located in the Namib Desert, 65 km east of

lasting impact. A great source of pride in this

which utilise some 16 percent of Namdeb’s

Swakopmund, near the town of Arandis. Last

regard is the B2Gold Namibia Game Farm

diamond production.

year Rössing Uranium celebrated 40 years of

and Education Centre. B2Gold has turned

Operations are centred along the southwest

production.

more than 16,000 ha of previously over-grazed

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MINING AND ENERGY

Image by NAMDEB

and neglected commercial farm land into a game conservancy and educational facility. In 2016 the Centre hosted some 1,500 learners. The educational programme is aligned with the government school curriculum and gives children from disadvantaged backgrounds an opportunity to learn about, experience and appreciate Namibia’s wonderful fauna and flora and the diverse and pristine landscapes that make this country so unique. According to the Chamber of Mines, some of the value-addition possibilities in the mining sector are: •

Diamonds: Cutting and polishing

Copper: Copper refining to 99.99% LME grade as well as manufacturing of copper products such as wire and tubes

Zinc: Zinc refining to 99.99 percent purity as well as manufacturing of zinc products

Dimension & semi-precious stones: Additional cutting and polishing factories

Salt: Refining and packing as well as use in a chemical industry

Development of materials from local minerals to be used in the construction industry, such as cement, tiles, bricks and panels.

NMA Manufacturing and Processing Directory

VITAL CONTACTS

Rössing Uranium

Ministry of Mines and Energy

RUL.communications@riotinto.com

+264 61 284 8111 info@mme.gov.na

+264 64 520 9111 www.Rossing.com

www.mme.gov.na

AREVA

Chamber of Mines of Namibia

smit.sugnet@gmail.com

+264 61 237925 info@chamberofmines.org.na

+264 64 415 720 www.areva.com

www.chamberofmines.org.na

Skorpion Zinc Mine

Electricity Control Board (ECB)

info@vedantaresources.co.na

+264 61 374 300

+264 63 271 2100 www.vedanta-zincinternational.com

www.ecb.org.na Namibian Uranium Association +264 64 402 393

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE)

www.namibianuranium.org

ENERGY-SAVING LIGHTS: NamPower

B2Gold Corp

nearly one million LED bulbs in mid-2016

Windhoek Head Office +264 61 295 8700 namibia.pr@b2gold.com www.b2gold.com

launched a countrywide free installation of to reduce the power demand during peak hours. The campaign, known as the 1 Million Light Emitting Diode (1mLED), will run until May this year.

  Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) +264 61 2043222 info@ndtc.com.na

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MINING AND ENERGY

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MINING AND ENERGY

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MINING AND ENERGY

DUNDEE PRECIOUS METALS TSUMEB

CREATING A WORLD-CLASS SMELTING OPERATION

OUR VISION STATEMENT

A progressive gold mining company that unlocks and delivers superior value through innovation and strong partnerships with stakeholders.

OUR MISSION STATEMENT

We acquire, structure and finance, explore, develop and operate our mining and processing assets. Our commitment is to deliver excellence in sustainability and to create value for all our stakeholders

OUR CORE VALUES SAFETY

The health and safety of our employees and local communities are paramount and enable us to be in business. Safety can never be compromised.

DIGNITY AND RESPECT

We care about people – their well-being, their careers and development, and their day-to-day work experience. We treat all colleagues fairly, listen to their input and work with them to create solutions that respect both individual needs and corporate interests.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY

We are leaders in promoting sustainable growth and environmental responsibility. We go beyond legislative compliance to promote pragmatic environmental solutions and practices in all of our operations.

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT

We care about the quality of the communities in which we operate. Our legacy will be to ensure we have helped residents make the community a better place than before we arrived on the scene. We have a strong corporate and social responsibility to the communities in which we invest.

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

We are passionate about continuous improvement. We seek out and execute operational practices that drive innovation, speed to market, cost efficiency, technical and professional excellence.

TRANSPARENCY

We set and uphold the highest ethical standards and business practices. Our dealings with employees, governments, stakeholders and communities are open, honest and transparent. We do what we say we will do and fulfill our commitments. We hold each other accountable for delivering results.

DUNDEE PRECIOUS METALS TSUMEB Alina Garises +264 67 223 4000 a.garises@dundeeprecious.com www.dundeeprecious.com

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MINING AND ENERGY

A fresh new era for our smelter Since purchasing the smelter in 2010, Dundee Precious Metals has had a vision of transforming the smelter into a viable, ďŹ nancially stable, world-class facility operating to international standards in worker safety, environmental protection and community relations. We look forward to continuing to collaborate with the community of Tsumeb and the government of Namibia to build a successful, safe and prosperous community and country.

We established the Tsumeb Community Trust to provide a funding source to address various needs such as education, social services, and health services. The Trust is entirely governed by local and national leaders.

His Excellency the President of the Republic of Namibia, Dr. Hage G. Geingob, and Zebra Kasete, Vice President and Managing Director of Dundee Precious Metals Tsumeb, ofďŹ cially opened the state-of-the-art acid plant in April 2016.

Because We Care. dundeeprecious.com

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MINING AND ENERGY

ERONGO RED

THE COMPANY BEHIND THE PROMISE

CORPORATE CHARTER Vision Electricity for all by 2020 Mission To distribute and supply affordable, reliable and accessible electricity to all in our region. Values Integrity Accountability Commitment Customer Focus Empowerment Teamwork

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES Enhance Customer/ Stakeholder Relations. Improve Quality of Supply and Service. Deliver Customer focused Services. Maintain and Operate. Network Infrastructure. Develop and Implement. Electrification Master Plan. Implement Asset Management Plan. Ensure Corporate Governance. Ensure Business Continuity / Risk Management.

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Transform the Organisational Culture. Implement Empowerment and Retention Strategies for staff. Keep abreast of appropriate. Technology to support Core Business Functions.

CORPORATE SOCIAL INVESTMENT

Our accountability to the communities in which we operate is underlying all Erongo RED’s policies and practices. As a corporate citizen, Erongo RED acknowledges its role in complementing government efforts towards social economic development and uplifting the Namibian people. Erongo RED’s Corporate Social Investment predominantly focuses its funding on the communities that are directly involved with the company’s operations. The company formalized its social commitment by setting up a CSR committee in 2013. The committee has

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since invested in a number of projects which are based on the needs of our local community.The company’s social investment is rendered in five key areas: Education and training – e.g bursaries, job attachments and training material. Community Support – e.g orphanages, old age homes and community centres. Environment – e.g. clean up campaigns and community assistance during droughts. Events and Functions – e.g sponsorship of temporary electricity connections for events and functions. Sport – Sponsoring a sports personality to be Erongo RED’s brand ambassador, and community involvement through sponsoring community tournaments.

RURAL AND PERI-URBAN ELECTRIFICATION PROJECTS -

Power to the people • Omaruru – 51 houses connected

• • • •

Karibib – 32 houses connected Usakos – 72 houses connected Otjimbingwe – 111 houses connected Okombahe (245), Omatjete (158), Tubusis (112), Otjohorongo (45), Anichab (41): another 601 houses to be connected in the 2016/2017 financial year.

ERONGO RED Public Relations & Marketing Officer Benjamin Nangombe +264 64 214 600 bnangombe@erongored.com.na www.erongored.com


MINING AND ENERGY

OUR PROFILE Envisaged as a dynamic and efficient commercialised electricity distributor for the Erongo Region, the Erongo Regional Electricity Distributor Company (Pty) Ltd, commonly known as Erongo RED, started trading on 1 July 2005 within the context of the Namibian Government’s National Development Plan.

“ELECTRICITY foR 2020”

BY

ALL

Erongo RED was formed by merging the service of electricity distribution from various municipalities and town councils in Erongo Region namely the Municipalities of Walvis Bay, Swakopmund, Henties Bay and Omaruru; the Town Councils of Karibib, Usakos and Arandis; the Erongo Regional Council and NamPower. All of these individual institutions are shareholders of Erongo RED. The initiative to create the REDs was part of the Electricity Supply Industry (ESI) and Electricity Distribution Industry (EDI) Restructuring Policy to distribute and supply electricity through economies of scale, pooling of human and operational capital resources to ultimately stabilize electricity prices and ensure reasonable, affordable and cost reflective tariffs for electricity consumers. Erongo RED purchases electricity from NamPower for both urban and rural customers. The electricity is transmitted and distributed to different customer segments ranging from residential, business and industrial customers. Erongo RED distributes about 15% of the total electricity requirement of Namibia. The electricity industry in Namibia is regulated by the Electricity Control Board of Namibia and the Erongo RED operates under set regulations. The core business of Erongo RED is to distribute and supply electricity within Erongo Region. Erongo RED received distribution and supply licences which are valid until 2030. The company also received a generation licence in 2006 for embedded power generation for a 220 kW wind generator near Walvis Bay, the first network-connected wind generator in Namibia.

red

power to the people

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MINING AND ENERGY

NAMCOR

EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION

Oil Rig

THE ROLE OF E&P

DOWNSTREAM

NAMCOR’S DATABASE

In line with this, NAMCOR’s downstream strategy is to establish and secure strategically located fuels and lubricant distribution networks, as well as sales infrastructure to boost the company’s brand and provide world-class service to you, our valued customers and business partners. NAMCOR’s business activities are bunkering, distribution, retail and wholesaling (B2B).We are duly committed to not only penetrate but also grow the commercial (B2B) and retail fuels and lubricants markets, in all profitable sectors, as well as to explore the export markets in the SADC region.

The institutional role of NAMCOR is to participate in hydrocarbon exploration activities on behalf of the Namibian government and to ensure optimum exploitation of Namibia’s petroleum resources. Additional roles include promotion of the hydrocarbon potential of Namibia locally and internationally.

Namibia’s offshore margin has excellent seismic data coverage across all four offshore basins. The technical data available for oil and gas exploration in the Namibian database consists of 2D, 3D seismic, well and aeromagnetic data. All the seismic and well data have been quality checked to meet industry standards. A physical data room is fully equipped with highend spec workstations and data can be viewed in both Petrel and IHS Kingdom depending on the clients preference.

KUDU GAS PROJECT

The Kudu Gas to Power project is seen as the most viable baseload clean energy solution to address the national energy crisis. The project involves the development of the offshore Kudu Gas field to deliver gas through a 170km pipeline to a new build power station. The power station is expected to generate 885 megawatts of electricity, of which half will be used for Namibia’s energy needs, and the rest will be exported to regional markets.The contractual frame work for the project is essentially complete, subject now to the finalisation of the project’s financing

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Downstream generally refers to the refining of crude oil, as well as the marketing and distribution of petroleum products derived from this activity. We are very active in the sourcing and selling, as well as the distribution of petroleum products. NAMCOR is a fast growing national petroleum company operating in Namibia.

RETAIL

The National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia has plans to enter the retail sector in the near future. This will see a number of NAMCOR branded service stations at strategic locations around the country.

SUPPLY AND TRADING

Our main objectives are to secure alternative sources of supply and to establish reliable networks with various suppliers from which products can be sourced. We are also dedicated to the establishment of export markets to contribute revenue through cross border trade of products through the port of Walvis Bay. NAMCOR is still an active participant


MINING AND ENERGY

Additionally NAMCOR offers Illuminating Paraafin (IP) and Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) at competitive prices. The quality of petroleum products to be supplied by NAMCOR conforms to the specifications set out by the Namibian Government. Please also note that the latest amendments shall apply. Quality certificates of all the products are regularly supplied on request.

LUBRICANTS

NAMCOR is the official dealer of Sasol Lubricants in Namibia. These lubricants are continously tested in one of the most advanced engine laboratories in the world to ensure that excellent quality products are sold to our customers. NAMCOR in conjunction with SASOL Oil Limited has an exhaustive lubricants range intended for different market sectors such as mining, construction, agriculture, marine and automotive industries. The NAMCOR team with the support of Sasol technical team can recommend equivalents to other brands and assist with product standardization. NAMCOR - Executive Management Team in the country’s down stream industry, holding a wholesale license and servicing a number of clients.

LOGISTICS

QUALITY DISTINCTIONS

For the automotive industry, NAMCOR offers a diverse variety covering petrol and diesel engine oils, gear oils, transmission oils, coolants, brake fluids and greases.

The Commercial Business Unit has since its inception established and developed a number of bulk fuel storage depots in key locations, from where it services valued customers.

NAMCOR also enjoys strong presence in the industrial segment with several offerings including cutting oils, heat transfer fluids, hydraulic oils, quenching oils, rust preventatives, textile oils, and marine lubricants.

NAMCOR has successfully refurbished a 650,000 litre capacity state of the art bulk storage depot in Otjiwarongo, from where it trades a full range of refined petroleum products (Fuels, Lubes and IP) and serves customers in the surrounding areas and Government agencies (near north & far north).

NAMCOR lubricants are available at our depots in Windhoek, Otjiwarongo, Mariental and Keetmanshoop and our agent in Walvis Bay. Sasol provides NAMCOR with the following support in terms of Lubricants:

NAMCOR also holds 25% shareholding equity in the Engen Depot in Keetmanshoop from where smaller towns, such as Tses, Koes, Bethanie, Berseba, Aroab, Karasburg and Noordoewer are served. This includes a Depot in Mariental in the Hardap Region in the southern part of the country, from where our products are supplied to towns, such as Stampriet, Gibeon, Maltahohe, Aranos and Gochas amongst other. NAMCOR has contracts with fuel transport companies, and has dedicated trucks to service its customers. NAMCOR intends to build its own storage facilities in Ondangwa, Windhoek and Gobabis. It is worth mentioning that the Government of the Republic of Namibia is constructing a bulk fuel storage facility in Walvis Bay, with a total capacity of 75 million in total, for the storage of ULP ’95, Diesel 50 and 500ppm, HFO and Jet Fuel, which will be operated by NAMCOR. Additionally, NAMCOR has accommodation arrangements with other Oil Marketing Companies to store and source products. NAMCOR took over the management of both the Bulk HFO and Joint Bunkering Storage (JBS) Facilities in Walvis Bay, and has started servicing its clients from those facilities.

FUELS

NAMCOR offers a number of main fuels, including Diesel 50ppm, 500ppm and Unleaded Petrol ’95 at a price based on the Government regulated wholesale price, as applied by the Namibian Government from time to time. Pricing (site specific) is available upon request.

Product recommendations

Carry out customer site visits to ensure correct usage of products

Lubrication surveys

Assist with all technical aspects of product range

Advise on best Lubrication practices on sites

Assist in the implementation of cost reducing projects at customer sites in terms of drain intervals and equipment component life extension by using high performance lubricants.

NAMCOR Utaara Hoveka/Nangombe Negumbo +264 61 204 5000 uhoveka@namor.com.na / nnegumbo@namcor.com.na www.namcor.com.na

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MINING AND ENERGY

WE’VE BUILT ON DIAMONDS TO ENSURE A BETTER TOMORROW.

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GOOD TODAY. BETTER TOMORROW.


ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE

MINING AND ENERGY

Namdeb Diamond Corporation (Pty) Limited NAME: FOUNDED: EMPLOYEES: HEAD OFFICE: OPERATIONS: VISION STATEMENT: MISSION STATEMENT: VALUES:

Namdeb Diamond Corporation (PTY) Ltd 1994 Approximately 1800 Windhoek Orange River Mines, Southern Coastal Mines and Northern Coastal Mines Namdeb, the pride of Namibia’s mining - to 2050 and beyond We produce diamonds profitably, sustainably and responsibly for the benefit of our shareholders and other stakeholders whilst making a lasting contribution to Namibia Safety + Teamwork + Accountability + Respect = STAR

Namdeb performs land-based prospecting (exploration), mining and rehabilitation operation and services for Namdeb Holdings. The heart of the operations is centred along the southwest coast of Namibia with the main land-based operations at the town of Oranjemund and satellite mines near Lüderitz as well as along the Orange River. Several types of innovative mining techniques are employed to extract diamonds from alluvial deposits of ore bodies. Specialized equipment such as vacuum extractors, dredgers, accretion conveyors and drill platforms are used to extract the resource, create more accretion and sampling respectively.

