__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

2018 ANNUAL BUDGET

•


2018 Annual Budget


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................. i Introduction Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Town Officials ................................................................................................................................. 4 Organizational Chart ....................................................................................................................... 5 GFOA Distinguished Budget Award .............................................................................................. 6 Budget Process ................................................................................................................................ 8 Budget Calendar .............................................................................................................................. 9 Reader’s Guide to Budget Document ............................................................................................ 10 Budget Message ............................................................................................................................ 11 Town Vision, Mission and Strategic Goals ................................................................................... 21 Strategic Goals and Objectives...................................................................................................... 22 Town Profile .................................................................................................................................. 30 Budget Overview Budget Overview ........................................................................................................................... 39 Basis of Presentation, Budgeting and Accounting ........................................................................ 41 Department/Division Fund Summary ........................................................................................... 46 Budget Policy Summary ................................................................................................................ 49 Fund Structure ............................................................................................................................... 53 Major Revenues and Expenditures Graphs – All Funds ............................................................... 55 Fund Balance and Fund Cash Projections ..................................................................................... 56 Summary of All Funds by Fund Type ........................................................................................... 58 Summary of All Funds – Year to Year Comparison ..................................................................... 59 Summary of All Funds - Major Revenues and Expenditures ........................................................ 61 Debt Service and Financial Obligations ........................................................................................ 62 Staffing .......................................................................................................................................... 65 Revenue Manual Revenue Manual ............................................................................................................................ 67 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 69 Property Tax Revenue ................................................................................................................... 70 Sales Tax Revenue ........................................................................................................................ 74 Building Use Tax Revenue............................................................................................................ 75 Sales and Use Tax Audit Revenue ................................................................................................ 76 Lodging Tax .................................................................................................................................. 77 Specific Ownership Tax Revenue ................................................................................................. 78 Xcel Energy Franchise Fee............................................................................................................ 79 Intermountain Rural Electric Association (IREA) Excise Tax .................................................... 80 Cable Franchise Fee ...................................................................................................................... 81 Building Permit Revenue .............................................................................................................. 82

Table of Contents

i


Motor Vehicle Registration ........................................................................................................... 83 Highway Users Tax Revenue ........................................................................................................ 84 Faster Revenue............................................................................................................................... 85 Build America Bonds Interest Credit ............................................................................................ 86 Deficit Reduction Fees .................................................................................................................. 87 Excise Tax ..................................................................................................................................... 88 Plan Check Fees ............................................................................................................................. 89 Engineering Review Fees .............................................................................................................. 90 Cigarette Tax Revenue .................................................................................................................. 91 County Road and Bridge Revenue ................................................................................................ 92 Lone Tree Dispatch Fees ............................................................................................................... 93 Court Fines and Fees Revenue ...................................................................................................... 94 Investment Income ........................................................................................................................ 95 Stormwater Utility Fee Revenue ................................................................................................... 96 Cultural Ticket Revenue ................................................................................................................ 98 Cultural Concession Revenue ........................................................................................................ 99 Cultural Class Registration Revenue ........................................................................................... 100 Parker Arts, Culture and Events (PACE) Facility Rentals .......................................................... 101 Schoolhouse Facility Rentals ....................................................................................................... 102 H2O’Brien Pool Admission Revenues ........................................................................................ 103 Recreation Admission Revenue ................................................................................................... 104 Recreation Concession Revenue.................................................................................................. 105 Recreation Sports Program Fees .................................................................................................. 106 Recreation Swim Lesson Fees ..................................................................................................... 107 Recreation Specialty Fitness Fees ............................................................................................... 108 Fieldhouse Facility Rental Fees ................................................................................................... 109 Fieldhouse Day Camp Fees ......................................................................................................... 110 Fieldhouse Sports Instruction Fees .............................................................................................. 111 Personal Training Fees ................................................................................................................ 112 Douglas County Road Sales Tax Shared Revenue ...................................................................... 113 Lottery Revenue........................................................................................................................... 114 Budget Detail Budget Detail ............................................................................................................................... 117 General Fund Summary ............................................................................................................... 118 General Fund Revenue ................................................................................................................ 121 General Fund Expenditures.......................................................................................................... 125 Elected Officials .............................................................................................................. 126 Town Clerk ...................................................................................................................... 128 Municipal Court ............................................................................................................... 131 Town Administrator......................................................................................................... 134 Finance............................................................................................................................. 138 Town Attorney ................................................................................................................. 142 Human Resources ............................................................................................................ 145 Community Development ................................................................................................ 149 Communications .............................................................................................................. 155 Interdepartmental ............................................................................................................. 159 Table of Contents

ii


Police ............................................................................................................................... 161 Engineering/Public Works .............................................................................................. 167 Parks, Forestry and Open Space ...................................................................................... 173 Economic Incentives and Interfund Transfers ................................................................ 177 Special Revenue Funds Summary ............................................................................................... 181 Conservation Trust Fund ................................................................................................. 184 Parks and Recreation Fund .............................................................................................. 186 Law Enforcement Assistance Fund ................................................................................. 190 Cultural Fund................................................................................................................... 193 Recreation Fund .............................................................................................................. 198 Capital Renewal and Replacement Reserve Fund ........................................................... 208 Capital Projects Funds Summary ................................................................................................ 211 Public Improvements Fund ............................................................................................. 214 Excise Tax Fund .............................................................................................................. 218 Parkglenn Construction Fund .......................................................................................... 220 Debt Service Funds ..................................................................................................................... 223 General Debt Service Fund ............................................................................................. 224 Recreation Debt Service Fund ......................................................................................... 226 Enterprise Fund ........................................................................................................................... 229 Stormwater Utility Enterprise Fund ................................................................................ 230 Internal Service Funds Summary ................................................................................................ 235 Fleet Services Fund ......................................................................................................... 238 Technology Management Fund ....................................................................................... 241 Facility Services Fund ..................................................................................................... 245 Medical Benefits Fund .................................................................................................... 248 Capital Budget Capital Budget ............................................................................................................................. 251 Capital Budget and 10 year CIP Executive Summary ................................................................ 252 Capital Improvement Plan Summary .......................................................................................... 263 Parks and Recreation Capital Projects ........................................................................................ 264 Public Improvement Capital Projects .......................................................................................... 274 Stormwater Utility Capital Projects ............................................................................................ 294 Facilities Capital Outlay .............................................................................................................. 300 Machinery, Equipment and Software Capital Outlay ................................................................. 304 Operating Impacts of Non-Routine Capital Projects................................................................... 310 Appendix Appendix ..................................................................................................................................... 312 Principal Sales and Use Tax Payers ............................................................................................ 313 Operating Indicators by Function ................................................................................................ 314 Capital Assets by Function and Program .................................................................................... 315 Demographic and Economic Information ................................................................................... 316 Budget Ordinance ........................................................................................................................ 317 Mill Levy Ordinance ................................................................................................................... 322 Glossary ....................................................................................................................................... 325

Table of Contents

iii


Table of Contents

iv


INTRODUCTION

Introduction

1


INTRODUCTION

HISTORIC TWENTY MILE HOUSE

Introduction

2


Introduction

3


ELECTED OFFICIALS

Mayor Mike Waid

Councilmember Renee Williams

Councilmember John Diak

Introduction

Councilmember Amy Holland

Councilmember Debbie Lewis

4

Mayor Pro Tem Josh Martin

Councilmember Joshua Rivero


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Introduction

5


GFOA DISTINGUISHED BUDGET AWARD

Need New Award Graphic from Finance

The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an award of Distinguished Presentation to the Town of Parker for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2017. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan and as a communication device. The award is valid for one budget period only. The Town of Parker believes our current budget continues to conform to the program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. 2017 was the thirteenth time the Town of Parker has received this budget award.

Introduction

6


Introduction

7


BUDGET PROCESS

INTERNAL PROCESS The budget is prepared each year using the requirements and guidelines of the Town of Parker Charter, State of Colorado budget law and the Government Finance Officers Association. The steps that occur during the annual budget cycle are as follows:  Town goals are developed or reaffirmed by the Town Council. Budget requests must state how they meet some or all of the goals.  Specific budget requests are completed by the departments for the purpose of identifying and justifying additional funding for new staff or equipment. Requests are also received for special projects and changes to other line items.  The Town executive management team reviews each budget request and proposed compensation increases and makes a recommendation to the Town Council through the Town Administrator. Study sessions throughout the process are held to inform and seek the input of the Town Council and adjustments are made as necessary.  A proposed budget must be submitted to the Town Council by October 15. The Town Council must then hold a public hearing on the proposed budget by November 15 and adopt the budget and the annual appropriations by December 15.

CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT IN THE BUDGET PROCESS Citizen involvement is a way of making decisions that ensures the participation of the people affected by those decisions. The proposed budget and detailed justifications for capital outlay and staffing additions are made available on the Town’s Web site prior to adoption. Through the Talk of the Town newsletter, social media and online communication, interested citizens are made aware that the proposed budget is available online for their review and they are invited to provide feedback regarding the proposed budget. Two public hearings are held as Council considers the annual budget adoption. Prior to adoption of the budget, the Town holds several study sessions which are open to the public. At these meetings, Council and staff openly discuss budget requests, including proposed major capital projects and new staff positions, capital outlay and special project items.

Introduction

8


BUDGET CALENDAR

1

February 22-23, 2018

2

April 3, 2018

3

April 20, 2018

4

May 18, 2018

5

June 8, 2018

6

August 24, 2018

Council Retreat Strategic Planning

Discuss budget process with Executive Management Team

7

August 28, 2018

8

September 7, 2018

99

Capital Improvement Plan meeting #1

Budget communication regarding process to departments

Budget requests due to Finance

Capital Improvement Plan meeting # 2

EMT review of staffing, compensation, budget requests and CIP

CIP year-end projections due to Finance

September Council Retreat Review staffing, compensation, budget requests, and CIP w/EMT

10

October 8, 2018

11

November 19, 2018

12

December 3, 2018

Draft budget presented to Council

Public hearing

Public hearing and budget adoption

Strategic Planning Operating Budget Process Capital Budget Process Introduction

9


READER’S GUIDE TO BUDGET DOCUMENT

The primary purpose of this document is to provide citizens with a comprehensive overview of the Town’s adopted budget, the budget process, Town services and operations and the resources that fund those services. This document first outlines the process, policies, goals and issues involved in developing the budget. It then provides a discussion on the financial structure of the Town with an overview of the Town’s various funds, where the money comes from and how it is spent. Details about the budget, forecasted revenue and appropriated expenditures follow, along with an in-depth look at Town departments and programs. In addition to this document, Town staff receives a detailed line item budget document to assist them throughout the year. This document is divided into the following sections: INTRODUCTION The purpose of this section is to provide the reader with general information about the Town’s history, demographics and economy. The Town’s vision, mission, goals and strategic initiatives, organizational structure, budget message and budget process are also included in this section. BUDGET OVERVIEW Information in this section gives the reader an understanding about the services the Town provides to our citizens and the costs incurred in the provision of those services. It also includes the sources of funding, including long-term debt financing that support the Town’s operations and capital needs. This section also contains summaries of the 2018 budget, a fund structure matrix, a description of major fund types and a discussion by revenue and expenditures and how they are forecasted. REVENUE MANUAL This manual provides information on the Town’s major revenues that are received primarily from outside sources. Major revenues are those in excess of $100,000 annually. BUDGET DETAIL Presented in this section are summaries of the overall 2018 budget by fund, sources of revenue, types of expenditures and costs by departments, along with the authorized staffing levels by department or division. For comparison, the 2014, 2015 and 2016 actual amounts and 2017 amended and projected amounts are presented alongside the 2018 figures. There is also a fund balance summary for all funds.

Following the fund summaries is information at the department and division level, including a list of the services provided by the department or division, prior year accomplishments and 2018 goals, authorized positions and significant changes within the department or division. This section also details capital outlay and capital projects that are included in this budget. APPENDIX This section contains a copy of the signed budget ordinance, demographic information, and a glossary.

Introduction

10


Introduction

11


BUDGET MESSAGE

To the Honorable Mayor, Members of Town Council and Citizens of the Town of Parker: I am pleased to present the Town of Parker’s 2018 Annual Budget. The Council adopted the proposed budget on November 20, 2017, following a thorough staff development process, several Council study sessions, posting of the proposed budget on the Town website and two public hearings, held on November 4 and 20, 2017. I am happy to report the 2018 Annual Budget achieved the goals and guidelines set forth in the Town’s budget process. The 2018 Budget was developed with the overarching theme of “Achieving Financial Sustainability,” with a focus on strengthening the Town’s cash reserves. The 2018 budget matched total revenue with total expenditures (both one-time and ongoing) within the General Fund; continued to recognize the importance of Town employees to the success of our organization; and limited the impact on service levels and events provided to citizens. The 2018 Budget is balanced in all funds, maintains appropriate cash reserves and positions the Town for long-term financial health. General Fund revenues have averaged a 7 percent growth rate since 2014 with sales tax, the Town’s major revenue source, growing at eight percent over that same time period. With more than 395 residential building permits expected to be issued during 2017, building-related revenues such as use tax, excise tax, building permit fees and other related revenues are showing significant increases in 2017. While that growth rate is expected to slow in 2018, the dollar level of those revenues is expected to hold into 2018. Total appropriations, including interfund transfers, for the Town in 2018 are $102.6 million. The General Fund is $54.3 million of that total and includes expenditures for those departments providing direct support and services to the Town – public works, police department, community development, building inspection – and the administrative departments. Many of the expenditures are tied to projected inflation and population growth estimates which are both estimated at 3 percent for 2018. Expenditures also include a $15.3 million commitment to the building of new Town infrastructure, ongoing replacement and/or maintenance of existing infrastructure and related machinery, equipment and software. The ongoing commitment to our employees is reflected in the funding of a 4 percent average performance pay increase for 2018. The Commissioned officers within the Police Department will receive both step and range increases that reflect compensation increases across the Denver region. The Town is also maintaining its practice of paying the full healthcare premium contribution for employee-only insurance coverage. For 2018, the actual full-time equivalent (FTE) employee count will remain the same as 2017. The increased workloads related to Town growth will be absorbed by the existing employee body. As I met with our executive management team members, we were able to identify ways in which this could be accomplished with minimal to no impact on provided service levels.

Introduction

12


Fund Expenditure Summary 2014 Actual General Parks and Recreation

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017

2017

2018

Compound

Amended Budget

Projected Actual

Adopted Budget

Annual Growth

$ 37,778,649 $ 39,754,829 $ 44,923,927 $ 55,224,045 $ 53,114,591 $ 50,934,024 8,104,318 19,233,472 10,586,075 5,400,721 3,293,393 4,187,507

8% -15%

Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural

127,971 3,252,888

283,975 4,144,170

129,197 5,614,047

139,160 7,905,775

127,640 7,833,246

145,390 5,911,048

3% 16%

Recreation Mainstreet Center Fund

5,508,172 -

6,054,689 -

7,045,515 -

7,956,634 -

8,093,406 -

8,749,745 -

12%

Public Improvements 17,825,039 Police Station and PACE Center Construction Fund 316,663

11,500,243 28,933

14,211,073 -

20,627,982 -

19,284,690 -

5,515,000 -

-25%

General Debt Service Recreation Debt Service

261,021 1,361,316

941,395 1,709,536

941,725 1,583,520

940,273 1,584,700

940,273 1,584,700

943,123 1,586,500

38% 4%

Stormwater Utility Enterprise Fleet Services Internal Service

1,328,819 1,679,202

1,736,628 2,006,187

1,379,833 2,363,935

2,292,518 1,781,846

2,030,093 1,746,475

3,656,423 2,419,216

29% 10%

Technology Management Internal Service Facility Services Internal Services

2,481,313 751,347

2,488,689 793,020

3,259,395 984,491

4,168,983 891,920

4,066,651 935,703

3,556,087 990,700

9% 7%

1,798,342 2,561,733 2,360,000 2,524,000 2,890,700 $ 80,776,718 $ 92,474,108 $ 95,584,466 $ 111,274,557 $ 105,574,861 $ 91,485,463

3%

Medical Benefits Internal Services Total Expenditures Note: Interfund transfers are not included.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS Overall Budget Summary

.

The total 2018 Budget, including all Town funds, is $91.5 million (excluding interfund transfers). The Expenditure Summary below depicts the details by fund and also provides a historical context for the 2018 Budget amounts. Over the time period of 2014 through the 2018 budget, the expenditures have averaged a three percent growth. When comparing the 2017 Amended Budget to the 2018 Adopted Budget, expenditures have decreased 17.8 percent or $19.8 million. Major reasons for the reduction are as follows: General Fund - $4.3 million reduction  Completion of master plan and land development code update within the Community Development Department  Software purchase and installation complete within the Police Department  Economic incentive agreement completed  Schoolhouse capital project expenditures reduced Parks and Recreation Fund - $1.2 million reduction  Completion of Discovery Park and USMC CPL David M. Sonka Dog Park and Westcreek Disc Golf Course in 2017 and smaller projects planned for 2018 Cultural Fund - $2.0 million reduction  Majority of work associated with renovation of The Schoolhouse completed Public Improvement Fund - $15.1 million reduction  Completion of several major projects such as Jordan Road widening to Hess Road, and Motsenbocker Road widening, along with smaller projects scheduled for 2018

Introduction

13


General Fund

. The General Fund is the main operating fund of the Town. Town operations, which include Police/Public Safety, Public Works, Building Inspection, Community Development, Municipal Court and Administration (which includes Town Administration, as well as the Communications, Finance, and Human Resources Departments) are accounted for in this fund. General Fund Revenue Summary Revenue: Taxes Sales Tax Property Tax Other Taxes Total Taxes

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 27,510,421 $ 29,959,630 $ 32,136,000 $ 34,300,800 $ 35,100,000 $ 38,083,500 1,451,069 1,448,999 1,706,521 1,754,000 1,750,000 1,975,000 2,337,237 2,589,862 2,574,790 2,733,200 2,709,400 2,789,860 31,298,727 33,998,491 36,417,312 38,788,000 39,559,400 42,848,360

Compound Annual Growth

8% 8% 5% 8%

Licenses and Permits Building Permit Fee Other Licenses and Permits Total Licenses and Permits

1,644,823 188,560 1,833,383

1,594,755 55,889 1,650,645

1,658,483 169,599 1,828,083

1,656,100 164,950 1,821,050

2,205,000 155,100 2,360,100

2,271,150 158,760 2,429,910

8% -4% 7%

Intergovernmental Highway User Tax Fund Road/Bridge Shareback Build America Bonds Credit Motor Vehicle Registration Other Intergovernmental Total Intergovernmental

1,047,973 1,231,030 821,393 152,935 1,066,707 4,320,037

1,090,277 1,238,675 813,069 159,187 760,032 4,061,239

1,108,248 1,416,787 796,480 163,588 851,660 4,336,763

1,134,200 1,450,200 774,248 168,900 1,271,100 4,798,648

1,150,000 1,500,000 774,248 170,000 986,400 4,580,648

1,184,500 1,545,000 751,072 175,100 806,544 4,462,216

3% 6% -2% 3% -7% 1%

Charges for Services Deficit Reduction Fee Intergov. Agreement Services Other Charges for Services Total Charges for Services

1,023,310 482,782 816,382 2,322,473

846,441 626,281 836,725 2,309,447

827,688 625,661 1,035,527 2,488,876

981,800 866,400 933,200 2,781,400

1,108,000 685,700 1,161,960 2,955,660

1,100,000 677,880 1,193,907 2,971,787

2% 9% 10% 6%

184,179 154,848 927,600

199,047 236,802 975,100

216,656 393,923 1,095,900

204,300 444,000 1,152,600

197,100 268,843 1,152,600

197,313 227,300 1,253,298

2% 10% 8%

$ 41,041,247 $ 43,430,771 $ 46,777,513 $ 49,989,998 $ 51,074,351 $ 54,390,184

7%

Fines and Forfeitures Other Revenue Transfers In Total Revenue

The total revenue budgeted in the General Fund for 2018 is $53.1 million, excluding Transfers In. Eighty-one percent of the total revenue for this fund is generated by taxes. Sales tax revenue makes up 89 percent of the total tax amount and is the largest single revenue source for the General Fund. The General Fund also receives an interfund transfer from the Parks and Recreation Fund of $1.3 million as an offset to the parks and recreation administration costs included in the General Fund. Including this transfer, revenue is budgeted at $54.4 million. Introduction

14


General Fund Expenditure Summary Salaries and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Debt Service Capital Outlay Economic Dev Incentives Other Transfers Out Total Expenditures

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 17,751,262 $ 18,359,193 $ 20,716,040 $ 23,068,811 $ 22,584,102 $ 24,147,238 1,329,945 928,270 1,066,954 1,294,287 1,402,245 1,293,234 19,143,106 13,141,709 14,221,002 15,772,773 19,703,729 19,140,987 3,701,875 3,781,410 3,767,750 3,744,193 3,726,143 3,726,143 1,095,020 1,250,950 1,226,198 1,496,785 5,152,152 4,419,200 850,000 501,779 771,179 1,557,960 1,500,000 1,500,000 666,840 423,269 342,553 341,889 670,965 450,925 3,359,777 1,574,600 5,947,310 4,056,205 4,797,868 4,015,968 $ 39,353,249 $ 45,702,139 $ 48,980,132 $ 60,021,913 $ 57,130,559 $ 54,293,801

Compound Annual Growth 8% 9% 10% -1% -3% 14% 12% 21% 8%

General Fund appropriations have decreased 9.5 percent, or $5.7 million, when comparing the 2017 Amended Budget to the 2018 Adopted budget. One way of reviewing expenditures is to look at the various types of expenditures. From this table, the highlights when comparing the 2018 Adopted Budget to the 2017 Amended Budget include:    

Salary and benefits - reflects the four percent average pay for performance increase and increased benefit costs Capital outlay – $2.0 million records management system completed in 2017 and fewer requests for software updates and machinery and equipment in 2018 Economic development incentives – the composition of outstanding incentive agreements has changed resulting in fewer expenditures Transfers out – a reduced level of transfer to the Cultural Fund due to the major Schoolhouse renovation nearing completion

Reviewing expenditures by departments is the second way to analyze variances between the 2018 Adopted Budget and the 2017 Amended Budget. Major variances by department include the following:        

Town Administrator – restructuring of the office has reduced the total salaries Finance – 2017 included a one-time expense for software implementation Community Development – funds were included in 2017 for a master plan update and land development code update that have been completed Police – a capital outlay of $2.0 million for a records management system was completed in 2017 Public Works/Engineering – fewer capital requests for machinery and equipment in 2018 Parks and Recreation – reduction is related to work on the Parks and Recreation facility on Motsenbocker being completed in 2017 Economic Incentives - the composition of outstanding incentive agreements has changed, resulting in fewer expenditures Transfers out – a reduced level of transfer to the Cultural Fund due to the major renovation on The Schoolhouse nearing completion

Individual departmental summaries with more detail are presented in the Budget Detail section of this document.

Introduction

15


General Fund Department Expenditure Summary Elected Officials Town Clerk Municipal Court Town Administrator Elections Finance Sales Tax Legal Services Human Resources Risk Management Community Development Communications General Government Buildings Customer Service Historic Preservation Interdepartmental Debt Service Police Building Inspection Public Works Parks, Forestry and Open Space Public Works Building Parks Building Economic Development Economic Incentives Interfund Transfers Total Expenditures

2014 Actual $

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

110,369 $ 129,525 $ 321,299 314,625 263,563 273,384 552,746 639,304 26,188 38,670 769,072 786,955 318,624 390,548 561,817 494,901 730,647 728,911 254,714 265,222 1,531,769 1,329,655 707,838 693,351 476,947 640,233 111,860 118,794 682 502,150 399,877 3,781,410 3,767,750 12,750,986 12,934,777 1,097,275 1,166,009 8,918,242 9,623,290 2,724,910 2,806,307 122,641 198,275 565,366 565,487 753,555 501,779 771,179 1,574,600 5,947,310 $ 39,353,249 $ 45,702,139 $

2017 Amended Budget

154,118 $ 166,245 $ 241,326 411,742 300,215 339,457 879,212 1,003,250 29,110 26,000 1,031,875 1,270,335 414,148 471,857 597,799 687,043 810,889 865,857 304,653 387,086 1,624,273 2,344,366 801,822 1,026,824 490,320 770,400 135,023 148,543 5,570 3,000 412,658 694,990 3,744,193 3,726,143 15,178,448 19,261,577 1,532,118 1,605,439 10,135,179 13,029,341 3,463,138 3,968,030 182,674 186,000 277,997 479,850 619,209 850,670 1,557,960 1,500,000 4,056,205 4,797,868 48,980,132 $ 60,021,913 $

2017 Projected

2018 Adopted Budget

157,768 $ 169,189 354,322 402,854 340,112 391,373 964,459 822,291 32,000 1,181,955 1,032,202 475,152 497,667 678,968 724,143 772,957 913,209 387,256 377,323 2,140,222 1,587,531 994,314 1,063,588 769,452 786,020 149,075 158,907 3,000 3,000 449,099 672,805 3,726,143 3,701,875 18,617,084 17,108,643 1,482,999 1,614,956 12,596,022 12,610,823 3,901,940 4,175,260 173,548 190,700 479,324 257,800 819,420 789,865 1,500,000 850,000 4,015,968 3,359,777 57,130,559 $ 54,293,801

Compound Annual Growth 11% 6% 10% 10% 5% 8% 12% 7% 6% 10% 1% 11% 13% 9% 45% 8% -1% 8% 10% 9% 11% 7% 9% 14% 21% 8%

The General Fund is balanced through the revenue discussed above and the beginning fund balance of $15 million. These two items generate a total funds availability of $69.4 million. Appropriations of $54.3 million, including interfund transfers of $3.4 million, result in an ending fund balance of $15.1 million. The ratio of the ending fund balance to the total expenditures is 27.9%, in excess of the 25% ratio Council has recommended.

Other Major Fund Highlights: Conservation Trust Fund The annual lottery funds received from the State of Colorado are restricted in usage to parks, recreation and open space purposes. $400,000 in revenue is budgeted and $375,000 is being transferred to the Parks and Recreation Fund for trail enhancement at Sulphur Gulch and the Auburn Hills North/South Trail connection. The fund balance is budgeted at $118,568. Parks and Recreation Fund A portion of the Town’s sales and use tax – 0.5 cents – is dedicated to this fund for the planning, design and construction of parks, trails and recreation facilities. This is the primary source of revenue for the fund and consists of $8.2 million of the total $10.5 million. The primary expenditures in this fund are for capital outlays and interfund transfers. The top capital projects for 2018 include the following:  Harvie Open Space Planning and Development for $1.6 million; and  Bar CCC Park Improvements for $975,000 Introduction

16


Interfund transfers of $5.0 million are made to other funds containing expenditures related to parks and recreation projects and expenditures. The budgeted ending cash balance for 2018 is $9.2 million. Cultural Fund Expenditures of $5.9 million in this fund are supported primarily by ticket sales and fees, along with interfund transfers. Charges for services are budgeted at $2.3 million which is similar to 2016 and 2017. A capital outlay of just over $1.0 million is planned to continue the renovation related to the Schoolhouse and its surrounding property. The General Fund will support the operations and capital outlay through a $2.6 million interfund transfer.

The budgeted ending cash balance for 2018 is $0.3 million. Recreation Fund This fund accounts for customer charges received to pay for the operation of the Town’s Recreation Center, Parker Fieldhouse, H2O’Brien Pool and various athletic programs. Charges for services have been budgeted at $5.8 million for 2018. A transfer from the Parks and Recreation Fund of $2.2 million is the other major revenue support for the fund expenditures. Fund expenditures total $8.7 million and the ending cash balance is budgeted at $0.9 million. Public Improvement Fund Projected revenue of $10.4 million, sourced primarily from use tax and roads sales and use tax shareback, and the beginning fund balance of $5.1 million will provide total resources of $15.5 million. Expenditures of $5.5 million includes $5.2 million for streets and other related improvements and $0.3 million for traffic control expenditures. Major streets improvements funded in the 2018 budget include:  General street reconstruction projects $1,750,000  Kings Point Way $1,200,000  Parker Road sidewalk project $1,000,000 The ending fund balance is budgeted at $10 million. Excise Tax Fund The Excise Tax Fund accounts for the accumulation of new development excise taxes and the transfer of funds to other funds for the purpose of financing roads, parks or municipal facilities. The 2018 budget estimates revenue of $2.5 million and transfers to the Public Improvement Fund of $1,750,000 and the Cultural Fund of $400,000. Both of these transfers will partially fund capital projects occurring during the budget year. Stormwater Utility Fund 2018 revenue is budgeted at $3.7 million; with the beginning cash balance of $6.8 million, the fund is positioned to complete capital projects of $2.3 million in addition to covering related operating expenditures and an interfund transfer to the Debt Service Fund of $0.2 million.