HISTORY As far back as 1920 diamond-mining companies along the Orange River were amalgamated to form Consolidated Diamond Mines (CDM). In 1994 the Namibian Government and De Beers entered into a new partnership when Founding Father, His Excellency President Dr Sam Nujoma and Mr Julian Ogilvy Thompson signed an accord which led to the formation of Namdeb Diamond Corporation. ZERO HARM Safety is a key value and the number one priority for Namdeb. A zero harm approach forms the foundation of all aspects of operations and this care is extended to all stakeholders and the environment in which Namdeb operates. Namdeb is therefore proud to have continuously retained its Occupational Health and Safety Audit Standard (OHSAS 18001:2007) and ISO 14001:2004 certification.

BUILDING NAMIBIA’S SKILLS BASE With a workforce of approximately 1 800, Namdeb continues to build its skills base. There remains a focused commitment to increase the number of female employees within an industry that is traditionally male-dominated. Namdeb’s tertiary educational schemes have played a pivotal role in developing human capital not only for the company but for the nation at large. This contribution to national skills development is evidenced by the number of Namdeb-trained professionals employed in various key sectors of the Namibian economy. Other forms of educational assistance such as vocational training, learnership development programmes and self-study for employees have contributed to skills development.

INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY Namdeb continues to explore innovative ways to profitably and sustainably mine the resource in areas which were previously difficult to mine and thereby extend the life of mine (LOM) with regard to operations. TO 2050 AND BEYOND Diamond mining has created a wealth of expertise resulting in revenue, which has played a significant role in building the social and physical infrastructure of an independent Namibia. Namdeb is proud to have contributed to the national GDP over the years and remains committed to being the PRIDE of Namibia’s Mining to 2050 and beyond! Pauline Thomas BRAND MANAGER 10 Dr Frans Indongo Street Namdeb Centre, 10th Floor Telephone: +264 61 2043327 / +264 63 237172 Fax: +264 61 204 3367 E-mail: pauline.thomas@namdeb.com

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MINING AND ENERGY

NAMIBIA POWER CORPORATION (NAMPOWER)

CELEBRATING TWENTY YEARS OF POWERING THE NATION NamPower is celebrating 20 years of serving the Namibian nation. Since its establishment in 1996, NamPower has earned itself a solid reputation of reliably keeping the engine of the Namibian economy running. Recognising the enormous responsibility that it is charged with – i.e. ensuring a secure, affordable and reliable supply of electricity to Namibia – compelled NamPower to remain focused and to deliver on its mandate. Today NamPower stands firm as a leader in the electricity supply industry in the country and is highly regarded by its peers in the region.

POWER SUPPLY SITUATION

Due to mainly demographic and economic growth, the SADC region as a whole is currently faced with a shortage of power, a situation that will prevail for at least the next five years. In Namibia the power supply deficit will continue until the commissioning of a new base load power station (capable of operating 24 hours a day and shut down only when routine maintenance is required or due to unforeseen circumstances). To bridge the gap until an additional base load generation plant comes on-stream, NamPower in 2011 launched the Short Term Critical Supply Project which involves several short and medium-term initiatives to meet the challenges and to secure supply throughout the country. These include: • • • • •

The implementation of Demand Side Management initiatives which are aimed at cutting down on electricity consumption during peak hours; Upgrading existing generation sources; Continue to pursue both new Power Purchase Agreements and re-negotiate existing ones with neighbouring countries; Engage Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to provide electricity from renewable energy sources such as solar PV, biomass, and a possible conventional thermal plant; Implement the Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariff (REFIT) programme. The REFIT is designed to fast-track investment in renewable energy technologies by offering long-term contracts to renewable energy Independent Power Producers(IPPs), typically based on the cost of generation of each technology; Implement Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) with storage and Biomass projects in the next three years.

The utility is thus pursuing the potential of renewable energy, also as an interim measure, given the fact that Namibia has huge potential of renewable energy resources.

LONGER TERM DOMESTIC POWER SUPPLY OPTIONS

The flagship is the development of the Kudu Power Project, off Namibia’s southern coast. This projects will be a strategic investment for national security of supply and will serve as a catalyst for the commercialisation of Namibia’s unexploited oil and gas potential. It is envisaged that this mid-merit/peaking power station’s estimated capacity of 600MW will be equally divided between the two countries. Another long-term project is the Baynes hydro power plant, jointly planned by Namibia and Angola, to be built on the Kunene River, 200 km downstream of Ruacana. It is envisaged that this mid-merit/peaking power station’s capacity of about 600 MW will be equally divided between the two countries. The ZIZABONA Project – a joint venture between the power utilities of Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana and Namibia – will involve the construction of a multi-million dollar transmission line that will allow for an additional 300 MW to be wheeled around the region. NamPower’s success is built on very strong foundations. Moving forward, the company will continue to invest in powering the nation, protecting our environment, uplifting marginalised communities, providing excellent customer service and meeting the aspirations of our staff now and for generations to come, while valuing the contribution and support of all stakeholders throughout the country.

NAMPOWER Corporate Communications +264 61 205 4111 register@nampower.com.na www.nampower.com.na

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MINING AND ENERGY

Powering the Nation & beyond Through the power of strong leadership and a committed workforce Through the progressive implementation of our strategic plans Through sophisticated infrastructure and systems Through harmonising engineering and logistics of planning We are committed to ensuring security of power supply for Namibia and beyond.

Corporate Communications • P. O. Box 2864, Windhoek 15 Luther Street • Tel: + 264 61 205 4111 • Fax: +264 61 23 2805 register@nampower.com.na • www.nampower.com.na

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MINING AND ENERGY

OSHAKATI PREMIER ELECTRIC ENERGIZING YOUR FUTURE

BACKGROUND OF OPE

The Oshakati Town Council took a ground-breaking step in the history of local government in Namibia when it joined forces with Premier Electric (a subsidiary of NamPower) to establish a joint-venture company, Oshakati Premier Electric (OPE), in the year 2000. The company became operational in the same year. OPE’s main objectives are to distribute and supply electricity and to maintain and operate the electrical infrastructure in Oshakati. The Electricity Act of 2000 allowed Local Authorities to commercialize the electricity services through agreements such as joint ventures and private public partnerships. OPE became the first private company to distribute electricity in Namibia. OPE operates within the municipal boundaries of Oshakati and is responsible for supplying power to the town of Oshakati, maintaining and upgrading the street and traffic lights as well as existing and future networks. OPE also renders other related services such as account payments, power applications and a fault reporting function.

WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO

We deliver effective and efficient electricity supply services to all customers in Oshakati, and we plan and expand our electrical network to cope with the growing demand. We grow and maintain good relations with our customers while render the following services: •

Supply power to the town of Oshakati

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Maintain existing infrastructure

New connections

employees to obtain wiremen

Electrification

licensing, High Voltage

Reconnections and disconnec-

Switching Authorization and

tions of power on request

Training of our core business

various other fields of expertise.

Attend to all power failures

Sell prepaid electricity tokens

correction plant to ensure

(24hrs)

efficiency and reduce the costs

Account payments and enquiries

MILESTONES

Oshakati Premier Electric operates in accordance with a master plan that was formulated in 2001 for electrical services in Oshakati and the surrounding areas. This master plan governs the orderly implementation of new electrical services and the maintenance of the existing electricity infrastructure of the town. Listed below are some of OPE’s milestones: •

Investing in a power factor

of purchasing power. •

Connecting new customers in previously non-reticulated areas; OPE has distributed power to approximately 2,600 erven over the past 15 years in areas such as Evululuko, Okandjengedi (South, North and East), Oneshila, Uupindi North and South, part of Oshoopala and all authorized and enabled local areas.

OPE installed and maintains streetlights in Oshakati at no cost to the Oshakati Town Council; this translates into a contribution of some N$2

Upgrading the main NamPower supply from a 10MVA (Mega

million a year. •

OPE erected 45 high mast lights

Volt Amp) transformer to 20MVA

(25 metres high) in various areas

to cater for load growth.

such as Uupindi, Evululuko,

Growth in return on investments

Okandjengedi, Oneshila,

paid to the shareholder. OPE

Oshoopala and Mandume

currently pays in the order of N$ 8 million yearly as return on

Ndemufayo/Okahao. •

OPE installed seven traffic lights,

investment to the Oshakati Town

which not only ease traffic flow

Council.

but also give a modern look to

Reduction of power failures.

Oshakati. Traffic lights were

Reduction of debt collection

unheard of in the northern parts

days to 32 days.

of the country prior to

Completion of the 2001

independence.

electricity master plan projects, which ensures growth in the customer base. •

Updating of the OPE electricity master plan as well as a new maintenance master plan in 2013.

Investment in infrastructure as per OPE master plan from profits and yet remaining sustainable.

Providing 24 hour prepaid vending stations since 2003.

Awarding annual bursaries to students at tertiary institutions.

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OPE’s mission is to provide electricity to all residents of Oshakati and by doing so support Government in achieving Vision 2030 and the Harambee Prosperity Plan.

INTERIM BUSINESS CONTINUITY AND SUSTAINABILITY.

In order to ensure sustainability, OPE is currently at an advanced stage of developing a 10 Megawatt Solar Park near

Oshakati at an estimated cost of N$240 million. The solar park will complement supply from NamPower, improve the quality of electricity supply and ultimately provide a cost benefit to customers. Solar Energy is renewable and thus helps to reduce the carbon footprint, while at the same time improving OPE’s sustainability. An environmental impact assessment has already been completed and the site has been approved and made available by the Oshakati Town Council. Once this project is completed, it will increase the asset base of the company significantly. The solar plant, which will not be grid-connected, is expected to produce power for about 25 years, a life span that will also allow OPE sufficient time to manage its electricity tariffs. OPE is in the process of applying for a generation license from the Electricity Control Board. With the escalation of electricity tariffs the solar plant is expected to help alleviate the high cost of electricity while OPE works towards setting up other generation projects. OPE wants to supply electricity to as many people as possible as part of its contribution to Vision 2030. This will require that the company increases its own electricity generation capacity. Opportunities also exist to supply “smart” electric meters to customers.

OPE Rautia Mwaala +264 65 22 0229 Toll free 081 9779 RMwaala@ope.com.na www.ope.com.na


MINING AND ENERGY

OSHAKATI PREMIER ELECTRIC EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT

HENDRERIT Nelson T Sheya

Chief Executive OfďŹ cer

Leon P Hanekom

Bennodictus Sheehama

Executive Manager Technical Services SOLICIDUNT

Executive Manager Finance and Corporate Services

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TOURISM INVESTMENT IN THE TOURISM SECTOR, THE SECOND LARGEST CONTRIBUTOR TO FOREIGN CURRENCY RESERVES, IS STRONGLY ENCOURAGED. SINCE NAMIBIA IS RANKED AS THE 4TH MOST FAVOURED TRAVEL DESTINATION IN AFRICA, PROSPECTIVE INVESTORS CAN REST ASSURED THAT NAMIBIA’S TOURISM SECTOR WITH ITS HIGH STANDARDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION IS STILL GOING TO GROW FURTHER. Players involved in tourism consist of private owners, parastatals such

amounts of rain, boast tropical forests, perennial rivers and

as Namibia Wildlife Resorts and the Namibian government represented by the Ministry of Tourism. This industry comes in many different

woodland savannahs. •

Namibia is home to approximately 4,350 species and subspecies

guises, with the hospitality business, sightseeing, hunting and trophy

of vascular plants, of which 17% are endemic. Six hundred and

hunting all offering lucrative business opportunities.

seventy-six bird species have been recorded, more than 90 of which are endemic to Southern Africa and 13 to Namibia. As

CONSERVATION

for mammals, 217 species are found in Namibia; 26 of them

Conservation is a cornerstone of the Namibia experience.

are endemic, including the unique desert-dwelling rhino and

Namibia was the first African country to incorporate protection of the

elephant. This high level of endemism lends global significance to

environment in its constitution, and the government has reinforced this by giving its communities the opportunity and rights to manage their

Namibia’s efforts to protect biodiversity. •

wildlife through communal conservancies.

situated on the farm Hariseb, 46 km northwest from Grootfontein

Today, over 43% of Namibia’s surface area is under conservation management. This includes national parks and reserves, communal

Dragon’s Breath is the largest underground lake in the world. It is off the road C42 to Tsumeb.

Hoba Meteorite is the largest known meteorite in the world. It

and commercial conservancies, community forests and private nature

was discovered in the 1920s on the farm Hoba West some 20

reserves.

km from Grootfontein. The meteorite is approximately 80 000

FAST FACTS •

years old and weighs more than 50 tons. •

Namibia boasts the largest free-roaming population of black

Part of Namibia’s allure is that it is like four countries in one.

rhinos and cheetahs in the world and is the only country with an

Four different landscapes, each with their own characteristics and

expanding population of free-roaming lions.

attractions. The most easily distinguishable is the Namib, a long

Over 1.5 million visitors arrived in Namibia in 2015, representing a

coastal desert that runs the length of the country and is marked

3% increase on 2014 when 1.4 million arrivals were recorded. The

by migrating dune belts, dry riverbeds and canyons. Most of

tourist figures also indicate that in 2015 the largest numbers of

the towns and villages are found on the central plateau which is

visitors arrived from Angola, South Africa, Zambia, Germany, the

characterised by rugged mountain ranges and sandy valleys. The ancient red sand of the vast Kalahari Desert is sparsely vegetated. But the Kavango and Zambezi regions, blessed with generous

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United Kingdom, the United States and France. •

The peak season for overseas tourists coming to Namibia is May to September.


TOURISM

Wolwedans Boulders Camp, in the Namib Rand Nature Reserve

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS

The tourism sector in Namibia is represented by a number of trade associations, including the following: FENATA – Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations +264 61 230337 welcome@fenata.org www.fenata.org The Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations (FENATA) acts as an umbrella organisation for tourism associations in the private sector. As such, it is the voice of the tourism industry in Namibia, serving as a community vehicle between the government and the private sector. HAN – Hospitality Association of Namibia +264 61 222 904 www.hannamibia.com Since its inception in 1987 the has grown from an initial 16 members to a total of close to 400 members. H·A·N represents the full spectrum of the hospitality industry, from hotels to guesthouses, guest farms and lodges, rest camps, restaurants, conference centres and catering services. Increasing numbers of tourism and hospitality-related businesses have joined H·A·N over the years, making it a true umbrella-organisation and an important factor in the Namibia tourism & hospitality industry in general. NAPHA – The Namibia Professional Hunter’s Association +264 61 234 455 www.napha-namibia.com For the international hunting clientele, one of the main attractions of hunting in Namibia is the high standard of ethics maintained by the Namibia Professional Hunting Association (NAPHA). All hunting resorts are under the strict supervision of the Directorate of Resource Management of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET). TRAVEL NEWS NAMIBIA +264 61 420 500 bonn@venture.com.na www.travelnewsnamibia.com NAMIBIA TOURISM BOARD +264 61 290 6000 info@namibiatourism.com.na www.namibiatourism.com.na

ANTA – The Association of Namibian Travel Agents +264 61 23 66 70 TASA – The Tour and Safari Association +264 61 238 423    info@tasa.na www.tasa.na B&BAN – The Bed & Breakfast Association of Namibia +264 62 581 650 info@bedandbreakfastnamibia.com www.bedandbreakfastnamibia.com NATH – The Namibian Academy for Tourism & Hospitality +264 61 259 288 nathadmin@nathnamibia.org www.nathnamibia.org Tourism is increasingly becoming one of the most important industries in Namibia. The Namibian government realizes the importance of tourism for the future economic development of Namibia and stresses the importance of quality training as a pre-requisite to realize the full potential of tourism. Hence, the Namibian Academy for Tourism and Hospitality (NATH) was formally launched as an Article 21 Company in August 1994 (Reg. no. 21/91/449). NAMIBIA TOURISM EXPO Since its inception in 1999 the Namibia Tourism Expo has consistently grown and earned a superb reputation for offering the only centralized marketing platform for Namibia’s tourism industry. Apart from presenting a highly effective showcase for tourism exhibitors, the organisers have revitalized the exhibition year after year by expanding the Expo. The 2017 Namibia Tourism Expo will take place from the 31st of May to the 3rd of June.

NAMIBIA TOURISM EXPO

Since its inception in 1999 , the Namibia Tourism Expo has consistently grown and has earned a superb reputation for offering the only centralized marketing platform for Namibia’s Tourism Industry. Apart from presenting a highly effective showcase for Exhibitors active in Tourism, the organisers have revitalized the exhibition year after year by expanding the showcase. The Namibia Tourism Expo will take place from the 31st of May to the 3rd of June 2017.

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NAMIBIA WILDLIFE RESORTS

CONSERVING NAMIBIA’S NATURAL HERITAGE - TODAY, TOMORROW AND FOREVER Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) is a proudly Namibian hospitality and service company. It manages resorts and camps in the national parks across our beautiful country on behalf of the Namibian government. NWR’s knowledgeable staff is customer-driven and dedicated to providing a Namibian experience that is relaxing, memorable and liberating in comfortable surroundings. NWR operates 20 resorts in three different lodging categories which suit every need and pocket. • •

Eco-collection: Exclusive accommodation in the heart of Namibia’s national parks. Classic Collection: A variety of accommodation options from serviced chalets and standard hotel rooms to basic camp sites paired with a broad range of facilities and tours. Adventure & Camping: Campsites and cabins for the rugged traveller who appreciates ‘close to nature’ adventures.

NWR arranges intimate wildlife experiences on guided night drives in Etosha National Park as well as sunrise and sunset excursions to majestic Sossusvlei, or relaxing massages and wellness treatments based on the healing properties of the hot springs at Gross Barmen. NWR also provides adventure activities such as hikes into iconic landscapes on signature trails like the Fish River Canyon Hike through the second largest canyon on earth (four to five days, approximately 80 km), or the Namib Naukluft Hiking Trail through the rugged Naukluft Mountains which is considered one of the toughest trails in southern Africa (eight days, 120 km or four days, 60 km). NWR caters for everyone. Whether you are passionate about photography, wildlife, landscapes, geology, camping, fishing, history or culture or simply enjoy the pure exhilaration of finding yourself surrounded by the essence of Africa – NWR is your willing partner and host.

NAMLEISURE CARD

In its drive to make travel in Namibia more affordable, NWR offers three different membership card options to domestic, SADC and other international visitors. The NamLeisure card is for one person; NamLeisure Plus is for couples or an adult and one child aged between 13 and 17 years; NamLeisure Family is for two adults and two children aged between 13 and 17 years. Residents of Namibia qualify for a 50% discount, SADC travellers for 25% and international travellers for 10%. Non-cardholders who share a room or a camping site with a NamLeisure cardholder are also eligible for a 50% discount plus a supplementary rate. The benefits of NamLeisure membership go beyond discount rates. NWR uses a portion of the proceeds as well as 5% of the value of any member booking for conservation projects, including the NWR-EnviroKidz program, and joint projects with the Ministry of Environment and Tourism – providing a double “feel-good” experience.

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ONLINE BOOKING AND PAYMENTS

NWR has fine-tuned its online booking platform after realizing that clients are increasingly turning to instant electronic booking instead of writing emails and having to wait for the reply in order to finalize travel arrangements. At the same time NWR also made subtle changes to its website to facilitate navigation and easy access to the required information.

OUR PEOPLE

Service delivery and efficiency is all about people. NWR cares about client experience and therefore places so much value on service delivery, efficiency and enhancing client experience through all channels and at all points of contact. Customer experience is a core value that NWR emphasizes every day. It is the yardstick for its performance. From the reservations office to the front office of any NWR resort, to housekeeping, restaurants, game drives and excursions: you can rest assured that you will be met by the friendliest, most passionate and knowledgeable Namibians.

VISION

NWR to be a recognized leader in tourism and hospitality services in Namibia

VALUES

Accountability

With our decisions and actions we are accountable to our stakeholders. Integrity

We walk the talk: our personal and professional conduct is consistent with the common public good; we are trustworthy. Passion

We employ people with a zest for life and work – who are fully committed to work and life. Respect

We respect our clients, colleagues and all stakeholders.

NWR Anna Onen +264 61 285 72 00 AOnen@nwr.com.na www.nwr.com.na


TOURISM

EXPLORE Namibia has some of the world’s most magnificent landscapes but there’s more…

Let Namibia Wildlife Resorts (NWR) offer you a new perspective. With 21 resorts across Namibia we have something for everyone, including the children. From camping to hiking trails for the thrill seeker in you or when all you need is a breakaway from the big city monotony.

1. Onkoshi Resort 2. Namutoni Resort 3. Halali Resort 4. Okaukuejo Resort 5. Sossus Dune Lodge 6. Terrace Bay Resort 7. Waterberg Resort 8. /Ai-/Ais Hotsprings Spa 9. Popa Falls 10. Gross Barmen 11. Duwisib Castle 12. Sesriem Camp 13. Hobas Camp 14. Naukluft Camp 15. Dolomite Resort 16. Torra Bay Camp 17. Khorixas Camp 18. Shark Island 19. Sun Karros Daan Viljoen 20. Hardap Resort 21. Olifantsrus Camp

MAKE YOUR BOOKING TODAY!  +264 61 285 7200 or +264 64 402 172 or +27 21 422 3761  reservations@nwr.com.na or sw.bookings@nwr.com.na or ct.bookings@nwr.com.na  www.nwr.com.na

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TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS THE NAMIBIAN GOVERNMENT HAS IDENTIFIED SCALING-UP INVESTMENT IN TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE AS ONE OF THE KEY ENABLERS TO ACHIEVE ITS DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES AS OUTLINED IN THE FOURTH NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (NDP4), VISION 2030 AND THE HARAMBEE PROSPERITY PLAN. AN EFFECTIVE TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE IS THE BACKBONE OF A VIBRANT ECONOMY, AND NAMIBIA’S FAVOURABLE GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION ON THE SOUTH-WESTERN COAST OF THE CONTINENT, BORDERING WITH ANGOLA, BOTSWANA, SOUTH AFRICA, ZAMBIA AND ZIMBABWE, PUTS IT IN GOOD STEAD TO BE THE TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS HUB IN SOUTHERN AFRICA. Despite the good infrastructure, massive investment opportunities still exist in this sector as indicated by the number of projects requiring joint ventures/partnerships.

• •

ROADS

A 2 500 kilometre narrow-gauge track runs from the South African border via Keetmanshoop to Windhoek, Okahandja, Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. A northern branch line connects Omaruru, Otjiwarongo, Otavi, Tsumeb and Grootfontein, while in the far north a newly built track connects Tsumeb and Oshikango. A branch line connects Windhoek to Gobabis in the east.

Namibia has a well-established road infrastructure, regarded as one of the best on the continent. Namibia’s road network consists of about 37 000 kilometres of gravel and 6 000 kilometres of tarred roads. Nearly all roads are well maintained. Namibia is linked by road to South Africa, Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Namibia has four corridors – the Trans-Kalahari via Botswana, the TransCaprivi, the Trans-Cunene via Angola to the DRC and the Trans-Oranje via South Africa – that link it to the SADC countries. The Trans-Kalahari and the Trans-Caprivi highways provide a fast and comfortable road link between the Namibian port of Walvis Bay on the Atlantic coast and the landlocked neighbouring countries. The highways provide a regional transport corridor intended to reduce shipping times for imports and exports from the neighbouring countries to the markets of western Europe and the Americas by at least five days compared to traditional routes in southern Africa. Namibia has also committed to upgrading 1,480km of roads over the next five years, which will improve accessibility across the country.

POINTS OF ENTRY THROUGH TRADE CORRIDORS • • • • •

North – Oshikango Northeast – Katima Mulilo East – Gobabis South – Noordoewer and Ariamsvlei West – Walvis Bay and Lüderitz

BORDER POSTS • • • • • • •

Noordoewer – open 24 hours Ariamsvlei – open 24 hours Buitepos – open 07:00-24:00 Wenela – open 06:00-18:00 Ngoma – open 07:00-18:00 Mata Mata – open 08:00-16:30 Sendelingsdrift – open 07:00-24:00

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Dobe – open 06:00-18:00 Impalila/Kasane – open 07:00-18:00

RAILWAYS

AIR

Namibia is also strategically placed to take advantage of the air transport industry. Plans are underway to expand the international airport near Windhoek, while the Walvis Bay and Ondangwa airports have recently been extended to allow larger planes to land there. Direct air links are provided to major cities in southern Africa, such as Cape Town, Johannesburg, Gaborone, Luanda, Lusaka and Harare. There are regular international flights between Hosea Kutako International Airport (Windhoek) and Frankfurt. Namibian airports are developed and managed by the Namibia Airports Company (NAC). Several privately owned domestic charter companies offer regional flights on a regular basis.

AIRPORTS • • • • • • • • •

Hosea Kutako International Airport (48 km east of Windhoek) Eros Airport (Windhoek-South) Walvis Bay Airport (serves as a second international airport) Swakopmund Airport Katima Airport Lüderitz Airport Ondangwa Airport Oranjemund Airport Rundu Airport

More than 350 airstrips throughout the country serve the more remote areas.


TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

PORTS

The Port of Walvis Bay has become the preferred African west coast port and logistics corridor for southern and central African logistics operations. The Port of Walvis Bay is being expanded and expectations about the results are quite high among major shipping lines. Port of Walvis Bay North Port Development Program: The new proposed port to be built just north of the current build-up area in Walvis Bay. Project Value: N$60 billion Total of 1330 hectares of new port land, compared to only 105 hectares of land at the current port, will include: • World-class ship and rig repair yard plus oil and gas supply base • Huge dry bulk terminal (>100 million tons p.a.) • Container terminal • Small craft harbour with port control tower • New high-capacity rail, road, pipeline and conveyor link to the municipal heavy industrial area.

The Namibia Logistics Association is an independent non-profit organisation which represents the Namibian logistics industry. It serves as the industry’s collective voice, bringing to the fore the interests of its members, and thus serves as a platform to raise shared concerns. Namibian-German Centre for Logistics +264 61 207 2909 www.centreforlogistics.org The NGCL strives for excellence in logistics. Our mission is to contribute to the economic development of the country and the region by providing the expertise and strategies that promote and further logistics. The NGCL thus started its activities with education. We educate the future leaders of the logistics industry, train staff and provide skills that the industry needs in order to realise its full potential. Roads Authority +264 61 284 7000 www.ra.org.na

Plans are also underway to expand the Lüderitz Port and strengthen its connectivity with the Northern Cape Province of South Africa in terms of economic activity. Potential transport cargos for Lüderitz are manganese ore, zinc products (zinc ore and ingot of zinc) and fruit (table grapes and dates). The ports are operated by the Namibian Ports Authority (Namport).

The Roads Authority is a non-profit, mission-driven organisation that constantly strives to achieve a safe and efficient road network in Namibia. In this we adhere to a set of values built on the principle of good governance. NATIS - a subdivision of Transport Information and Regulatory Services, manages 32 registering authorities (NaTIS offices). NATIS Switchboard: +264 61 322 6000

In order to transform Namibia into an international logistics hub for the SADC region, all elements related to transport and logistics (road, railway, maritime & port and aviation), should be brought up to “international standard”. Therefore, plans for developing a Master Plan for the International Logistics Hub for SADC Countries in Namibia are underway and are expected to be completed by 2025.

Road Fund Administration +264 61 433 3000 www.rfanam.com.na

VITAL CONTACTS Ministry of Works & Transport +264 61 208 4274 www.mwt.gov.na The Ministry of Works & Transport is responsible for sectorial policy and regulation, and has a mandate to ensure infrastructure development and maintenance of transport and state asset management through operational excellence and prudent management of resources. Namibia Logistics Association +264 61 411 100 info@nla.org.na www.nla.org.na

OMAKE MOMENTS (OMAKE = APPLAUDABLE) CONGRATULATIONS to the MVA FUND: According to a survey given to employees across the country by professional service firm Deloitte Namibia, our client, MVA Fund of Namibia, was announced the winner in the category “Best Company to work for in 2016”. Smith bags Africa Transport Leader award: The Transport Africa Awards named the CEO of the Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG), Johny Smith, Africa’s Transport Leader of the Year 2016. This is the second major accolade for Namibia’s transport sector, following 2015’s award to the Namibia Port Authority (Namport) as the African Port Operator of the Year.   The Transport Africa Awards were introduced in 2008 to identify and reward leaders in transportation who demonstrate an unparalleled ability to succeed, offer a competitive advantage and set standards of excellence in the sector.

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AUTOHAUS TRUCK & BUS MAN KANN. FIRST GEAR AND GO

In April 2010, after being appointed the new agents for MAN and Volkswagen, Autohaus Windhoek officially opened the Truck & Bus division which incorporates the complete truck and bus range of products. Hard work and constant improvement over the years ensured the stability and popularity the division enjoys today. In September 2015 the huge new premises in Birmingham Street were officially inaugurated and the bigger and better service centre became a reality. The Genuine MAN Parts® centre was also upgraded to improve stock variety and quantities.

The division is led by a powerful trio, driven by passion for the game. Johan Steenkamp (Dealer Principal), Gert Du Preez (Head of Sales) and Frik van Wyk (Head of Service) are the prime movers behind the current success story. Each of them has an average sixteen years of experience in the commercial sector. While the VW Constellation range caters for smaller and more affordable products, the MAN line-up is well known for its commercial and industrial workhorses. The entire range is also backed by various sublet body manufacturers in South Africa, simply making VW / MAN the logical choice.

HIGH GEAR INTO THE FUTURE

Autohaus Truck & Bus launched a new campaign in November 2016. “We’re with you all the way” heralded a completely new approach to customer service for 2017. With renewed expertise in the service, sales and marketing departments the newcomers have become a competitive force on the Namibian market. Both the MAN and Volkswagen brands are also internationally renowned for high quality products, catering for every consumer need and spread over a vast range of applications. Nationwide 24/7

roadside assistance is available throughout the year. Visit us at Autohaus Truck & Bus… Experience the difference.

AUTOHAUS TRUCK & BUS Gert du Preez +264 61 414154 gdp@metjeziegler.com www.metjeziegler.com

Trucks Buses

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TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

Integrated Solutions for International Logistics

Logistics Support Services (Pty) Ltd

Corner of 2nd Street East & John Newman Syncrolift Industrial Area P O Box 4407, Walvis Bay, Republic of Namibia

Your Logistics Partner in Namibia At Logistics Support Services (Pty) Ltd, we are passionate about delivering excellent and on-time service in the most cost effective and efficient way. We can be relied upon to take care of any logistical requirements including freight management, imports and exports, customs clearing and forwarding, warehousing, transport, equipment rentals, procurement, vessel agency, crewing and husbandry. We are strategically placed to service the mining and construction as well as the ship repair and offshore industries. Our Head Office premises in Walvis Bay include significant warehousing (bonded and non-bonded) within the harbour vicinity, and our operations are extended nationally through our branches in Windhoek and Lßderitz. Our global network allows us to deliver robust, economic and integrated logistics solutions tailored to each customer’s individual requirements.

Telephone: +264 64 276600 Fax: +264 64 276601 / 602 Email: info@lssnamibia.com Website: www.Lssnamibia.com

Logistics Freight Forwarding Warehousing Sourcing Special Projects Procurement Crewing Husbandry Services & Vessel Agency

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We are DRIVEN to DELIVER. Our capabilities in cross-border transport, distribution and courier services, provide customers with a multitude of competitive solutions. A network of 18 sites throughout South Africa and Namibia and almost one thousand employees, offer our customers superior service quality and local knowledge in order to satisfy their diverse supply chain requirements. From 1968 until today, our recipe for success has remained unchanged: To provide excellent customer service. Never complacent, FP du Toit Transport Group has become a brand acknowledged for innovative solutions and regional strength. At the heart of our success are our employees. They focus on the requirements of our customers and have the ability to offer a wide range of customised solutions. These, together with our customers, have helped us to evolve into the leading Namibian transport company, and we are still growing!

2015 - We aquired Wesbank Transport 2013 - We established the FP du Toit Training Academy 2012 - The JET.X national footprint was dramatically extended 2007 - Central Africa Division created 2005 - We acquired JET.X couriers 1997 - ProParcel Distribution was established 1996 - Textile distribution was launched 1975 - We entered the refrigerated transport market 1968 - FP du Toit Transport was established

and growing...

Over the last 5 decades, the company introduced a number of value-adding innovations. To avoid long delays at the borders due to customs-clearing procedures, a customs presence of Namibian customs ofďŹ cials was established at the main Windhoek distribution centre. The company has always been at the forefront of vehicle trailer design and optimization. FP du Toit Transport also continues to invest in computer technology that ranges from the latest hardware in scanning technology to software (to improve track and trace in support of the operational environment) as well as client engagements through software integration. Willie du Toit is the Managing Director, with Stephan Terblanche appointed as Chief Executive OfďŹ cer of FP du Toit Transport Group in January 2016.