Introduction

17


Major projects included in the 2018 budget are as follows:  Lemon Gulch Improvements $1,500,000  Cherry Creek stabilization at KAO $ 250,000  Newlin Gulch drainage improvements $ 200,000 The ending fund balance is budgeted at $6.7 million.

Staffing: The chart below summarizes the number of FTEs by department. As I mentioned at the beginning of this letter, the decision was made during the budget process to maintain existing employee counts into the 2018 budget year.

Introduction

18


Acknowledgements: I am pleased to present the official budget document detailing the budget adopted by Town Council on November 20, 2017. Council and staff worked diligently over the course of several months to develop a financial plan that strengthens the Town’s financial position going forward into the future. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the Town Council, department directors and staff for their valuable assistance and input. I welcome citizen comments and questions about this budget. Respectfully,

Michelle Kivela Town Administrator

Introduction

19


Introduction

20


TOWN VISION, MISSION AND STRATEGIC GOALS

Introduction

21


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

SUPPORT AN ACTIVE COMMUNITY

2018 Strategic Objectives                 

Update the Open Space, Trails, and Greenways Master Plan. Update the Land Development Ordinance regarding parks dedication and design requirements. Grow Parks and Recreation Facebook followers by 10 percent by increasing engagement and reach, posting to relevant groups/pages and using post boosts. Grow Parks and Recreation Twitter followers by 10 percent by posting more frequently, following other users and retweeting pertinent information. Grow Parks and Recreation Instagram followers to 1,000 by posting more frequently, using/promoting relevant hashtags and following other users. Run Facebook ad campaigns to boost registration/attendance at specific events or activities. Create and begin implementing a Parker Parks and Recreation Department email marketing strategy, which incorporates all of our available email resources. Provide programs such as the Special Olympics cops vs. kids softball game and other physical activities at events like National Night Out. Grow participation in senior programming by 10%. Enhance special needs offerings by adding up to 2 more sensory friendly shows. Secure and coordinate the various planning entitlements on the Harvie Open Space property including annexation, zoning, minor development plat, and Master Plan Site Plan for the entire 72 acre site. Coordinate various planning efforts, including community outreach efforts, regarding design, engineering and construction of the E-470 Regional Trail. Begin preliminary planning, phasing and development assessment for Salisbury Park North build-out Initiate the design and engineering of the Bar CCC parking lot improvements including lights for the parking lot. Construction of the Auburn Hills north/south trail connection. Construction of the Salisbury east/west trail connection. Participate as-needed on the Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreation Authority regarding implementation of the R-H Reservoir Master Plan.

Introduction

22


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

FOSTER COMMUNITY CREATIVITY AND ENGAGEMENT

2018 Strategic Objectives  

           

Complete the online community engagement system implementation with at least two pilot projects and develop a framework to provide guidance on the most effective uses of the tool. Initiate and host off-site meetings between the Parker Town Council and other partners, such as Parker Chamber of Commerce, Parker Water and Sanitation District to enhance the relationship and discuss items of mutual interest. Update Zoning Map online to be interactive for residents and prospective businesses to understand zoning information that guides development or improvements to land Develop a Community Outreach and Engagement Policy in partnership with the Communications Department to identify opportunities to engage the public on a variety of issues Redesign the Town of Parker website, the Parker Parks and Recreation website, and the Employee Intranet. Marketing and rollout plan for the Town’s new online engagement tool. Distribute an RFP for Town marketing/branding contract and select new firm to represent Parker. Complete and debut the new State of the Town video. Maximize our community outreach through comprehensive communication strategies, engaging 2-way communication, PSA’s, recruitment video and social media conversations. Launch a Parker Public Safety Youth Council. Launch a Citizen’s Academy Alumni Advisory Board. Provide rental opportunities for 10 community arts groups in the renovated Schoolhouse Theater. Increase student participation in the second annual Portfolio Day by 5 new schools. Increase the number of households with Family Circle memberships by at least 10%, and add 4 new Business Members.

Introduction

23


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

INNOVATE WITH COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE

2018 Strategic Objectives    

                  

Implementation of an electronic voting feature and a meeting minutes feature to the electronic packet system. Conduct the next steps in the strategic planning process to include prioritizing projects and initiatives that are aligned with the strategic vision and mission and operationalizing the strategic plan. Move forward with the next phase of Priority Based Budgeting to include analyzing the initial data, adjusting programs accordingly and using the tool for decision-making for the 2019 budget process. Develop an in-kind contribution policy that is aligned with the true costs of community event sponsorship and with benchmark municipalities, and will provide guidance in evaluation of requests for fair and equitable funding. Develop a Town Council Policy Manual to assist the elected officials and staff in their respective roles and capacities. Conduct an employee engagement survey to quantify the Town culture and establish a baseline for determining the success of future employee engagement initiatives. Implement new purchasing card program. Implement budgeting module within Caselle Connect. Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the 2018 Budget. Achieve the Association of Public Treasurers of the United States and Canada Cash Handling Certification. Implement new requisition/purchase order processing solution. Create educational opportunities for Town staff on specific financial topics such as grant management, timekeeping and cash handling. Develop an overall purchasing seminar to educate all employees regarding purchasing guidelines and laws. Expand First Aid/CPR/AED training town wide. Update HR procedural manuals for Benefits & Wellness, HR Technician and Recruitment. Audit current wellness program and expand and grow program for full- and part-time employees. Implement HRIS system. Implement an analytics database that creates reports, graphs, and dashboards based on the Department’s performance aligned with the Town’s Strategic Plan. Implement OTC permitting for small residential projects and special conditional commercial projects. Achieve $50,000 in revenue sponsorship for Town Events. Host a Town Services Fair to engage the community to learn about Town services, programs and activities. Continue to maximize and enhance the use of mass public notification systems through social media (NextDoor, Twitter, Facebook, CODERED System) and all media outlets. Launch an enhancement to mobile application that will provide enhanced engagement and transparency beyond the current mobile application vendor.

Introduction

24


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

INNOVATE WITH COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE

2018 Strategic Objectives    

Complete installation of upgraded fiber optic network. Activate links along with IT staff/contractors. Become a CAPRA Accredited Agency. Implement a more streamlined and sophisticated day camp check-in and tracking application utilizing tablets. Begin implementing findings and major themes from the 2017 Parks and Recreation Master Plan.

Introduction

25


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

ENHANCE ECONOMIC VITALITY

2018 Strategic Objectives            

Work with the business community to develop a better understanding of the sales tax ordinances through educational seminars and audit guidance. Implement online payments for those accounts receivable and miscellaneous payments that are not currently accepting online payments. Conduct impact fee analysis study and identify other ways in which revenue may be enhanced. Reinstitute the Financial Trend Monitoring System. Evaluate expedited plan review for non-complex residential projects and a special tenant improvement program for commercial projects in the Building Division. Implement new targeted marketing initiatives aimed specifically at relocating small growing companies from the west coast and mid-western markets. Complete the strategic planning effort for the Economic Development department and begin implementation of recommendations from the study. Design and implement a new and unique 2018 Parker Visitor’s Campaign. Market Parker through Visit Parker videos produced in 2017 and produce two additional videos showcasing the Parker community. Expand our crime prevention programs more vigorously into HOA’s. Begin Schoolhouse plaza and parking lot renovation project with the objective of making this area a more welcoming and engaging space for the community in the heart of downtown. Foster at least three new collaborations between Parker Arts and local Parker businesses.

Introduction

26


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

PROMOTE A SAFE AND HEALTHY COMMUNITY

2018 Strategic Objectives            

Train judge and prosecutors on use of Court Management System to assist in becoming paper on demand operation. Implement a probation/supervision program for defendants in Municipal Court. Import police records to Court management system. Initiate a Complete Streets Policy to identify recommendations and opportunities to support multi-modal access and mobility for Town residents and visitors. Update Building Code to 2018. Complete Phase 2 of the Wayfinding Sign Program. Provide emergency management training opportunities to staff and the public to include tabletop exercises. Enhance capabilities in traffic accident reconstruction through computer analysis of vehicle crash data recorders. Upgrades to tactical and personal protective equipment for police officers to include; gasmasks, thermal units, rifle plate carriers and tactical safety eyewear. Add more vehicle-mounted radar units to the patrol cars. Implement the new Town snow and ice control policy to enhance resident satisfaction and keep Town roads safe during and after winter storms. Prepare and solicit competitive bids for the additional removal and replacement of approximately 1,500 cubic yards of concrete curb/gutter/sidewalk/ramps across Town. Target resurfacing/reconstructing of approximately 850,000 square yards of Town roadways in 2018.

Introduction

27


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

DEVELOP A VISIONARY COMMUNITY THROUGH BALANCED GROWTH

2018 Strategic Objectives          

Initiate the Strategic Transit Plan to evaluate current and proposed transit services and connections to future RidgeGate Light Rail Stations. Complete the Parker Road Corridor Plan which will provide a long-term vision for the Corridor, address mobility issues, and promote future growth and development. Complete Phase 1 recommendations such as Parking Ratios for the Greater Downtown Districts, and Shared Parking Opportunities with private property owners for the Downtown Parking Study/Plan. Begin the Land Development Ordinance modernization process. Design Standards update and implement the new standards through the development review process. Outfit patrol vehicles with a streamlined mobile video solution that reduces staff research time and on-site storage considerations. Take concept level for Downtown circulation into design phase. Work towards a lasting solution to traffic congestion and safety concerns through downtown Parker. Finalize and adopt revisions to the Roadway Design Criteria and Construction Manual Analyze Grading Permit and Right-of-Way Permit procedures and requirements to better apply to current conditions. Complete ADA Transition Plan and park wayfinding sign installation and institute efforts toward ongoing goal of near-100% compliance in all Town outdoor recreational areas.

Introduction

28


Introduction

29


TOWN PROFILE

Located 20 miles south of Denver and spanning 21.5 square miles, the Town of Parker offers the perfect balance of a full-service community with a hometown feel. A community that is highly rated for safety, Parker provides more than 52,000 residents with an unmatched quality of life, spectacular parks and recreation amenities, a great business mix, world-class cultural facilities and a wide variety of community events. With a highly-educated population and household income that exceeds most of the Denver Metro area, Parker is well positioned for the future. Parker operates under a Town Council/Administration form of government. The Mayor and Town Council, who are elected at large, make policy decisions, approve the Town budget and enact and provide for the enforcement of Town ordinances (laws). Town Council hires and directs the Town Administrator, who oversees Town staff and the day-to-day operations of the organization. The Town employs 344 full-time and 339 part-time employees who are dedicated to providing services to our Parker citizens. The Parks, Recreation and Open Space Department employs the largest number of staff. Parker’s Arts, Culture and Events Center also bustles with activity year round, with more than 213,000 residents and visitors being served by Parker Arts programs and performances in 2017. The Town continues to grow quickly and works diligently to provide and maintain the necessary community infrastructure, including more than 500 lane miles of roadway, 87 traffic signals, over 6,500 stormwater drainage facilities, and 32 Town-owned buildings. Our Police Department is an accredited industry leader and recently implemented a nationally-recognized body-worn camera program, as well as other innovative initiatives. In addition to the many services offered by the Town, we strive to engage our community through social media, opportunities for involvement and a wide range of activities and events. Even through Parker’s growth, we’ve managed to maintain a palpable feeling of community. Parker is a well-planned community that offers excellent opportunities for investors, retailers and developers to relocate or expand. Both businesses and residents enjoy the open space and trails, recreational amenities, opportunities for community involvement and great schools. They also enjoy a wide range of shopping venues, access to many modes of transportation and quality services. History When the Town incorporated in 1981, it was one square mile and had a population of 285. Since then, Parker has transformed from a rural equestrian community to an exciting town with more than 52,000 residents, beautiful open spaces and well-planned residential and commercial developments. The municipalities of Lone Tree and Aurora are directly adjacent to Parker while Castle Rock is located just to the south. Governance The Town is a home-rule municipality governed by a Council-Administrator form of government. Six Councilmembers and the Mayor are elected to staggered four-year terms, such that no more than three Councilmember terms expire every two years. Councilmembers and the Mayor are limited to two consecutive four-year terms.

Introduction

30


Town Council is given the power by the Town Charter to enact and provide for the enforcement of ordinances, make policy decisions and approve the Town budget. They also hire, supervise and direct the Town Administrator, Town Attorney and Municipal Court Judge. The Town Administrator carries out the Council's directives and is responsible for all other Town staff and day-to-day activities.

PARKER AMENITIES . Healthcare Parker Adventist Hospital is located in Parker and offers a wide array of specialists and services, including a branch of The Children’s Hospital. New medical offices and practices continue to locate near this facility and the surrounding area, attracting a high-quality workforce to the community. In addition, the Skyridge Medical Center is located in Lone Tree, just 10 miles west of Parker. Both hospitals have recently added new facilities to accommodate the growth that Parker and Douglas County have experienced in recent years. Parker is also home to the Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine. The Rocky Vista University campus includes leading-edge technology, AV capabilities and educational support which are evident throughout the approximately 145,000 square feet of campus and buildings of the University. Water Three special districts serve the greater Parker area's water needs: Parker Water and Sanitation District, Cottonwood Water and Sanitation District and Stonegate Village Metropolitan District. Roadways and Travel Parker is located in northeast Douglas County approximately five miles east of I-25. The E-470 tollway runs through the northern area of Town and the 15 to 20 minute commute to the Meridian, Inverness and Denver Tech Center business parks is easily made via the expressway. South Parker Road (Highway 83) provides connectivity and convenient access for commuters. The Regional Transportation District (RTD) also serves the Parker community by providing rapid transit services, including the Light Rail on Lincoln Avenue and a Call-N-Ride system to various businesses and residents.

Introduction

31


Airports Centennial Airport, located about 15 minutes from central Parker, is the third busiest general aviation facility in the country, handling corporate and charter air traffic. Denver International Airport is approximately 30 miles northeast of Parker and can easily be reached in 30 minutes via E-470.

miles

Housing Parker’s residential communities include a variety of well-planned housing opportunities, ranging from entry level homes to luxury executive housing to multi-family townhomes, condos and apartments. Mixed-use neighborhoods are being developed in Parker, as well as a variety of homes along golf courses, parks and open space. The median home value is $446,200.

.

Introduction

32


Recreation Parker residents enjoy a wide variety of recreational activities, including a newly built library, a senior center and 17 public parks. The public parks contain a variety of facilities including soccer, baseball and softball fields, basketball courts, tennis courts, a skate park, walking trails, picnic pavilions and playgrounds, as well as a brand new dog park and disc golf course, which opened in 2017. The Town’s Railbender Skate and Tennis Park is a favorite for many local in-line skaters and skateboarders. The Parker Fieldhouse is a 100,000-square-foot indoor facility that features basketball courts, a 25-foot climbing wall, inline hockey rink, turf field, fitness center, running track and batting cages. Program participation continues to exceed expectations. The Recreation Center is home to an Olympic-size indoor swimming pool that is used by the high school swim teams, as well as for swimming lessons, exercise classes and year-round recreational swimming. The facility also includes basketball courts, work-out area with state-of-the-art equipment, cycling area and classrooms for various activities. The Recreation Center underwent a major expansion in 2015. Approximately 24,600 square feet was added to the existing facility, and approximately 8,000 square feet of the current facility was renovated. H2O’Brien Pool is an outdoor swimming pool that features slides, a zero-depth entry, water cannons and a fort in the pool that allows kids and adults to play and relax. Of course, Parker recreation is much more than facilities. Our community enjoys a full range of adult and youth programming choices. Offerings include year-round swimming lessons, youth and adult sports and special interest classes, arts and crafts classes and cultural events. Recreational sport leagues are available year-round for nearly all age groups. Arts, Culture and Events . From festivals and events to public art and performances, Parker is an exceptionally artistic and creative community. The Parker Arts, Culture and Events (PACE) Center opened in the fall of 2011 and is home to a 500-seat theater, 250-seat amphitheater, art gallery, event room, dance studio, culinary teaching kitchen, visual arts studios, media room and several classrooms. The PACE Center provides a wide variety of family-oriented cultural, arts, scientific and educational programming to the region and serves as a rental venue for community, business and social events.

The Schoolhouse, located in the heart of downtown Parker, continues to house fantastic events, shows, classes and art. Originally opened in 1915 as the Parker School House, the building operated as a school until 1967 and was acquired by the Town in 1995. The Schoolhouse includes a 200-seat theater, dance studio and classrooms for community, cultural and recreational activities. Education Parker is served by the Douglas County School District Re. 1 (DCSD). The third largest school district in the state, DCSD serves more than 68,000 students and is one of the highest performing districts in Colorado. In addition to the Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Parker is also home to the Arapahoe Community College Parker Campus, which provides a convenient location for educational opportunities for higher education to those living or working in and around Douglas County. The University of Colorado (CU) South Denver is also conveniently located just west of Parker.

Introduction

33


(Assoc. Degree, Bach. Degree and Grad. Degree combined)

Parker Tax Rates . The Town’s property tax rate is 2.602 mills, which is one of the lowest property tax rates in the state. The Town’s sales tax rate is 3 percent and is the largest revenue source for the Town. The total sales tax rate in Parker is 8 percent and includes the state, county and RTD. Of the Town’s 3 percent sales tax, 2.5 percent is directed to the General Fund to support the majority of the Town’s operations including public safety and public works. The other 0.5 percent is dedicated to meeting Parker’s parks, recreation and open space needs. Economy and Demographics . In addition to the excellent recreation, education, health care, transportation access and water amenities currently available, strong demographics in Parker and Douglas County support the Town’s economic activity and growth. The following set of data and graphical information illustrates various demographic and economic indicators of the Town and the surrounding area.

Introduction

34


Introduction

35


Introduction

36


To find out more about our great community, visit www.ParkerOnline.org.

Parker, Colorado. It’s your kind of place.

Introduction

37


Introduction

38


BUDGET BUDGET VERVIEW OVERVIEW

Budget Overview

39


BUDGET OVERVIEW

Budget Overview

40


BASIS OF PRESENTATION, BUDGETING AND ACCOUNTING

This section of the 2018 annual budget document provides an overview of the departmental narratives, revenues and expenditures in the Town’s primary funds. In addition, this section provides a definition and explanation of the fund types used by the Town, and an explanation of the budgeting and accounting basis for presentation of revenues and expenditures by fund and a summary of budget policies.

Departmental Narratives The mission of the Town of Parker is to enrich the lives of residents by providing exceptional services, engaging community resources, and furthering an authentic hometown feel. The Town promotes transparent governing, supports sustainable development, and fosters a strong, local economy. To that end, each department and division budget narrative provides a detailed description of the activities, budgeted staffing levels, as well as goals for the upcoming budget and accomplishments for the current budget year.

Basis of Presentation—Fund Accounting The activities of the Town are organized into separate funds that are designated for a specific purpose or set of purposes. Each fund is considered a separate accounting entity, so the operations of each fund are accounted for with a set of self-balancing accounts that comprise its revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, and fund equity as appropriate. The number and variety of funds used by the Town promotes accountability but can also make municipal budgeting and finance complex. Therefore, understanding the fund structure is an important part of understanding the Town’s finances. The three basic fund categories are Governmental Funds, Proprietary Funds and Fiduciary Funds; within each fund category there are various fund types. Following is a description of the six fund types that contain the Town’s various funds.

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS General Fund The General Fund is the Town’s primary operating fund and is used to track the revenues and expenditures associated with the basic Town services that are not required to be accounted for in other funds. This includes services such as police, public works, parks and recreation, and other support services such as finance and human resources. These services are funded by general purpose tax revenues and other revenues that are unrestricted. This means that the Town Council, with input from the public, has the ability to distribute the funds in a way that best meets the needs of the community as opposed to other funds that are restricted to predefined uses. Special Revenue Funds Special Revenue funds account for activities supported by revenues that are received or set aside for a specific purpose that are legally restricted. The Town has six Special Revenue funds that it budgets; Parks and Recreation Fund, Conservation Trust Fund, Law Enforcement Assistance Fund, Cultural Fund, Recreation Fund, and Capital Renewal and Replacement Reserve Fund.

Budget Overview

41


Capital Projects Funds Capital Projects funds account for financial resources that must be used for the acquisition, improvements or construction of major capital projects. The Town has four Capital Projects funds; Public Improvement Capital Project Fund, Excise Tax Fund, Parkglenn Construction Fund and Police Station/PACE Center Construction Fund. The 10 year capital improvements plan lists approved and anticipated capital projects of the Town, and can be located in the capital section of the budget document. Debt Service Funds Debt Service funds are used to account for resources that will be used to pay the interest and principal of longterm debts. The Town has two Debt Service funds; General Debt Service and Recreation Debt Fund.

PROPRIETARY FUNDS Enterprise Funds Enterprise funds account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business, where the intent of the Town is that the fund will be self supporting. This requires that the expense of providing goods and services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. In the event that these user charges are insufficient to cover the operations of the Enterprise fund, transfers can be made from other fund types to provide additional support. The Town’s Enterprise funds consist of the Stormwater Utility Fund. Internal Service Funds Internal Service funds account for the financing of goods and services provided primarily by one Town department to other Town departments or agencies, or to other governments, on a cost-reimbursement basis. The Town’s Internal Service funds consist of the Fleet Management Fund, Information Technology Fund, Facility Services Fund and Medical Benefits Fund.

FIDUCIARY FUNDS (CUSTODIAL FUNDS) Trust Funds Custodial funds account for resources that the Town does not have the authority to spend on its own because the Town is holding assets of these funds in a trustee capacity or as an agent for another organizational unit. The Town has one Custodial fund which is not budgeted, Security Escrow Fund.

Basis of Budgeting Basis of budgeting refers to the methodology used to include revenues and expenditures in the budget. The Town of Parker primarily budgets on a cash basis. The Town does not budget for non-cash items such as depreciation and amortization. The revenues and expenditures are assumed to be collected or spent during the period appropriated. Using this assumption, the current year revenues are compared to expenditures to ensure that each fund has sufficient revenues to cover expenditures during the budget year, or that there are sufficient cash reserves in the fund to cover a revenue shortfall.

Basis of Accounting Basis of accounting refers to the point at which revenues or expenditures are recognized in the accounts and reported in the financial statements. The government-wide financial statements, as well as the financial statements for proprietary funds and fiduciary funds, are reported using the economic resource measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting. Under accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of when the cash is received or disbursed. Budget Overview 42


Governmental fund financial statements are reported using current financial resources measurement focus and the modified accrual basis of accounting. Under modified accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recognized as soon as they become both measurable and available, and expenditures are recorded in the period that the expenditure occurs and becomes a liability.

Basis of Budgeting vs. Basis of Accounting The basis of budgeting differs from the basis of accounting only by the assumptions that are made in regards to the timing of the recognition of revenues and expenditures. The budget assumes that all revenues and expenditures as well as, the associated cash, will be expended or received during the budget period. Conversely, the basis of accounting only recognizes revenues when they become both measurable and available, and expenditures when incurred. Cash is not necessarily received or expended at the same time.

MAJOR FUNDS The Town reports the following major governmental funds: General Fund – This is the Town’s primary operating fund. It accounts for all financial resources of the Town except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Parks and Recreation Fund – Accounts for the resources accumulated and expenditures made for the acquisition, development and maintenance of parks, open space and recreational facilities. Public Improvements Fund – Accounts for the financing and construction of street and street-related improvements. The Cultural Fund – Accounts for the operations of PACE and the Schoolhouse and is classified as a major fund for SCFD Tier II grant requirements. The Town reports the following major proprietary fund: Stormwater Utility Fund – Accounts for the collection of stormwater fees from residential and commercial property owners in the Town. These fees are used to fund the planning and construction of drainage improvements, maintenance of storm sewers and detention facilities, and monitoring and safeguarding water quality.

OTHER (NON-MAJOR GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS) Special Revenue Funds Special revenue funds are used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources (other than expendable trust or major capital projects) that are restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. The Parks and Recreation Fund, discussed in the Major Funds section above, is a special revenue fund. Conservation Trust Fund – Accounts for lottery proceeds from the State of Colorado and the subsequent transfer of those monies for expenditures for parks and recreation purposes. Law Enforcement Assistance Fund – Accounts for Victim Assistance Law Enforcement (VALE) grant funds and court surcharge revenues that are used to fund the victim/witness program and other Policerelated expenditures.

Budget Overview

43


Recreation Fund – Accounts for the revenue and expenditures of all recreation programs and the operations of the Parker Recreation Center, Parker Fieldhouse and H2O’Brien. Capital Renewal and Replacement Reserve Fund – Accounts for funds transferred from other funds for the purpose of saving for future capital facility needs. Capital Projects Funds Capital projects funds are used to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities and infrastructure other than those financed by other funds including the General Fund, Parks and Recreation Fund and the Stormwater Utility Fund. The Public Improvements Fund, discussed in the Major Funds section above, is a capital projects fund. Excise Tax Fund – Accounts for the collection of excise tax on new development for the purpose of building streets, parks and recreation facilities, and police and municipal facilities. At Town Council’s discretion, accumulated funds are transferred to the fund where the expenditures will take place. Parkglenn Construction Fund – This fund consists of revenue received and being held for the purpose of installing a traffic signal at the Parker Road and Parkglenn Way intersection once federal warrants are met. Debt Service Funds Debt service funds are used to account for the accumulation of resources for and the payment of general long-term debt principal, interest and related costs. General Debt Service Fund – Accounts for payments of principal and interest on the 2014 Certificates of Participation for the Public Works Facility. Recreation Debt Service Fund – Accounts for payments of principal and interest on the 2006 sales and use tax issued to construct the Fieldhouse. This fund also accounts for payments of principal and interest associated with the issuance of Certificates of Participation for the Recreation Center expansion. Enterprise Funds Enterprise funds account for activities that are operated in a manner similar to private business, where costs are predominantly supported by user charges or where management has decided periodic determination of revenues, expenses and changes in net assets are appropriate. The Stormwater Utility Fund, discussed above in the Major Fund section, is the Town’s only enterprise fund. Internal Service Funds Internal service funds are used to account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department or agency to other departments or agencies of the government and to other government units on a cost reimbursement basis. Fleet Services Internal Service Fund – Accounts for repairs and preventative maintenance of Town vehicles and vehicle-related equipment. Revenue is derived from participating departments based upon services rendered and fleet replacement schedules.

Budget Overview

44


Technology Management Internal Service Fund – Accounts for IT personnel, the purchasing of computer equipment, software, licenses, copiers, and computer repair and maintenance for all departments of the Town. Revenue is derived from all departments based on their estimated share of these costs. Facility Services Internal Service Fund – Accounts for the cleaning and maintenance of Town facilities. Funding is charged to applicable departments based on the square footage and amount of usage of each building. Medical Benefits Internal Service Fund – Accounts for the medical claims and insurance premiums of Town employees. Funding is charged to participants in the medical benefits plan based on their type of coverage. Summary The summary on the next page depicts the relationships between departments/division and the fund categories into which they fall.

Budget Overview

45


DEPARTMENT/DIVISION FUND SUMMARY

Fund/Department Matrix

Governmental Funds

General Fund

Budget Overview

nd Fu ent s vem pro

und

bli

c Im

nF Re cre a tio

Pu

nF La und wE As nf or c sis tan emen ce Fun t d Cu ltu ral Fu nd

and Par ks

nse rva tion

Tru

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Co

Ge ner al F

und

Department/Fund

Elected Officials Town Clerk Municipal Court Town Administrator Elections Finance Sales Tax Legal Services Human Resources Risk Management Community Dev./Economic Dev. Information Technology Communications General Government Buildings Customer Service Historic Preservation Interdepartmental Debt Service Police Building Inspection Public Works/Engineering Parks, Forestry and Open Space Public Works Buildings Economic Incentives Interfund Transfers

Re cre atio

st F

und

Special Revenue Funds

X X X

X

X

X

46

X

X

X

X

X

X


X X

X

X

X

Budget Overview Fun d

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X X X

X

47

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

und

und

its F

erv ice sF Me dic al B ene f

yS

Enterprise Funds

Fac ilit

und M Fu anage nd me nt

Te chn olo gy

erv ice sF

und

ice

Debt Service Funds

Fle et S

rm wa ter Uti lity F

Sto

Ser vic eF

nD eb Fu t Se rv nd

Re cre a tio und

n

Co n Fu str uc nd tio

enn

Ta x

Ge ner al D ebt

Par kgl

cis e

Ex

Proprietary Funds

Internal Service Funds


Budget Overview

48


BUDGET POLICY SUMMARY

The Town of Parker has an important responsibility to its citizens to account for public funds and manage municipal finances wisely. This section provides a summary of the significant elements of the adopted 2018 Annual Budget and major financial policies in place to ensure that the funding for the Town’s services is managed in a responsible manner. The Town of Parker prepares the operating and capital budgets simultaneously on an annual basis. All funds are included in the operating budget. BALANCING THE BUDGET  Proposed expenditures must be equal to or less than forecasted revenues and fund balance for any budgeted year in all funds contained in the budget.  The budget must be balanced when it is formally presented to the Town Council by the Town Administrator and when it is passed by the Town Council.  Sales and excise taxes are the primary revenues used by the Town to offset expenditures and balance the budget. Property taxes, charges for services and other revenues are also used to balance the budget.  Alternative forms of revenue may be used to balance the budget, such as bonds, grants, and lease and purchase agreements.  Revenues remaining from the previous year will be placed in the fund balance and can be used for the purpose of balancing the budget, as long as the Council-mandated contingency amount is maintained.

BUDGET RESERVES 

 

Non-appropriated General Fund balance will be maintained at levels sufficient to provide necessary working capital and contingency reserves. In previous budget years, Council has suggested the equivalent of at least two months (16.7 percent) of expenditures be maintained as a working capital reserve. For 2018, that amount is being increased to a Council suggested level of at least three months or 25 percent. In addition, reserves for future major capital expenditures may be accrued in the fund balance. Non-appropriated emergency reserves will be maintained at 3 percent of budgeted expenditures, in accordance with Article X of the Colorado Constitution (TABOR). Use of the budget reserves must be recommended by the Town Administrator and be approved by a majority vote of the Town Council.

REVENUES One-time Revenues One-time revenues are federal, state or private grants and tax windfalls that may occur in any given year.  Grants must be shown as revenue in the appropriate fund and approved for expenditure by the Town Council. Also, the funds may only be used for the intended purpose as outlined by the contributing party.  One-time revenues, such as tax windfalls, will be placed into the fund balance of the appropriate fund. The funds can be utilized only after the Town Council has approved the expenditure. Service Charges and Fees Service charges and fees should be reviewed annually. This review process should coincide with the annual budget process.

Budget Overview

49


Temporary Loans between Funds The transfer of revenues between funds to cover temporary short-falls in cash revenue is at the discretion of the Finance Director, but is only permissible under the following circumstances:  A temporary loan can be made to funds that may experience a revenue lag due to collections.  A temporary loan can be used to satisfy a shortfall in a transfer to a subsidized fund until the budget can be revised to the required transfer amount.

EXPENDITURES Expenditure Types The expenditure types that are used throughout all Town funds include salary and benefits, supplies, purchased services, capital outlay, debt service, contributions, interfund transfers and other.

Personnel Only positions approved by Council may be filled. New positions may not be created during the year without Council approval. Budget Reallocation Budget reallocations may be made between line items by completing a budget reallocation form and obtaining the approval of the Town Administrator and Finance Director. Reallocations must be approved before goods or services are ordered. Budget reallocations to or from personnel line items will not be approved. Capital Outlay Capital outlay funds are to be appropriated for specific capital assets. Purchasing, acquiring or constructing a capital asset must be verified by the Finance Department prior to the purchase or contract to ensure that the expenditure of capital outlay funds has been specifically approved by Council during the budget process. Expenditure of capital outlay funds that are not on the approved list must be approved by the Town Administrator before making the purchase.

ENTERPRISE FUNDS Enterprise funds act like a private sector enterprise and revenues must cover 100 percent of the expenditures.

AUTHORITY OVER EXPENDITURES All expenditures for a department must be authorized by the Department Director. The ultimate responsibility for a departmental budget lies with that Department’s Director. Directors must approve all disbursements by signing the source document to be paid or in a manner that signifies their approval. There are certain instances in which an additional signature or delegated approval signature may be desirable for the Director.   

The Department Director may delegate their approval to a direct report when the director will be away from the office for a period longer than one (1) week. The Department Director may delegate their approval on invoices or other cash disbursements under $5,000 to a direct report. The Department Director may delegate their approval to another director for purchases that are routinely made by the other department on behalf of their department.

In all of these instances, written authorization delegating the Department Director’s approval must be submitted to the Finance Department. Budget Overview

50


EXECUTIVE TERMINATION OF APPROVED SPENDING The Town Administrator may stop a department from spending appropriated funds in the event there is evidence that funds are being misused. The Town Administrator must present the reasons for the action to the Town Council within 30 days of the expenditure stoppage.

DEBT MANAGEMENT Short-term Debt/Lease-purchase Agreements Short-term borrowing or lease-purchase contracts should be considered for financing major operating capital equipment when the Finance Director, along with the Town Administrator, determine that this is in the Town’s best financial interest and the Town Council concurs. Lease-purchase decisions should have the approval of the appropriate operating manager. Long-term Debt Long-term debt will not be used to finance current operating expenses. When long-term debt is warranted for a project, the payback period for bonds used for the project must not exceed the useful life of the project. Bond Rating The Town will attempt to obtain the best possible bond rating and to maintain a favorable rating through prudent financial management and adherence to a policy of full disclosure on financial reports. Voter Approval of Debt As required by the Town Charter and State Statute, appropriate elections will be held to obtain voter approval for debt issuance.

BUDGET AMENDMENTS The Town Charter allows Town Council to make additional appropriations by ordinance during the fiscal year for unanticipated expenditures of the Town. Such appropriations shall not exceed the amount by which actual and anticipated revenues of the year exceed the revenues estimated in the budget, unless the appropriations are necessary to relieve an emergency endangering public peace, health, safety or property. Requests for budget amendments are submitted to the Finance Director for consideration, if the request is justified and there is offsetting revenue, it is submitted to the Town Administrator for approval prior to being placed on a Council agenda. Budget amendments are presented to Town Council at a regular meeting and require two readings prior to adoption.

Budget Overview

51


Budget Overview

52


FUND STRUCTURE

The following chart illustrates the fund structure and the various funds the Town uses. Also shown is the total budget, the total budget for each fund type and the budget for each fund. The total appropriation amount for all funds, including interfund transfers, is $102,604,767.

2018 Budget $102,604,767

Governmental funds $88,905,812

General Fund $54,293,801

Proprietary funds $13,698,955

Special Revenue $24,417,388

Capital Projects $7,665,000

Debt Service $2,529,623

Enterprise $3,842,252

Internal Service $9,856,703

Parks and Recreation $9,236,205

Public Improvements $5,515,000

General Debt Service $943,123

Stormwater Utility $3,842,252

Fleet Services $2,419,216

Law Enforcement Assistance $145,390

Excise Tax $2,150,000

Recreation Debt Service $1,586,500

Cultural $5,911,048

Facility Services $990,700

Recreation $8,749,745

Medical Benefits $2,890,700

Conservation Trust $375,000

Budget Overview

Technology Management $3,556,087

53


Budget Overview

54


MAJOR REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES GRAPHS—ALL FUNDS

Budget Overview

55


FUND BALANCE AND FUND CASH PROJECTIONS

Town of Parker 2018 Budget FUND BALANCE PROJECTION - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS

Fund

Fund Balance 12/31/2013

2014 Revenue

2014 Expenditure

Fund Balance 12/31/2014

2015 Revenue

2015 Expenditure

Fund Balance 12/31/2015

OPERATING FUND General Fund

23,896,533

41,041,247

39,353,249

25,584,531

43,430,771

45,702,139

23,313,163

3,230,876 5,167,481 232,429 619,936 1,171,383 1,941,781

393,757 13,452,193 129,668 3,643,412 5,528,555 6,014

11,607,434 127,971 3,252,888 5,508,172 -

3,624,633 7,012,240 234,126 1,010,460 1,191,766 1,947,795

402,164 30,363,999 135,078 4,302,604 6,262,017 31,491

3,750,000 23,773,609 283,975 4,144,170 6,054,689 -

276,797 13,602,630 85,229 1,168,894 1,399,094 1,979,286

11,710,098 4,544,443 370,257 198,957

23,280,413 2,674,423 660 616

17,825,039 510,000 316,663 -

17,165,472 6,708,866 54,254 199,573

8,965,422 2,074,855 156 546

11,500,243 3,950,000 54,410 -

14,630,651 4,833,721 200,119

261,021 1,361,316

261,021 1,361,316

941,395 1,709,536

941,395 1,709,536

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Conservation Trust Parks and Recreation Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural Recreation Capital Renewal/Replacement Reserve CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS Public Improvements Excise Tax Police Station/PACE Center Construction Parkglenn Construction DEBT SERVICE FUND Recreation Debt Service Recreation Debt Service

-

-

-

FUND CASH PROJECTION - ALL PROPRIETARY FUNDS

Fund

Projected Cash 12/31/2013

2014 Expenditure

Projected Cash 12/31/2014

2,251,692

1,380,240

4,912,891

1,654,900 2,597,209 737,966 -

1,679,202 2,481,313 751,347 -

2014 Revenue

2015 Expenditure

Projected Cash 12/31/2015

2,813,654

1,922,083

5,804,462

1,584,764 2,793,580 918,639 2,264,105

2,006,187 2,503,689 793,020 1,798,342

2015 Revenue

ENTERPRISE FUNDS Stormwater Utility

4,041,439

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Fleet Services Technology Management Facility Services Medical Benefits

Budget Overview

90,880 320,582 (30,536) -

56

66,578 436,478 (43,917) -

(354,845) 726,369 81,702 465,763


Town of Parker 2018 Budget FUND BALANCE PROJECTION - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS (continued)

2016 Revenue

2016 Expenditure

Fund Balance 12/31/2016

Projected 2017 Revenue

Projected 2017 Expenditure

Fund Balance 12/31/2017

Budget 2018 Revenue

Budget 2018 Expenditure

Fund Balance 12/31/2018

46,777,513

48,980,132

21,110,543

51,074,351

57,130,559

15,054,335

54,390,184

54,293,801

15,150,718

475,771 8,165,798 141,797 5,442,401 6,696,353 12,114

600,000 14,589,143 129,197 5,614,047 7,045,515 -

152,568 7,179,285 97,829 997,248 1,049,932 1,991,400

415,800 9,532,536 127,150 7,276,587 8,568,260 14,000

475,000 8,850,793 127,640 7,900,746 8,093,406 -

93,368 7,861,028 97,339 373,089 1,524,786 2,005,400

400,200 10,553,000 124,050 5,811,163 8,083,600 15,000

375,000 9,236,205 145,390 5,911,048 8,749,745 -

118,568 9,177,823 75,999 273,204 858,641 2,020,400

12,031,322 2,833,767 1,225

14,211,073 588,000 -

12,450,900 7,079,488 201,344

11,992,257 3,055,000 1,500

19,284,690 4,099,900 -

5,158,467 6,034,588 202,844

10,378,300 2,560,000 1,500

5,515,000 2,150,000 -

10,021,767 6,444,588 204,344

941,725 1,583,520

941,725 1,583,520

940,273 1,584,700

940,273 1,584,700

943,123 1,586,500

943,123 1,586,500

Budget 2016 Revenue

-

Budget 2016 Expenditure

Projected Cash 12/31/2016

2,383,993

1,565,353

6,623,102

2,230,679 3,820,201 944,480 2,597,030

2,363,935 3,259,395 984,491 2,561,733

(488,101) 1,287,175 41,691 501,060

Budget Overview

Budget 2017 Revenue

-

Budget 2017 Expenditure

Projected Cash 12/31/2017

2,409,100

2,215,298

6,816,904

2,401,539 4,016,520 941,000 2,779,450

1,746,475 4,066,651 935,703 2,524,000

166,963 1,237,044 46,988 756,510

57

Budget 2018 Revenue

-

Budget 2018 Expenditure

Projected Cash 12/31/2018

3,733,000

3,842,252

6,707,652

2,534,400 4,149,002 991,800 3,010,170

2,419,216 3,556,087 990,700 2,890,700

282,147 1,829,959 48,088 875,980


SUMMARY OF ALL FUNDS BY FUND TYPE

Summary of All Funds 2018 Adopted Budget - By Fund Type General Fund Revenues General Property Tax Sales and Use Tax Other Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Transfers In Total Revenues Expenditures General Government Public Safety Public Works Parks and Recreation Cultural Community Development Economic Development Other Transfers Out Debt Service Total Expenditures

7,483,631 18,723,599 12,801,523 4,433,060 1,587,531 1,639,865 562,940 3,359,777 3,701,875 54,293,801

Capital Projects

Internal Service

Debt Service

145,390 12,864,252 5,911,048 73,000 5,423,698 24,417,388

5,515,000 2,150,000 7,665,000

9,856,703 9,856,703

569,625

5,274,800

828,669

-

6,660,225

11,955,010

11,395,899

2,207,505

-

47,429,653

$ 15,150,718 $ 6,707,652 $ 12,524,635 $ 16,670,699 $ 3,036,174

-

$ 54,089,878

96,383

Beginning Fund Balances

15,054,335

Budget Overview

Special Revenue

$ 2,179,400 $ $ $ $ $ $ 2,179,400 38,354,610 8,203,000 3,130,000 49,687,610 2,314,350 2,900,000 5,214,350 2,429,910 2,429,910 4,462,216 2,751,500 3,996,000 11,209,716 2,971,787 2,203,000 8,101,180 10,670,772 23,946,739 197,313 80,000 277,313 227,300 1,530,000 264,950 1,163,800 14,600 3,200,650 1,253,298 5,586,383 1,750,000 2,529,623 11,119,304 54,390,184 3,733,000 24,987,013 12,939,800 10,685,372 2,529,623 109,264,992

Net Increase (Decrease) in Fund Balances

Ending Fund Balances

Enterprise Fund

Total All Funds

3,656,423 185,829 3,842,252

(109,252) 6,816,904

58

943,123 1,586,500 2,529,623

17,340,334 18,868,989 22,916,069 18,883,812 5,911,048 1,587,531 1,712,865 562,940 11,119,304 3,701,875 102,604,767


SUMMARY OF ALL FUNDS—YEAR TO YEAR COMPARISON

Summary of All Funds Year-to-Year Comparison

Beginning Fund Balances

2017 2017 2018 2014 2015 2016 Amended Projected Adopted Actual Actual Actual Budget Actual Budget $ 57,506,539 $ 70,105,746 $ 68,213,035 $ 60,275,464 $ 60,275,464 $ 47,429,653

Compound Annual Growth -2%

Revenues General Fund Special Revenue Funds Conservation Trust Parks and Recreation Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural Recreation Mainstreet Center Capital Renewal/Replacement Reserve Capital Project Funds Public Improvements Excise Tax Police Station/PACE Center Construction Parkglenn Construction Debt Service Fund General Debt Service Recreation Debt Service

40,113,647

42,455,671

45,681,613

48,838,098

49,921,751

53,136,886

9%

393,757 13,452,193 129,668 1,935,712 4,462,055

402,164 19,398,999 135,078 2,552,604 4,406,517

475,771 7,565,798 141,797 3,054,401 5,467,453

416,300 7,950,756 119,800 2,955,095 4,928,800

415,800 8,990,036 127,150 3,015,787 5,748,160

400,200 10,178,000 124,050 2,808,680 5,874,700

-2% 16% -1% 16% 8%

6,014

6,013

12,114

9,900

14,000

15,000

66%

22,965,413 2,674,423 660 616

8,774,052 2,074,855 156 546

10,436,574 2,833,767 1,225

7,546,432 1,536,400 1,000

8,892,257 3,055,000 1,500

8,628,300 2,560,000 1,500

13% 15%

-

-

-

-

-

65%

-

Enterprise Fund Stormwater Utility

2,251,692

2,813,654

2,383,993

2,418,800

2,409,100

3,733,000

17%

Internal Service Funds Fleet Services Technology Management Facility Services Medcial Benefits

1,654,900 2,597,209 737,966 -

1,584,764 2,793,580 918,639 2,264,105

2,230,679 3,820,201 944,480 2,597,030

2,344,700 3,857,120 894,600 2,784,450

2,401,539 4,016,520 941,000 2,779,450

2,534,400 4,149,002 991,800 3,010,170

12% 22% 9%

93,375,925

90,581,397

87,646,896

86,602,251

92,729,050

98,145,688

12%

Total Revenues

Budget Overview

59


Summary of All Funds Year-to-Year Comparison 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures General Fund

37,778,649

39,754,829

44,923,927

55,224,045

53,114,591

50,934,024

8%

8,104,318 127,971 3,252,888 5,508,172

19,233,472 283,975 4,144,170 6,054,689

10,586,075 129,197 5,614,047 7,045,515

5,400,721 139,160 7,905,775 7,956,634

3,293,393 127,640 7,833,246 8,093,406

4,187,507 145,390 5,911,048 8,749,745

34% 2% 23% 13%

17,825,039 316,663 -

11,500,243 28,933 -

14,211,073 -

20,627,982 -

19,284,690 -

5,515,000 -

30%

Debt Service Fund General Debt Service Recreation Debt Service

261,021 1,361,316

941,395 1,709,536

941,725 1,583,520

940,273 1,584,700

940,273 1,584,700

943,123 1,586,500

6%

Enterprise Fund Stormwater Utility

1,328,819

1,736,628

1,379,833

2,292,518

2,030,093

3,656,423

22%

Internal Service Funds Fleet Services Technology Management Facility Services Medcial Benefits

1,679,202 2,481,313 751,347 -

2,006,187 2,488,689 793,020 1,798,342

2,363,935 3,259,395 984,491 2,561,733

1,781,846 4,168,983 891,920 2,360,000

1,746,475 4,066,651 935,703 2,524,000

2,419,216 3,556,087 990,700 2,890,700

10% 21% 8%

80,776,718

92,474,108

95,584,466

111,274,557

105,574,861

91,485,463

13%

Ending Fund Balances $ 70,105,746 $ 68,213,035 $ 60,275,464 $ 35,603,158 $ 47,429,653 $ 54,089,878 Note: Interfund transfers have been eliminated

-2%

Special Revenue Funds Parks and Recreation Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural Recreation Capital Project Funds Public Improvements Police Station/PACE Center Construction Parkglenn Construction

Total Expenditures

Budget Overview

60


SUMMARY OF ALL FUNDS—MAJOR REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES

Summary of All Funds For the Years Ended December 31, 2014-2018 Actual 2014 Revenues General Property Tax Sales and Use Tax Other Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Transfers In Other Financial Sources Total Revenues Expenditures General Government Public Safety Public Works Parks and Recreation Cultural Community Development Economic Development Other Transfers Out Debt Service Total Expenditures

$

Actual 2015

Actual 2016

Projected 2017

Adopted 2018

1,584,849 $ 1,590,673 $ 1,873,217 $ 1,935,900 $ 2,179,400 36,839,963 39,111,361 41,910,689 46,161,800 49,687,610 5,103,905 4,579,977 5,401,923 5,652,300 5,214,350 1,833,383 1,650,645 1,828,083 2,360,100 2,429,910 7,832,176 10,836,529 8,686,684 9,462,905 11,209,716 15,221,449 18,152,899 21,696,491 23,113,871 23,946,739 265,028 280,844 309,359 277,100 277,313 4,488,917 4,489,031 5,871,299 3,742,574 3,200,650 5,639,137 18,413,379 9,432,793 14,400,973 11,119,304 20,206,254 9,889,439 69,150 22,500 99,015,062 108,994,776 97,079,689 107,130,023 109,264,992

10,260,078 13,992,302 28,139,277 16,361,786 3,553,481 1,531,769 1,173,979 360,300 5,639,137 5,403,747 86,415,855

12,734,598 14,408,307 22,982,802 28,570,414 4,149,557 1,329,655 1,614,154 265,940 18,413,379 6,418,681 110,887,487

15,491,967 16,839,763 25,674,652 21,283,288 5,614,047 1,624,273 2,500,713 286,325 9,432,793 6,269,438 105,017,259

16,602,753 20,227,723 34,084,353 15,667,063 7,833,246 2,140,222 2,420,420 347,965 14,400,973 6,251,116 119,975,834

17,340,334 18,868,989 21,972,946 17,297,312 5,911,048 1,587,531 1,712,865 562,940 11,119,304 6,231,498 102,604,767

Net Increase (Decrease) in Fund Balances

12,599,207

(1,892,711)

(7,937,571)

(12,845,811)

6,660,225

Beginning Fund Balances

57,506,539

70,105,746

68,213,035

60,275,464

47,429,653

Ending Fund Balances

Budget Overview

$ 70,105,746 $ 68,213,035 $ 60,275,464 $ 47,429,653 $ 54,089,878

61


DEBT SERVICE AND FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS

Occasionally, the Town has issued debt as a means of providing the necessary funding to construct major capital projects. When advantageous, the Town has also used long-term financing to fund land and equipment purchases. The Town has outstanding long-term financial obligations in the form of sales and use tax revenue bonds and certificates of participation. There are currently no plans to increase the amount of debt.

Revenue, Spending and Debt Limitations In 1992, voters approved an amendment to the Colorado Constitution that places limits on revenue and expenditures of the state and local governments. Even though the limit is placed on both revenue and expenditures, the constitutional amendment in reality applies to a limit on revenue collections. Growth in revenue is limited to the increase in the Denver-Boulder Consumer Price Index plus local growth (new construction and annexation). This percentage is added to the preceding year’s revenue base, giving the dollar limit allowed for revenue collection in the ensuing year. Any revenue collected over the limit must be refunded to the citizens. Federal grants or gifts to the Town are not included in the revenue limit. In April 1996, voters in Parker approved an amendment to the Home Rule Charter which authorizes the Town to collect, retain and expend all revenue of the Town for 1996 and each subsequent fiscal year, not withstanding any limitation contained in Article X, Section 20 of the State Constitution. The Amendment is complex and subject to judicial interpretation. The Town believes it is in compliance with the requirements of the Amendment. However, the Town has made certain interpretations in the Amendment's language in order to determine its compliance. The Town has no legal debt limit other than voters must approve the creation of multiple-fiscal year debt as required by the Amendment. Certificates of participation are a lease-purchase financing method and the annual lease payment must be appropriated by Town Council and does not create multiple-fiscal year debt. Therefore, voter approval is not required for COPs. The Amendment requires that emergency reserves be established. These reserves must be at least 3 percent of fiscal year spending (excluding bonded debt service). The Town is not allowed to use the emergency reserves to compensate for economic conditions, revenue shortfalls or salary or benefit increases. 2015 Sales and Use Tax Refunding Note In October 2015, a refunding note was issued in the amount of $9,880,000 to provide funds for the refunding of the 2006 Sales and Use Tax Revenue Bonds used to construct the Parker Fieldhouse and related improvements. The annual debt service payments are accounted for in the Recreation Debt Service Fund, which receives a transfer from the Parks and Recreation Fund. The note will be fully satisfied in 2025. The debt service payment schedule for the outstanding debt is shown in the following table.

Budget Overview

62


Sales and Use Tax Refunding Note Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025

Principal $935,000 $955,000 $975,000 $995,000 $1,015,000 $1,040,000 $1,065,000 $1,090,000

Interest $163,454 $143,136 $122,389 $101,211 $79,603 $57,512 $34,884 $11,718

Total $1,098,454 $1,098,136 $1,097,389 $1,096,211 $1,094,603 $1,097,512 $1,099,884 $1,101,718

2009 Certificates of Participation In 2009, the Town issued $44,250,000 in certificates of participation to finance the cost of constructing a new Police station and the PACE Center. To obtain favorable interest rates, the Town issued most of the COPs ($40,720,000) using the federal government’s Build America Bond program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. With the Build America Bonds, the Town initially received a credit of 35 percent of the interest payment from the federal government. Congress’s failure to meet federal deficit reduction targets in 2012 has resulted in a reduction of the 35 percent credit. The remaining COPs ($3,530,000) were issued using traditional municipal tax-exempt bonds. The debt service payment schedule for the outstanding debt is shown in the following table.

Certificates of Participation Series 2009 Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035

Budget Overview

Principal $1,390,000 $1,435,000 $1,485,000 $1,540,000 $1,595,000 $1,655,000 $1,730,000 $1,805,000 $1,880,000 $1,960,000 $2,045,000 $2,135,000 $2,225,000 $2,325,000 $2,425,000 $2,535,000 $2,650,000 $2,765,000

Interest $2,309,375 $2,235,705 $2,158,215 $2,075,798 $1,988,788 $1,896,278 $1,786,220 $1,671,175 $1,551,142 $1,426,122 $1,295,782 $1,159,790 $1,017,812 $867,625 $710,688 $544,575 $370,928 $189,402

63

Total $3,699,375 $3,670,705 $3,643,215 $3,615,798 $3,583,788 $3,551,278 $3,516,220 $3,476,175 $3,431,142 $3,386,122 $3,340,782 $3,294,790 $3,242,812 $3,192,625 $3,135,688 $3,079,575 $3,020,928 $2,954,402

BABs credit ($808,281) ($782,497) ($755,375) ($726,529) ($696,076) ($663,697) ($625,177) ($584,911) ($542,900) ($499,143) ($453,524) ($405,927) ($356,234) ($303,669) ($248,741) ($190,601) ($129,825) ($66,291)

Net $2,891,094 $2,888,208 $2,887,840 $2,889,269 $2,887,712 $2,887,581 $2,891,043 $2,891,264 $2,888,242 $2,886,979 $2,887,258 $2,888,864 $2,886,578 $2,888,956 $2,886,947 $2,888,974 $2,891,103 $2,888,111


2014 Certificates of Participation In 2014, the Town issued $19,520,000 in certificates of participation to finance the cost of constructing a Public Works facility and the expansion and renovation of the Town’s existing Recreation Center. The portion of annual debt service payments attributable to the Public Works facility are accounted for in the General Debt Service Fund, which receives a transfer from the General Fund (53%) and Stormwater Utility Fund (13%). The portion of annual debt service payments attributable to the Recreation Center is accounted for in the Recreation Debt Service Fund, which receives a transfer from the Parks and Recreation Fund (34%). The debt service payment schedule for the outstanding debt is shown in the following table.

Town Credit Ratings Credit ratings can affect the interest rate (i.e. cost of borrowing). In order to reduce the cost of borrowing, the Town strives to achieve the highest credit rating possible. The Town’s current credit ratings are as follows. 2006 Sales and Use Tax Revenue Bonds – AA Standard & Poor’s, Fitch 2009 Certificates of Participation – AA Standard & Poor’s 2014 Certificates of Participation – AA Standard & Poor’s

Budget Overview

64


Staffing As the population of the Town of Parker has grown and services have increased, the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees has reflected that change. The number of FTEs will remain static from 2017 to 2018.