Our combined fleet drives in excess of 21 million kilometres annually.

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TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

FP du Toit Transport’s Full Loads and Central Africa Division, operate on the Trans Kunene, Trans Kalahari and Trans Caprivi corridors, thereby providing transport and logistical services to various destinations within the SADC region. The Central Africa Division ensures dedicated monitoring, local knowledge and support as well as continuous risk management of all central Africa routes, borders, vehicles and drivers.

This new acquisition (2015) was also founded in the middle sixties. Together, clients receive the benefit of more than a century of experience. Wesbank transport is a leader in the operational fields of: • The largest Abnormal transport operation in Namibia • Open yard storage • Shunting operation • Walvis Bay harbour operations and handling all clearing and forwarding services • Side Loaders • Dangerous Goods Transport • Container handling including stuffing and destuffing • Reach Stackers, Forkllifts and the largest crane hire business in Namibia The Wesbank Transport division’s main field of operation are in the mining industry. They are also the largest harbour carrier, container handling and storage facility operator in Walvis Bay.

Guaranteed Services: • Cross-Border • Air Express • Overnight Road • Second Day Road • Domestic Courier • Overnight Road

More than 60 000 parcels monthly. Delivery to every Namibian town Monday to Saturday

Services • Priority • Door-to-Door • Terminal-to-Door • Depot-to-Depot • Refrigerated part-loads • Palletised part-loads • Economy

More than 200 000 parcels delivered across Namibia monthly

Isn’t this what you would expect from a 48 year old Namibian Company? Tel: +264 61 294 5000 | marketing@FPdT.na | www.FPdT.na | 51 Nickel Street, Prosperita, Windhoek, Namibia

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one-stop-shop

Logistics

Accreditations & Memberships

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TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

A Passion for Logistics

I

t was one of those typical wind and dustridden days, on Wednesday, 1 October 1924 in the small fishing town of Walvis Bay that Theodore ‘Tetje’ Woker and Walter Maertins opened the doors of a shipping and forwarding company, called Maertins & Woker Limited. Over the span of nine decades this small company developed into a premier logistics and marine industry leader known as Manica Group Namibia. Since its inception Manica has been at the forefront of developing innovative and integrated supply chain solutions for companies that require shipping and logistics services to and from Africa. Today Manica provides one-stopshop logistics and marine services, including clearing and forwarding, warehousing, shipping, transport, cargo handling, oil and gas support, ships’ agency, lubricant supplies, bunkering and airport ground-handling support. With a well-established international network of logistics partners Manica is able to offer “global solutions” to local and international customers. We are passionate about finding solutions to the most challenging logistics tasks. Solutions that are often highly innovative but within the business principles of being a safe operator, a responsible partner, ethical and a caring corporate citizen. With Manica at the helm of your off- and onshore logistics management and support requirements, you can sit back knowing that we will deliver – anything, anytime, anywhere.

Why choose us?

Manica Group Namibia believes that true logistics is seamless, flexible and hassle-free. Our advantages include:

„ Well established Namibian company, more „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „

than 90 years of experience Service flexibility and bundled services guarantee significant cost saving and faster turnaround time “Key Account Management” – you deal only with one person Highly qualified staff contingent Ample warehousing space Continuous optimisation of the supply chain and material flows, cost structures Proficient resources, equipment and capacity backup Access to international forwarding networks High standard of service level agreements and performance indicators ISO 9001:2008 certified and a member of various logistics regulatory bodies Progressive quality management and safety systems Advanced track & trace software As part of Bidvest Namibia, Manica enjoys access to specialized IT services, consumer goods, food, automotive, industrial and office supplies

What we offer

Manica is able to offer integrated solutions for the most daunting logistics challenge:

„ Complete logistics services, supply chain

management and project cargo solutions

„ Clearing and forwarding for sea, air and road transport

„ Cross-border and project freight „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „

management, compliance checking, customs brokering and consolidation services Shore-based logistics support for Oil & Gas, exploration drilling and project management Shipping (exports and imports) Ship agency and husbandry services for all types of vessels Intermodal transport solutions Stevedoring, cargo handling, equipment rental Warehousing, container stuffing, unpacking Airport ground handling services Lubrication products, greasing technology Bunkering Procurement, trade and chandelling services Launch service, charters, crew transfers, airport shuttles Visa applications, accommodation, car hire and travel arrangements for the marine industry contractor

Subsidiaries & Divisions

er at

ins & Wok mbers of Maert The first staff me s opening in 1924. the firm’

MACS Maritime Carrier Shipping (PTY) LTD

105,000m

2

Under roof warehousing and open-air storage.

638

21% 6% management 79%

Highly qualified staff contingent. 86% previously disadvantaged.

Equipment

State of the art long-haul trucks, side loaders, super-links, delivery vehicles, forklifts, forklift-trucks (up to 18 tons), cranes (up to 55 tons), reach stackers, gooseneck, hoppers, airport ground handling equipment and full range of stevedoring and heavy lifting equipment (rigging, tackles, lashing, graps, hooks, chains etc.).

Contact Us Namibia

Manica Group Namibia Head office Tel: +264 64 201 2911 Email: contact@manica.com.na Web: www.manica.com.na

Europe

Hans-Werner Timke Dreikönigenstr. 12 50997 Köln Mobil: + 49 172 417 5169 Email: h-w.timke@gmx.de

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TRANSPORT A LO & NLDO G I SGT II SCTSI C S

Call the Accident Response Number 0819682 to report road crashes.

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T R ATN ATN D R SAPNOS RP TO R & LOGISTICS

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TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

NAMIBIA AIRPORTS COMPANY UPGRADING AIRPORTS

VISION

To be a world-class service provider in airports operations and management.

• • •

MISSION

STRATEGIC PLAN

Develop, manage and operate safe and secure airports on sound business principles with due considerations to the interest of our stakeholders.

CORE VALUES

Safety and Security, Integrity, Teamwork, Customer Service Excellence and Innovation

INTRODUCTION

The Namibia Airports Company (NAC), a state-owned enterprise, was established under the Airports Company Act of 1998. It commenced operations in February 1999.

ALLIANCES AND MEMBERSHIP

NAC is a member of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), Airports Council International (ACI) and the International Air Cargo Association (TIACA). NAC is a national corporate member of the Namibia Chamber of Commerce & Industry (NCCI) and, given its central role in the tourism sector, the NAC is represented on the Marketing Committee of the Namibia Tourism Board.

MANAGEMENT

Six Strategic Executives who report to the CEO head the following departments: • Projects, IT and Engineering • Business Strategy • Finance

Human Resources and Administration Strategic Business Unit One Strategic Business Unit Two

As part of the victory plan, NAC coined the 2014-17 turnaround stra­ tegy. It is a commitment-centred, strategic comeback which revolves around capital expenditure of N$ 1, 3 billion to ensure safe and secure airports, achieve revenue growth of 10 percent per annum, rehabilitate the airside of six airports, upgrade the terminals of three airports, schedule periodic maintenance of assets & equipment and improve staff morale and productivity. In this cycle, which is nearing the end, our focus is on the four strategic airports: Hosea Kutako International Airport, Ondangwa, Walvis Bay International and Eros. As for the remaining four airports the focus is on compliance during this cycle, without any plans to upgrade.

AIRPORT CATEGORIES IN NAMIBIA

We have two airport categories: International and Domestic. International airports receive both international and domestic air traffic. They have direct flights to/from airports outside Namibia and to/from other airports in Namibia. Hosea Kutako and Walvis Bay are in this category. Walvis Bay International Airport has direct flights to/from two South Africa cities, Cape Town and Johannesburg, as well as direct flights to/ from Windhoek. The modern and efficient infrastructure caters for the passenger demands of today and many years to come. Hosea Kutako International Airport (HKIA) is our national flagship. HKIA links Namibia to the world: with direct flights to Cape Town and Johannesburg (South Africa), Harare and Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe), Luanda (Angola), Lusaka (Zambia), Maun (Botswana) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) as well as Frankfurt (Germany), Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Doha (Qatar). It also serves domestic destinations such as Walvis Bay, Lüderitz and Oranjemund. The second category – domestic airports with air services between towns in Namibia – comprises Eros, Katima, Ondangwa, Lüderitz and Rundu.

CAPITAL PROJECTS

New Walvis Bay International Airport

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In fulfilling its mandate of managing and developing national airports, NAC has focused on the following key projects during the last three years: • Acquisition of 11 fire fighting tenders for our airports; • Installation of dual view scanners at all our airports; • Completion of Ondangwa & Walvis Bay terminal buildings; • Rehabilitation & upgrading of Ondangwa runway was completed in August; currently the taxiway and apron are being rehabilitated and upgraded, due for completion towards the end of next year upgrade to Category 4C; • Rehabilitation and upgrading of Walvis Bay runway to Category 4F has been completed; • Construction of polymer fencing at Walvis Bay & Lüderitz Airports; • Rehabilitation of Katima Mulilo runway, due for completion this year; • Completion of a new rescue & fire station at Eros Airport; • Construction of rescue & fire stations at Ondangwa, Katima & Rundu airports is underway;


TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

Ethiopian Airline arrival at Hosea Kutako International • • • • •

Upgrade of the water reticulation/supply systems at all airports (HKIA is completed); Rehabilitation & upgrading of Eros Airport runway to Category 4C will commence in due course; Construction of NAC headquarters at Eros Airport, commencement in due course. Some of our public-private partnership initiatives are: Awarding the contract for the fuel service station at HKIA to National Petroleum Corporation (NAMCOR), construction will commence in due course; Awarding the contract to operate Restaurants at Eros & Ondang­wa Airports

POSITIONING NAMIBIA AS A KEY AVIATION CONNECTION HUB - HKIA

NAC is proud of the increased number of airlines serving our airport. In 2015 Namibia witnessed the arrival of Condor which flies to Frankfurt twice a week, and SA Air Link which flies to Cape Town daily. In late 2016 Namibia welcomed Qatar, which serves the Windhoek and Doha route four times per week and KLM now flies between Windhoek and Amsterdam via Luanda. Ethiopian Airlines also started to fly to HKIA in October, connecting Namibia to additional new destinations. NAC plans to construct a new world-class airport with state of the art facilities to cater for its customers. The new airport will be able to serve bigger aircrafts and will be designed along the concept of an airport city where facilities such as hotels and shopping centres will be integrated into the airport design. The new airport will offer a runway category 4F that can accommodate multiple wide-bodied Code F aircraft, a double deck terminal building for international passengers, a VIP lounge, a rescue & fire station category 11 and a new air traffic control tower.

fire station was commissioned in July 2016 and the rehabilitation and upgrading of the runway is underway.

ONDANGWA AIRPORT

The new Ondangwa Terminal building was built at a total cost of N$80 million in 2015 and boosted passenger capacity from 40 000 to 75 000 per annum. Cargo capacity is expected to reach 2400 tonnes this year. The new terminal is a state of the art building with a restaurant, bistro, curio shop, foreign exchange, plenty of comfortable seating, car rental facilities and an automated parking management system.

REGIONAL AIRPORTS (LUDERITZ, RUNDU, KATIMA MULILO & KEETMANSHOOP)

Most of these airports were military airports and need considerable investment to convert them into proper civilian airports. NAC currently focuses on compliance matters without any plans to upgrade.

WALVIS BAY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Walvis Bay is a key driver of the Namibian economy. In order to support fishing companies and in line with the growth at home strategy, Walvis Bay International Airport has been developed into a fully-fledged international airport with a special focus on cargo transportation. Walvis Bay International Airport is equipped with the entire infrastructure to facilitate air transportation of sea-based products. The airport terminal (at a cost of N$ 100 million) and the runway have been completed. Rehabilitation and upgrading of the runway to category 4F is complete and so is the construction of polymer fencing at Walvis Bay (at a cost of N$ 37 million).

EROS AIRPORT

There are plans to develop hangars and aircraft maintenance warehouses through public-private partnership initiatives. A new rescue &

NAMIBIA AIRPORTS COMPANY Dan Kamati +264 61 295 5000 pr@airports.com.na www.airports.com.na

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NAMPORT MEGA PROJECT Port of Walvis Bay, new Container Terminal

NEW CONTAINER TERMINAL To support the growth and performance of Namibia’s economy, Namport has to continually upgrade and expand. This is why the new container on reclaimed land project was implemented in the Port of Walvis Bay. This project will expand not only the Container handling capacity in the Port of Walvis Bay, but also that of non-containerized cargo such as dry-bulk and break-bulk. The project will cater for containerized cargo handling capacity well into the next decade. The Port of Walvis Bay is ideally located to accelerate the growth of Namibia and the SADC region as a whole by providing a gateway to the region, thus serving as a Logistics Hub.

Head Office: Namport, Nr 17, Rikumbi Kandanga Rd, P O Box 361, Walvis Bay, Namibia, Tel: (+264 64) 208 2111, Fax: (+264 64) 208 2323

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The new Container Terminal project is valued at N$ 4 Billion. A N$ 3 Billion loan from the African Development Bank was received in November 2013. The ground-breaking ceremony for the project took place on 19 May 2014 and was officiated by His Excellency the former Head of State, President Pohamba. The main contractor is China Harbour Engineering Company Ltd. The reclamation process involves dredging and reclaiming 40 hectares of new land from the bay. The project will increase the current TEU capacity from 350,000 TEU’s to 750,000 TEU’s per annum. It will have 600m of new quay wall length with a water depth of 16m below chart datum. The overall project progress to date stands at 55%, as at 8 June 2016.

Port of Lüderitz: Hafen Street, P O Box 836, Lüderitz, Namibia, Tel: (+264 63) 200 2017, Fax: (+264 63) 200 2028

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The National Road Safety Council Ensuring safety for all road users

The National Road Safety Council (NRSC) was established in 1996 in terms of section 2 of the National Road Safety Act 9 of 1972 following a Cabinet resolution of 28 November 1995. MANDATE The National Road Safety Council in terms of the National Road Safety Act, no. 9 of 1972 is empowered and mandated to: • Prepare and systematically carry out a road safety research programme in conjunction with the National Transport Commission, • Collate and analyze road accident data to asses associated risks and disseminate appropriate information to road users and by any means deemed fit for such purpose, • Provide guidance on road safety where necessary • Consult with all parties concerned in an effort to assist the Minister of Works and Transport in combating road accidents through promotion and awareness campaigns • Promote road safety in the Republic of Namibia.

To this end, the NRSC has committed itself to undertake reasonable actions within its limits to promote road safety. The Council’s programme for the promotion of road safety is predominantly characterised by road safety Communication,

Executive Secretary of the National Road Safety Council: Mr. Eugene Tendekule

Administration and Support Services Sub Division The Administration and Support Services Sub Division is responsible for providing the above mentioned services to the secretariat, financial, personnel and asset management, procurement, contract management and the execution of NRSC resolutions.

Education and Public awareness and Road Safety Research. Communication Sub Division: The Communication Sub-division is responsible for road safety messaging and education nationwide through the development and implementation of road safety awareness and educational programmes, developing and producing road safety educational material, the management of the scholar patrol programmes, community mobilization, the co-ordination of Road Safety campaign activities and the carrying out road safety publicity activities. Road Safety Research Sub Division The Road Safety research sub-division is responsible for carrying out research programs aimed at providing thorough understanding of the prevailing road safety situation to create an environment conducive for informed decision making. The sub division fulfils this role through the collection and analysis of accident statistics, monitoring and evaluation of road safety research initiatives, development and production of road safety research publications and the co-ordination of road safety audits along with the management of the resource centre.

TAKE THE PLEDGE BE A SAFE ROAD USER!