Fund/Department Authorized FTEs General Fund: Town Clerk Municipal Court Town Administrator Finance Town Attorney Human Resources Community Development Communications

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

3.00 2.60 3.00 11.00 2.00 7.00 12.50 3.50

3.00 2.60 4.00 12.00 2.00 7.00 12.00 3.50

3.00 2.60 4.00 12.34 2.00 7.00 13.80 3.00

5.60 3.40 4.00 12.34 3.00 7.00 11.80 4.00

5.60 3.40 4.00 12.34 3.00 7.00 11.80 4.00

Customer Service Police Building Inspection Public Works & Engineering Parks/Forestry/Open Space Economic Development General Fund Total Parks and Recreation Fund Law Enforcement Assistance Fund Cultural Fund Recreation Fund Stormwater Utility Enterprise Fund Fleet Services Internal Service Fund Information Technology Facility Services Internal Services Fund

2.60 98.80 10.00 30.70 21.90 4.00 212.60 1.60 1.50 12.10 19.90 8.00 4.40 10.00 7.40

2.60 106.00 12.00 32.30 22.40 4.00 225.40 1.60 1.50 15.90 22.90 8.00 4.40 11.00 8.90

2.60 114.60 12.00 34.80 23.90 4.00 239.64 2.93 1.50 18.33 27.40 7.20 4.83 11.00 9.33

2.60 120.00 13.00 34.60 25.20 4.00 250.54 3.18 1.50 20.33 34.75 8.20 4.60 12.00 9.10

2.60 120.00 13.00 34.60 25.20 4.00 250.54 3.18 1.50 20.33 34.75 8.20 4.60 12.00 9.10

Total Percentage Increase/Decrease

277.50

299.60

322.16

344.20

344.20

Budget Overview

3.4%

65

8.0%

20.1%

6.8%

0.0%


Budget Overview

66


REVENUE MANUAL

Revenue Manual

67


REVENUE MANUAL

AN EVALUATION OF MAJOR REVENUES 2013 - 2018 Prepared by The Finance Department

Revenue Manual

68


INTRODUCTION

This manual provides information on the Town’s major revenues that are received primarily from outside sources. Major revenues are greater than $100,000 received annually. Cumulatively, the 2018 projections for the revenues identified in this manual account for 81% of the total revenues anticipated to be received by the Town. Interfund transfers are not included in this manual or in the calculation of percentage of total revenues. The information provided in this manual for each revenue source includes: · · · ·

Distribution – the fund or funds where the revenue is accounted for. Source – the source of the revenue stream. Collection – the basis for and the logistics of the collection of the revenue. Trend – includes actual collections for the prior four years and projections for the current and following year, along with the basis for the forecasted revenues.

Revenue Manual

69


PROPERTY TAX REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Parker property owners

Collection:

The collection process begins with the Douglas County Assessor's Office. Two types of property are valued by the Assessor's Office: 1) "real property" (land and buildings) and 2) “personal property� (business machines and equipment). Once market values are established, the Assessor's Office computes the assessed valuation of property based on State-legislated assessment percentages. Property is assessed at the end of one year, for collection in the following year. A ten year history of these assessment percentages is provided in the table below:

Overview: Assessment Percentages Property Class

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Real Property: Commercial Residential

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96

29.00 7.96 *

Personal Property:

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

29.00

*The residential real property assessment percentage will change to 7.20 for the 2017 assessment that impacts 2018 property tax collected Total assessed valuation (in millions) for the Town of Parker for the past nine years is demonstrated by the following table:

Assessed Valuation

Revenue Manual

2007 $556.0

2008 $582.4

2009 $597.0

2010 $603.6

2011 $559.4

70

2012 $564.6

2013 $568.2

2014 $577.9

2015 $667.8

2016 $690.8


Payment Property owners pay property taxes to Douglas County in either two installments due February 28 and June 15 or in one installment due April 30. Douglas County wire transfers the Town’s property taxes directly to the Town’s main bank account on the 10th of the month following the month that the collection is processed by Douglas County. A five-year history of the mill levies which apply to all Parker taxpayers is provided in the table below: Five Year Mill Levy History Town of Parker Douglas County Douglas County School District Douglas County Libraries Parker Fire Protection Cherry Creek Basin Water Urban Drainage District TOTAL Town's % of Tax Bill

2012 2.602 19.774 48.727 4.068 14.220 0.500 0.657 90.548 2.9%

2013 2.602 19.774 48.727 4.029 13.096 0.500 0.608 89.336 2.9%

2014 2.602 19.774 48.727 4.032 13.053 0.500 0.632 89.320 2.9%

2015 2.602 19.774 42.439 4.035 9.406 0.500 0.632 79.388 3.3%

2016 2.602 19.274 41.064 4.016 9.250 0.473 0.620 77.299 3.4%

In addition, many Parker property owners also are subject to mill levies issued by various Metro Districts throughout the Town and Parker Water and Sanitation (9.095), Cottonwood Water and Sanitation District (19.000) or Stonegate Water.

Revenue Manual

71


Computing the Property Tax Bill The formulas used for computing property taxes are as follows: Assessed valuation = Property market value x Assessment ratio Property tax = Assessed valuation x Mill levy / 1000

Market value x Assessment Ratio Assess Value x Mill Levy Divided by 1,000 Property Tax

Other Parker Government $300,000 $300,000 7.96% 7.96% $23,880 $23,880 2.602 74.697 /1000 /1000 $62 $1,784

For the 2016 assessments paid in 2017, the owner of a home valued at $300,000 would have paid $62 in property taxes to the Town of Parker and $1,784 to the other governments common to all Parker taxpayers. Performing the calculating using the 29% business assessment percentage, a business with a 2016 market value of $300,000 would have paid $226 in property taxes to the Town of Parker in 2016, and $6,499 to the other governments common to all Parker taxpayers.

Legal Restrictions The Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) Amendment to the Colorado Constitution limits property tax revenue growth to the amount collected the previous year increased by the Denver-Boulder Consumer Price Index and a local growth factor. However, Parker citizens have voted to exempt the Town from the revenue limit provisions of TABOR. TABOR also prohibits any increase to the mill levy except by election. The Gallagher Amendment to the Colorado Constitution also restricts property tax growth in requiring the legislature to annually adjust the residential assessed valuation percentage to ensure that the proportion of residential to total State assessed valuation remains constant – residential properties pay 45% of the total property taxes, while commercial and industrial properties pay 55%. A decreasing residential assessment ratio would be the result of residential growth and market values rising relative to commercial market values. In order to maintain this proportional allocation, the residential property assessment percentage has declined from 21% in 1982 to the current level of 7.96%, while the non-residential property percentage has remained at 29%. The 2017 residential property assessment percentage will decline to 7.20%.

Revenue Manual

72


Finally, there is a statutory limitation which prohibits property tax revenue growth from exceeding 5.5% each year, adjusted for new construction, although it is generally held that home rule municipalities, like Parker, are exempt from this provision. Trend: 2,500,000

Year Revenue 2013 1,352,560 2014 1,374,795 2015 1,448,999 2016 1,706,521 2017 Projected 1,750,000 2018 Budgeted 1,975,000

2,000,000

1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 Projected

2018 Budgeted

·

The increasing tax level is related to the strong local housing market and commercial construction.

·

Annexation of properties into the Town’s boundaries will also impact the trend.

·

2017 was a reassessment year; the budgeted 2018 tax level is based on the Douglas County Assessor valuations which are showing strong growth.

Revenue Manual

73


SALES TAX REVENUE

Distribution: Gener al Fund 83% Parks and Recreation Fund 17% Source:

Visitors, residents and employees in Parker

Collection:

In 1981, the citizens of Parker voted to install a 1% sales and use tax. In 1982, the citizens voted to increase the sales and use tax rate to 2.5%. In 1984, Parker became a home-rule municipality with power to self-govern in matters of local and municipal concern. In 1990, the citizens voted to increase the sales tax rate to the current level of 3%, with the extra .50% to be earmarked for parks and recreation improvements. Sales tax is charged on certain services and all retail purchases including food. As a home rule Town, Parker collects and administers its own sales and use tax. Businesses remit tax to Parker on a monthly, quarterly or annual basis. Taxes collected are due to the Town by the 20th of the month following collection. The Town has established a lockbox for the efficient and secure deposit of sales and use tax monies. Returns are mailed directly to the bank, eliminating processing float. The Town utilizes a number of enforcement procedures to collect from delinquent accounts including taxpayer education, delinquency notices, personal phone contact and visits, audits, summons to municipal court and seizures.

Trend: 50,000,000 45,000,000 40,000,000 35,000,000 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

2013

2014

2015

2016

General Fund 25,576,071 27,510,421 29,959,630 32,136,000 35,100,000 38,083,500

P&R Fund 5,114,756 5,502,274 5,991,926 6,427,621 7,020,000 7,616,700

Total 30,690,827 33,012,695 35,951,557 38,563,622 42,120,000 45,700,200

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Sales tax revenue grew between 7.3% and 8.9% for the years 2014 through 2016.

·

The Town’s increasing population and commercial activity drive a strong sales tax base leading to the 2017 Projected and 2018 Budgeted amounts.

Revenue Manual

74


BUILDING USE TAX REVENUE

Distribution: Capital Improvements Fund 83% Parks and Recreation Fund 17% Source:

Contractors, developers, Parker businesses and residents

Collection:

Building use tax is assessed at 4% (3% is Town of Parker and 1% is collected and remitted to Douglas County) on 50% of the estimated value of the construction project. Construction labor is typically not subject to use tax, and the Town of Parker estimates that 50% of the building permit value is related to taxable materials, equipment, appliances, etc. Building use tax is estimated and collected by the Building Department at the time a building permit is obtained. Monies collected are deposited through the Finance Department.

Trend: 4,000,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

3,000,000

2,000,000

Capital P&R Improvement Fund Fund 372,552 1,862,760 588,370 3,097,710 588,054 2,917,167 489,213 2,588,634 550,000 3,120,000 500,000 3,100,000

Total 2,235,313 3,686,080 3,505,221 3,077,847 3,670,000 3,600,000

1,000,000

0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

Building use tax fluctuates based on the number of residential and commercial permits issued and the valuation associated with permits, primarily commercial.

Permit history is as follows:

Residential Commerical

2013 332 43

2014 356 33

2015 335 13

2016 330 27

2017 permits are projected to exceed 395 (residential) and 30 (commercial).

2018 permits and corresponding valuation are expected to mirror 2017 activity.

Revenue Manual

75


SALES AND USE TAX AUDIT REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 83% Parks and Recreation Fund 17% Source:

Parker businesses and construction companies with construction projects in Parker

Collection:

The Town's audit program emphasizes taxpayer education and voluntary compliance. As a result, the Town works with businesses which are delinquent or not remitting taxes to educate them on the correct way to calculate and remit sales and use tax. An audit may take two hours or several months to perform, depending on the complexity of the organization. Once the Town completes an audit, it meets with the taxpayer to go over the audit assessment and make any appropriate adjustments or corrections. The taxpayer then has 30 days to pay the assessment, work out a settlement or payment plan, or protest the assessment. The Town collects assessments through the Finance Department.

Trend: 350,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000

General Fund 190,348 59,111 251,581 95,397 210,000 216,300

P&R Fund 38,211 11,822 50,316 19,079 42,000 43,300

Total 228,559 70,933 301,898 114,476 252,000 259,600

100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Audit revenues will fluctuate based on the size and number of audits.

¡

Sales tax staff experienced turnover and vacancies during 2017. The team will be fully staffed entering 2018 so a conservative revenue estimate is being utilized that reflects a 3% revenue growth.

Revenue Manual

76


LODGING TAX

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Visitors, residents and employees in Parker

Collection:

In 2003, the citizens of Parker voted to install a 3% lodging tax on the purchase price for lodging within the Town of Parker. As a home rule town, Parker collects and administers its own lodging. Vendors remit tax to Parker on a monthly basis and taxes collected are due to the Town by the 20th of the month following collection. The Town has established a lockbox for the efficient and secure deposit of lodging tax monies. Returns are mailed directly to the bank, eliminating processing float. The Town utilizes a number of enforcement procedures to collect from delinquent accounts including taxpayer education, delinquency notices, personal phone contact and visits, audits and liens on tangible personal property.

Trend: 180,000

Year Revenue 2013 105,661 2014 146,500 2015 159,652 2016 165,796 2017 Projected 161,000 2018 Budgeted 165,830

160,000 140,000

120,000 100,000 80,000

60,000 40,000

20,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Lodging tax revenue is leveling out at approximately $160,000.

¡

3% growth for 2018 is budgeted which brings the revenue amount back to 2016 levels.

Revenue Manual

77


SPECIFIC OWNERSHIP TAX REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Residents and businesses of Parker

Collection:

The State of Colorado establishes the statutory authority for collecting auto ownership tax. Specific vehicle ownership taxes are based on the year of manufacture and the original taxable value. The original taxable value is determined when the vehicle is new and does not change throughout the life of the vehicle. Taxable value for passenger vehicles is 85 percent of the MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price); for trucks the taxable value is 75 percent of the MSRP. · · · ·

46% of ownership tax is allocated to the school district. 4% is allocated to law enforcement. 21% to Douglas County Road and Bridge, Social Services, Debt Service, Capital Expenditures and the General Fund. 29% is disbursed to a variety of other districts – which includes the Town of Parker.

The Town of Parker receives its share via wire transfer from Douglas County into its main bank account on the 10th of the month following the month that the collection is processed by Douglas County. Trend: 250,000

Year Revenue 2013 123,173 2014 132,680 2015 141,852 2016 157,314 2017 Projected 185,000 2018 Budgeted 203,500

200,000

150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

The tax revenue has continued to increase each year. The growth is attributable to the increased population, number of vehicles owned and increased vehicle taxable value.

·

A 10% growth rate for 2018 is conservative but reflective of growth in the above-mentioned underlying drivers.

Revenue Manual

78


XCEL ENERGY FRANCHISE FEE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Gas company customers

Collection:

Under the auspices of the franchise agreement with Xcel Energy, 3% of gross revenues received by Xcel Energy on sales of gas within the Town is to be remitted to the Town monthly, no later than 30 days following the close of the month.

Trend: 500,000

Year Revenue 2013 381,332 2014 429,204 2015 378,416 2016 336,726 2017 Projected 352,000 2018 Budgeted 362,560

400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenues fluctuate based on the combination of the number of customers, consumption related to temperatures and utility rates.

¡

With the Town population increasing, a 3% growth is budgeted for 2018.

Revenue Manual

79


INTERMOUNTAIN RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION(IREA) EXCISE TAX

Distribution: General Fund 75%, Public Improvement Fund 25% Source:

Electric power customers

Collection:

Under the auspices of the franchise agreement with IREA, 4% of gross revenues received by IREA on sales of electric power within the Town is to be remitted to the Town monthly, no later than 30 days following the close of the month.

Trend: 1,550,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

1,500,000 1,450,000 1,400,000

General Public Imp Fund Fund 1,032,692 344,231 1,033,396 362,232 1,075,865 358,622 1,109,342 369,780 1,100,000 392,800 1,133,000 400,000

Total 1,376,923 1,395,628 1,434,487 1,479,122 1,492,800 1,533,000

1,350,000 1,300,000 1,250,000 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenues fluctuate based on the combination of the number of customers, consumption related to temperatures and utility rates.

¡

With the Town population increasing, an approximate 3% growth is budgeted for 2018.

Revenue Manual

80


CABLE FRANCHISE FEE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Cable television customers

Collection:

Under the auspices of the franchise agreement with Comcast, 5% of gross revenues received by Comcast on sales of cable television within the Town is to be remitted to the Town monthly, no later than 30 days following the close of the month.

Trend: 700,000

Year Revenue 2013 459,839 2014 476,257 2015 541,098 2016 621,740 2017 Projected 646,000 2018 Budgeted 652,460

600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000

200,000 100,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

The trend reflects a reduced growth in the number of cable subscribers.

¡

Minimal growth is budgeted for 2018 based on the number of consumers opting for choices other than cable.

Revenue Manual

81


BUILDING PERMIT REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Contractors, developers, Parker businesses and residents

Collection:

The building permit fee is determined by Public Works in accordance with the standard fee schedule based on total valuation of the construction project contained in the Uniform Building Code. The fee is paid at the time a building permit is obtained. Monies collected are deposited through the Finance Department. Additional fees are collected as determined through the audit of building projects.

Trend: 2,500,000

Year Revenue 2013 1,368,297 2014 1,644,823 2015 1,594,755 2016 1,658,483 2017 Projected 2,205,000 2018 Budgeted 2,271,150

2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Building permit fees fluctuate based on the number of residential and commercial permits issued and the valuation associated with permits, primarily commercial.

¡

2018 revenue is expected to increase a modest 3%; it is not anticipated the 33% growth rate in 2017 will be repeated based on expected 2018 development.

Revenue Manual

82


MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Parker businesses and residents

Collection:

Douglas County Motor Vehicle offices title and register vehicles of residents of Douglas County, which includes the Town of Parker. Fees are assessed based on the weight of the vehicle. The funds are allocated per statute between the State, counties, and cities/towns based on a funding formula.

Trend: 200,000 180,000 160,000 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0

Year Revenue 2013 145,711 2014 152,935 2015 159,187 2016 163,588 2017 Projected 170,000 2018 Budgeted 175,100

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Parker’s proportionate share of the revenue is impacted by the relationship of its growth with that of the remainder of the state.

·

A second factor impacting revenue growth is consumer vehicle preferences.

·

The 3% growth budgeted for 2018 anticipates Parker’s proportionate share.

Revenue Manual

83


HIGHWAY USERS TAX REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Gasoline tax and related fees paid by Colorado motorists

Collection:

The Highway Users Tax Fund (HUTF) is state-collected, locally-shared revenue that is distributed via electronic funds transfer on a monthly basis to the Town of Parker in accordance with the following formulas: · Basic Fund - the first seven cents of gasoline taxes and the base amount of various motor vehicle registration, title and license fees. 9% of these revenues are distributed to municipalities. The basic fund monies may be spent on acquisition of rights-of-way for, and the construction, engineering, safety, reconstruction, improvement, repair, maintenance and administration of streets, roads and highways. · Supplemental Fund - 8% of the next eleven cents of gasoline taxes are distributed to municipalities and may be spent only on road improvements including new construction, safety improvements, maintenance and capital improvements. · 1989 Increase Fund -18% of the gasoline tax, registration fee and driver's license fee increases enacted in 1989 are shared with municipalities and can be used for the same purposes designated in (2) above. · 1995 Increase Fund - 18% from a three-year phased reduction of the amount previously withheld by the state for administrative purposes which can be used for the same purposes designated in (2) above.

Trend: 1,200,000

Year Revenue 2013 1,020,120 2014 1,047,973 2015 1,090,277 2016 1,108,248 2017 Projected 1,150,000 2018 Budgeted 1,184,500

1,150,000 1,100,000 1,050,000 1,000,000 950,000 900,000 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Parker’s proportionate share of the revenue is impacted by the relationship of its growth with that of the remainder of the state.

·

3% growth for 2018 reflects the historical trend.

Revenue Manual

84


FASTER REVENUE

Distribution: Capital Programs Fund 100% Source:

State of Colorado

Collection:

FASTER, Funding Advancements for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery, was signed into law on March 2, 2009. It provided increased revenues for statewide transportation improvements. Revenues are generated from the Road Safety Surcharge, Oversize/Overweight Surcharge, Rental Car Surcharges and late vehicle registration fees. Revenues are credited to the Highway Users Tax Fund (HUTF) and distributed per statute to the Colorado Department of Transportation, counties and municipalities.

Trend: 350,000

Year Revenue 2013 271,878 2014 282,848 2015 294,442 2016 302,669 2017 Projected 306,100 2018 Budgeted 315,200

300,000 250,000

200,000 150,000 100,000

50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

The revenue has remained relatively flat with only small percentage increases year-over-year.

¡

2018 budgeted growth of 3% is within the historical growth range.

Revenue Manual

85


BUILD AMERICA BONDS INTEREST CREDIT

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Federal Government

Collection:

Build America Bonds are taxable municipal bonds that carry special tax credits and federal subsidies for either the bond issuer or the bondholder; the program was created in 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. There are two types of Build America Bonds (often abbreviated as BABs): "Tax Credit BABs" and "Direct Payment BABs." In 2009, the Town issued taxable certificates of participation as Direct Payment BABs to fund the new police station and PACE center. The Town receives a federal subsidy of 35% of the interest paid on the Direct Payment BABs. Monies collected are deposited through the Finance Department.

Trend: 880,000 860,000 840,000 820,000 800,000 780,000 760,000 740,000 720,000 700,000 680,000

Year Revenue 2013 860,677 2014 821,393 2015 813,069 2016 796,480 2017 Projected 774,248 2018 Budgeted 751,072

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Interest payments on bonds steadily decrease as the outstanding debt is paid down. Since the revenue is tied directly to interest payments, the revenue will steadily decrease as well.

·

In 2013, the Federal Government was required to cut spending due to sequestration. As a result, the exact percentage of cuts for BABs and other direct-pay bonds will be 8.7%, less than the 35% subsidy that was originally due to the Town.

·

The 2018 budgeted interest credit reflects the impact of both of the above points.

Revenue Manual

86


DEFICIT REDUCTION FEES

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Contractors and developers

Collection:

The Town developed a fiscal impact model in 1998 that calculates the financial effect of proposed new developments on the Town’s future operating budgets. The model looks at a 20year projection of the revenues (property tax, sales tax, etc.) and the cost of services added by the proposed development (public safety, streets and parks maintenance, etc.). When there is a cumulative deficit for the 20-year period, a present value of the deficit is calculated. A development with a retail commercial component will have a lower or no deficit reduction fee depending on the retail versus residential mix. The fee is increased annually by inflation as measured by the Denver-Boulder Consumer Price Index (CPI). The deficit reduction fee is negotiated and agreed to by and between the developer of a proposed new development and the Town during the annexation process. Once agreed upon, the fee becomes a part of the annexation contract.

Trend: 1,200,000

Year Revenue 2013 898,295 2014 1,023,310 2015 846,441 2016 827,688 2017 Projected 1,108,000 2018 Budgeted 1,100,000

1,000,000

800,000 600,000

400,000 200,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Revenues fluctuate based on the amount of new development.

·

The number of remaining lots with deficit reduction fees that will be developed in 2018 is expected to be similar to 2017.

Revenue Manual

87


EXCISE TAX

Distribution: Excise Tax Fund 100% Source:

Contractors and developers

Collection:

Excise Tax is paid by the builder at the time a building permit is issued for a new residence or commercial structure. The fees are used to pay for capital projects, such as street improvements or parks that are needed for the new residents moving into the Town. The fees are only used for capital items and not to fund regular operations.

Trend: 3,500,000

Year Revenue 2013 1,446,864 2014 2,655,816 2015 2,997,564 2016 2,798,039 2017 Projected 3,000,000 2018 Budgeted 2,500,000

3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 2013

·

2014

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

Revenues will fluctuate based on the amount of annual development. The number of permits and average value of those permits for the current and prior year is as follows:

Single family Multi family Commercial

·

2015

2016 2017 Permits Avg Value Permits Avg Value 291 $359,406 380 $367,000 39 $1,186,958 20 $2,500,000 27 $1,888,118 32 $1,100,000

The amount of tax collected per unit is as follows for 2018: Single family Attached dwelling (townhomes and condos) Apartment dwelling

·

$4,832 $3,865 $3,502

The commercial rate is $0.36 per square foot.

Revenue Manual

88


PLAN CHECK FEES

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Contractors, developers and residents

Collection:

The plan check fee is determined by Public Works and charged based on a fee schedule in accordance with the International Building Code. Fees are assessed for the review of plans for construction permit issuance. The fee is paid at the time the plans are reviewed. Monies collected are deposited through the Finance Department.

Trend: 600,000

Year Revenue 2013 203,909 2014 315,559 2015 354,067 2016 413,152 2017 Projected 503,000 2018 Budgeted 518,090

500,000

400,000 300,000

200,000 100,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenue will fluctuate based on the amount of commercial construction, new residential housing starts and home improvements.

¡

2018 budgeted revenue growth is expected to decline resulting in only a slight increase over 2017. The number of plans to be reviewed is not expected to grow at the same pace as the last several years.

Revenue Manual

89


ENGINEERING REVIEW FEES

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Contractors, developers and residents

Collection:

Engineering Review fees are assessed through a Chargeback Agreement which is executed as part of development applications. The Engineering Review fees are collected to offset the costs associated with staff time spent reviewing development project submittals and performing construction inspections. These submittals typically include construction drawings, drainage reports, traffic studies, site plans, plats, easements and other technical documents. The construction inspections are focused on public improvements that are constructed as part of a development project. Staff keeps track of the time spent on each development project and invoices are generated through the Finance Department which are then mailed to the applicant.

Trend: 225,000

Year Revenue 2013 124,762 2014 132,688 2015 136,907 2016 133,856 2017 Projected 197,000 2018 Budgeted 202,910

200,000

175,000 150,000 125,000

100,000 75,000

50,000 25,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenues fluctuate based on the number of development applications received.

¡

2018 is budgeted to remain fairly flat with 2017 as the development activity is not expected to increase much over the 2017 levels.

Revenue Manual

90


CIGARETTE TAX REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Cigarette smokers in Colorado

Collection:

The state imposes and collects a 4.2 cent tax per cigarette, of which 27% of the proceeds are distributed to municipalities and counties according to the ratio of the state sales tax collected in the entity to the total state sales tax collected in the prior year. The state disburses the funds two months after they are collected. (Note: Voters in Colorado approved an increase in the cigarette tax, effective January 1, 2005. However, the increase is earmarked for specific purposes and is not included in the distribution to municipalities and counties.)

Trend: 200,000

Year Revenue 2013 112,368 2014 112,842 2015 112,596 2016 120,449 2017 Projected 125,000 2018 Budgeted 128,750

175,000 150,000

125,000 100,000 75,000 50,000

25,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Revenue is dependent upon the number of smokers and number of cigarettes purchased within the state, in addition to the Town’s proportionate share of sales tax collections.

·

Revenue has remained relatively flat and the growth budgeted for 2018 is reflective of historical gains.

Revenue Manual

91


COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Residents and businesses owning property in Douglas County

Collection:

Douglas County imposes a mill levy dedicated to road and bridge improvements throughout Douglas County. Because Douglas County's efforts only include unincorporated areas and the property tax is collected from all areas, the State requires that Douglas County return one half of the road and bridge levy to each Town. The formula used to compute the amount returned to Parker is as follows: County Road and Bridge Levy x Total Town Assessed Value / 2 = Town Portion The money is distributed via electronic funds transfer on a quarterly basis to the Town of Parker.

Trend: 1,600,000 Year Revenue 2013 1,223,658 2014 1,231,030 2015 1,238,675 2016 1,416,787 2017 Projected 1,500,000 2018 Budgeted 1,545,000

1,500,000 1,400,000

1,300,000 1,200,000

1,100,000 2013

¡

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

Revenue is impacted by the change in assessed valuations within the Town.

Revenue Manual

92


LONE TREE DISPATCH FEES

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

City of Lone Tree

Collection:

In 2007, the City of Lone Tree and the Town of Parker entered into an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) whereby the Town of Parker would provide dispatch services to the City of Lone Tree. The City of Lone Tree pays the Town based on a percentage of incidents per billing cycle plus a 15% administration fee, a 35% allocation for Dispatch depreciation and capital outlays. In 2013, the fee billing was amended from being based on a percentage of incidents per billing cycle to a flat 35% fee based on the total operating budget of dispatch; all other items remained the same.

Trend: 800,000

Year Revenue 2013 453,065 2014 305,326 2015 414,615 2016 424,636 2017 Projected 470,000 2018 Budgeted 484,100

600,000

400,000

200,000

0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenue fluctuates based on the Town Dispatch budget.

¡

Growth budgeted for 2018 is in line with personnel and operating expense increases.

Revenue Manual

93


COURT FINES AND FEES REVENUE

Distribution: General Fund 100% Source:

Tickets and citations issued by the Parker Police and fines adjudicated by the Parker Municipal Judge

Collection:

Tickets are paid through the mail, online or directly to the Court. Court arraignments are generally two times a month on Tuesdays and Court trials are generally once a month on Fridays. All collection efforts are made by the Parker Municipal Court.

Trend: 250,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

200,000 150,000 100,000

Court 148,881 152,131 159,887 180,965 160,000 160,000

DUI 25,121 29,713 36,860 31,552 30,000 30,000

Total 174,002 181,844 196,747 212,517 190,000 190,000

50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Court revenues are dependent on citations issued by the Police Department and fines and court costs as administered by the Judge.

·

Amounts have steadily increased; however, actual year-to-date revenue indicates a drop in revenue.

·

2018 is anticipated to be flat.

Revenue Manual

94


INVESTMENT INCOME

Distribution: All Funds on a pro rata basis to cash and investment balances held. Source:

Interest and investment income from investments made by the Town. Interest revenues will vary based on rates and portfolio volume. The Town utilizes the services of Chandler Asset Management for investment recommendations. Securities authorized by the Town Council’s approved investment policy do not include derivative products.

Collection:

Investment maturities and earnings are set up for automatic wire transfers or deposit to the Town's Local Government Investment Pool.

Trend: 450,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000

200,000 150,000

Revenue 53,716 172,057 189,106 391,445 392,000 401,220

100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Investment income reflects the low interest rates that have occurred since the Great Recession.

·

In January 2017, the effective Federal Funds Rate was 0.65% and increased to 1.15% in October. The absolute Federal Funds Rate was increased in March from 0.75% to 1.0% and again in June to 1.25%.

·

Portfolio values have remained fairly consistent and with interest rates increasing only slightly, investment income is relative flat.

·

The portfolio book value as of 9/30/2017 was $45.9 million. Of this, $29.5 million was invested in a Local Government Investment Pool with an annualized yield of 1.2%; investments in US Agency securities, US Treasuries and money market mutual funds was $16.4 million with an average market yield of 1.54%.

Revenue Manual

95


STORMWATER UTILITY FEE REVENUE

Distribution: Stormwater Utility Fund 100% Source:

Property owners within the Town limits

Collection:

Residential Stormwater Utility fees are a flat fee that is billed through the Water and Sanitation District in Parker in order to minimize administrative costs of collection and to make it easier for citizens to make their payment. Residents remit payments to the Water and Sanitation District. This includes Parker Water and Sanitation, Cottonwood Water and Sanitation, and Stonegate Water and Sanitation Districts. The Districts will then turn over the Stormwater fees to the Town. Stormwater Utility fees for commercial property are calculated based on impervious area and billed annually by the Finance Department. Impervious area constitutes any area that doesn't allow water/snow to be absorbed by the ground, i.e. sidewalks, rooftops, driveways, parking lots, etc. The invoices for each calendar year are sent out on January 31. Payments are made directly to the Town of Parker. If paid by February 28, a two percent discount is allowed. If not paid early, the fee is due by April 30. Fees collected from each residence and business will provide funding to pay for construction of new and required drainage improvements, maintenance of existing eligible drainage facilities, monitoring and safeguarding stormwater quality, and for planning, designing and constructing regional drainage improvements in cooperation with the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District.

Trend: Commercial Residential Utility Utility Year Fees Fees 2013 712,911 1,020,501 2014 740,642 1,071,241 2015 796,102 1,129,155 2016 823,608 1,162,997 2017 Projected 889,500 1,205,700 2018 Budgeted 890,000 1,250,000

2,500,000 2,000,000

1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 2013

Revenue Manual

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

96

Total Utility Fees 1,733,412 1,811,884 1,925,258 1,986,606 2,095,200 2,140,000


·

Increasing fee revenue is the result of residential/commercial construction, annexations and periodic fee increases.

·

The fee increases are based on the U.S. Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index for Denver/Boulder.

·

Single family residential (SFR) property fees were $7.04 per month in 2017 and will be $7.26 per month in 2018. Commercial and non-residential properties are calculated as follows:

·

SFR fee x total impervious area of property in square feet ÷ 4000 square feet

·

2018 budget is based on a 2.1% growth rate to allow for an increase in rates and/or the customer base.

Revenue Manual

97


CULTURAL TICKET REVENUE

Distribution: Cultural Fund 100% Source:

Customers of the PACE Center and the Schoolhouse

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments, and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by staff at PACE and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 1,600,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 800,000 600,000

TOTAL 731,545 985,886 1,152,321 1,336,935 1,339,299 1,181,000

400,000 200,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Ticket revenues are demand based and are the result of ticket sales for performances such as concerts, plays and other cultural events.

¡

In order to improve the bottom line performance, the number of national acts is being reduced due to their high cost; this also has an impact on revenues.

Revenue Manual

98


CULTURAL CONCESSION REVENUE

Distribution: Cultural Fund 100% Source:

Customers of the PACE Center and the Schoolhouse

Collection:

Collected over-the-counter with purchase of concessions. Funds are deposited daily by staff at PACE and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: Concession Year Income 2013 85,742 2014 97,243 2015 116,466 2016 173,579 2017 Projected 179,360 2018 Budgeted 197,500

250,000 200,000 150,000

100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Concession revenue is dependent upon the number and type of performances.

¡

The renovation of the Schoolhouse will be complete in 2018 and increased revenue is due to this venue becoming operational.

Revenue Manual

99


CULTURAL CLASS REGISTRATION REVENUE

Distribution: Cultural Fund 100% Source:

Customers of the PACE Center and the Schoolhouse

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by staff at PACE and reported to the Finance Department. Course offerings include theater, science, digital art, dance, music and visual art courses. The facilities include dance studios, flexible classroom spaces, media lab and a theater.

Trend: Class Year Registration 2013 214,259 2014 245,116 2015 390,642 2016 372,934 2017 Projected 419,265 2018 Budgeted 431,850

500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Class registration revenues are demand based and are the result of class registrations for arts and cultural classes for youth and adults.

¡

Usage of the facilities has been very strong with minimum availability for increased classes. Revenue is budgeted to increase 3%.

Revenue Manual

100


PARKER ARTS, CULTURE and EVENTS (PACE) FACILITY RENTALS

Distribution: Cultural Fund 100% Source:

Customers of the PACE Center

Collection:

Collected by over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by staff at PACE and reported to the Finance Department..

Trend: 300,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

250,000 200,000

150,000 100,000

Rental Theatre 83,151 100,197 67,934 62,795 55,500 75,000

Rental Events 100,872 120,490 168,146 170,960 110,000 169,000

Total Rental 184,023 220,686 236,079 233,755 165,500 244,000

50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Rental revenue is demand based and the result of theater and event room, west terrace, gallery and classroom rentals.

¡

Emphasis in 2018 is being placed on facility rentals as a means to increase overall revenue while minimizing cost increases.

Revenue Manual

101


SCHOOLHOUSE FACILITY RENTALS

Distribution: Cultural Fund 100% Source:

Customers of the Schoolhouse

Collection:

Collected by over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by staff at the Schoolhouse and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: Rental Year Theatre 2013 82,925 2014 75,503 2015 23,798 2016 20,402 2017 Projected 12,650 2018 Budgeted 25,000

100,000

80,000 60,000 40,000

Rental Events 0 0 52,741 29,213 10,000 23,000

Total Rental 82,925 75,503 76,538 49,615 22,650 48,000

20,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Rental revenue is demand based.

·

The facility has been undergoing a renovation resulting in the reduced 2017 revenue.

·

2018 revenue is budgeted at the 2016 level as the facility will be reopened in 2018.

Revenue Manual

102


H2O’BRIEN POOL ADMISSION REVENUES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

H2O’Brien Pool users

Collection:

Collected over-the-counter at the H2O’Brien Pool, Parker Recreation Center and Parker Fieldhouse. H2O’Brien Pool users can pay either a Daily Admission Fee, purchase a punch card, season membership or add a season pass to an existing membership. H2O’Brien is also available for rental. The H2O’Brien Pool is open Memorial Day weekend, generally through Labor Day. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 400,000

Year Revenue 2013 146,270 2014 151,827 2015 141,931 2016 132,763 2017 Projected 120,000 2018 Budgeted 133,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Revenues for the pool are primarily weather related.

·

A newly remodeled pool at the Parker Recreation Center has impacted the 2016 and 2017 revenues for H2O’Brien Pool.

·

Based on average summer weather, revenues are budgeted to increase back to 2016 levels.

Revenue Manual

103


RECREATION ADMISSION REVENUE

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Users of the Recreation Center and Fieldhouse

Collection:

Recreation Center and Fieldhouse users can pay a daily admission fee, punch card, monthly or annual memberships. Fees are collected by over-the-counter payments and direct payment (direct transfer through the Automated Clearing House – ACH - from the customer’s bank account to the Town’s bank account). Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department. The ACH payments are initiated by recreation staff on a monthly basis.

Trend: 2,500,000

Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Projected 2018 Budgeted

2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000

Daily Annual Total Users Members Admissions 278,338 860,426 1,138,764 254,424 964,202 1,218,626 319,643 937,342 1,256,985 460,148 1,583,769 2,043,918 440,000 1,800,000 2,240,000 445,000 1,800,000 2,245,000

500,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

A remodel and expansion of the Recreation Center was completed and began to positively impact admission revenues in 2016.

·

2018 revenue is expected to increase only slightly as the Recreation Center has been operating at near capacity levels during 2017.

Revenue Manual

104


RECREATION CONCESSION REVENUE

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Users of H2O’Brien, the Fieldhouse, Salisbury Park and Discovery Park

Collection:

Collected over-the-counter with purchase of concessions. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: Concession Year Income 2013 122,958 2014 116,747 2015 119,827 2016 119,562 2017 Projected 114,000 2018 Budgeted 125,000

160,000

120,000

80,000

40,000

0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Concession revenue is dependent upon the number of attendees at the various park and recreation facilities.

·

Discovery Park will be in its first full year of operations and awareness of the ice skating facility is expected to increased attendance which in turn will result in increased concession revenue.

Revenue Manual

105


RECREATION SPORTS PROGRAM FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Participants in Parker organized sporting activities such as softball, basketball, flag football, kickball, soccer and several other programs

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments, and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: Adult Youth Contracted Program Program Program Year Fees Fees Fees 2013 302,406 775,413 0 2014 291,362 978,265 0 2015 253,360 919,518 0 2016 274,257 839,182 59,024 2017 Projected 275,000 695,000 290,000 2018 Budgeted 285,000 695,000 290,000

1,300,000 1,250,000 1,200,000

1,150,000 1,100,000

Total Sports Fees 1,077,818 1,269,627 1,172,878 1,172,463 1,260,000 1,270,000

1,050,000 1,000,000 950,000 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Increased sports program revenues are the result of increased participation and new programs due to the remodeled and enlarged Recreation Center.

¡

The 2018 budget revenue anticipates only marginal growth as the facility has been operating at near capacity during 2017.

Revenue Manual

106


RECREATION SWIM LESSON FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Recreation Center customers

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments, and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 250,000

Year Revenue 2013 179,069 2014 165,354 2015 173,633 2016 206,954 2017 Projected 200,000 2018 Budgeted 200,000

200,000 150,000 100,000

50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Swim lessons are provided at both the Recreation Center indoor pool and at H2O’Brien Pool in the summer.

·

Revenues increased in 2016 with the completion of new pool areas at the Recreation Center.

·

2018 revenue is expected to remain stable with 2016 and 2017.

Revenue Manual

107


RECREATION SPECIALTY FITNESS FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Recreation Center customers

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments, and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 250,000

Year Revenue 2013 167,195 2014 184,627 2015 188,061 2016 231,705 2017 Projected 195,000 2018 Budgeted 195,000

200,000

150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Specialty fitness includes activities such as TRX suspension training, focus interval training and various other fitness programs.

·

The 2016 increase is related to participation in new programs due to the Recreation Center expansion.

·

Many customers move to a facility membership that allows them to train on their own or participate in other classes that are free with their membership.

Revenue Manual

108


FIELDHOUSE FACILITY RENTAL FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Fieldhouse customers

Collection:

Collected by phone registrations and over-the-counter payments. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 250,000

Year Revenue 2013 170,917 2014 185,383 2015 156,872 2016 198,470 2017 Projected 190,000 2018 Budgeted 195,000

200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Rental fees are dependent upon demand.

·

2015 revenues declined due to Recreation Center programs being scheduled in Fieldhouse spaces during the Recreation Center renovation and expansion.

·

It is expected revenues will remain flat and stable going forward.

Revenue Manual

109


FIELDHOUSE DAY CAMP FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Fieldhouse customers

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 600,000

Year Revenue 2013 427,554 2014 431,652 2015 426,152 2016 470,723 2017 Projected 500,000 2018 Budgeted 500,000

500,000

400,000

300,000 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

The day camp program includes both before and after school programs and is operating near capacity.

¡

2018 budgeted revenue is expected to remain stable.

Revenue Manual

110


FIELDHOUSE SPORTS INSTRUCTION FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Fieldhouse customers

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 400,000

Year Revenue 2013 262,287 2014 189,307 2015 150,715 2016 201,801 2017 Projected 200,000 2018 Budgeted 175,000

300,000 200,000

100,000

0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Decreased revenues in 2015 are related to the impact of the Recreation Center expansion which reduced available space at the Fieldhouse as Recreation Center programs were moved to the Fieldhouse.

·

Revenues rebounded in 2016 and 2017.

·

Revenues are expected to decline in 2018 as more activities occur at the Recreation Center.

Revenue Manual

111


PERSONAL TRAINING FEES

Distribution: Recreation Fund 100% Source:

Recreation customers

Collection:

Collected by internet and phone registrations, over-the-counter payments and by mail. Funds are deposited daily by recreation staff and reported to the Finance Department.

Trend: 300,000

Year Revenue 2013 182,611 2014 202,389 2015 208,543 2016 214,630 2017 Projected 210,000 2018 Budgeted 220,000

250,000 200,000

150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

¡

Revenue for personal training customers continues its slow and stable growth.

¡

Most customers move from the personal training package to a facility membership that allows them to train on their own or participate in other classes that are free with their membership.

Revenue Manual

112


DOUGLAS COUNTY ROAD SALES TAX SHARED REVENUE

Distribution: Capital Improvement Fund 100% Source:

Citizens and visitors in Douglas County

Collection:

Douglas County collects a 0.4 percent roads sales and use tax county-wide and then remits 75 percent of the amount collected within Parker town-limits to the Town. This revenue helps fund the construction of new road projects and is accounted for in the Public Improvements Fund. Funds are received electronically directly to the Town’s bank account on a monthly basis.

Trend: Shared Sales Tax Use Tax Sales & Use Year Revenue Tax Revenue Tax Revenue 2013 2,140,103 223,531 2,363,634 2014 2,218,219 353,022 2,571,241 2015 2,413,380 352,832 2,766,212 2016 2,532,893 293,528 2,826,421 2017 Projected 2,635,400 325,000 2,960,400 2018 Budgeted 2,740,800 300,000 3,040,800

3,500,000

3,000,000 2,500,000

2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000

500,000 0 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 Projected Budgeted

·

Douglas County’s sales tax has a different base than the Town’s sales tax (excludes tax on groceries and utilities).

·

Revenue growth has been occurring at a relatively stable rate.

Revenue Manual

113


LOTTERY REVENUE

Distribution: Conservation Trust Fund 100% Source:

Customers who buy lottery and lotto tickets

Collection:

Lottery proceeds are collected from retail merchants selling lottery products by the State of Colorado. Municipal lottery proceeds are distributed to municipalities based upon current population estimates prepared by the State Division of Local Governments. Parker’s share is electronically transferred to the Town’s depository bank account on December 1, March 1, June 1 and September 1. Conservation trust funds can only be used for the acquisition, development and maintenance of new park and open space sites or for capital improvements and maintenance of a public site used for recreational purposes.

Trend: 500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0

Year Revenue 2013 431,371 2014 392,734 2015 401,810 2016 475,660 2017 Projected 415,700 2018 Budgeted 400,000

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 Projected

The revenue is directly related to lottery participation and changes in population relationship amongst Colorado municipalities.

2017 and 2018 both reflect a return to the 2015 revenue level.

Revenue Manual

114


Revenue Manual

115


Revenue Manual

116


BUDGET DETAIL

Budget Detail

117


GENERAL FUND SUMMARY

General Fund Summary 2014 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Interest Miscellaneous Other Financial Sources Transfers In Total Revenues

Ending Fund Balances

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 23,896,533 $ 25,584,531 $ 23,313,163 $ 21,110,543 $ 21,110,543 $ 15,054,335

31,298,727 1,833,383 4,320,037 2,322,473 184,179 58,416 95,153 1,278 927,600 41,041,247

33,998,491 1,650,645 4,061,239 2,309,447 199,047 135,962 91,402 9,439 975,100 43,430,771

36,417,312 1,828,083 4,336,763 2,488,876 216,656 122,167 202,607 69,150 1,095,900 46,777,513

38,788,000 1,821,750 4,798,648 2,781,400 204,300 330,600 113,400 1,152,600 49,990,698

39,559,400 2,360,100 4,580,648 2,955,660 197,100 130,000 116,343 22,500 1,152,600 51,074,351

Compound Annual Growth -11%

42,848,360 2,429,910 4,462,216 2,971,787 197,313 102,920 124,380 1,253,298 54,390,184

8% 7% 1% 6% 2% 15% 7%

$ 25,584,531 $ 23,313,163 $ 21,110,543 $ 11,079,328 $ 15,054,335 $ 15,150,718

-12%

8% 7%

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Debt Service Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Other Transfers Out Total Expenditures Ending Fund Balances

24,147,238 1,329,945 19,143,106 3,701,875 1,095,020 850,000 666,840 3,359,777 54,293,801

8% 9% 10% -1% -3% 14% 12% 21% 8%

$ 25,584,531 $ 23,313,163 $ 21,110,543 $ 11,079,328 $ 15,054,335 $ 15,150,718

-12%

17,751,262 928,270 13,141,709 3,781,410 1,250,950 501,779 423,269 1,574,600 39,353,249

18,359,193 1,066,954 14,221,002 3,767,750 1,226,198 771,179 342,553 5,947,310 45,702,139

20,716,040 1,294,287 15,772,773 3,744,193 1,496,785 1,557,960 341,889 4,056,205 48,980,132

23,068,811 1,402,245 19,703,729 3,726,143 5,152,152 1,500,000 670,965 4,797,868 60,021,913

22,584,102 1,293,234 19,140,987 3,726,143 4,419,200 1,500,000 450,925 4,015,968 57,130,559

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances   

 

Detailed revenue variance explanations can be found in the General Fund Revenue Detail section. Salary and Benefits - The increase from 2017 projected of $1.6 million reflects a budgeted merit increase of 4 percent, full staffing levels and no new positions. Capital Outlay - The 75 percent or $3.3 million reduction is primarily related to the completion of the Police Department implementation of a records management system in 2017. Capital outlay expenditures are detailed in the individual departmental or fund budgets and in the appendix to the budget document. Economic Development Incentives - The 57 percent or $650,000 reduction is related to the completion of agreements. Other - The 53 percent or $238,440 increase is primarily due to the increase in contingency funds.

Budget Detail

118


General Fund Department Expenditure Summary Elected Officials Town Clerk Municipal Court Town Administrator Elections Finance Sales Tax Legal Services Human Resources Risk Management Community Development Communications General Government Buildings Customer Service Historic Preservation Interdepartmental Debt Service Police Building Inspection Public Works Parks, Forestry and Open Space Public Works Building Parks Building Economic Development Economic Incentives Interfund Transfers Total Expenditures

2014 Actual $

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

110,369 $ 129,525 $ 321,299 314,625 263,563 273,384 552,746 639,304 26,188 38,670 769,072 786,955 318,624 390,548 561,817 494,901 730,647 728,911 254,714 265,222 1,531,769 1,329,655 707,838 693,351 476,947 640,233 111,860 118,794 682 502,150 399,877 3,781,410 3,767,750 12,750,986 12,934,777 1,097,275 1,166,009 8,918,242 9,623,290 2,724,910 2,806,307 122,641 198,275 565,366 565,487 753,555 501,779 771,179 1,574,600 5,947,310 $ 39,353,249 $ 45,702,139 $

2017 Amended Budget

154,118 $ 166,245 $ 241,326 411,742 300,215 339,457 879,212 1,003,250 29,110 26,000 1,031,875 1,270,335 414,148 471,857 597,799 687,043 810,889 865,857 304,653 387,086 1,624,273 2,344,366 801,822 1,026,824 490,320 770,400 135,023 148,543 5,570 3,000 412,658 694,990 3,744,193 3,726,143 15,178,448 19,261,577 1,532,118 1,605,439 10,135,179 13,029,341 3,463,138 3,968,030 182,674 186,000 277,997 479,850 619,209 850,670 1,557,960 1,500,000 4,056,205 4,797,868 48,980,132 $ 60,021,913 $

2017 Projected Actual

157,768 $ 169,189 354,322 402,854 340,112 391,373 964,459 822,291 32,000 1,181,955 1,032,202 475,152 497,667 678,968 724,143 772,957 913,209 387,256 377,323 2,140,222 1,587,531 994,314 1,063,588 769,452 786,020 149,075 158,907 3,000 3,000 449,099 672,805 3,726,143 3,701,875 18,617,084 17,108,643 1,482,999 1,614,956 12,596,022 12,610,823 3,901,940 4,175,260 173,548 190,700 479,324 257,800 819,420 789,865 1,500,000 850,000 4,015,968 3,359,777 57,130,559 $ 54,293,801

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Budget variances are explained in General Fund Expenditure Detail section

Budget Detail

119

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth 11% 6% 10% 10% 5% 8% 12% 7% 6% 10% 1% 11% 13% 9% 45% 8% -1% 8% 10% 9% 11% 7% 9% 14% 21% 8%


Revenue and Expenditure Comparison

Budget Detail

120


GENERAL FUND REVENUE

General Fund 2014 Actual Beginning Fund Balance

$ 23,896,533

2015 Actual

1,451,069 132,680 27,510,421 58,489 59,111 146,500 476,257 500 429,204 1,033,396 1,100 31,298,727

1,448,999 141,852 29,959,630 40,075 251,581 159,652 541,098 1,500 378,416 1,075,865 (177) 33,998,491

Licenses and Permits Business Licenses Liquor Licenses and Permits Peddler and Solicitor Permits Building Permits Building Permits Credit Sign Permits Street Cut Permits Total Licenses and Permits

64,495 25,343 3,960 1,644,823 18,675 76,087 1,833,383

41,459 25,977 4,280 1,594,755 (117,690) 19,345 82,519 1,650,645

11,053 724,402 821,393 125,256 38,000 18,576 152,935 1,047,973 112,842 36,579 1,231,030 4,320,037

26,557 1,125 203,990 214,641 813,069 129,756 19,200 9,616 159,187 1,090,277 112,596 42,551 1,238,675 4,061,239

COP BABS Interest Credit School Marshall Program EMPG Grant Other Police Grants Motor Vehicle Regis Fees Highway User Taxes Cigarette Taxes Severance Taxes Road and Bridge Shareback Funds Total Intergovernmental

Budget Detail

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 25,584,531 $ 23,313,163 $ 21,110,543 $ 21,110,543 $ 15,054,335

Revenue Taxes Real Property Taxes Specific Ownership Taxes Sales Taxes Sales Tax Penalty and Interest Sales Tax Audit Revenue Lodging Tax Franchise Taxes - Cable Franchise Taxes - Fiber Optics Franchise Taxes - Gas Excise Taxes - Electric Interest - Property Taxes Total Taxes

Intergovernmental South Metro Task Force Grant LEAF-DUI Enforcement Grant CDBG Grant 911 Authority Seizure Fund Revenue

2016 Actual

1,706,521 157,314 32,136,000 78,593 95,397 165,796 621,740 500 336,726 1,109,342 9,382 36,417,312

Compound Annual Growth -11%

1,754,000 155,400 34,300,800 40,800 250,000 168,600 571,300 500 367,500 1,178,400 700 38,788,000

1,750,000 185,000 35,100,000 54,000 210,000 161,000 646,000 500 352,000 1,100,000 900 39,559,400

1,975,000 203,500 38,083,500 54,810 216,300 165,830 652,460 500 362,560 1,133,000 900 42,848,360

8% 11% 8% -2% 38% 3% 8% 0% -4% 2% -5% 8%

71,294 25,925 4,520 1,658,483 (2,737) 17,061 53,537 1,828,083

21,150 27,000 4,400 1,656,100 20,100 92,300 1,821,050

51,000 27,700 4,300 2,205,000 15,600 56,500 2,360,100

52,530 28,531 4,373 2,271,150 15,865 57,461 2,429,910

-5% 3% 3% 8%

9,402 14,026 374,000 134,293 796,480 133,611 39,772 6,503 163,588 1,108,248 120,449 19,605 1,416,787 4,336,763

1,010,000 774,248 135,700 168,900 1,134,200 110,400 15,000 1,450,200 4,798,648

11,400 565,000 125,000 774,248 137,800 2,200 170,000 1,150,000 125,000 20,000 1,500,000 4,580,648

11,594 383,000 125,000 751,072 137,800 175,100 1,184,500 128,750 20,400 1,545,000 4,462,216

121

-4% -7% 7%

1% -15% -2% 2%

3% 3% 3% -14% 6% 1%


Charges for Services Court Costs, Fees and Charges Open Records Fees Zoning and Subdivision Fees Service Plan Fees Deficit Reduction Fees Plan Checking Fees Plan Review Credit Rental of Kiosk Signs Sales of Maps and Publications Advertising Commissions Engineering Review Fees Administrative Fees ATM Fees Misc Charges/Fees Liquor Investigations Fee Impound Fees Police Reports Drug Testing Lone Tree Dispatch Services School Resource Officer Lone Tree Crime/Evidence Services Foxfield Court Services PAR Services Police Off-duty Reimbursement C-DOT Signal Operations Event Sponsorship Total Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Court Fines DUI Fines Miscellaneous Fines Total Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Interest Earnings and Invest Interest Earnings - 2009 COPS Contributions Contributions - Explorer/Cadet Contributions - Other Police Contributions - Teen Court Contrib. - Historic Preservation Contrib. - Tree Mitigation Restitution Contributions - K-9 Program Abandonned Property Records Other Miscellaneous Revenue Total Miscellaneous

Budget Detail

82,319 3,452 111,208 22,500 1,023,310 315,559 11,235 397 7,868 132,688 43,685 22 4,527 655 2,050 40,479 10,746 305,326 39,049 47,970 6,460 32,200 4,976 46,800 26,992 2,322,473

79,950 580 74,651 7,750 846,441 354,067 (31,139) 16,800 151 6,116 136,907 74,474 20 17,007 937 1,900 50,720 10,138 414,615 67,862 66,889 4,885 23,000 2,231 46,800 35,698 2,309,447

90,371 1,661 147,336 30,000 827,688 413,152 (1,261) 24,780 359 6,650 133,856 67,279 17 11,943 809 1,300 56,974 6,193 424,636 62,882 64,810 2,398 23,000 1,136 46,800 44,110 2,488,876

152,131 29,713 2,335 184,179

159,887 36,860 2,300 199,047

56,916 4,584 1,500 8,293 80 6,099 -

57,556 6,418 78,406 8,151 40 250 55 6,547 69,941 227,364

76,097 153,569

83,000 117,400 7,500 981,800 373,800 15,000 200 6,500 144,500 78,600 2,200 1,800 52,700 10,000 641,200 47,900 104,000 5,000 21,500 46,800 40,000 2,781,400

84,000 600 125,000 5,000 1,108,000 503,000 8,500 600 8,200 197,000 94,000 10 18,000 850 800 62,000 6,400 470,000 63,000 76,000 4,200 21,500 4,200 46,800 48,000 2,955,660

85,000 500 128,750 5,000 1,100,000 518,090 8,755 250 8,200 202,910 96,820 18,000 800 1,000 63,240 6,592 484,100 63,000 78,280 4,200 1,500 46,800 50,000 2,971,787

1% -38% 4% -31% 2% 13%

180,965 31,552 4,138 216,656

166,000 38,300 204,300

160,000 30,000 7,100 197,100

160,000 30,000 7,313 197,313

1% 0% 33% 2%

98,528 23,639 19,350 589 1,000 40 27,730 (13) 4,329 57 149,525 324,773

330,600 28,400 85,000 444,000

92,000 38,000 5,300 400 45 24,043 255 86,300 246,343

92,920 38,380 10,000 86,000 227,300

13% 70% 61%

122

-6% -11% 1% 11% 22% 41% 5% -16% 12% -12% 12% 13% 13% -10% -26% 0% 17% 6%

3% 10%


Other Financial Sources Insurance Recoveries Sales of General Fixed Assets Total Other Financial Sources Transfers In From Parks and Recreation Fund Total Transfers In Total Revenue Total Funds Available

1,278 1,278

9,439 9,439

64,190 4,960 69,150

-

22,500 22,500

-

927,600 927,600

975,100 975,100

1,095,900 1,095,900

1,152,600 1,152,600

1,152,600 1,152,600

1,253,298 1,253,298

8% 8%

41,041,247

43,430,771

46,777,513

49,989,998

51,074,351

54,390,184

7%

$ 64,937,780

$ 69,015,301

$ 70,090,675

$ 71,100,541

$ 72,184,894

$ 69,444,519

2%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances     

Additional information on major General Fund revenues can be found in the Revenue Manual section of the Budget document. Property Taxes - the $225,000 or 13 percent increase is due to the increased property values and new construction. Sales Taxes - the $3.0 million or 8.5 percent projected increase is due to better than expected sales tax revenue in 2017 resulting in a 2 percent increase in the 2017 projection. 911 Authority - the $182,000 or 65 percent projected decrease is due to the one time reimbursements that occurred in 2017 for the new records management system in the Police Department. Transfers In - the $100,700 or 9 percent increase is due to the increase in parks operations in the General Fund. The Parks and Recreation Fund covers 30 percent of parks operations.