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Traffic Safety Secretariat

Find us on

facebook

Twitter

www.nrsc.org.na

NRSC


TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE

OF TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS IN NAMIBIA BY JOHNY SMITH

WALVIS BAY CORRIDOR GROUP CEO

The changing picture of global trade is providing opportunities for the Transport and Logistics Industry. Recent decades have seen momentous changes in the economic geography of the world. Trade routes between emerging and developed economies are expected to become more significant over the next 20 years. It is key that operators in the industry reshape their operations and take advantage of this changing business climate. If properly realised, the logistics industry has the potential to contribute 4.6% to Namibia’s GDP. A number of projects have already been initiated to ready shape the country for the Logistics Hub Vision. These include the new container terminal at the Walvis Bay port to be completed in 2017, establishment of dry ports for Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zambia, one stop border posts and the new SADC Gateway Port. Priority projects related to the road infrastructure are also enjoying attention as well as a focused approach by the government in the railway sector. As the Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG) is about to conclude the second decade of facilitating and promoting transport and trade along our secure and reliable corridors, our quest to ultimately achieve a robust and lucrative economy continues. Appointed patron by the government to spearhead the effective implementation of the Namibia Logistics Hub Project (to transform the country into a regional leader in logistics and distribution in Southern Africa), WBCG continues to create platforms to have thematic intervention and dialogue with the industry to share information, solicit input and keep the momentum going towards becoming a Logistics Service Centre for the region. Despite the country’s small population and domestic market, as well as other economic challenges, we continue to actively facilitate trade along our corridors and market Namibia’s transport and logistics industry and specifically the Namibia Logistics Hub Project, both regionally and internationally in order to attract investors and development partners. By positioning Namibia as the preferred gateway into SADC, via the Port of Walvis Bay, a conducive environment is created to attract new industries and thus address the socio-

economic needs of the country. Together with the Ministry of SME Development, Industrialisation and Trade, the WBCG is in the process of developing investment projects and opportunities for the four Walvis Bay corridors which link the port to Angola, Zambia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa. In addition, uncongested roads, the absence of bridges and the efficiency of the port of Walvis Bay are helping to attract increased volumes of project cargo through the harbour and along the corridors. Therefore, it is quick to transport abnormal loads from Walvis Bay to neighbouring countries. This institutional arrangement seems to be most appropriate for the utilization and enhancement of the existing capacities and resources for the benefit of an integrated and sustainable logistics hub for Namibia. A powerful logistics strategy can only bring its capacity into full play with a well-handled Transport System. The most important activity among the components of business logistics systems is the linking of transportation; goods could be sent to the right place at the right time in order to satisfy customers’ demands. It brings efficacy, and it also builds a relationship between the producer and the consumer. A good transport system improves the safety, reliability and efficiency of its routes. Meanwhile, cost pressures in two of the world’s largest project cargo-generating industries, energy and mining have further intensified this year and the challenge is to manage the movement of such cargo to remain robust in achieving immediate cost benefits. The impact of falling oil prices on the global market has been enormous, with no exception to WBCG, as we have experienced a decline in business to Angola resultantly. The business is further tested in the DRC market as infiltration and expansion is hampered by the political instability in the country. Additionally, one of the biggest challenges remains to build more capacity in the Transport Sector to exploit trade opportunities and alleviate trade difficulties.

WBCG CEO - Mr. Johny Smith unique Public Private Partnership existing between countries along the corridors have been instrumental to identify and resolve hurdles to trade along the corridors. Through this partnerships, the Governments continue to work on the betterment of the transport infrastructure along these corridors. As such the corridor contributes towards intra-SADC and global competitiveness, as a result integrating our economies into the global economy.

Our efforts toward making the Walvis Bay Corridors efficient moves forward as the

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TRANSNAMIB HOLDINGS LTD.

NAMIBIA’ LEADING BULK LOGISTICS PROVIDER

NAMIBIA’S BULK CARRIER OF CHOICE

TransNamib Holdings Limited, the national transport logistics provider in Namibia, specializes in shipping bulk freight and containerized cargo across the country. A combination of rail and road transport facilitates the reliable, cost-effective and seamless movement of cargo. Over the past few years TransNamib struggled to provide suitable products and services that meet customer demands and expectations. The Company therefore launched critical transformation initiatives to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness. As a result TransNamib recently adopted a five-year integrated strategic business plan. It is a recognized fact that for any nation rail transport can play an important role in meeting the challenge of moving increasing freight volumes. Namibia is no exception. TransNamib favours a synchronized approach through the four modes of transport in alliance with Harambee Prosperity Plan. TransNamib’s strategic advantage is rail-friendly freight: moving bulk commodities over long distances. The railways are a core element of the ability to move goods efficiently, seamlessly and sustainably, which significantly contributes to the prosperity and viability of any economy. TransNamib also promotes development initiatives to carry freight on various trade corridors which efficiently connect landlocked countries such as Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe to ports. Logistics remains a key economic priority sector. A railway network improves freight and logistics efficiency which translates into lower production cost, lower carbon dioxide emissions as well as less congestion and fewer accidents and fatalities on the roads. Overall, rail transportation is safe and environmentally friendly, offers macroeconomic advantages for society, meets demands for mobility, defies congestion, relieves pressure on the roads and enhances sustainable integration of transport. TransNamib remains committed to provide rail transportation and logistics solutions that meet customer demands and expectations – through collective efforts between us, the valued customers we serve and the nation at large.

Windhoek Tel +264 61 298 2302 Ondangwa Tel +264 65 281 208 Walvis Bay Tel +264 64 208 561

TRANSNAMIB HOLDINGS LTD Commercial and Marketing +264 61 298 2302 / 2365 pubrelations@transnamib.com.na www.transnamib.com.na

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NAMIBIA’S LARGEST BULK Logistics Provider

STORAGE FACILITIES ANGOLA KATIMA MULILO

OSHIKANGO ONDANGWA OPUWO

RUNDU

OSHAKATI

BAGANI

LIVINGSTONE

Trans Kunene

TSUMEB

CAPE FRIA

OTAVI

ANGOLA

WAREHOUSEOSHIKANGO FACILITIES OPUWO OSHAKATI STORAGE FACILITIES Trans Kunene

OTJIWARONGO

ONDANGWA

OMARURU

RUNDU

KRANZBERG TSUMEB

CAPE FRIA

GROOTFONTEIN

OUTJO

OTAVI

OKAHANDJA GOBABIS

ARANDIS

SWAKOPMUND

LIVINGSTONE

BAGANI

GROOTFONTEIN

OUTJO

WAREHOUSE FACILITIES

KATIMA MULILO

Trans Kalahari

WINDHOEK

OTJIWARONGO

WALVIS BAY

REHOBOTH

OMARURU KRANZBERG

SWAKOPMUND

OKAHANDJA

MARIENTAL

WINDHOEK

WALVIS BAY

CONTAINER FACILITIES WAREHOUSE FACILITIES

STORAGE FACILITIES

GOBABIS

ARANDIS

Trans Kalahari

GIBEON

REHOBOTH

BOTSWANA

GIBEON LÜDERITZ

AUS SEEHEIM

KEETMANSHOOP AUS

BOTSWANA

KARASBURG

GOBAS KARASBURG

NAKOP

SEEHEIM

CONTAINER FACILITIES

GOBAS NAKOP

MARIENTAL

LÜDERITZ

STORAGE FACILITIES

KEETMANSHOOP

UPINGTON

ARIAMSVLEI UPINGTON

RSA

ARIAMSVLEI RSA

LEGEND

Our core business lies in bulk freight logistics solutions and containerized transport, carefully tailored to customers’ requirements in different industries such as mining, fuel, agriculture, building and containers. In addition, TransNamib provides warehousing and siding storage facilities across the country.

LEGEND

Stations Stations with warehouse space

with warehouse space

TransNamib has the experience and expertise to convey any bulk freight in an efficient and cost-efficient manner whatever your specific needs may be. The company has the a longstanding track record in handling bulk cargo and tailor-made solutions for extensive requirements. Current railway line For your transport logistics needs, please contact our Commercial and Marketing department at 061 298 2302/01/64 Future railway lines or visit any of our depots across the country.

Sidings and/or smaller station space

Sidings and/or smaller station space

Current railway line Future railway lines

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WALVIS BAY CORRIDOR GROUP CONNECTING SOUTHERN AFRICA TO THE REST OF THE WORLD The Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG), a Public Private Partnership (PPP), was established in the year 2000 as a service and facilitation centre to promote the benefits of using the Walvis Bay corridors through the Port of Walvis Bay to and from southern Africa. We continuously identify opportunities, plan, coordinate, market, advocate for infrastructure development and facilitate trade. Through this unique institutional arrangement as a PPP, the WBCG is a perfect example of how Govern­ment and the private sector work together to integrate business potential and utilise transport and trade opportunities. This collaboration is incredibly important for economic development within the region and for the growth of the private sector.

OUR MEMBERS

Ministry of Works and Transport: Department of Transport; Ministry of Finance: Department of Customs; Ministry of Industrialization, Trade and SME Development: Investment Centre; Ministry of Home Affairs and Immigration: Department of Immigration; Namibian Ports Authority; Roads Authority; TransNamib Holdings; Walvis Bay Port Users Association; Container Liners Operators Forum; Namibia Logistics Asso­ ciation; Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Namibia Transporters Association and the Municipality of Walvis Bay.

THE WALVIS BAY CORRIDORS

The Trans Kalahari Corridor links the port of Walvis Bay to Botswana’s capital, Gaborone, the heartland of South Africa’s industrial capital, Gauteng and Zimbabwe. It is perfectly positioned to service the two-way trade between South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Europe, the Americas

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and the Far East. This corridor allows for 48 hours’ transit to and from Gauteng. The Walvis Bay-Ndola-Lubumbashi Corridor (WBNLDC) provides the shortest route between the Namibian west coast Ports of Lüderitz and Walvis Bay and the vital transport hubs of Livingstone, Lusaka and Ndola in Zambia, Lubumbashi (southern DRC), and Zimbabwe. This corridor is perfectly positioned to service the two-way trade between the SADC region and Europe, North and South America and emerging markets in the East. The Trans-Cunene Corridor links Walvis Bay’s port to southern Angola via Tsumeb and Ondangwa to Oshikango in Namibia and the Santa Clara border post in Angola. It is perfectly positioned to service the two-way trade between Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Europe, the Americas and the East with the rail line that has been completed up to the Angolan border.

THE WBCG FOOTPRINT

The WBCG has established a branch office in Lubumbashi, DRC as well as a representative office in Sao Paulo, Brazil since 2012 and therefore the footprint of the WBCG has been extended to four offices beyond the borders of Namibia, which include Lusaka, Zambia since 2005 and Johannesburg, South Africa since 2008.

FACILITATING NAMIBIA’S TRANSFORMATION INTO A LOGISTICS NATION Namibia has a clear vision to become a regional leader in logistics in southern Africa. Our current National Development Plan four (NDP4) has identified Logistics as one of the economic priorities, an area in which Na-

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mibia has a clear competitive advantage. Against this background, Namibia has embarked on a transformation process to establish itself as the ‘Logistics Hub for Southern Africa’.

be on the mining, tourism, manufacturing, agriculture, fisheries and logistics sectors.

The Namibian Logistics Hub Concept entails an intervention process that strives to put in place sustainable institutional arrangements and mechanisms that would ensure the transfor­ mation of the Port of Walvis Bay and the Walvis Bay Corridors into Economic Corridors for the socio economic growth and development of the country. To achieve this objective, the Logistics Hub Project was established under the umbrella of the Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG).

Regional support to ensure harmonisation of standards, allowing for the smooth flow of trade between borders, is ensured through the establishment of regional committees and partnerships with regional bodies, under which the Trans-Kalahari Corridor Secretariat is made up of Government and private sector representatives from Namibia, Botswana and South Africa.

The role of the Ministry of Works & Transport and the WBCG (as the PPP entity), will ensure that the future Logistics Hub development process will take place under the auspices of and with the direct involvement of the National Planning Commission.

TURNING NAMIBIA’S TRANSPORT CORRIDORS INTO ECONOMIC CORRIDORS

In an effort to further support the acceleration of corridor development, the Ministry of Industrialization, Trade and SME Development in Namibia with the support of the Department of Trade in South Africa has mandated the WBCG to identify ways of attracting investment along the Walvis Bay corridors through the Spatial Development Initiative (SDI) programme. The SDI programme aims to increase the scale of economic activity and improve the diversity of economic activity along these corridors, thereby enhancing the economic growth of the region. The initial focus in terms of economic activities will

REGIONAL STAKEHOLDERS AND PARTNERSHIPS

The Walvis Bay-Ndola-Lubumbashi Corridor Management Committee, which is a partnership between Namibia, Zambia and DRC was established to address problems, which could impede the smooth movement of goods across the borders along the Walvis Bay-NdolaLubumbashi Corridor. The Port of Walvis Bay is strategically located on the west coast of Africa serving as a strategic link to southern Africa’s more than 350 million consumers. With Walvis Bay now firmly established as one of the major gateways into southern Africa, the WBCG continuously seeks to maximise the potential of the corridors to boost the social and economic benefits for Namibia and for the Southern African region as a whole.

WALVIS BAY CORRIDOR GROUP Cindy-Lu Hasheela marketing@wbcg.com.na +264 61 251669 www.wbcg.com.na


TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS

Democratic Republic of Congo 66 million customers

Tanzania 43.7 million customers

Angola 18.5 million customers

Zambia

Mozambique

12.9 million customers

Malawi

22.9 million customers

15.2 million customers

Zimbabwe

THE SADC MALL

12.5 million customers

Botswana 1.95 million customers

Namibia 2.1 million customers

South Africa 49.3 million customers

Africa’s biggest shopping mall.

Welcome to the Southern

African Development Community (SADC), one of the largest emerging markets in the world, with over 330 million consumers and a GDP in excess of US$500 000 billion. Through strategic partnerships, we can give you the logistical solutions to gain access into this lucrative market via the Port of Walvis Bay, the obvious hub for trade between Southern Africa and the rest of the world.

Contact us today to discover how easy it is to gain trade access to Africa’s most lucrative and rapidly expanding market - the SADC shopping mall.

WBCG Head Office T. +264 61 251 669 E. marketing@wbcg.com.na

WBCG South Africa T. +27 11 258 8912 E. bdm@wbcg.co.za

WBCG Zambia T. +260 21 129 4494 E. bdm@wbcgzm.com

WBCG DRC T. +322 386 5109 E. bdm@wbcg.cd

WBCG Brazil T. +55 11 5044 7701 E. ricardo@wbcg.com.br

www.wbcg.com.na

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WESTAIR AVIATION

50 YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE

Aviation is a fully integrated aviation service provider based at Eros airport, Windhoek. Starting out as an aircraft maintenance facility 50 years ago, in 1967, Westair has grown to become the most experienced aviation company in Namibia. Today the Westair fleet consist of more than 30 aircraft suitable for any mission, be it transporting freight to Mozambique, VIP charters for the Namibian government or crew rotations for the mining sector. Westair has an experienced and highly qualified workforce of aircraft engineers and pilots who have in the past offered services as far as Libya and Southern Sudan. Westair offers a diverse range of tailored aviation services which include: • Aircraft leasing • Cargo flights • Scheduled passenger flights • Scheduled freight operations • Charters and fly-in-safaris • Geophysical survey flying • Emergency medical evacuation • Flight training

BARS ACCREDITED SERVICE PROVIDER

Westair has been awarded Green

status by the Flight Safety Foundation, thus becoming the only Namibian based aviation company to hold such safety and quality recognition. Developed by the Flight Safety Foundation, the Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) is the single aviation safety standard for the mining sector and uses a new risk-based model framed around the actual threats to aviation operations and linking these directly to associated controls and recovery/mitigation measures. The conferment of GREEN status comes as Westair, an approved supplier to the resource and oil and gas industry, works for several of Namibia’s top resource companies, having met the standards of the BARS and other audit requirements.

EMBRAER ERJ 145

Westair operates an Embraer ERJ 145 capable of seating 50 passengers. This aircraft is used to support current mining clients to conduct crew changes to and from various outstations across southern Africa. Westair is the only privately owned Namibian aviation service provider to offer flexible and tailored solutions for large groups of passengers.

FLIGHT OPERATIONS

Dedicated to customer service, at Westair we pride ourselves on our steadfast reputation and long-standing relationship with our customers. Our experience allows us to deliver transportation services of the highest quality and safety standards.

BUSINESS VIP CHARTER

Westair has a wide range of luxury jet and turbo prop aircraft that are available 24 hours a day seven days a week. Westair provides business and VIP travellers with flexibility and the peace of mind that any destination is just a phone call away.

CHARTERS AND FLY-IN SAFARIS

Westair has a wide range of twin and single engine aircraft that are able to land on unpaved runways. With a large fleet of aircraft that are able to carry up to 11 passengers Westair has the capability to cater for your needs.