Budget Detail

123


Budget Detail

124


GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES

Budget Detail

125


ELECTED OFFICIALS

ABOUT THE TOWN OF PARKER’S ELECTED OFFICIALS Town Council is the legislative and policy-making body of Town government and represents the citizens of Parker. The Council establishes Town policy through the enactment of ordinances and resolutions, determines the Town’s budget, establishes Town goals, appoints advisory committees and commissions and participates in various county-wide intergovernmental relationships.

Budget Detail

126


Elected Officials

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Elected Officials

$

110,369 $

129,525 $

154,118 $

166,245 $

157,768 $

169,189

11%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Total

87,098

98,191

106,849

101,945

103,068

104,427

5%

5,331

5,440

26,617

36,800

34,900

27,830

51%

36,932

20%

$

110,369 $

17,940

129,525 $

25,894

154,118 $

20,652

166,245 $

27,500

157,768 $

19,800

169,189

11%

$

110,369 $

129,525 $

154,118 $

166,245 $

157,768 $

169,189

11%

Sources of Funding General Fund

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances There are no significant budget variances in the Elected Officials budget from 2017 to 2018.

Budget Detail

127


TOWN CLERK

ABOUT THE TOWN CLERK The Town Clerk is the custodian of all Town legal documents, including the Municipal Code and Home Rule Charter. The Clerk also prepares Council meeting agendas and minutes, administers municipal elections, manages the Town’s record-keeping system, administers liquor licenses, registers voters, handles open records requests, oversees the Special Licensing Authority and issues peddler and solicitor licenses and permits. The Deputy Town Clerk oversees the Administrative Assistant and the Customer Service Division.

Budget Detail

128


Town Clerk

Expenditures by Function Town Clerk Elections Customer Service Total Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total Sources of Funding Liquor Licenses Open Records Fees Peddler and Solicitor Licenses General Fund Total

2014 Actual

$

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

$

321,299 $ 26,188 347,487 $

314,625 $ 38,670 353,295 $

241,326 $ 29,110 270,436 $

411,742 $ 26,000 148,543 586,285 $

354,322 $ 149,075 503,397 $

402,854 32,000 158,907 593,761

176,398 20,203 156,694 353,295 $

130,553 10,448 129,435 270,436 $

356,210 4,950 175,125 50,000 586,285 $

330,622 5,050 147,725 20,000 503,397 $

411,027 4,050 178,684 593,761

21% -27% 6%

$

191,224 14,204 142,059 347,487 $

$

25,343 3,452 3,960 314,732 347,487 $

26,800 580 4,280 321,635 353,295 $

27,700 1,661 4,300 236,776 270,436 $

27,000 4,400 554,885 586,285 $

27,700 600 4,300 470,797 503,397 $

28,531 500 4,373 560,357 593,761

3% -38% 3% 16% 14%

1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 2.6 5.6

1.0 1.0 1.0 2.6 5.6

Authorized FTE positions Town Clerk Deputy Town Clerk Administrative Clerk Customer Service Specialist Total

1.0 1.0 1.0 2.6 5.6

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances   

Customer Service became a part of the Town Clerk’s Office increasing the Town Clerk budget. Increase in the staff training for new members of the Department. Decrease in Capital Outlay due to the electronic packet system being launched.

Budget Detail

Compound Annual Growth

129

6% 5% 14%

14%


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Innovate with Collaborative Governance:  A new electronic packet system for official Town meetings was launched that now provides easier access and adds archived video for those who were unable to attend Town meetings.  Administrative approval of certain liquor license applications was added this year to help speed up applications that previously were required to be approved by the Special Licensing Authority.

2018 GOALS Innovate with Collaborative Governance:  Continue with the implementation of electronic packet system adding an electronic voting feature and a meeting minutes feature.

Budget Detail

130


MUNICIPAL COURT

ABOUT MUNICIPAL COURT The Municipal Court functions include collection of fines, court fees and restitution, as well as conducting trials on these cases as needed. The Court processes all municipal summons issued by the Parker Police Department. The Town also provides court services to the Town of Foxfield and oversees the highly successful Parker Teen Court.

Budget Detail

131


Municipal Court

Expenditures by Function Municipal Court

2014 Actual

$

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Total Sources of Funding Court Cost Fees Foxfield Court Services

$

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

263,563 $

273,384 $

300,215 $

339,457 $

340,112 $

391,373

10%

160,954 11,836

173,331 8,709

173,715 19,716

208,570 13,000

209,240 13,000

237,340 18,600

10% 12%

90,773 263,563 $

91,344 273,384 $

106,784 300,215 $

117,887 339,457 $

117,872 340,112 $

135,433 391,373

11%

82,319 6,460

86,100 4,885

90,371 2,398

83,000 5,000

84,000 4,200

85,000 4,200

1% -10%

174,784 263,563

182,399 273,384

207,446 300,215

251,457 339,457

251,912 340,112

302,173 391,373

15%

Authorized FTE positions Court Administrator Court Clerk

1.0 1.6

1.0 1.6

1.0 1.6

1.0 2.4

1.0 2.4

1.0 2.4

Total

2.6

2.6

2.6

3.4

3.4

3.4

General Fund Total

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Purchased Services – 15 percent increase is due to the purchase of three incremental laptops and the related software licenses.

Budget Detail

132


Municipal Court $450,000 $400,000 $350,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Partnered with other Colorado Municipal Courts using same records management system and provided specific training for employees.  Continued to evaluate connection between Police Records and Court Records Management Systems to possibly reduce the use of paper.  Reviewed Court operations in different jurisdictions to seek out best practices for process improvement purposes.  Sent Customer Service surveys to attorneys that appeared before the Court for constructive feedback on staff and judge.  Explored the use of a modified probation system for the Municipal Court.  Explored the use of video hearings from the Douglas County Jail.

2018 GOALS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Train judge and prosecutors on use of Court Management System to assist in becoming paper on demand operation.  Implement a probation/supervision program for defendants in Municipal Court.  Import police records to Court management system.  Enhance new operations related to new legislation from 2017.  Assist the judge in improving and updating PSA for arraignments.

Budget Detail

133


TOWN ADMINISTRATOR

ABOUT THE TOWN ADMINISTRATOR’S OFFICE The Town Administrator is appointed by the Town Council and serves as the chief administrative officer of the organization. The Town Administrator’s Office is responsible for providing direction on day-to-day operations, overseeing and implementing organizational policies, laws and Town ordinances, providing Town Council support, implementing Town Council and organizational goals, appointing department directors and the development and submission of the annual budget to Town Council.

Budget Detail

134


Town Administrator

Expenditures by Function Town Administrator Customer Service Total

2014 Actual

$

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

552,746 $ 111,860 664,606

639,304 $ 879,212 $ 1,003,250 $ 118,794 135,023 758,098 1,014,235 1,003,250

964,459 $ 964,459

822,291 822,291

10%

630,752 864,500 757,240 16,683 11,315 19,100 110,663 138,420 226,910 758,098 $ 1,014,235 $ 1,003,250 $

731,724 17,425 215,310 964,459 $

691,630 9,710 120,951 822,291

5% 13% 7% 5%

758,098 $ 1,014,236 $ 1,003,250 $

964,459 $

822,291

5%

5%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Total

$

565,381 6,034 93,191 664,606 $

Sources of Funding General Fund

$

664,606 $

Authorized FTE positions Town Administrator

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

Deputy Town Administrator Assistant Town Administrator Administrative Manager Assistant to the Town Administrator Executive Assistant Customer Service Specialist Total

1.0 1.0 2.6 5.6

1.0 1.0 1.0 2.6 6.6

1.0 1.0 1.0 2.6 6.6

1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

 

The $65,610 decrease in full-time salaries and wages is primarily due to the elimination of the Assistant Town Administrator position. The FTE count remains the same as 2017 due to the addition of an Executive Assistant position still resulting in a net reduction in salary and benefits. The $105,959 decrease in Purchased Services is due primarily to a one-time expenditure of $100,000 in 2017 for a Facility Master Plan. The $9,390 reduction in supplies is due to decreases in travel, mileage reimbursement and training as a result of eliminating the Assistant Town Administrator position. Also contributing to the decrease was an adjustment down in certain lines items to reflect actual historical spending.

Budget Detail

135


Town Administrator $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 2017 2017 2018 Actual Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Foster Community Engagement and Creativity  Based upon input from the citizen survey, established a new avenue of Town-wide communications to connect with residents by procuring an online community engagement technology system. Once implemented, the system will provide citizens with the ability to provide input on projects and initiatives at their convenience. It will also provide an online tool for the community to discuss issues through a well -managed and authorized space.  Instituted a Homeowner’s Association Roundtable with Town Council and staff to share information and enhance community relations.  Initiated and hosted an off-site meeting with the Town of Castle Rock elected officials and executive leadership to enhance the partnership and discuss issues of mutual concern.  Continued the 2017 Parker Civic Academy over ten weeks, with twenty-eight citizens participating. The goal of the program is to encourage participation in local issues and to improve the understanding and awareness of how local government works.

Budget Detail

136


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  With assistance from a consultant, established a performance evaluation system and criteria for the Town Administrator and Town Attorney.  Restructured the Town Administrator’s Office resulting in a reduction in salary and benefit expenditures as well as an increase in capacity to perform more strategic and centralized projects and initiatives.  Participated in the Douglas County Open Data initiative and contributed to the Ask Douglas County Alexa Skill pilot project, leveraging new technology to better serve and inform citizens.  Worked in collaboration with the Facilities Management Division and other Departments to complete a competitive solicitation to select a consultant to develop a Facility Master Plan including a Space Needs Analysis and Staffing Assessment. The plan, analysis and assessment will provide evidence-based information to make decisions on future Town facility reconfiguration to accommodate service delivery in future years.  Served on the Douglas County Access to Care initiative in partnership with the Parker Adventist Hospital, Castle Rock Adventist Hospital and neighboring municipal jurisdictions to provide input and recommendations on the requirement for non-profit hospitals to conduct a Community Needs Assessment once every three years. The purpose of the assessment is to gauge the health needs of the communities and develop strategies for implementation plans for addressing them.

2018 GOALS Foster Community Engagement and Creativity  Complete the online community engagement system implementation with at least two pilot projects and develop a framework to provide guidance on the most effective uses of the tool.  Initiate and host off-site meetings between the Parker Town Council and other partners, such as Parker Chamber of Commerce, Parker Water and Sanitation District to enhance the relationship and discuss items of mutual interest. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Conduct the next steps in the strategic planning process to include prioritizing projects and initiatives that are aligned with the strategic vision and mission and operationalizing the strategic plan.  Collaborate with the Finance Department on the next phase of the Priority Based Budgeting system to include analyzing the initial data, adjusting programs accordingly and using the tool for decision-making for the 2019 budget process.  Develop an in-kind contribution policy that is aligned with the true costs of community event sponsorship and with benchmark municipalities, and will provide guidance in evaluation of requests for fair and equitable funding.  Develop a Town Council Policy Manual to assist the elected officials and staff in their respective roles and capacities.  Conduct an employee engagement survey to quantify the Town culture and establish a baseline for determining the success of future employee engagement initiatives.

Budget Detail

137


FINANCE

ABOUT FINANCE The Finance Department is responsible for development of the annual budget, long-range financial plans, assisting Town leadership with policy decisions that may impact Town finances and developing and implementing policies and procedures that serve to protect all Town assets. Other department responsibilities include accounting, financial reporting, sales tax administration, debt management, cash management, central purchasing and payroll.

Budget Detail

138


Finance

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Finance Sales Tax Total

769,072 786,955 1,031,875 1,270,335 1,181,955 1,032,202 318,624 390,548 414,148 471,857 475,152 497,667 $ 1,087,696 $ 1,177,503 $ 1,446,023 $ 1,742,192 $ 1,657,107 $ 1,529,869

8% 12% 9%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total

842,836 907,854 1,009,930 1,124,100 1,117,920 1,141,485 17,698 32,260 21,945 10,225 13,620 11,600 227,162 227,192 383,837 428,367 340,567 376,784 10,197 30,311 179,500 185,000 $ 1,087,696 $ 1,177,503 $ 1,446,023 $ 1,742,192 $ 1,657,107 $ 1,529,869

8% -10% 13%

Sources of Funding Administrative Fees Business Licenses Sales Tax Audit General Fund Total

2,362 4,134 5,413 32,000 32,000 20,000 64,495 67,300 71,294 21,150 51,000 52,530 117,600 291,657 173,990 290,800 264,000 271,110 903,239 814,412 1,195,326 1,398,242 1,310,107 1,186,229 $ 1,087,696 $ 1,177,503 $ 1,446,023 $ 1,742,192 $ 1,657,107 $ 1,529,869

71% -5% 23% 7% 9%

Authorized FTE positions Finance Director Accounting Manager Sales Tax Administrator Procurement Officer Accountant Accounting/Sales Tax Technician Sales Tax Auditor Total

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 2.0 11.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 3.0 12.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.3 3.0 12.3

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.3 3.0 12.3

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.3 3.0 12.3

9%

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.3 3.0 12.3

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Purchased Services—11 percent increase is due to increases in contractual services and training costs for new employees. Capital Outlay—the reduction of $185,000 is related to the implementation of the new Kronos payroll software.

Budget Detail

139


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Completed Caselle Connect software upgrade.  Received GFOA Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for 2016 Comprehensive Annual Finance Report.  Received the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the 2017 Budget.  Completed the compliance testing for the Association of Public Treasurers of the United States and Canada Cash Handling Certification. This included the writing, release and introduction of the cash handling procedures for all departments.  Created the Priority Based Budgeting programs and corresponding financial data.  Continued to emphasize teamwork utilizing lessons learned from synergy exercises completed in 2016  Participated in identifying revisions to the Operations Manual and improved the guidance provided on financial activities.  Began the restructuring of the budget document. Enhance Economic Vitality  Improved processing of sales tax returns with 92% being submitted electronically, held 4 sales tax educational seminars and conducted 49 sales and 37 construction use tax audits with $347,858 of additional sales/use tax revenue collected.  Actively participated with the Colorado Municipal League (CML) on the Standard Definitions project for sales tax.  Drafted Municipal Code sales tax changes to make the Code consistent with CML Standard Definitions  Completed 2017/2018 business license renewals for 3,988 accounts and processed 519 new business license requests.  Increased automation of cash receipts and accounts receivable handling. Budget Detail

140


2018 GOALS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Implement new purchasing card program.  Implement budgeting module within Caselle Connect.  Receive GFOA Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for 2017 Comprehensive Annual Finance Report.  Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the 2018 Budget.  Achieve the Association of Public Treasurers of the United States and Canada Cash Handling Certification  Roll out the Priority Based Budgeting tools to departments.  Implement a scoring tool to prioritize capital projects, similar to the process used in Priority Based Budgeting for expenditures.  Implement new Kronos payroll solution.  Implement new requisition/purchase order processing solution.  Implement new document management solution.  Implement electronic workflow for accounts payable.  Continue to build a high performance team.  Create educational opportunities for Town staff on specific financial topics such as grant management, timekeeping and cash handling.  Develop an overall purchasing seminar to educate all new and existing employees regarding purchasing guidelines and laws.  Implement a set of finance department performance measures. Enhance Economic Vitality  Work with the business community to develop a better understanding of the sales tax ordinances through educational seminars and audit guidance.  Continue emphasis on increasing the number of online sales tax and business license payments, returns and license requests.  Implement online payments for those accounts receivable and miscellaneous payments that are not currently accepting online payments .  Participate in the impact fee analysis study and identify other ways in which revenue may be enhanced.  Reinstitute the Financial Trend Monitoring System.

Budget Detail

141


TOWN ATTORNEY

ABOUT THE TOWN ATTORNEY The Town Attorney is legal advisor and counsel for the Mayor and Town Council. The Town Attorney is also legal advisor to any Town department or department head relating to his/her official duties.

Budget Detail

142


Town Attorney

Expenditures by Function Town Attorney

2014 Actual

$

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

561,817 $

494,901 $

597,799 $

687,043 $

678,968 $

724,143

7%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies

308,919 11,455

311,340 16,187

339,972 15,511

455,423 15,950

380,440 16,815

440,328 17,075

9% 10%

Purchased Services Total

241,443 561,817 $

167,374 494,901 $

242,316 597,799 $

215,670 687,043 $

281,713 678,968 $

266,740 724,143

3% 7%

22,500 539,317

7,500 487,401

30,000 567,799

7,500 679,543

5,000 673,968

5,000 719,143

-31% 7%

561,817 $

494,901 $

597,799 $

687,043 $

678,968 $

724,143

7%

Town Attorney Legal Administrator Legal Assistant

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

Total

2.0

2.0

2.0

3.0

3.0

3.0

$

Sources of Funding Service Plan Fees General Fund Total

$

Authorized FTE positions

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

All expenditure category increases are due to the full year costs associated with the addition of one authorized FTE position in the legal department during 2017.

Budget Detail

143


Town Attorney $800,000 $700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Acted as legal advisor concerning significant development issues, including the annexation of residential and commercial projects.  Acted as legal advisor in preparing ordinances and codifying Town ordinances.  Acted as legal advisor for Town contracts, including the annexation agreements, as well as several intergovernmental agreements with Douglas County, Douglas County Libraries, Parker Water and Sanitation District, and several metropolitan districts.  Responsible for prosecution of Town Code violations.  Assisted in updating the Town Personnel Manual, Operations Manual, Police Department Policy and Procedure Manual, and Police Department Standard Operating Procedure Manuals.  Acted as legal counsel in defending/prosecuting litigation involving the Town.

2018 GOALS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  The Town Attorney will prepare or review all ordinances, resolutions, contracts and other written instruments.  Prosecute ordinance violations.  Represent the Town in court and other legally constituted tribunals in which the Town is a party.  Advise Council of all matters of law and changes or development in law.  Act as legal advisor for election(s).

Budget Detail

144


HUMAN RESOURCES

ABOUT HUMAN RESOURCES The Human Resources Department manages a variety of services including employee compensation and benefits administration; recruitment, hiring and new employee orientation processes; employee relations, training and development of staff; personnel policy development and interpretation; and personnel records tracking and retention. The Human Resources Department also oversees risk management.

Budget Detail

145


Human Resources

Expenditures by Function Human Resources

2014 Actual

$

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

810,889 $

865,857 $

2017 Projected Actual

772,957 $

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

730,647 $

728,911 $

913,209

6%

Risk Management Total

254,714 985,361

265,222 994,133

304,653 1,115,542

387,086 1,252,943

387,256 1,160,213

377,323 1,290,532

10% 7%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies

642,748 20,766

607,177 22,734

665,293 22,869

723,770 23,820

690,470 23,050

774,247 25,320

5% 5%

Purchased Services Total

$

321,847 985,361 $

364,222 427,380 505,353 446,693 490,965 994,133 $ 1,115,542 $ 1,252,943 $ 1,160,213 $ 1,290,532

11% 7%

Sources of Funding General Fund

$

985,361 $

994,133 $ 1,115,542 $ 1,252,943 $ 1,160,213 $ 1,290,532

7%

Authorized FTE positions Human Resources Director Human Resources Analyst Human Resources Technician Organization Development

1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 2.0 2.0

Manager Risk Manager Total

1.0 1.0 7.0

1.0 1.0 7.0

1.0 1.0 7.0

1.0 1.0 7.0

1.0 1.0 7.0

1.0 1.0 7.0

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Purchased Services – The 3% reduction is related to a reduction in insurance deductibles related to the Town’s liability insurance. The reduction is based on historical amounts.

Budget Detail

146


Human Resources $1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000

$0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 Amended Projected Budget Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Risk Management Innovate with Collabor ative Gover nance  Selected new health care provider for Worker’s Compensation to increase service expectations of organization.  Offered First Aid/CPR/AED training to Public Works, PACE and Parks personnel.  Increased ADA awareness / addressing of issues throughout community.

Human Resources Innovate with Collabor ative Gover nance  Improved leave tracking and wellness expenditures.  Transitioned to new employee retirement funds, new online platform and negotiated for lower cost dental carrier.  Increased voluntary Biometrics Screening participation by over 33% from 2016 to 2017.  Conducted 58 full time recruitments which is an increase of 9% over 2016.  Conducted 37 part time / seasonal recruitments which resulted in 222 part time / seasonal employees hired.  Improved background screening process time by changing criminal background / drug screen providers.  Conducted part time hiring managers meetings to provide ongoing training and feedback around the part time hiring process.  Provided townwide prevention training.  Continued to work on and improve new performance evaluation system.

2018 GOALS Risk Management Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Expand First Aid/CPR/AED training townwide.  Increase risk related training on a variety of topics to various departments / facilities. Budget Detail

147


Human Resources Innovate with Collabor ative Gover nance  Update HR procedural manuals for Benefits & Wellness, HR Technician and Recruitment.  Audit current wellness program and expand and grow program for full- and part-time employees.  Implement HRIS system.  Improve efficiencies within part time hiring to reduce turnover.

Budget Detail

148


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ABOUT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT The Community Development Department is responsible for the orderly growth, development and economic health of the Town of Parker in accordance with the community’s vision for the future. The Department consists of Comprehensive Planning, Development Review, Building, and Economic Development Divisions. The Comprehensive Planning and Development Review Divisions implement the Master Plan and other long-term plans. They process development applications, review sign permits and provide staff support to the Planning Commission. The Building Division administers the building code to ensure safe and sound construction. They provide inspection services and partner with agencies to promote fire and life safety. Economic Development seeks to promote economic activity, broaden the tax base and increase primary employment in the Town.

Budget Detail

149


Community Development

Expenditures by Function Community Development Building Inspection Economic Development Historic Preservation Total Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 1,531,769 $ 1,329,655 $ 1,624,273 $ 2,344,366 $ 2,140,222 $ 1,587,531 1,097,275 1,166,009 1,532,118 1,605,439 1,482,999 1,614,956 565,487 753,555 619,209 850,670 819,420 789,865 682 5,570 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,195,213 3,249,219 3,781,170 4,803,475 4,445,641 3,995,352

2,146,924 33,920 750,080 231,406

2,168,766 49,011 906,985 82,001

2,459,076 42,928 1,217,008 32,816

2,697,104 54,850 1,941,521 30,000

2,521,520 50,650 1,778,471 30,000

Compound Annual Growth

1% 10% 9% 45% 6%

2,785,100 46,340 1,098,912 -

7% 8% 10%

Other Total

32,883 42,456 29,342 80,000 65,000 65,000 $ 3,195,213 $ 3,249,219 $ 3,781,170 $ 4,803,475 $ 4,445,641 $ 3,995,352

19% 6%

Sources of Funding Building Permits Sign Permits Zoning and Subdivision Fees Plan Checking Fees Rental of Kiosk Signs Parker Authority for Reinvestment General Fund Total

1,644,823 1,477,065 1,655,747 1,656,100 2,205,000 2,271,150 18,675 19,345 17,061 20,100 15,600 15,865 111,208 74,651 147,336 117,400 125,000 128,750 315,559 322,927 411,891 373,800 503,000 518,090 11,235 16,800 24,780 15,000 8,500 8,755 32,200 23,000 23,000 21,500 21,500 1,061,513 1,315,431 1,501,356 2,599,575 1,567,041 1,052,742 $ 3,195,213 $ 3,249,219 $ 3,781,170 $ 4,803,475 $ 4,445,641 $ 3,995,352

8% -4% 4% 13% -6% 0% 6%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Purchased Services – Decrease is due to the completion of several major projects and reduction in the number and scope of new projects in 2018.

Budget Detail

150


Authorized FTE positions Building/Electrical Inspector Business Development Officer

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.0

4.0 1.0

Business Recruitment Manager Chief Building Official Code Enforcement Officer Commercial Plans Examiner

1.0 1.0 2.0 -

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0

Community Development Director Comprehensive Planning Manager Deputy Chief Building Official Deputy Community Development Director Development Review Manager

1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 -

1.0 1.0 1.0 -

1.0 1.0 1.0 -

1.0 1.0 1.0 -

Economic Development Coordinator Executive Assistant Fire/Life Safety Inspector Neighborhood Services Manager

1.0 2.0 1.0

1.0 2.0 1.0

1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 2.0 2.0 -

1.0 2.0 2.0 -

1.0 2.0 2.0 -

Permit Technician Planner and Associate Planner Planning Manager Planning Technician

2.5 3.0 -

2.0 4.0 1.0

2.0 5.8 1.0 1.0

2.0 5.8 1.0 1.0

2.0 5.8 1.0 1.0

2.0 5.8 1.0 1.0

2.0 1.0 2.0 26.5

1.0 1.0 1.0 28.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 29.8

1.0 1.0 1.0 28.8

1.0 1.0 1.0 28.8

1.0 1.0 1.0 28.8

Plans Examiner Senior Inspector Senior Planner Total

Community Development $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000

$3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000

$0 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

151

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Community Development Support an Active Community  Partnered with Parks, Recreation and Open Space Department to develop a Parks, Open Space and Recreation Master Plan.  Partnered with Town Departments on the design and construction of Sulphur Gulch Trail/Pikes Peak Drive Crossing improvements.  Through the development review process, preserved a 19.1 acre community park to be dedicated and constructed with the Trails at Crowfoot development. Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Developed an interactive web-site for Parker Road Corridor Plan.  Created public participation methods to generate engagement for Development Design Standards update  Partnered with University of Colorado Denver and the Cottonwood neighborhood on creation of a neighborhood organization.  Created the Development Tour Map to improve customer service access to applications and projects under construction. Enhance Economic Vitality  Adoption of a Preliminary Site Plan process that will allow non-residential development to gauge demand, obtain funding, and respond to market cycles without requiring 100% design and engineering.  Adoption of Land Development Ordinance amendment to simplify timelines/schedules.  Initiated improvements to the Pre-Application meeting process to inform future applicants of process and development requirements. Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Completed Phase 1 of the Way-Finding Signage Project and initiated Phase 2 for directional, gateway and trail signage for the Town outside of downtown.  Building Division has achieved 100% certification for all staff members through the International Code Council. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Adoption of the Downtown Parking Study and Plan in response to concerns about downtown parking.  Development of a Cut Sheet in TRAKiT to improve access to public information on applications.  Successful completion of licensing all elevators into the TRAKiT system. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Initiated a comprehensive revision to the Commercial, Industrial and Multi-Family Residential Design Standards and Land Development Ordinance.  Coordinated with PAR on the strategic implementation process to develop and dispose of remaining Townowned property.

Economic Development Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Participated in the Parker Road Corridor Study as the Town looks to shape the future of this corridor. Land use, zoning, development/redevelopment strategies, activation and implementation are all part of this effort.  Participated as a stakeholder in the update of Commercial, Industrial and Multi-Family design standards that developers must follow as they look to build in Parker.