CARGO AND FREIGHT OPERATIONS

Westair operates daily cargo flights between Windhoek, Johannesburg and Maputo. Westair

also offers tailored cargo flights to anywhere in southern Africa.

EMERGENCY EVACUATION AND AIR AMBULANCE

Over the past nineyears E-Med Rescue 24 together with Westair has saved countless lives by responding to medical emergencies. Westair has aircraft on 24 hour standby and is ready to respond to any medical emergency anywhere in southern Africa. Our aircraft are equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment to handle even the most complex medical cases.

GEOPHYSICAL SURVEY FLYING

Westair has 17 years’ experience flying geophysical surveys in Africa. Westair has used various aircraft to conduct survey operations in more than ten African countries operating as far as Libya and South Sudan.

TAILORED SCHEDULE FLIGHTS

Westair provides tailored fixedwing support to offshore oil and gas prospecting, as well as current operating companies, by flying tailored schedules to various outstations for crew changes.

WESTAIR AVIATION +264 83 937 8247 info@westair.com.na www.westair.com.na

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VITAL CONTACTS INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 We acknowledge that addresses and contact persons may change from time to time and we appreciate being advised of any changes, omissions, updates and improvements. Amendments for the purposes of the Namibia Trade Directory can be forwarded to info@ namibiatradedirectory.com and for the purposes of the list of Diplomatic Missions to the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation Ms Marbeline Goagoses, Tel 061 2822129.

EMBASSIES & HIGH COMMISSIONS IN NAMIBIA Embassy of the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Sid Ali Abdelbari P O Box 3079, Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 1507 Fax + 264 61 23 6376

Embassy of the Republic of Angola Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Manuel Alexandre Duarte Rodrigues Private bag 1220 Ausspannplatz Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 7535 Fax: +264 61 22 1498 Email: embangol.nam@gmail. com

High Commission of the Republic of Botswana

High Commissioner: H.E. Claurinah Tshenolo Modise P O Box 20359 Windhoek Tel: +264 61 22 1941\2\7 Fax +264 61 23 6034

Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Eduardo Carvalho

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P O Box 24166,Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 23 7368\9 Fax: +264 061 23 3389 Email: brasemb.windhoek@ itamaraty.gov.br

P O Box 11853, Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 1501 Fax: +264 61 22 8856 Email. embassy.windhoek@mfa. gov.eg

Embassy of the People’s Republic of China

Delegation of the European Union

P O Box 22777 Windhoek Tel +264 61 40 2598 Fax +264 61 40 2655 Website: www. na.chineseembassy.org

Embassy of the Democratic Republic of CongoFederation of Namibia

Ambassador: H. E. Mr. Anastas Kaboba Kasongo Wa-Kimba P O Box 9064 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 6287 Fax +264 61 25 6286 Email: missionrdcwindhoekdeux@ gmail.com

Embassy of the Republic of Congo Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Marie Thèrése Avemeka P O Box 22970 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 7517/25 3328 Fax +264 61 240796 Email: embcongo@iway.na

Embassy of the Republic of Cuba

Ambassador: H. E. Mr. Giraldo Mazola P O Box 23866 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 7072 Fax: +264 61 23 1584 Email: embajada@cubanembassy. net Website: www.cubanembassy.net

Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Mahmoud Fawzy Abou Dounya

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Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Jana Hybaskova P O Box 24443, Windhoek Tel +264 61 20 26000/20 26202 delegation-namibia@eeas. europa.eu Website: www.delnam.ec.europa.eu

Embassy of Finland

Ambassador: Mrs. Anne Saloranta P O Box 3649 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 1355 Fax: +264 61 22 1349 Email: sanomat.win@formin.fi Website: www.finland.org.na

Embassy of the French Republic

Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Jacqueline BassaMazzoni P O Box 20484 Windhoek Tel +264 61 27 6700 Fax: +264 61 2 76710 Email: cad.windhoek-amba@ diplomatie.gouv.fr

Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Christian Matthias Schlaga P O Box 231 Windhoek Tel +264 61 27 3100 Fax: +264 61 22 2981 Email: info@windhuk.diplo.de Website: www.windhuk.diplo.de

High Commission of the Republic of Ghana

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr. Alhaji Abdul Rahman Harruna Attah P O Box 24165 Windhoek

Tel +264 61 22 1341/2 Fax: +264 61 22 1343 Email: ghmissio@mweb.com.na

High Commission of India

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr. Kumar Tuhin P O Box 1209, Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 6037 Fax: +264 61 23 7320 Email: hicomind@mweb.com.na

Embassy of Republic of Indonesia

P O Box 20691 Windhoek Tel +264 61 285 1000/ 22593 Email: kbri@iafrica.com.na Website: www.kemlu.go.id/ windhoek

Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran

P O Box 23022, Windhoek Tel +264 61 24 9700 Fax: +264 61 30 4026 Email: milad110mobarak@yahoo. com

Embassy of Japan Ambassador:

H.E. Mr. Hideyuki Sakamoto P O Box 23025 Windhoek Tel +264 61 42 6700 Fax: +264 61 426749 Email: info@wh.mofa.go.jp

High Commission of the Republic of Kenya

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr. Isaac G. Njenga P O Box 2889 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 6836 Fax: +264 61 22 1409 Email: kenyanet@mweb.co.na

Embassy of Libya

P O Box 124 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 4454 Fax: +264 61 23 4464

High Commission of Malaysia


V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 High Commissioner: H.E. Hishamuddin Ibrahim P O Box 312 Klein Windhoek Tel +264 61 24 9885 NEAB@iway.na admin@namibia-realestate.com

High Commission of the Federal Republic of Nigeria

P O Box 23547 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 2103/4/5 Fax: +264 61 22 1639 Email: info@nhcnamibia.org Website: www.nhcwindhoek.org

Embassy of the Portuguese Republic P O Box 443 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 9791 Fax: +264 61 25 9792

Embassy of the Russian Federation

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Alexander Khudin P O Box 3826 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 22 8671 Fax: +264 61 22 9061 Email: rusemnam@mweb.com.na

High Commission of the Republic of South Africa

High Commissioner: H. E. Ms. Yvette Lillian Mavivi Myakayaka-Manzini P O Box 23100 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 20 57111 Fax: +264 61 22 4140 www.office@nipa.com.na

Embassy of the Kingdom of Spain

Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Concepción Figuerola Sanchez P O Box 21811 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 3066 Fax +264 61 27 1478 Email: emb.windhoek@maec.es Website: www.maec.es

Embassy of the Republic of Turkey Ambassador: H. E. Ms. Deniz Ҫakar P O Box 090998, Windhoek Tel +264 61 24 6158 Fax: +264 61 21 3096 Email: embassy.windhoek@mfa. gov.tr

British High Commission

High Commissioner: H.E. Mrs. Joanne Lomas P O Box 22202 Windhoek Tel. +264 61 274800 Fax: +264 61 22 8895 Email: general.windhoek@fco.uk Website: www.gov.uk/world/ namibia

Embassy of the United States of America

Ambassador: H.E. Thomas F. Daughton Private Bag 12029 Ausspannplatz Tel. +264 61 29 58500 Fax: +264 61 295 8593 Email: embassywindhoek@state. gov

Embassy of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Juan Carlos Barrios Hurtado P O Box 13353 Windhoek Tel. +264 61 22 7905 Fax: +264 61 22 7804 Email: embavenenam@gmail.com

High Commission of the Republic of Zambia P O Box 22882 Windhoek Tel +264 61 237610/1 Fax: +264 61 22 8162

Embassy of the Republic of Zimbabwe Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Rovina N. Chikava P O Box 23056 Windhoek

MAN – Medical Association of Namibia

Tel +264 61 22 8134 Fax: +264 61 22 6859

P O Box 3369 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 4455 man.office@iway.na www.man.com.na

REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (ESAMI) Representative: Dr. Bonard Mwape (Based in Arusha) P O Box 1836, Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 6965/6 Fax +264 61 24 9822

P O Box 86099 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 0558 office@nacobta.com.na www.nacobta.com.na

NAMAF – Namibia Association of Medical Aid Funds

FAO Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations Delegate in Charge: Mr Babagana Ahmadu P O Box 24185 Windhoek Tel. +264 61 204 6111/22 4094 Fax +264 61 22 5726 FAO-NA@fao.org www.fao.org-namibia

ICRC International Committee of the Red Cross Delegate: Mr Olivier Dubois P O Box 3970 Harare, Zimbabwe Tel +263 470 2440 Fax +263 470 2378 harare.har@icrc.org www.icrc.org

INTERNATIONAL Organisation FOR MIGRATION (IOM)

NACOBTA – Namibia Community Based Tourism

Representative for Southern Africa: Mr. Bernardo Mariano- Joaquim (Based in RSA) Private Bag 13301 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 1639 Fax. +264 61 23 4396 Email. iomnamibia@iom.int www.iom.int

P O Box 11974 Klein Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 7211 nfo@namaf.org.na www.namaf.org.na

NASRIA – National Special Risks Insurance Association P O Box 417 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 9207 tjozo.nasria@iway.na www.nasria.com.na

NIBA – Namibia Insurance Brokers Association P O Box 35138 Windhoek Tel +264 61 270 4420 Christine.deklerk@marsh.com www.nibanam.com

NSS – Namibia Scientific Society P O Box 67 Windhoek Fax +264 61 22 6846 nwg@iafrica.com.na

PAN AFRICAN WOMAN’S ORGANISATION (PAWO)

Executive Secretary: Ms. Mildred Jantjies P O Box 96094 Windhoek Tel. +264 61 22 9640 Fax: +264 61 23 1671 Website: kaliswani@yahoo.com

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V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 PAN - Payments Association of Namibia P O Box 134, Windhoek Tel +264 61 41 5420 info@pan.org.na gkavariiobnam@mweb.com.na Annette.rathenam@pan.org.na www.pan.org.na

SADC Tribunal Southern African Development Community Tribunal Judge President: Hon Jmc Chingi’anyi Mkandawire P O Box 40624 Ausspannplatz Windhoek Tel +264 61 38 3600 Fax +264 61 38 3624 regiatary@sadc-tribunal.org www.sadc.tribunal.org

SOUTH EAST ATLANTIC FISHERIES ORGANISATION (SEAFO) Executive Secretary: Dr. Ben Van Zyl

P O Box 4862

Windhoek Tel +264 64 406 885 Fax +264 64 40 6884 Email: info@seafo.org

SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION (SACU) Executive Secretary: Ms. Paulina Mbala Elago Private Bag 13285 Tel +264 61 29 58000 Fax: +264 61 24 5611 Email: sacusec@sacu.int Website: www.sacu.int

SADC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM (SADC–PF) Secretary General: Dr. Esau Chiviya P O Box 13361 Windhoek Tel +264 61 287 0000 Fax: +264 61 25 4642 Website: www.sadcpf.org

SOVEREIGN MILITARY HOSPITALLER ORDER OF ST. JOHN OF JERUSALEM OF

230

RHODES AND OF MALTA

Ambassador: H.E. Prof. Marcello Bandettini (Based in Italy) P O Box 9458 Windhoek Tel +264 61 30 9391 Fax +264 61 30 9392 Email: bandettinimarcello@gmail. com

UNDP United Nations Development Programme Private Bag 13329 Windhoek Tel +264 61 204 6111 Fax +264 61 204 6203 www.undp.org.na

UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation P O Box 24519 Windhoek Tel +264 61 291 7000 Fax +264 61 291 7220 windhoek@unesco.org www.unesco.org-windhoek

UNHCR United Nations High Commission for Refugees Private Bag 13310 Windhoek Tel +264 61 204 6500 Fax +264 61 23 0055 namwi@unher.org www.mgdangsoaunhtl.org

UNIC United Nations Information Centre Private Bag 13351 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 3035 Fax +264 61 204 6206

UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund Representative: Ms Micaela M De Sousa P O Box 1706 Windhoek Tel +264 61 204 6111

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Fax +264 61 204 6206 cchisenga@unicef.org www.unicef.org

UNPF United Nations Population Fund Private Bag 13329 Windhoek Tel +264 61 204 6283 Fax +264 61 204 6204 unfpa@un.na www.unfpa.org

WFP World Food Programme

Country Director: Ms Jennifer Kamanzi Bitonde P O Box 11043 Windhoek Tel +264 61 204 6359 Fax +264 61 24 7065 Charmaine.detering@wfp.org Marcia.sajeni@wfp.org www.wfp.org.na

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO) Representative: Prof. Monirul Islam P O Box 11974 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 25 5121 Fax: +264 61 20 46202

BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATIONS AAN – Accommodation Association of Namibia

P O Box 90270, Windhoek Tel +264 67 30 1264 Fax +264 67 30 3885 info@bed-breakfast-namibia.com www.accommodationassociation.com

ACEN – Association of Consulting Engineers of Namibia P O Box 25837, Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 7672 info@acen.org.na www.acen.org.na

BAN – Bankers’ Association of Namibia P O Box 195, Windhoek Tel +264 61 299 2016 Fax +264 61 22 0979

CARAN – Car Rental Association of Namibia P O Box 80368 Windhoek www.caran.org

NIPA - Namibia Institute of Professional Accountants P O Box 90756, Windhoek Tel +264 61 38 2700 Fax +264 61 38 2701 www.office@nipa.com.na

CIF – Construction Industries Federation of Namibia P O Box 1479 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 0028 Fax +264 61 22 4534 secretariat@cifnamibia.com www.cifnamibia.com

COM – The Chamber of Mines of Namibia

P O Box 2895 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 7925 Fax +264 61 22 2638 dmeyer@chamberofmines.org.na www.chamberofmines.org.na

EAN – Economic Association of Namibia www.ean.org.na

FENATA – Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations P O Box 86495 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 0337 welcome@fenata.org www.fenata.org

HAN – Hospitality Association of Namibia P O Box 86078 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 2904 info@HANnamibia.com www.hannamibia.com


V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 ICAN – Institute of Chartered Accountants of Namibia P O Box21459 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 02181 secretariat@icanpaab.com www.icancpd.net

IPBF – Indigenous Peoples Business Forum P O Box 22402 Windhoek Tel +264 61 40 0862 info@ipbf.com.na www.ipbf.com

INQS – Institute of Namibia Quantity Surveyors P O Box 9507 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 8970 info@inqs.org.na www.inqs.org.na

Law Society of Namibia P O Box 714 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 0263 lawsoc@iafrica.com.na www.lawsocietynamibia.org

MAN – Medical Association of Namibia P O Box 3369, Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 4455 man.office@iway.na www.man.com.na

Michelle McLean Children’s Trust P O Box 97428 Windhoek Tel +264 61 24 0807 info@mmct.org.na www.mmct.org.na

NACOBTA – Namibia Community Based Tourism P O Box 86099 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 0558 office@nacobta.com.na www.nacobta.com.na

NAGN – National Art Gallery of Namibia

P O Box 994 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 1160 pro@nagn.org.na www.nagn.org.na

NAMAF – Namibia Association of Medical Aid Funds P O Box 11974 Klein Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 7211 info@namaf.org.na www.namaf.org.na

NAMFISA – Namibia Employers’ Federation P O Box 21250 Windhoek Tel +264 61 290 5000 info@namfisa.com.na www.namfisa.com.na

NASRIA – National Special Risks Insurance Association P O Box 417 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 9207 tjozo.nasria@iway.na www.nasria.com.na

NEAB – Namibia Estate Agents Board

P O Box 90091 Klein Windhoek Tel +264 61 24 9885 NEAB@iway.na admin@namibia-realestate.com

NCE Namibian Chamer of Environment Tel: +264 61 240 140 Mobile: +264 81 162 5807 ceo@n-c-e.org www.n-c-e.org

NIA – Namibia Institute of Architects P O Box 1478 Windhoek Tel +264 61 23 1559 nia@mweb.com.na www.nia.org.na

NIBA – Namibia Insurance Brokers Association P O Box 35138

Windhoek Tel +264 61 270 4420 Christine.deklerk@marsh.com www.nibanam.com

NLA – Namibia Logistics Association P O Box 90546 Windhoek Tel +264 61 41 1100 info@nla.org.na www.nla.org.na

Honorary Consul: Mr. Mihail Mihaylov P O Box 24449 Windhoek Tel/Fax: +264 61 24 6333 Email: mihail_m@hotmail.com