Budget Detail

152


Enhance Economic Vitality  Assisted ET Investments with relocation of their headquarters from Aurora to Parker. Will bring 75 new jobs to Parker and ultimately employ 150 individuals.  Assisted Architectural Concepts (an existing Parker employer) with expansion of their existing facility that will more than double the production capacity.  Assisted BrightView Landscaping in the consolidation of their Front Range facilities into the Parker location following the acquisition of a major national competitor.  A strategic program, Business Retention and Expansion visits was implemented in 2017. The program exceeded its initial goals and in doing so garnered information about the economic health of businesses that employ approximately one third of Parker’s employees.  Staff assisted 18 small businesses with grants, provided scholarships for 11 organizations/individuals and technical/training information to dozens of organizations throughout the year.  Conducted departmental organizational assessment as the precursor to a formal strategic planning effort in 2018.

2018 GOALS Community Development Support an Active Community  Update the Open Space, Trails, and Greenways Master Plan.  Partner on the design and construction of Harvie Open Space improvements.  Update the Land Development Ordinance regarding parks dedication and design requirements. Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Update Zoning Map online to be interactive for residents and prospective businesses to understand zoning information that guides development or improvements to land.  Develop a Community Outreach and Engagement Policy in partnership with the Communications Department to identify opportunities to engage the public on a variety of issues.  Utilize online engagement tool and software to increase communication with the general public. Enhance Economic Vitality  Evaluate expedited plan review for non-complex residential projects and a special tenant improvement program for commercial projects in the Building Division.  Evaluate the Tax and Fee Assistance Program in support of economic growth. Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Initiate a Complete Streets Policy to identify recommendations and opportunities to support multi-modal access and mobility for Town residents and visitors.  Cross train building inspectors in all disciplines and initiate additional planning inspections during construction.  Complete Phase 2 of the Wayfinding Sign Program. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Implement an analytics database that creates reports, graphs, and dashboards based on the Department’s performance aligned with the Town’s Strategic Plan.  Implement OTC permitting for small residential projects and special conditional commercial projects. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Initiate the Strategic Transit Plan to evaluate current and proposed transit services and connections to future RidgeGate Light Rail Stations.  Complete the Parker Road Corridor Plan which will provide a long-term vision for the Corridor, address mobility issues, and promote future growth and development.  Complete Phase 1 recommendations such as Parking Ratios for the Greater Downtown Districts, and Shared Parking Opportunities with private property owners for the Downtown Parking Study/Plan. Budget Detail

153


 

Begin the Land Development Ordinance modernization process. Complete the Design Standards update and implement the new standards through the development review process.

Economic Development Enhance Economic Vitality  Implement new targeted marketing initiatives aimed specifically at relocating small growing companies from the west coast and mid-western markets.  Complete the strategic planning effort for the Economic Development department and begin implementation of recommendations from the study.  Continue regional involvement in positioning the Metro Denver region and the Town of Parker as a premier location for business relocation and growth.  Continue participation in national and regional retail marketing conferences (International Conference of Shopping Centers).  Provide ongoing educational opportunities to existing town businesses, prospective town businesses, community stakeholders, and the general public to enhance understanding of Town ordinances.

Budget Detail

154


COMMUNICATIONS

ABOUT COMMUNICATIONS The Communications Department works to enhance communication between the Town and Parker residents, the media and other interested parties. Town-wide public relations are handled by the department, including promoting the Parker community, responding to media inquiries and providing awareness of and opportunities for citizen involvement in the Town’s decision-making processes. The department also oversees marketing efforts for the Town’s Recreation Department and serves as the Public Information Office for the Town.

Budget Detail

155


Communications

Expenditures by Function Communications

2014 Actual

$

Sources of Funding Event Sponsorship General Fund Total Authorized FTE positions Communications Director Communications Coordinator Special Events and Marketing Supervisor Social Media Coordinator Recreation and Community Marketing Coordinator Total

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

693,351 $

801,822 $ 1,026,824 $

994,314 $ 1,063,588

11%

290,100 2,136

299,543 9,092

310,472 4,890

374,510 6,000

404,190 6,700

9% 33%

$

415,602 707,838 $

384,716 693,351 $

486,460 628,254 801,822 $ 1,026,824 $

613,804 652,698 994,314 $ 1,063,588

12% 11%

$

26,992 680,846 707,838 $

35,698 657,653 693,351 $

44,110 40,000 757,712 986,824 801,822 $ 1,026,824 $

48,000 50,000 946,314 1,013,588 994,314 $ 1,063,588

17% 10% 11%

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0 -

1.0 -

1.0 -

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

0.5 3.5

0.5 3.5

3.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

707,838 $

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Total

2015 Actual

392,370 6,200

Purchased Services – The 6 percent increase is due to the inclusion of costs associated with employee recognition and events in the Communications budget. Previously the costs were allocated in other departments. Therefore this is not a net increase in the General Fund.

Budget Detail

156


Communications $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000

$600,000 $400,000 $200,000

$0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 Amended Projected Budget Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Support an Active Community  Grew Parks and Recreation Instagram followers by 174% through fun and innovative marketing campaigns.  Redesigned the Recreation Activity Brochure.  Created a Parker Parks and Recreation Department Marketing Plan in accordance with The Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA). Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Distributed the 2017 Citizen Survey and publicized results to the community.  Began live streaming Town Council, Planning Commission and Parker Authority for Reinvestment public meetings.  Designed and printed a local government activity book for elementary school aged students.  Held four “Connect with Council” meet and greet opportunities in association with community events in summer 2017.  Hired dedicated Digital Marketing Coordinator to build social media engagement and followers  Created a Town social media plan and strategic initiatives, resulting in a significant increase in social media reach, engagement and followers.  Grew Town Instagram followers by 283% through innovative and community-building campaigns. Enhance Economic Vitality  Produced a series of Visit Parker videos to showcase on social media and the Town website.  Rolled out a 2017 Visitor’s Campaign, including social media, digital and print advertising components, as well as a printed Town of Parker Visitor’s Guide.  Created the first annual Hometown Holiday Weekend to highlight Downtown Parker to our community and their holiday guests, including the Mayor’s Holiday Lighting; Holiday Carriage Rides with increased ridership of 42% over 2016; and activation of Discovery Park with walk-around entertainment, holiday carriage rides at that location, and ice skating.

Budget Detail

157


Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Exceeded the budgeted sponsorship revenue of $40,000 by 30%, which helps to offset the cost of Townplanned events.  Increased Parks and Recreation Run Series sponsorship revenue by 70% over prior year.  Rolled out a new “Meet Our Staff” feature on social media to allow our community to virtually “meet” the staff who work to provide Town services.  Doubled the available parking at the Parker Stars and Stripes Celebration on July 4, which allowed more guests to enjoy this great event.

2018 GOALS Support an Active Community  Grow Parks and Recreation Facebook followers by 10 percent by increasing engagement and reach, posting to relevant groups/pages and using post boosts.  Grow Parks and Recreation Twitter followers by 10 percent by posting more frequently, following other users and retweeting pertinent information.  Grow Parks and Recreation Instagram followers to 1,000 by posting more frequently, using/promoting relevant hashtags and following other users.  Run Facebook ad campaigns to boost registration/attendance at specific events or activities.  Create and begin implementing a Parker Parks and Recreation Department email marketing strategy, which incorporates all of our available email resources. Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Complete a redesign of the Town of Parker website, the Parker Parks and Recreation website, and the Employee Intranet.  Complete a marketing and rollout plan for the Town’s new online engagement tool.  Distribute an RFP for Town marketing/branding contract and select new firm to represent Parker.  Complete and debut the new State of the Town video. Enhance Economic Vitality  Design and implement a new and unique 2018 Parker Visitor’s Campaign.  Continue to enhance the Hometown Holiday Weekend and associated festivities.  Market Parker through Visit Parker videos produced in 2017 and produce two additional videos showcasing the Parker community. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Achieve $50,000 in revenue sponsorship.  Host a Town Services Fair to engage the community to learn about Town services, programs and activities.  Enhance parking capacity and ease of use at the Parker Stars and Stripes Celebration.

Budget Detail

158


INTERDEPARTMENTAL

ABOUT THE INTERDEPARTMENTAL BUDGET The Interdepartmental budget accounts for expenditures that benefit multiple departments or ones that are not specifically assigned to a Town department. Town contributions to various community organizations that serve Parker residents are included in the Interdepartmental budget. It also includes debt service for the Certificates of Participation issued for the new Police station and PACE Center and contingency funds for unforeseen expenditures.

Budget Detail

159


Interdepartmental

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Interdepartmental

$ 4,283,560 $ 4,167,627 $ 4,156,851 $ 4,421,133 $ 4,175,242 $ 4,374,680

1%

Expenditures by Category Supplies

51,219

49,071

26,721

46,900

27,400

42,840

-4%

Purchased Services

90,631

84,866

99,612

100,125

73,734

67,025

-7%

3,781,410 360,300

3,767,750 265,940

3,744,193 286,325

3,726,143 547,965

3,726,143 347,965

3,701,875 562,940

-1% 12%

$ 4,283,560 $ 4,167,627 $ 4,156,851 $ 4,421,133 $ 4,175,242 $ 4,374,680

1%

Debt Service Other Total Sources of Funding COP BABS Credit Contributions

821,393 1,500

General Fund Total

794,771 -

774,248 5,300

774,248 -

774,248 5,300

751,072 10,000

-2% 61%

3,460,667 3,372,856 3,377,303 3,646,885 3,395,694 3,613,608 $ 4,283,560 $ 4,167,627 $ 4,156,851 $ 4,421,133 $ 4,175,242 $ 4,374,680

1% 1%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

The $33,000 reduction in the purchased services category from 2017 to 2018 is due to transferring the employee recognition expenditures to Communications. It is not a true variance, but a transfer to improve operational efficiency.

Interdepartmental $4,450,000 $4,400,000 $4,350,000 $4,300,000 $4,250,000 $4,200,000 $4,150,000

$4,100,000 $4,050,000

$4,000,000 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

160

2017 2017 Amended Projected Budget Actual

2018 Adopted Budget


POLICE ABOUT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT The Police Department provides year-round, 24-hour service to citizens of the Town of Parker and adheres to the highest standards of ethical behavior. The Department's primary objective is to provide a safe community environment with the highest level of service possible. The organization is committed to safeguarding the community that makes Parker a great place to live, work and play. Public safety services the Police Department provides are patrol, investigations, community policing, 911 communications, community services, emergency management, property and evidence, public safety education, crime scene investigation, records and victim services. The Police Department also handles 911 communications, crime scene investigation, crime analysis and property and evidence services for the City of Lone Tree. Victim services are accounted for in its own fund.

Budget Detail

161


Police

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Administration Investigations Patrol Records Communication Police Station Property and Evidence Emergency Management Neighborhood Services Total

$ 2,650,306 $ 2,982,907 $ 3,458,146 $ 4,086,315 $ 3,992,415 $ 4,139,857 1,666,766 1,592,304 1,661,926 1,412,220 1,556,157 1,658,800 5,284,718 5,587,519 6,706,476 6,580,090 6,895,600 7,066,180 543,972 585,150 682,590 2,736,313 2,487,586 748,492 1,865,494 1,396,840 1,770,445 2,533,312 2,135,612 1,897,118 507,999 536,976 662,098 880,900 904,494 612,080 410,141 367,000 531,029 132,861 77,279 90,721 264,780 39,850 83,650 98,870 175,802 146,046 357,506 238,370 371,437 12,750,986 12,934,777 15,178,448 19,261,577 18,617,084 17,108,643

-11% 39% 8%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Other Total

8,809,481 9,067,653 10,218,545 305,596 334,953 559,022 2,793,855 2,978,487 3,690,558 821,965 532,642 688,210 20,089 21,042 22,113 $ 12,750,986 $ 12,934,777 $ 15,178,448 $

11,240,288 11,893,100 620,384 549,680 4,165,952 4,150,963 2,567,500 491,000 22,960 23,900 18,617,084 $ 17,108,643

8% 16% 10% -12% 4% 8%

Sources of Funding Charges for Services Grants City of Lone Tree Douglas County School District General Fund Total

58,251 64,988 65,602 64,500 73,400 72,332 67,629 270,014 194,593 138,600 136,594 353,296 481,504 489,446 745,200 546,000 562,380 164,305 197,618 196,493 183,600 200,800 200,800 12,107,505 11,920,653 14,232,315 18,268,277 17,658,284 16,136,537 $ 12,750,986 $ 12,934,777 $ 15,178,448 $ 19,261,577 $ 18,617,084 $ 17,108,643

6% 19% 12% 5% 7% 8%

11,150,079 616,050 4,254,496 3,217,952 23,000 19,261,577 $

12% 0% 8% 8% 0% 5%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances Investigations 

Increase of 17.5 % (+$246,580) from 2017 to 2018 due to the following:  Adding tools for enhanced child forensic interviewing.  Advanced training for investigators to include a child forensic interviewing class.  Enhancements to cell-phone forensic investigation equipment.

Patrol 

Increase of 7.4% (+$486,090) from 2017 to 2018 due to the following:  Enhance our capabilities in traffic accident reconstruction through computer analysis of vehicle crash data recorders.  Upgrades to tactical and personal protective equipment for police officers to include gasmasks, thermal units, rifle plate carriers and tactical safety eyewear.  Adding more vehicle-mounted radar units to the patrol cars.  Maintaining the Body Worn Camera Program.  Maintaining two (2) K-9 units.  Enhancing training for staff and maintaining certifications.

Budget Detail

162


Records 

Decrease of 72.6% (-$1,987,821) from 2017 to 2018 due to the money for the new Records Management System being allotted in the 2017 budget. The 2018 budget is back in-line with years previous to 2017 for operational expenses.

Communications (Dispatch) 

Decrease of 25.1% (-$636,194) from 2017 to 2018 due to the money for the new 911 Management System being allotted in the 2017 budget. The 2018 budget is back in-line with years previous to 2017 for operational expenses.

Police Station 

Decrease of 30.5% (-$268,820) from 2017 to 2018 due to putting off maintenance that was scheduled for 2018 until sometime after 2019. This maintenance includes: Access control and security systems, Preventative maintenance for HVAC, Cooling system for data center, Gates, Parking Lot Striping, Bulbs & Ballasts, Plumbing, Paint, Replacement of concrete sections in parking lot.

Property and Evidence 

Increase of 29.5% (+$120,888) from 2017 to 2018 due to the following:  Additional supplies to enhance lab capabilities.  Increased staffing in this Section.  Accounting for the separation of the Property and Evidence Section from the Investigations Division to more accurately track the cost of operations.

Emergency Management 

Decrease of 68.4% (-$181,130) from 2017 to 2018 due to a cut-back in 2018 on funding, advanced education, development and table-top exercises.

Budget Detail

163


Authorized FTE positions Police Chief Deputy Chief Commander Captain Lieutenant Sergeant

1.0 2.0 3.0 10.0

1.0 2.0 4.0 10.0

1.0 1.0 6.0 10.0

1.0 1.0 6.0 10.0

1.0 1.0 6.0 10.0

1.0 1.0 6.0 10.0

Police Officer/Detective Public Relations Coordinator Community Outreach Coordinator Communications Supervisor Communications Technician/Lead Records Supervisor Records Clerk Report Technician Administrative Technician Crime Analyst

49.0 2.0 13.0 1.0 2.0 4.2 5.0 1.0

51.0 1.0 2.0 15.0 1.0 3.0 4.2 5.0 1.0

54.0 1.0 2.0 17.0 1.0 3.0 2.8 5.0 1.0

54.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 18.0 1.0 3.0 3.2 5.0 1.0

54.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 18.0 1.0 3.0 3.2 5.0 1.0

54.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 18.0 1.0 3.0 3.2 5.0 1.0

Crime Scene Investigator Manager Crime Scene Investigator Property and Evidence Technician Animal Welfare Officer Neighborhood Services Manager Neighborhood Services Officer Operations Service Technician Subtotal Overhire Police Officer Grand Total FTE

1.0 2.0 1.8 0.8 98.8 98.8

1.0 2.0 2.0 0.8 106.0 106.0

1.0 2.0 2.0 0.8 110.6 4.0 114.6

1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 0.8 116.0 4.0 120.0

1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 0.8 116.0 4.0 120.0

1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 0.8 116.0 4.0 120.0

Police $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 $0 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

164

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Support an Active Community  Continued to support and enhance public safety and encouragement of the trail systems by providing bicycle officer patrol and Mounted Patrol on trails and in neighborhoods.  Provided programs such as the Special Olympics cops vs. kids softball game and other activities at events. Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Expanded the K-9 program to two (2) dogs for drug interdiction and community outreach.  Launched the Town of Parker Apartment Managers working group.  Recruited and hired a Community Outreach Coordinator to enhance community engagement activities.  MyPD mobile application to enhance connections with the community and add a way for citizens to engage in two-way public safety information sharing and crime prevention.  Continued to participate in community outreach activities such as Citizen’s Academy, Coffee with a Cop, Cram the Cruiser Food Drive, COPS Fighting Cancer At Children’s Hospital, Special Olympics Colorado events and Shop with a Cop.  136 different members of the community have had the opportunity to ride-along with Parker Officers to gain exposure to law enforcement. Enhance Economic Vitality  Continued to enhance our loss mitigation and business education programs to establish Parker as a safe and prudent location to operate a business.  Participated in the Priority Based Budgeting process to enhance our capabilities for analyzing our programs and funding.  Continued participation in the ICAC Grant.  Continued participation in the LEAF Grant for both Parker and Lone Tree. Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Launched the In-House Clinician program to provide enhanced services to those with mental illness in the community.  Provided emergency management training opportunities to staff to include tabletop exercises. Innovative with Collaborative Governance  Continued to maximize and enhance the use of mass public notification systems through social media (NextDoor, Twitter, Facebook, MyPD App, CODERED System) and all media outlets.  Received Re-Accreditation from IAPE (International Association of Property and Evidence) for excellence in property and evidence management.  Presented at the national IACP (International Association of Chiefs of Police) conference for our approach to collaborative community engagement strategies. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Purchased a new Records Management and Field Reporting System (RMS/FBR) that will meet the needs of the department for many years. The new software will increase efficiency through automation and the elimination of duplicative effort. Next steps include design and implementation (2018).  Implemented a new 911 phone system. The previous system was approximately eight years old and was noncompliant with Next Generation 911 capabilities. The new system brings capabilities such as enhanced Text to 911, video and audio transfer. This project was funded through the Douglas County Emergency Telephone Service Authority.  Transitioned the Support Services Division from Community Development to the Police Department.  Combined Neighborhood Services with Animal Services for the Police Department.

Budget Detail

165


2018 GOALS Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Continue to maximize community outreach through comprehensive communication strategies, engaging 2way communication, PSA’s, recruitment video and social media conversations.  Launch a Parker Public Safety Youth Council.  Launch a Citizen’s Academy Alumni Advisory Board. Enhance Economic Vitality  Expand crime prevention programs more vigorously into HOA’s.  Continue Multi-Family management crime prevention through the Town of Parker Apartment Managers working group. Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Provide emergency management training opportunities to staff and the public to include tabletop exercises.  Enhance our capabilities in traffic accident reconstruction through computer analysis of vehicle crash data recorders.  Upgrades to tactical and personal protective equipment for police officers to include; gasmasks, thermal units, rifle plate carriers and tactical safety eyewear.  Add more vehicle-mounted radar units to the patrol cars. Innovative with Collaborative Governance  Launch an enhancement to our mobile application that will provide enhanced engagement and transparency beyond the current mobile application vendor.  Leverage our position as a flagship law enforcement organization to promote progressive changes in the industry. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Finalize contract negotiations and plan for implementation of new RMS system.  Provide in house cell phone downloads for patrol and investigations so citizens can get their phones back more quickly.  Outfit patrol vehicles with a streamlined mobile video solution that reduces staff research time and on-site storage considerations.

Budget Detail

166


ENGINEERING/PUBLIC WORKS ABOUT ENGINEERING/PUBLIC WORKS The Engineering/Public Works Department is responsible for the installation, maintenance and repair of Town streets, traffic signals, traffic signs, sidewalks, curb and gutter, development engineering, inspection and review services, stormwater management, traffic management, snow plowing and street sweeping. Capital improvement projects, including new construction or replacement of roads, bridges, trails and Town facilities, are managed by Public Works. The department also performs fleet maintenance for Town vehicles and provides custodial and maintenance services for Town facilities. Stormwater management is accounted for in its own enterprise fund. Fleet services and facility services are accounted for in internal service funds and the cost for these services is allocated back to the appropriate departments.

Budget Detail

167


Public Works

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Administration/Engineering Streets Traffic Services Public Works Buildings General Government Buildings Total

$ 1,226,269 $ 1,261,580 $ 1,401,400 $ 1,509,739 $ 1,416,460 $ 1,551,023 6,465,660 7,191,677 7,381,413 9,539,704 9,209,774 9,115,997 1,226,313 1,170,033 1,352,366 1,979,898 1,969,788 1,943,803 198,275 688,007 460,671 665,850 652,872 448,500 476,947 640,233 490,320 770,400 769,452 786,020 9,593,464 10,951,530 11,086,170 14,465,591 14,018,346 13,845,343

6% 9% 12% 23% 13% 10%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total

2,227,214 2,410,175 2,694,629 402,837 434,832 472,416 6,809,025 7,604,250 7,329,609 154,388 502,273 589,516 $ 9,593,464 $ 10,951,530 $ 11,086,170 $

9% 2% 9% 35% 10%

Sources of Funding Street Cut Permits Highway Users Tax Fund Road and Bridge Property Tax Shareback C-DOT Signal Operations Engineer Review Fees Bus Shelter Advertising Fees General Fund Total

76,087 1,047,973

82,519 1,090,277

53,537 1,108,248

3,092,710 476,100 9,339,881 1,556,900 14,465,591 $

92,300 1,134,200

2,905,010 3,180,474 394,840 436,600 9,219,596 9,715,749 1,498,900 512,520 14,018,346 $ 13,845,343

56,500 1,150,000

57,461 1,184,500

-7% 3%

1,231,030 1,238,675 1,416,787 1,450,200 1,500,000 1,545,000 46,800 46,800 46,800 46,800 46,800 46,800 132,688 136,907 133,856 144,500 197,000 202,910 7,868 6,116 6,650 6,500 8,200 8,200 7,051,019 8,350,236 8,320,292 11,591,091 11,059,846 10,800,473 $ 9,593,464 $ 10,951,530 $ 11,086,170 $ 14,465,591 $ 14,018,346 $ 13,845,343

6% 11% 1% 11% 10%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Streets - The decline from $9.5 million to $9.1 million is related to a reduced requirement for new machinery and equipment in 2018. Public Works Buildings - The decline of $217,000 is related to the completion of work on the Motsenbocker Building in 2017.

Budget Detail

168


Authorized FTE positions Engineering & Public Works Director Executive Assistant

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

0.8 1.0

0.6 1.0

0.6 1.0

0.6 1.0

Administrative Assistant Capital Improvement & Construction Manager Project Manager Associate Project Manager

1.5

1.1

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

Senior Develeopment Review Engineer Development Review Engineer Engineering Inspection Supervisor Engineering Technician

1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

Fleet/Facilities Manager Streets Manager Streets Associate Project Manager

0.2 -

0.2 1.0 -

1.0 -

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

1.0 1.0

Streets Supervisor Streets Crew Leader Streets Maintenance Worker III Streets Maintenance Worker I/II

1.0 2.0 6.0 6.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 10.0

1.0 2.0 2.0 12.0

2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0

2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0

2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0

Traffic Engineer Traffic Engineering Tech Traffic Signal Technician I/II Traffic Signal Technician III

1.0 1.0 2.0 -

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0

30.7

32.3

34.8

34.6

34.6

34.6

Total

Public Works $16,000,000 $14,000,000 $12,000,000 $10,000,000 $8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000 $0 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

169

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Engineering Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Reviewed and inspected the infrastructure associated with approximately 90 site plans and 50 subdivisions.  Began review on 13 Final Plats representing the first development on the Hess Ranch property. This included the design of new segments of Bayou Gulch Road/Chambers Road and North Pinery Parkway.  Administered and inspected over 200 right-of-way permits for work within public right-of-way.  Reviewed and inspected the following improvements to public roadways:  Cottonwood Drive extension east of Chambers Road  Cottonwood Drive widening east of Parker Road  Chambers Road auxiliary lanes north of Chambers Road  Twenty Mile Road widening south of Lincoln Meadows Parkway  Lincoln Avenue improvements east of Parker Road  Newlin Gulch Boulevard extension north of Mainstreet  Stroh Road expansion east of Parker Road  Parker Road widening north and south of Stroh Road

Streets Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Enhance Economic Vitality  Streets contactors performed preventative maintenance surfacing on 128 lane miles of Town roadways.  Town contractors milled and resurfaced 43,529 square yards of streets.  Town crews repaired 552 potholes.  Streets installed 26 tons of hot crack sealant through October.  Town Street sweepers collected and disposed of 1,004 tons of debris along Town roadways.  Streets processed about 170 customer service requests.  During the winter of 2016/2017, Streets plows cleared snow over 26,631 miles of roads, applying more than 721 tons of solid deicer and more than 36,696 gallons of liquid deicer; over about 17 storm events.  A new Town snow removal policy was approved by Town Council. This was the first update since 1993 and lowered the threshold for plowing local streets from 10-inches to 6-inches of accumulation.

Traffic Enhance Economic Vitality  Collected new traffic counts for map of traffic volumes used by the business community. Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Performed in excess of 7,000 underground utility locate tickets for contractors and homeowners.  Ongoing operation and maintenance of 87 traffic signals, 44 school flashers, and thousands of street signs.  Established new intersection analysis protocol for identifying traffic accident trends.  Completed deployment of new product for keeping LED faces clear of snow during blowing snow events. eleven signals along Parker Road have new equipment with noticeably better visibility under wet snow/ blowing snow head packed conditions.

Budget Detail

170


Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Expanded deployment travel time monitoring test bed. Links between 8 traffic signals are operational.  Worked with the Douglas County School District on updates to circulation and other site issues at Gold Rush Elementary School, Iron Horse Elementary School, and Parker Performing Arts Academy.  Completed installation of new fiber optic cable route along Jordan Road to support redundant IT communication links. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Completed signal timing modifications throughout Parker to better serve traffic. AM peak timings have been revised town wide as of December 2017.  Worked on Downtown Safety and Circulation Study. Study identified both short and long term options for better operations through the Downtown area.

2018 GOALS Streets Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Install 50 tons of crack seal and mastic material to prevent moisture from penetrating Town pavement roadbases.  Prepare and solicit competitive bids for the additional removal and replacement of approximately 1,500 cubic yards of concrete curb/gutter/sidewalk/ramps across Town. Continue effective management of the Town’s roadways through ongoing competitively bid preventative maintenance, resurfacing and reconstruction where needed to extend useful life. Target resurfacing/ reconstructing of approximately 850,000 square yards of Town roadways in 2018.  Clean 10,000 miles of streets and remove 800 cubic yards of street debris. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Complete installation of upgraded fiber optic network. Activate links along with IT staff/contractors. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Continue commitment to quality infrastructure through development review, specifically through review, coordination, and inspection of major developments in the Anthology/Hess Ranch area.

Traffic Support an Active Community Foster Community Creativity and Engagement Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  LED upgrades of roadway luminaires on Parker Square Drive and trail lighting as appropriate.  Develop guidelines for expanded pedestrian flasher use beyond Downtown area.  Complete field deployment of new traffic signal monitoring system to be compatible with current technology.  Establish new sign replacement program to keep sign retroreflectivity within appropriate limits.  Expand use of heated LED faces to Jordan Road, Chambers Road, and 20-Mile Road. Innovative Governing in a Collaborative Community  Work on upgraded fiber optic network. Activate additional redundant links. Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Take concept level for Downtown circulation into design phase. Work towards a lasting solution to traffic congestion and safety concerns through downtown Parker.

Budget Detail

171


Engineering Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Finalize and adopt revisions to the Roadway Design Criteria and Construction Manual – key revisions include a requirement for new Town roads to utilize a composite roadway section.  Analyze Grading Permit and Right-of-Way Permit procedures and requirements to better apply to current conditions.  Participate in the revision of the Land Development Ordinance.