Consulate of Canada

TRANS KALAHARI CORRIDOR SECRETARIAT P O Box 23017 Windhoek Tel +264 61 25 0071 Fax: +264 61 25 0074 info@HANnamibia.com www.hannamibia.com

Honorary Consul: Mr. François Uys P O Box 128 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 25 1254 Fax: +264 61)25 1686 Email: canada@mweb.com.na

Consulate of the Republic of Cyprus

CONSULAR REPRESENTATIVES Consul General: Mr. Gilberto Pinto Chikoti P O Box 1279 Windhoek Tel +264 66 25 5782 Email: consulado.ang.rundu@ hotmail.com www.accommodationassociation.com

Australian Consulate

Honorary Consul: Mr. Savvas I. Savva P O Box 24
 Windhoek Tel.: +264 64 20 4501 Fax: +264 64 20 7029 Email: sisavva@venus.com.na www.chamberofmines.org.na

Royal Danish Consulate

Honorary Consul: Mr. Carsten Norgaard P O Box 24236 Windhoek Tel.: +264 85 12 44219 Email: cfnorgaard@gmail.com

Consulate of the French Republic

Honorary Consul: Mr. Edward Humphrey P O Box 86491 Windhoek

Austrian Consulate General Honorary Vice-Consul: Mr. Josef Vitus Schubert P O Box 11848 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 2159 Website: www.bmeia.gv.at/en/ ambassy/pretoria

Consulate of the Kingdom of Belgium Honorary Consul: Mr. Hans-Bruno Gerdes P O Box 43, Windhoek

Consulate of the Republic of Bulgaria

Honorary Consul: Mr. Milutin Djoulizibaritch P O Box 86078 Windhoek Tel.: +264 64 22 0374 Fax: +264 61 88 619548 Website: www.hannamibia.com

Consulate of the Republic of Greece

P O Box 24 Windhoek Tel.: +264 64 20 4501 Fax: +264 64 20 5576 Email: sisavva@venus.com.na

Consulate of the Republic of Hungary w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

231


V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 Honorary Consul: Mr. Gyรถrgy Trepper P O Box 20392 Windhoek Tel +264 61 22 3175 Fax: +264 61 22 3175 Email: trepper@iway.na

Consulate General Italy

Honorary: Mrs. Rosanna Reboldi Bleks P O Box 6176 Windhoek Tel.: +264 81 147 1250 Fax: +264 61 25 7122 Email: rosannareboldi@yahoo. com

Consulate of Jamaica

Honorary Consul: Prof. Earle Spencer Taylor P O Box 25315 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 23 8288 Fax: +264 85 20 64065 Email : jhcon.nam@afol.com.na

Consulate of the Netherlands

Honorary Consul: Mr. Servaas van den Bosch P O Box 564, Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 22 3733 Fax: +264 61 22 3732 Email: honconsulnl@ namibianederland.net Website: www.namibianederland.net

New Zealand Consulate Honorary Consul: Mr. Bradley D. Basson P O Box 97428 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 38 6600 Email: bdblaw@iway.na

Royal Norwegian Consulate

General Mr. Klaus Endresen Private Bag X 13303 P O Box 86099 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 25 8278 Telefax: +264 61 23 0528 Email: Klaus@appiah-endresen. com

232

Consulate of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan

Honorary Consul: Mr. Akapandi Johannes Endjala P O Box 32128 Windhoek Tel: +264 61 37 5700/12 Fax: +264 61 256131 Email: akapandi@jandpgroup.biz

Consulate of Portugal

Honorary Consul: Mr. Alfredo Lourenco Pimenta P O Box 11974 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 29 68000 Fax: +264 61 24 9300 Email: court@safarihotelsnamibia Website: www. safarihotelsnamibia.com

Consulate of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka

Honorary Consul: Mr. Sackey Aipinge P O Box 98456 Windhoek Telefax: +264 61 24 4064 Email: consulslnam@gmail.com Website: www. consulsrilankanamibia.webs.com

Consulate of the Kingdom of Spain

Honorary Consul: Mr. Miguel Angel Tordesillas Herranz P O Box 417 Windhoek Tel.: +264 63 20 2891 Fax: +264 63 20 2040 Email: tjozo.nasria@iway.na Website: www.nasria.com.na

Consulate of the Kingdom of Sweden

Honorary Consul: Mr. Klaus Endresen Private Bag x13303 Windhoek Tel: +264 61 25 8278 Fax:+264 61 23 0528 Email: klaus@appiah-endresen. com

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Consulate-General of Switzerland

Consul-General: Mr. Urs Gamma P O Box 9245 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 22 3853 Email: windhoek@honrep.ch

Consulate of the Kingdom of Thailand

Consul General: Dr. Gabriel T. Uahengo P O Box 805 Windhoek Tel.: +264 61 23 3737 Fax: +264 61 23 3209 Email:gabes@zenith.com.na

Consulate of Republic of Turkey Honorary Consul: Mr. Burhan Seber Email: burhan@seber.com

NAMIBIAN MISSIONS ABROAD ANGOLA

Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Grace Ndadaleka Uushona P O Box 953 , Windhoek Tel.: +244-222 321 241 Fax: +244 - 222 322 008 Email: embnam@netangola.com

AUSTRIA

P O Box 987, Gaborone Tel.: +267 39 02181 Fax: +267 39 02248 Email: namibhc@botsnet.bw

BRAZIL

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Samuel Sheefeni Nuuyoma Tel.: +55-61 3248 6274 Fax: +55-61 3248 7135 Email: info@embassyofnamibia. org.br

CHINA

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Ringo F. Abed P O Box 1479, Windhoek Tel.: +8610-653-22211 Fax: +8610-653-24549 secretariat@cifnamibia.com www.cifnamibia.com

CONGO (Brazzaville)

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Vilio Hanooshike Hifindaka P O Box 2895 Windhoek Tel: +242 06 466 668 Email: vhifindaka@gmail.com

CUBA

Ambassador: H.E. Dr. Jerobeam Shaanika Tel.: +53-7-204 1430/28 Fax: +53-7-204 1431 Email: namembassycuba@ hotmail.com

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Simon Madjumo Maruta Tel.: +431-402 9371/2/3 Fax: +431-402 9370 Email: nam.emb.vienna@eunet.at

EGYPT

BELGIUM & EU

ETHIOPIA & AU

BOTSWANA

FINLAND Embassy of the Republic of Namibia

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Kaire K. Mbuende Tel.: +32-2-771 1410 Fax: +32-2-771 9689 Email: nam.emb@brutele.be

High Commissioner: H. E. Mr. Mbapeua Muvangua

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Japhet Isaack Tel.: + 202 235 89649 Fax: + 00202 2359 8170 Email: namembcai@link.net

Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Monica Nashandi Tel.:+2511-1-6611966 Fax: +2511-1-6612677 Email: nam.emb@ethionet.et


V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 Ambassador: H. E. Mr. Bonny Haufiku Cell. + 358 41 7047153 Email: elizabeth.theron@yahoo. com

FRANCE

Ambassador: H. E. Ms. Frieda Nangula Ithete P O Box 9507 Windhoek Tel.: +33-1-44-17 3265 Fax: +33-1-44 17 3273 Email: info@embassyofnamibia.fr Website: www. embassyofnamibia.fr

GERMANY

Ambassador: H. E. Mr. Andreas B.D Guibeb Tel.: +49-30-254-0950 Fax: +49-30-254-09555 Email: berlin@mfa.gov.na Website: www.namibia-botschaft.de

GHANA

High Commissioner: H. E. Mr. Charles Bernardt Josob P O Box 3369, Windhoek Tel.: +233302799764 Email: accra@mirco.gov.na

INDIA

High Commissioner: H. E. Mr. Pius Dunaiski Tel.: +91-11-24115632 Fax: +91-11-24115637 Email: nam@nhcdelhi.com

JAPAN Embassy of the Republic of Namibia

Ambassador: Mrs. Sophia-Namupa Nangombe P O Box 86099 Windhoek Tel.: +81-3-6426-5460 Fax: +81-3-6426-5461 Email: embassy@namibiatokyo.or.jp

MALAYSIA High Commission of the Republic of Namibia High Commissioner: H.E. Mrs. Anne Namakau

Mutelo Tel.: +60-3-21646520 Fax: +60-3-21688790 Email: namhckl@streamyx.com

NIGERIA High Commission of the Republic of Namibia

High Commissioner: H. E. Dr. Peingeondjabi Titus Shipoh Tel.: +234-9-7809 441 Klein Windhoek Tel 25 7211 Email: info@namibiahc.com.ng Website: www.namibiahc.com.ng

RUSSIAN FEDERATION Embassy of the Republic of Namibia

Ambassador H. E. Mr. Ndali Ché Kamati P O Box 21250, Windhoek Tel: +7-499-230 3275 Fax: +7-499-230 2274 Email: moscow@mirco.gov.na Website: www.namibian-embassy.ru

SENEGAL Namibia

High Commissioner: H.E. Mrs. Trudie Tshiwa Amulungu P O Box 417, Windhoek Tel.: +221 33 859 2321 Email: dakar@mirco.gov.na

SOUTH AFRICA

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr. Veiccoh K. Nghiwete P.O. Box 29806 Pretoria Tel.: +27-12-4819100 Fax: +27-12-343-7294 Email: secretary@namibia.org.za

SWEDEN

Ambassador: H.E. Ms. Morina Muuondjo P.O. Box 19151 SE-104 32 Stockholm Sweden Tel.: +46-8-442-9800 Fax: +46-8-612-66 55 Email: info@embassyofnamibia.se Website: www. embassyofnamibia.se

TANZANIA

Tel.: +263-4-885-841/882-709 Fax: +263-4-885-800 Email: secretary@ namibianembassy.co.zw Website: www.chamberofmines. org.na

UNITED KINGDOM

MUNICIPALITIES

High Commissioner: H.E. Mrs. Theresia Samaria P.O. Box 80211 Dar Es Salaam Tel.: +255 22 2601903 Fax: +255 22 2602003 Email: namhcdar@gmail.com

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr Steve Vemunavi Katjiuanjo P O Box 195 Windhoek Tel.: +44-207-636-6244 Fax: +44-207-637-5694 Email: info@namibiahc.org.uk

UNITED NATIONS Permanent Mission of the Republic of Namibia to the United Nations Ambassador H.E. Mr. Wilfried I. Emvula Tel.: +1-212-685 2003 Fax: +1-212-685 1561 Email: namibia@un.int

+264 61 211 111

Maxuilili Fire Station +264 61 212 265

Diaz Street Fire Station0

+264 61 250 084 / +264 61 250 446

State Hospitals

+264 61 203 9111

Namibian Police +264 61 10 111

City Police

+264 61 290 2239 / +264 61 290 2018 (All hours) Toll Free Number +264 61 302 302

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ambassador: H.E. Mr. Martin Andjaba P O Box 90756 Windhoek Tel.: +1-202-986 0540 Fax: +1-202-986 0443 Email: info@ namibianembassyusa.org Website: www. namibianembassyusa.org

Electricity Failures

+264 290 2452/3/4 (All hours) / +264 222 658 (After hours)

Water and Sewerage (office hours) +264 61 290 2402 (After hours)

ZAMBIA

High Commissioner: H.E. Mr. Leonard Nambahu P.O. Box 30577 Lusaka Tel.: +260-211 260 407/8 Fax: +260-211-263-858 Email: info@namibiahczambia.org Website: www.namibiahczambia.org

ZIMBABWE

Headquarters Fire Station

Ambassador: H.E. Mrs. Balbina Daes Pienaar P O Box 7166 Hafare

Receiver of Revenue +264 61 209 9111

Civic Affairs

+264 61 292 9111

City Traffic Management Services

+264 61 290 2722 / +264 61 258 473

Municipal services

Customer Care Officer +264 61 290 2690 / +264 61 290 2568

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INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 Accounts Enquiries:

Town Houses: +264 61 290 2105 / +264 61 290 2224 Soweto Office: +264 61 290 2766  Wanaheda Office: +264 61 290 2723

Promotion, Business Development and Liaison: +264 61 290 2577 Email Address invest@windhoekcc.org.na

Fax +264 64 51 2429 mayor@atc.com.na pa2mayor@atc.com.na

Community Development Division

Kuhanga P O Box 157 Aranos Tel +264 63 27 2051 Fax +264 63 27 2373 aranos@iway.na www.aronostc.org

+264 61 290 2690 / +264 (0) 61 290 2568

Manager: Community Development +264 61 290 3152 Project Coordinator: Youth Development and Training +264 61 290 3152 Project Coordinator: Social Welfare +264 61 290 3509 Project Coordinator: Social Welfare +264 61 290 3510 Project Coordinator: Settlement Development +264 61 290 3153 Project Coordinator: Public Participation +264 61 290 2795

Building Control

Recreations and Sport

Okuryangava Office: +264 61 290 3145/6 Khomasdal Office: +264 61 290 2536/7/8

Debt Management DivisionCredit Control: +264 61 290 2069

Animals

Chief Health Services: +264 61 290 2496

Customer Care Officer:

Building Control: +264 61 290 2386

Enquiries Katutura:

+264 61 290 2772 Building lines for lateral and rear boundaries remain at 3 meters and set back from the street frontage at 5 meters.

Building Plans

Chief Building Inspector: +264 61 290 2386

Bus services

Manager: Bus Service: +264 61 290 2505 / +264 61 290 2528

Business Development Research

Analyst: Research and Information Management: +264 61 290 2024

Business Promotion and Liaison Analyst: Investment

234

Recreational Facilities

Aranos Village Council Mayor: Cllr Elden

Aroab Village Council

Chairperson: Mr J Van Wyk P O Box 51 Aroab Tel +264 63 28 0513 Fax +264 63 683 481 aroabvc@iway.na

Berseba Village Council

Chairperson: Ms Anna Katrina Haman Private Bag 2043 Berseba Tel +264 63 25 7033 Fax +264 63 25 7045 councilberseba@gmail.com

Brakwater: +264 61 216 766 Goreagab dam: +264 61 271 917 Olympia swimming pool +264 61 239 467 Western Surbubs swimming pool +264 61 290 2753 U.N. Plaza +264 61 290 3169 Sam Nujoma Stadium +264 61 291 367 Maintenance of playgrounds and recreational areas +264 61 290 3545

Bethanie Village Council

Sports

Gibeon Village Council

Sports Officer: +264 61 290 3570/71

Arandis Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Risto Kapenda Private Bag 7002 Arandis Tel +264 64 51 2400

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Chairperson: Aletha Frederick P O Box 74 Bethanie Tel +264 63 28 3006 Fax +264 63 28 3107 bethanievc@iway.na

Eenhana Municipality

Mayor: Cllr JN Shikongo Private Bag 88007 Eenhana Tel +264 65 29 0600 Fax +264 65 26 3068 ndevashiyaw@eenhanatc.org.na www.eenhanatc.com.na

Chairperson: Ms Anna Justine Garoes Private Bag 1001, Gibeon Tel +264 63 25 1014 Fax +264 63 25 1116 gvc-ceo@iway.na www.gibeon/council.com

Gobabis Municipality

Mayor: Silas Izaks P O Box 33 Gobabis Tel +264 62 57 7300 Fax +264 62 56 3012 ceogomun@iafrica.com.na www.gobmun.com

Gochas Village Council

Chairperson: Ms Leesma Swart P O Box 103 Gochas Tel +264 63 25 0019 Fax +264 63 25 0065 gochasvc@iway.na

Grootfontein Municipality

Mayor: Cllr A Haimen P O Box 23 Grootfontein Tel +264 67 24 3101 Fax +264 67 24 2930 korrienroodt@grootfonteinmun. com.na www.grootfontein.com.na

Helao Nafidi Municipality Mayor: Cllr Eliaser Nghipangelwa Private Bag 503 Helao Nafidi Tel +264 65 26 0000/1900 Fax +264 65 26 0032 info@ helaonafidi.org

Henties Bay Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Herman Honep P O Box 61 Henties Bay Tel +264 64 50 2000 Fax +264 64 50 2001 mayor@hbaymund.com.na www.hentiesbaymunicipality.com

Kalkrand Village Council

Chairperson: Jokobus Nuganab P O Box 5, Kalkrand Tel +264 63 26 4005 Fax +264 63 26 4005 yvonne.mupetami@gmail.com

Kamanjab Village Council Chairperson: Mr Niklas Hendrick P O Box 81 Kamanjab


V I TA L C O N TA C T S

INTERNATIONAL DIALLING CODE: +264 ALL TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS WITHOUT CODES ARE FOR WINDHOEK, CODE 061 Tel +264 67 33 0051 Fax +264 67 33 0061 kamanjabvc@iway.com

Karasburg Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Anna-marie Vries P O Box 33, Karasburg Tel +264 63 27 0032 Fax +264 63 27 0440 karasburgm@iway.na

Karibib Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Titus Nabot P O Box 19, Karibib Tel +264 64 55 0016 Fax +264 64 55 0032 Pa2ceo@karibibtown.org

Katima Mulilo Municipality Mayor: Cllr Georgina Mwiya Private Bag 5009 Katima Mulilo Tel +264 66 26 1500 Fax +264 66 25 3220 ljob@kmtc.org.na www.kmtc.org.na

Keetmanshoop Municipality Mayor: Cllr Gaudentia Kröhne Private Bag 2125 Keetmanshoop Tel +264 63 22 1211 Fax +264 63 22 3818 www.keetmanshoopmunicipality. org.na

Khorixas Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Ms T Moloto Private Bag 2005 Khorixas Fax +264 67 33 1001 towncouncilktc@gmail.com

Koës Village Council

Chairperson: Johannes Cupido P O Box 68, Koës Tel +264 63 25 2747 Fax +264 63 25 2757 koesvc@iway.na

Leonardville Village Council Chairperson: Rudolf Shomonguula P O Box 56, Leonardville Tel +264 62 56 9115 Fax +264 62 56 9166 Leonard@iway.na

Lüderitz Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Hilaria Mupalulie P O Box 19, Lüderitz Tel +264 63 20 2041/7800 Fax +264 63 20 2971 martha@ltc.com.na www.luderitztowncouncil.com.na

Omaruru Municipality Mayor: Cllr H Gebhardt P O Box 14 Omaruru Tel +264 64 57 0028 Fax +264 64 57 0105 muniomar@iway.na

Maltahöhe Village Council

Chairperson: Richard Naftalie Hansen P O Box 98, Maltahöhe Tel +264 63 29 3048 Fax +264 8 8655 6784 maltacouncil@iway.na

Mariental Municipality Mayor: Cllr WJ Mensah P O Box 110 Mariental Tel +264 63 24 5600 Fax +264 63 24 2039 marmun@iafrica.com.na

Nkurenkuru Municipality Mayor: Cllr ES Kandjimi P O Box 6004, Nkurenkuru Tel +264 66 25 8089 Fax +264 66 25 8000 nkutown@iway.na

Okahandja Municipality

Mayor: Cllr Johannes-Kongo Hingou P O Box 15, Okahandja Tel +264 62 50 5100 Fax +264 62 20 1746 Okahandja@iway.na www.okahandja.org.na

Okahao Town Council

Mayor: Cllr ID Uuzambala P O Box 699 Okahao Tel +264 65 25 2204 Fax +264 65 25 2201 info@okahaotc.com.na www.okahaotc.com.na

Okakarara Municipality Mayor: Cllr Olga Tjiurute Private Bag 2104 Windhoek Tel +264 67 31 7084 Fax +264 67 31 7202 okakaratc@gmail.com

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INDEX

INDEX A

Advantage 78 African Leadership Institute 114 Agra 83 Agribank 84 Allan Gray 34 Allgemeine Zeitung 76, 77 ANTA / The Association of Namibian Travel Agents 203 AREVA 26, 187 Association for Local Authorities in Namibia (ALAN) 169 Association of Consulting Engineers of Namibia / ACEN 124, 230 Autohaus Truck and Bus 208

B

B2Gold Corp 26, 64, 184, 186, 187, 239 Bank Bic 36 Bank of Namibia 38 Bank Windhoek 40 Bed & Breakfast Association of Namibia (B&BAN) 203 Benguela Current Commission 133 Bidvest 142 Business and Intellectual Property Authority / BIPA 18, 94 Business Connexion 167

C

Chamber of Mines of Namibia / COM 186, 187, 231 City Of Windhoek 125, 168, 172, 240 College Of The Arts 113 Communications Regulatory Authority Of Namibia (CRAN) 154, 155, 156 Construction Industries Federation Of Namibia / CIF 124, 231 Consulate - Italy 232 Consulate - Australian 231 Consulate - Austrian 231 Consulate - Canada 232 Consulate - Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka 232 Consulate - French Republic 232 Consulate - Islamic Republic of Pakistan 232 Consulate - Jamaica 232 Consulate - Kingdom of Belgium 231 Consulate - Kingdom of Spain 232 Consulate - Kingdom of Sweden 232 Consulate - Kingdom of Thailand 232 Consulate - New Zealand 232 Consulate - Portugal 232 Consulate - Republic of Bulgaria 231 Consulate - Republic of Cyprus 232 Consulate - Republic of Greece 232 Consulate - Republic of Hungary 232 Consulate - Republic of Turkey 232 Consulate - Royal Danish Consulate 232 Consulate - Royal Norwegian Consulate 232 Consulate - Switzerland 232 Consulate - The Netherlands 232

D

236

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Debmarine 24, 186 Delegation of the European Union 228 Deloitte 42 Development Bank 44 Document Warehouse 109 Dr.Weder Kauta & Hoveka 98 Dundee Precious Metals Tsumeb 190

E

E-Power 126 Eastern and Southern Africa Management Institute / ESAMI 229 Economic Association of Namibia 33, 231 Electoral Commission 22, 23 Electricity Control Board (ECB) 187, 200 Embassy - Algeria 228 Embassy - Angola 228 Embassy - Arab Republic of Egypt 228 Embassy - Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela 229 Embassy - Brazil 228 Embassy - Democratic Republic of Congo 228 Embassy - Federal Republic of Germany 228 Embassy - Finland 228 Embassy - French Republic 228 Embassy - Islamic Republic of Iran 228 Embassy - Japan 228 Embassy - Kingdom of Spain 229 Embassy - Libya 228 Embassy - People’s Republic of China 228 Embassy - Portuguese Republic 229 Embassy - Republic of Cuba 228 Embassy - Republic of Indonesia 228 Embassy - Republic of Turkey 229 Embassy - Republic of Zimbabwe 229 Embassy - Russian Federation 228 Embassy - United States of America 229 Embassy - Zimbabwe 229 EMH Prescient 46 Engineering Council of Namibia 124 Ernst & Young 48 Erongo Red 192

F

FabLab Namibia (Fabrication Laboratory) 112, 113 Federation of Namibian Tourism Associations / FENATA 203, 231 Feedmaster 93 Filmmakers Association of Namibia / FAN 77 FNB Namibia 50 Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations / FAO 229 FP Du Toit 210 Francois Erasmus Law 96 Frans Indongo Group 144

G

Geocarta 100 GIPF 52


INDEX

Gobabis Municipality 169, 234 Omaruru Municipality 169, 235 Green Enterprise Solutions 158 Grootfontein Municipality 169, 234 Guans Packaging 176

H

HAN / Hospitality Association of Namibia 203, 231 Henties Bay Municipality 169, 234 High Commissioner - Botswana 229 High Commissioner - British High Commission 229 High Commissioner - India 228 High Commissioner - Malaysia 228 High Commissioner - Nigeria 229 High Commissioner - Republic of Ghana 228 High Commissioner - Republic of Kenya 228 High Commissioner - Republic of South Africa 229 High Commissioner - Tanzania 233 High Commissioner - United Kingdom 233 High Commissioner - Zambia 229 Hollard 54 Husab 25, 184, 186

I

ICAN – Institute of Chartered Accountants of Namibia 33, 231 ICT Professionals Association of Namibia 155 Informanté 77 Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture Namibia 133 International Organisation for Migration / IOM 229 Investment Centre 16

J

John Meinert Printing 77

K

KaapAgri 86 Kalahari Holdings 141 Karibib Municipality 169, 235 Keetmanshoop Municipality 169, 235 Königstein Capital 56

L

Law Society of Namibia 95, 96, 231, 238 Legal Assistance Centre 94 Lewcor Plant Hire 102 Logistics Support Services 209

M

Manica 212 Mariental Municipality 169, 235 Meat Board of Namibia 88 Meatco 90 Medical Association of Namibia / MAN 229, 231 Michelle McLean Children’s Trust 231 Ministry of Agriculture, Water & Forestry 14, 83

Ministry of Education, Arts & Culture 14, 112, 115 Ministry of Finance 7, 11, 16, 32, 224 Ministry of Fisheries & Marine Resources 15, 132, 133 Ministry of Industrialisation, Trade & SME Development 3, 11, 16, 18, 19, 20, 113, 175 Ministry of Information & Communication Technology 13, 155 Ministry of Mines And Energy 13, 187 Ministry of Works & Transport 13, 207, 224 Ministry of Home Affairs & Immigration 14, 76, 224 Ministry of Defence 15 Ministry of Economic Planning & National Planning Commission 11 Ministry of Higher Education, Training & Innovation 13 Ministry of Environment & Tourism 12, 203, 204 Ministry of Gender Equality & Child Welfare 14 Ministry of Health & Social Services 13, 115 Ministry of Justice 13 Ministry of Labour, Industrial relations & Employment Creation 15, 109 Ministry of Land Reform 14 Ministry of Lands & Resettlement 100 Ministry of Public Enterprises 12 Ministry of Poverty Eradication & Social Welfare 12 Ministry of Safety & Security 11 Ministry of Urban & Rural Development 12 MMI Holdings 146 MPP Civils Namibia 128 MTC / Mobile Telecommunications Namibia 26, 33, 153, 154, 159 MTN Business 155 Multichoice 76, 80, 139, 159 MVAF 214

N

Namcor 194 Namdeb 196 Namfisa 58 Namib Mills 181 Namibia Agricultural Union / NAU 83 Namibia Airports Company / NQA 216 Namibia Asset Management 60 Namibia Association of Medical Aid Funds / NAMAF 229 Namibia Breweries Limited 178 Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry / NCCI 95, 175, 216, 224, 238 Namibia College of Open Learning (NAMCOL) 113 Namibia Community Based Tourism / NACOBTA 229 Namibia Competition Commission (NACC) 18, 95 Namibia Construction 130 Namibia Dairies 180 Namibia Development Corporation (NDC) 19, 95, 237 Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) 187 Namibia Economist 76, 77 Namibia Estate Agents Board 20, 95, 231 Namibia Film Commission / NFC 76, 77 Namibia Fish Consumption Promotion Trust 134 Namibia Institute of Professional Accountants / NIPA 231, 237, 238 Namibia Insurance Brokers Association / NIBA 229 w w w. n a m i b i a t r a d e d i r e c t o r y. c o m

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INDEX

Namibia Logistics Association 207, 231, 224 Namibia Media Holdings 77 Namibia National Farmers Union 83 Namibia Press Agency / NPA 76, 77 Namibia Qualifications Authority / NQA Namibia Student Financial Assistance Fund (NSFAF) 113 Namibia Tourism Board / NTD 100, 203, 216 Namibia Trade Forum 20, 95, 175 Namibian Agronomic Board 83 Namibian Association of Local Authority Officers (NALAO) 169 Namibian Broadcasting Corporation / NBC 76, 77 Namibian Institute of Mining and Technology / NIMT 113, 125 Namibian Manufacturers Association 174, 175 Namibian Maritime and Fisheries Institute / NAMFI 113, 133 Namibian Mission - Angola 232 Namibian Mission - Austria 232 Namibian Mission - Belgium 232 Namibian Mission - Botswana 232 Namibian Mission - Brazil 232 Namibian Mission - China 232 Namibian Mission - Congo 233 Namibian Mission - Cuba 233 Namibian Mission - Egypt 233 Namibian Mission - Ethiopia & AU 233 Namibian Mission - Finland 233 Namibian Mission - France 233 Namibian Mission - Germany 233 Namibian Mission - Ghana 233 Namibian Mission - India 233 Namibian Mission - Japan 233 Namibian Mission - Malaysia 233 Namibian Mission - Nigeria 233 Namibian Mission - Russian Federation 233 Namibian Mission - Senegal 233 Namibian Mission - South Africa 233 Namibian Mission - Sweden 233 Namibian Mission - Tanzania 233 Namibian Mission - United Kingdom 233 Namibian Mission - United Nations 233 Namibian Mission - United States of America 233 Namibian Mission - Zambia 233 Namibian Mission - Zimbabwe 233 Namibian Sun 77 Namibian Uranium Association 187 Namibia Mineworkers Investment Holdings Company (Pty) Ltd / NAMMIC 64 Namport 218 Nampost 160 Nampower 198 Namsov 136 NAPHA / Namibia Professional Hunter’s Association 203 NATH / Namibian Academy for Tourism & Hospitality 203 National Art Gallery of Namibia / NAGN 231 National Arts Council of Namibia 113 National Examination And Assesment 113 National Institute for Educational Development / NEID 113 National Special Risks Insurance Association / NASRIA 229, 231 NCCI / Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry 95, 175, 216, 224, 238 NCHE /National Council for Higher Education 1113, 114 Nedbank 66

238

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Nederburg 182 New Era 76, 77 NIA / Namibia Institute for Architects 125 NIPA – Namibia Institute of Professional Accountants 231, 237, 238 NIPAM 120 NMG Benefits 62 NTA 116 NUST 118 NWR 204

O

O & L Group 148 Office of The Ombudsman 95 Office of the President 10 Office of the Prime Minister 10 Offshore Development Company / ODC 16, 18, 95 Ohorongo Cement 184 Okahandja Municipality 169, 235 Old Mutual 68 One Africa Television 79 Oshakati Premier Electric 200 Otjiwarongo Municipality 169

P

PAAB – Public Accountants and Auditors Board 33, 231 PAN African Woman’s Organisation / PAWO 229 Powercom 159 Prudential 63 Pupkewitz Foundation - The Harold & Ethel Pupkewitz Heart Research Foundation 152 Pupkewitz Group of Companies 150 PWC 70, 121

R

Rennies Travel 108 Republikein 76, 77 RMB Namibia 71 Road Fund Administration 207 Roads Authority 100, 207, 224 Rössing Uranium 26, 100, 186, 187 Rundu Municipality 169

S

SACU 102 SADC Parliamentary Forum 230 Sanlam Namibia 72 Schoemans Data Card 166 Schoemans Office 162 Skorpion Zinc Mine 25, 187 SME Bank 33 South East Atlantic Fisheries Organisation / SEAFO 230 Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and Malta 230 Standard Bank 74 Swakopmund Municipality 169

T

Team Namibia 21, 175 Telecom 26, 76, 154, 159, 164 The Institute of Namibian Quantity Surveyors / INQS 125 The University Centre for Studies in Namibia / TUCSIN 112, 113


INDEX

Therapeutic Informatics 110 TN Mobile 26, 154, 155, 159, 164 Tour and Safari Association / TASA 203 Trans Kalahari Corridor Secretariat 231 Transnamib 222, 224 Travel News Namibia 2, 230 Tsumeb Municipality 169

U

UNAM 29, 113, 122 United Nations 17, 23, 233 United Nations Children’s Fund / UNICEF 230 United Nations Development Programme / UNDP 230 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation / UNESCO 230

United Nations High Commission for Refugees / UNHCR 230 United Nations Population Fund / UNFPA 230 Usakos Municipality 169

V

Venture Media 2, 77

W

Walvis Bay Corridor Group 224 Walvis Bay Municipality 169, 172 Walvis Bay Salt Holdings 174, 183 Westair 226 Windhoek Observer 76, 77 Windhoek Vocational Training Centre / WVTC 112, 113 World Food Programme / WFP 230 World Health Organisation / WHO 230

B2Gold Corporation - Otjikoto mine

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239


INDEX

NAMIBIA TRADE DIRECTORY IN PICTURES

Top left: Old Mutual 2016 i-Life Women's Summit Second top left: Okaukuejo Team celebrating their N$ 100 million revenue generation achievement. Middle left: MultiChoice - Team Namibia member Bottom left: Guans Packaging - NMA Awards Top right: NTD 25th Birthday Celebrations Middle right: #Don’t Wash Me Nam campaign - City of Windhoek Bottom right: Invest in Namibia Conference

240

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INDEX

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241


INDEX

A Manufacturing Basket ďŹ lled with Opportunities...

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Namibia Trade Directory 2017