Budget Detail

172


PARKS, FORESTRY AND OPEN SPACE

ABOUT PARKS AND FORESTRY/OPEN SPACE The Parks and Forestry/Open Space division of the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Department maintains the Town’s parks, open spaces, trails and Town-owned trees. The division also prepares parks and trails for sports activities, special events and a variety of community activities; provides citizen outreach and education with tree, lawn and horticulture care; and assists in the development and design of new park and open space areas.

Budget Detail

173


Parks, Forestry and Open Space

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Parks Forestry and Open Space Total

$ 2,302,086 $ 2,386,186 $ 3,008,234 $ 3,298,400 $ 3,291,890 $ 3,540,640 422,824 420,121 454,904 669,630 610,050 634,620 2,724,910 2,806,307 3,463,138 3,968,030 3,901,940 4,175,260

11% 11% 11%

Expenditures by Category Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Other Total

1,478,383 1,508,013 1,742,506 2,009,290 1,979,290 2,083,890 45,238 67,779 59,889 78,300 70,100 133,600 1,148,101 1,118,315 1,500,702 1,742,640 1,719,750 1,851,270 43,191 99,085 155,932 117,800 117,800 91,500 9,997 13,115 4,109 20,000 15,000 15,000 $ 2,724,910 $ 2,806,307 $ 3,463,138 $ 3,968,030 $ 3,901,940 $ 4,175,260

9% 31% 13% 21% 11% 11%

Sources of Funding Parks and Recreation Fund General Fund Total

927,600 975,100 1,095,900 1,152,600 1,152,600 1,253,298 1,797,310 1,831,207 2,367,238 2,815,430 2,749,340 2,921,962 $ 2,724,910 $ 2,806,307 $ 3,463,138 $ 3,968,030 $ 3,901,940 $ 4,175,260

8% 13% 11%

Authorized FTE positions Parks and Recreation Director Customer Service Specialist Parks and Open Space Manager Parks Supervisor Parks Crew Leader Parks Technician III Parks Technician I/II Forestry/Open Space Supervisor Forestry/Open Space Crew Leader Open Space Technician III Open Space Technician II Total

0.4 0.5 1.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 21.9

0.4 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 22.4

0.4 0.5 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 23.9

0.4 0.8 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 25.2

0.4 0.8 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 25.2

0.4 0.8 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 11.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 25.2

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Supplies - The $55,000 increase is related to the purchase of additional park benches and trash cans. Purchased Services - The $109,000 increase is driven by higher repair and maintenance cost projections.

Budget Detail

174


Parks, Forestry, and Open Space $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000

$1,000,000 $500,000

$0 2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 Amended Projected Budget Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

2017 ACHIEVEMENTS Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Completion and maintenance acceptance of the Chambers medians landscaping.  Mass plant replacements at Auburn Hills Park, PACE, Parker Road medians, West Hess medians, and East Lincoln medians.  Phase I completion of the Sulphur Gulch trail crossing at Pikes Peak Ave. to include trail realignment and addition of trail amenities.  Redesign of the Old Town Hall parking lot landscaping. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Completion of fully automated, online playground safety inspection system via Noratek’s CityReporter.  Utilization of TRACKiT for real-time open space mowing and weed management data.  Centralized irrigation system updates allowing for all Town properties to communicate with our master computerized system and be controlled from any location remotely.  Renovation of Keiffer’s wall at O’Brien Park.  Creation of Discovery Park Emergency Management Plan, Hazard Response Plan, and SOP’s and Evacuation plans.  Creation and implementation of residential snow removal plan.  Completion of Sulphur Gulch trail crossing at Pikes Peak to include landscape and irrigation improvements.  Renovation of park tables and benches throughout the parks system.

2018 GOALS Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Watering to ET (evapotransporation) on-site per weather station data.

Budget Detail

175


Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Renovations to the interior of Keiffer’s tunnel at O’Brien Park.  Renovations to the Salisbury equestrian arenas .  Complete ADA Transition Plan and park wayfinding sign installation and institute efforts toward ongoing goal of near-100% compliance in all Town outdoor recreational areas.  Determine a platform and implement a formal Parks capital inventory system for more accurate documentation of park, trail, and open space assets to include location, age, and value.

Budget Detail

176


ECONOMIC INCENTIVES AND INTERFUND TRANSFERS ABOUT ECONOMIC INCENTIVES AND INTERFUND TRANSFERS The Town has entered into various economic incentive agreements that involve sharing a percentage of sales tax generated by new retail businesses. The agreements are subject to a maximum amount and a maximum period (typically 10 years), whichever comes first. They are also subject to appropriation. Most of the agreements are subject to a negotiated base amount, which is put in place to protect existing revenues.

Budget Detail

177


Economic Incentives and Interfund Transfers

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Function Economic Incentives

$

501,779 $

771,179 $ 1,557,960 $ 1,500,000 $ 1,500,000 $

850,000

14%

2,602,483

25%

Transfers to‌ Cultural Fund

1,050,000

1,500,000

1,800,000

Public Improvements Fund

315,000

191,370

1,500,000

Debt Service Fund

209,600

755,940

756,205

755,068

755,068

757,294

38%

2,076,379

3,218,489

5,614,165

6,297,868

5,515,968

4,209,777

19%

501,779

771,179

1,557,960

1,500,000

1,500,000

850,000

14%

1,574,600

2,447,310

4,056,205

4,797,868

4,015,968

3,359,777

21%

$ 2,076,379 $ 3,218,489 $ 5,614,165 $ 6,297,868 $ 5,515,968 $ 4,209,777

19%

Total

4,042,800 -

3,260,900 -

-

Sources of Funding Sales Tax General Fund Total

Economic Incentives $1,800,000 $1,600,000 $1,400,000 $1,200,000

$1,000,000 $800,000

$600,000 $400,000

$200,000 $0

2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

178

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget


Interfund Transfers $7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

179

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Actual Budget


Budget Detail

180


SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS SUMMARY

Budget Detail

181


Special Revenue Funds Summary

Beginning Fund Balances

$

Revenues Taxes Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Other Financing Sources Transfers In Total Revenues

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

12,363,886 $

15,021,020 $

18,511,930 $

11,468,262 $

11,468,262 $

11,955,010

-1%

6,114,232 646,284 6,110,256 80,849 427,778 7,000,000 2,774,200 23,153,599

6,532,037 3,714,636 6,442,917 81,797 249,988 9,880,000 14,595,978 41,497,353

6,986,847 1,220,831 7,710,199 92,703 706,754 4,216,900 20,934,234

7,326,310 1,583,700 7,191,195 70,000 209,446 7,623,400 24,004,051

7,652,800 1,615,757 7,927,441 80,000 1,034,935 7,623,400 25,934,333

8,203,000 2,751,500 8,101,180 80,000 264,950 5,586,383 24,987,013

8% 44% 7% 0% -11%

4,372,720

4,808,281

5,745,056

6,392,816

6,391,366

7,061,882

13%

552,351

671,843

715,222

816,878

806,714

879,572

12%

4,032,722

14,506,217

5,339,928

5,797,103

5,772,065

6,096,711

11%

19% 2%

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services

7,960,804

9,640,545

11,485,191

8,294,493

6,276,540

4,882,525

-12%

74,752 3,503,116 20,496,465

89,420 8,290,137 38,006,443

89,437 4,603,068 27,977,902

101,000 6,099,900 27,502,190

101,000 6,099,900 25,447,585

73,000 5,423,698 24,417,388

12%

$

15,021,020 $

18,511,930 $

11,468,262 $

7,970,123 $

11,955,010 $

12,524,635

-4%

$

393,757 $

402,164 $

475,771 $

416,300 $

415,800 $

400,200

0%

Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Transfers Out Total Expenditures Ending Fund Balances

-1% 4%

Revenue by Fund Conservation Trust Parks and Recreation

13,452,193

30,363,999

8,165,798

8,493,256

9,532,536

10,553,000

-6%

Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural

129,668 3,643,412

135,078 4,302,604

141,797 5,442,401

119,800 7,215,895

127,150 7,276,587

124,050 5,811,163

-1% 12%

Recreation

5,528,555

6,262,017

6,696,353

7,748,900

8,568,260

8,083,600

10%

6,014 23,153,599

31,491 41,497,353

12,114 20,934,234

9,900 24,004,051

14,000 25,934,333

15,000 24,987,013

26% 2%

11,607,434

3,750,000 23,773,609

600,000 14,589,143

475,000 10,958,121

475,000 8,850,793

375,000 9,236,205

-6%

127,971

283,975

129,197

139,160

127,640

145,390

3%

3,252,888 5,508,172

4,144,170 6,054,689

5,614,047 7,045,515

7,973,275 7,956,634

7,900,746 8,093,406

5,911,048 8,749,745

16% 12%

24,417,388

4%

Capital Renewal and Replacement Total Revenues Expenditures by Fund Conservation Trust Parks and Recreation Law Enforcement Assistance Cultural Recreation Total Expenditures

Budget Detail

$

20,496,465 $

38,006,443 $

27,977,902 $

182

27,502,190 $

25,447,585 $


Budget Detail

183


CONSERVATION TRUST FUND

ABOUT CONSERVATION TRUST This fund accounts for lottery funds from the State of Colorado, based on a formula tied to population. These funds are restricted and can only be used for parks, recreation and open space purposes. When Council identifies a particular use, the funds are appropriated as a transfer to the fund in which they will be used.

Budget Detail

184


Conservation Trust Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Budget

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures Transfer to Parks & Rec Fund

-

3,750,000

600,000

475,000

475,000

375,000

401,810

475,660

415,700

415,700

400,000

Revenue Intergovernmental State Conservation Trust Fund Miscellaneous

392,734

Interest Earnings Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp

1,023

354

111

600

100

200

393,757

402,164

475,771

416,300

415,800

400,200

0%

276,797 (124,229)

152,568 (58,700)

152,568 (59,200)

93,368 25,200

-59% -50%

118,568

-57%

3,230,876 393,757

Ending Fund Balance

0%

3,624,633 (3,347,836)

$ 3,624,633 $

276,797 $

152,568 $

93,868 $

93,368 $

-34%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Transfer to Parks & Rec Fund— $100,000 or 21 percent decrease is due to the amount of available Conversation Trust funds for 2018 versus what was available for 2017.

Conservation Trust $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000

$2,500,000 $2,000,000

Expenditures

$1,500,000

Revenue

$1,000,000 $500,000 $0 2014 Actual

Budget Detail

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 2017 2018 Amended Projected Adopted Budget Budget Budget

185


PARKS AND RECREATION FUND

ABOUT PARKS AND RECREATION The Parks and Recreation Fund is primarily supported by the Town’s 0.5 percent sales and use tax which are to be used for parks, trails, open space and recreation purposes. Major activities that are funded through this revenue stream include planning, design and construction of parks, trails and recreation facilities. Other uses include land acquisition, repayment of debt issued and special studies and analysis related to the overall operation, functionality and implementation of park and recreational facilities.

Budget Detail

186


Parks and Recreation Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Transfer to‌ General Fund Recreation Fund Mainstreet Center Fund Public Improvements Fund Recreation Debt Service Fund Total Expenditures

$

197,192 $

193,887 $

271,550 $

340,446 $

340,446 $

4,961

2,903

4,359

5,100

3,500

5,100

1%

92,565

10,006,124

205,781

291,100

193,325

229,350

25%

7,734,848

8,941,138

10,014,948

4,663,075

2,655,122

3,530,500

-18%

74,752

89,420

89,437

101,000

101,000

73,000

-1%

927,600

975,100

1,095,900

1,152,600

1,152,600

1,253,298

8%

1,066,500

1,855,500

1,228,900

2,820,100

2,820,100

2,208,900

20%

147,700 -

-

94,748

-

-

349,557

15%

-

1,361,316

1,709,537

1,583,520

1,584,700

1,584,700

1,586,500

4%

11,607,434

23,773,609

14,589,143

10,958,121

8,850,793

9,236,205

-6%

5,502,274

5,991,926

6,427,621

6,860,200

7,020,000

7,616,700

8%

11,724 11,822

8,015 50,316

15,729 19,079

8,200 50,000

10,800 42,000

11,000 43,300

-2% 38%

Revenue Taxes Sales Taxes Sales Tax Penalty and Interest Sales Tax Audit Revenue Use Taxes Total Taxes Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Rent Contributions Other Intergovernmental Transfers In Other Financing Sources Total Miscellaneous Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance Authorized FTE positions Parks and Recreation Director

588,412

481,780

524,418

407,910

580,000

532,000

-2%

6,114,232

6,532,037

6,986,847

7,326,310

7,652,800

8,203,000

8%

19,818 16,146

38,672 23,202

71,963 30,227

58,300 16,146

58,300 16,146

60,000 15,000

32% -2%

301,865

24,390

421,505

-

711,521

-

132 -

698 2,900,000

256 55,000

550,000

1,269 550,000

1,900,000

10,965,000

600,000

542,500

542,500

375,000

7,000,000 7,337,961

-

9,880,000 23,831,962

1,178,951

1,166,946

1,879,736

2,350,000

-25%

13,452,193

30,363,999

8,165,798

8,493,256

9,532,536

10,553,000

-6%

5,167,481

7,012,240

13,602,630

7,179,285

7,179,285

7,861,028

11%

1,844,759 6,590,390 (6,423,345) (2,464,865) 681,743 1,316,795 $ 7,012,240 $ 13,602,630 $ 7,179,285 $ 4,714,420 $ 7,861,028 $ 9,177,823

-8% 7%

-

0.35

0.35

0.35

0.35

0.35

0.35

0.25 1.00

0.25 1.00

0.25 1.00

0.50 1.00

0.50 1.00

0.50 1.00

-

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

-

0.33

0.33

0.33

0.33

2.93

3.18

3.18

3.18

Recreation/Community Marketing Coordinator Project Administrator Special Project Analyst Accounting Technician Total

Budget Detail

1.60

1.60

187


Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Capital Outlay—The 2018 Budget is $1.1 million less than the 2017 Amended Budget due to the completion of Discover Park and USMC CPL David M Sonka Park and Westcreek Disc Golf Course.

2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Support an Active Community  Completed Discovery Park summer seasonal improvements (spray pad).  Completed construction of the memorial Dog Park & Disc Golf course, including the project identification signage.  Finalized the transfer of the Harvie Open Space property from the County to the Town. Completed the PW&SD inclusion process (96 water credits), finalized an amendment to the conservation easement, over saw the completion of the Conceptual Design including all public outreach efforts. Douglas Land Conservancy approval was received on 12/13/17. Continued coordination with Douglas County regarding use of our “share-back” funds for this project.  Completed negotiations and approval by Town Council of the 30-year land lease to construct the Parker Tennis Indoor Tennis Facility.  Completed the final two phases of the East/West Regional Trail.  Provided technical support as-needed for the preparation of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Budget Detail

188


      

  

Secured an additional 25 acres of open space for the Town as part of the Reata West development application negotiations. Secured $213,000 in-lieu park fee contributions as part of negotiations and design of the on-site park improvements for the Depot at West Creek project. Secured approximately $80,000 as a developer contribution for the East/West Regional Trail just west of Motsenbocker Road. Completed the design and engineering of the Auburn Hills north/south trail connection. Completed the design and construction of the Sulphur Gulch Trail crossing of Pikes Peak Drive. Completed the design and engineering of the Salisbury Sports & Equestrian Park east/west internal trail connection. Continued to organize and coordinate major planning efforts related to the design, funding and construction of the E-470 Regional Trail including working with the Partners Group that includes, Arapahoe and Douglas Counties, and the City of Aurora. Completed the initial SOW with Stanley Consultants regarding the future bridge design. Participated with Douglas County staff and Town staff to review and complete the annual Conservation Easement Monitoring programs for the Norton Farms and 17-Mile House properties. Secured various easements and HOA approvals for a number of community spur trail connections throughout the Town. Participated (ongoing) and coordinated with other staff regarding the Recreation Departments Accreditation process through the Commission for Accreditation of Park & Recreation Agencies (CAPRA).

2018 GOALS Support an Active Community Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth  Secure and coordinate the various planning entitlements on the Harvie property including annexation, zoning, minor development plat, and Master Plan Site Plan for the entire 72 acre site.  Continue to coordinate various planning efforts, including community outreach efforts, regarding design, engineering and construction of the E-470 Regional Trail.  Begin preliminary planning, phasing and development assessment for Salisbury Park North build-out  Initiate the design and engineering of the Bar CCC parking lot improvements including lights for the parking lot  Complete the construction of the Auburn Hills north/south trail connection.  Complete the construction of the Salisbury east/west trail connection.  Continue to participate as-needed on the Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreation Authority regarding implementation of the R-H Reservoir Master Plan.

Budget Detail

189


LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE FUND

ABOUT LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE This fund accounts for crisis intervention, Police training and equipment and victim services and support. The Victim Services Program is an integral part of the Parker Police Department and assists victims of crime and surviving families in cases of death, domestic violence, sexual assault and other crimes. Emotional support is provided, as well as information regarding available long-term support services.

Budget Detail

190


Law Enforcement Assistance Fund

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total Expenditures

2014 Actual

$

99,591 $ 1,938 10,560 15,882 127,971

2015 Actual

106,977 $ 2,965 11,489 162,544 283,975

2016 Actual

118,407 $ 1,663 7,284 1,843 129,197

2017 Amended Budget

118,910 $ 3,200 17,050 139,160

2017 Projected Actual

118,910 $ 2,050 6,680 127,640

Revenue Intergovernmental V.A.L.E. Grants Charges for Services Lone Tree Victim Services Fines and Forfeitures Court Surcharges Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

232,429 1,697 234,126 $

234,126 (148,897) 85,229 $

85,229 12,600 97,829 $

97,829 (19,360) 78,469 $

97,829 (490) 97,339 $

1.00 0.50 1.50

1.00 0.50 1.50

1.00 0.50 1.50

1.00 0.50 1.50

1.00 0.50 1.50

Authorized FTE positions Victim Witness Coordinator Victim Advocate Total

$

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

132,490 2,500 10,400 145,390

7% 7% 0% 3%

44,200

48,800

45,432

45,000

42,500

40,000

-2%

3,444

3,089

2,114

4,100

2,000

2,000

-13%

80,849

81,797

92,703

70,000

80,000

80,000

0%

1,175 129,668

1,392 135,078

1,548 141,797

700 119,800

2,650 127,150

2,050 124,050

15% -1%

97,339 (21,340) 75,999

-20% -25%

1.00 0.50 1.50

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Purchased Services – The 40% reduction in expenditures is related to a reduction in the expected level of travel, training and education and more closely mirrors historical expenditures.

Budget Detail

191


Budget Detail

192


CULTURAL FUND

ABOUT CULTURAL The mission of the Cultural Department, also known as Parker Arts, is to enhance the cultural and economic vitality of the greater Parker region by providing access to quality arts, culture, history, and science programs and to provide unique community gathering spaces.

Budget Detail

193


Cultural Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Interfund Transfer Total Expenditures

$ 1,090,015 $ 1,290,439 $ 1,533,392 $ 1,742,820 $ 1,685,790 $ 1,859,707 97,594 184,190 172,616 186,420 186,420 179,497

14% 16%

1,918,239

2,350,542

2,641,773

2,954,365

2,938,866

2,828,819

10%

147,040 -

318,999 -

1,266,266 -

3,022,170 67,500

3,022,170 67,500

1,043,025 -

63%

3,252,888

4,144,170

5,614,047

7,973,275

7,900,746

5,911,048

16%

194,350

346,176

634,739

553,000

597,557

391,500

19%

Revenue Intergovernmental Grants Charges for Services Commission Income

186

100

74

50

70

50

-28%

Concession Income Ticket Handling Fee

97,243 125,525

116,466 113,563

173,579 148,700

109,180 172,570

179,360 144,067

197,500 140,000

19% 3%

Tickets Revenue

860,361

1,058,631

1,213,716

1,274,365

1,246,745

1,121,000

7%

12,391 4,060

21,376 8,155

26,062 10,600

12,360 4,375

27,000 5,150

27,810 -

22%

Merchandise Sales Advertising Revenue Less: Patron Credit Taken Art Sales Rental Income Catering Fee Production Fee Class Registrations Fundraising Event Total Charges for Services Miscellaneous Interest Earnings

(931)

-

-

-

-

-

2,138 312,166

6,433 336,334

29,349 301,120

2,500 272,510

2,575 194,729

25,770 307,000

86% 0%

9,006

8,196

12,566

10,300

10,300

10,600

4%

245,115

390,709

362,806

412,385

412,385

424,750

15%

1,667,260

2,059,963

2,278,572

10,000

10,000

10,000

2,280,595

2,232,381

2,264,480

8% 28%

3,766

3,852

7,486

5,100

10,000

10,000

Contributions

64,150

141,377

132,132

115,200

120,849

141,500

22%

Other Miscellaneous Revenue Total Miscellaneous

6,186 74,102

1,236 146,465

1,472 141,090

1,200 121,500

55,000 185,849

1,200 152,700

-34% 20%

1,050,000 147,700

1,500,000 -

1,800,000 -

4,042,800 -

3,260,900 -

2,602,483 -

25%

Transfer In From General Fund From Parks and Recreation Fund From Excise Tax Fund Total Transfers In Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

Budget Detail

510,000

250,000

588,000

218,000

999,900

400,000

-6%

1,707,700 3,643,412

1,750,000 4,302,604

2,388,000 5,442,401

4,260,800 7,215,895

4,260,800 7,276,587

3,002,483 5,811,163

15% 12%

619,936 390,524

1,010,460 158,434

1,168,894 (171,646)

$ 1,010,460 $ 1,168,894 $

997,248 $

194

997,248 (757,380) 239,868 $

997,248 (624,159) 373,089 $

373,089 (99,885)

-12%

273,204

-28%


Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Personal Services – up 10 percent from 2017 Projected due to reopening of the Schoolhouse and increase in the cost of health insurance. Capital Outlay – down 65 percent due to completion of rehabilitation and renovation of Schoolhouse classrooms, theater and lobby.

Cultural Fund

Authorized FTE positions Cultural Director Education Manager Education Assistant Development Manager Assistant Cultural Director for Communications and External Relations Assistant Marketing Coordinator Outreach Specialist Asst. Cultural Director for Programs Facilities Coordinator Audio Technician Production Assistant Box Office Manager Food & Beverage Coordinator Entertainment Lighting Technician Accounting Technician Asst. Cultural Director For Operations Schoolhouse Facility Specialist Administration Specialist Graphic Design Stagehand III Stage Technician Membership Specialist Total

Budget Detail

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 0.80 1.00

1.00 1.00 0.80 1.00

1.00 1.00 0.80 1.00

1.00 1.00 0.80 1.00

1.00 1.00 0.80 1.00

1.00 -

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.80

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.80

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.33 1.00 0.80 0.80

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.33 1.00 0.80 0.80

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.33 1.00 0.80 0.80

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.33 1.00 0.80 0.80

0.80 12.10

0.80 15.90

0.80 0.80 18.33

0.80 0.80 1.00 1.00 20.33

0.80 0.80 1.00 1.00 20.33

0.80 0.80 1.00 1.00 20.33

195


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Presented 30 national touring shows including 11 popular music performances and 10 educational shows.  Partnered with local arts groups to present 135 community arts performances, including 53 musical theater shows and 8 Family Discovery shows.  Grew Family Circle memberships 17% through renewals and new members.  Launched Otocast, a new app that allows the public to find, view and learn about Parker’s Public Art program.  Presented our most successful Parker Honey Festival yet, with almost 2,000 visitors, vendors and bee experts. Enhance Economic Vitality  Completed the rehabilitation of the historic Schoolhouse which enhances Mainstreet and improves downtown Parker’s reputation as a visitor destination.  Added new permanent public artwork downtown, including the larger than life “Jacks” and the whimsical bike rack “Maneater” in Discovery Park.  Hosted shopping events including the Sip N Shop holiday bazaar for the Chamber of Commerce and the Parker Panache Fashion Show.  Launched a regular weekend update for downtown restaurants that provides attendance projections to help them plan for staffing, and provided information about downtown shopping and dining options in our weekly patron enews.

Budget Detail

196


Support an Active Community  Delivered 449 unique cultural enrichment classes and camps to 3,360 youth and adults.  Presented 11 free family-oriented summer concerts at Discovery Park to over 13,000 people.  Expanded our offerings for senior citizens to include price-reduced daytime matinees and classes in theater, dance, art and cooking.

2018 GOALS Foster Community Creativity and Engagement  Provide rental opportunities for 10 community arts groups in the renovated Schoolhouse Theater.  Increase student participation in the second annual Portfolio Day by 5 new schools.  Increase the number of households with Family Circle memberships by at least 10%, and add 4 new Business Members. Enhance Economic Vitality  Begin Schoolhouse plaza and parking lot renovation project with the objective of making this area a more welcoming and engaging space for the community in the heart of downtown.  Help facilitate a successful merger between the Downtown Business Alliance and the Creative District so that their combined efforts continue to raise downtown Parker’s visibility as a destination for arts and culture.  Foster at least three new collaborations between Parker Arts and local Parker businesses. Support an Active Community  Grow participation in senior programming by 10%.  Enhance special needs offerings by adding up to 2 more sensory friendly shows.

Budget Detail

197


RECREATION FUND

ABOUT RECREATION The Recreation Fund includes the administrative functions for all recreation and park design/ development activities. In addition, the Recreation Fund includes facility operations for the Parker Recreation Center, the Parker Fieldhouse and H2O’Brien Pool, as well as programming for adult and youth sports, aquatics, fitness, special interest, senior citizen, therapeutic and preschool activities.

Budget Detail

198


Recreation Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Expenditures by Program/Function Administration Recreation Center Building Sports and Leisure Programs Special Interest Programs

966,872 $ 1,100,481 $ 1,324,019 $ 1,401,679 $ 1,363,244 $ 629,926 515,251 607,345 761,288 750,488 753,908 1,983,534 1,016,746 1,040,660 1,029,944 1,239,640 1,231,660 1,312,666 26,224 30,156 34,867 40,520 46,860 47,509

-10% 40% 7% 16%

Aquatics H2O'Brien Outdoor Pool Fieldhouse Fitness Programs Therapeutic Programs

466,492 409,509 1,200,617 484,786 23,059

565,882 357,934 1,321,945 560,520 38,053

681,477 486,380 1,517,371 660,636 78,736

734,500 558,130 2,046,342 574,485 94,790

736,182 522,130 2,094,530 637,504 91,020

825,399 688,096 1,668,240 664,680 104,089

15% 14% 9% 8% 46%

Day Camp Youth Programs Discovery Park Total Expenditures

316,782 81,834 5,508,172

335,973 95,740 6,054,689

343,546 121,432 5,819 7,045,515

380,290 135,770 7,956,634

380,290 141,150 94,928 8,093,406

465,535 139,136 220,935 8,749,745

10% 14%

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services

2,985,922 447,858 2,011,358

3,216,978 481,785 2,138,062

3,821,707 536,584 2,485,090

4,190,640 622,158 2,534,588

4,246,220 614,744 2,633,194

4,720,128 692,475 3,028,142

12% 12% 11%

Capital Outlay Total Expenditures

63,034 5,508,172

217,864 6,054,689

202,134 7,045,515

609,248 7,956,634

599,248 8,093,406

309,000 8,749,745

49% 12%

Budget Detail

$

199

12%


Recreation Fund (continued)

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Revenue Intergovernmental Grants Charges for Services

15,000

17,850

10,000

20,000

10,000

20,000

7%

Swimming Lesson Fees

165,354

173,633

206,954

200,000

200,000

200,000

5%

Memberships

964,202

937,342

1,583,769

1,250,000

1,800,000

1,800,000

17%

Daily User Fees

158,465

218,102

352,647

185,000

350,000

350,000

22%

Facility Rentals

18,841

33,497

84,451

30,000

30,000

20,000

2%

-

PRC Hosted Events

50,000

25,000

60,000

49,056 184,627

50,042 188,061

72,352 231,705

55,000 145,000

31,000 195,000

4,500 195,000

-45% 1%

Advertising Revenue

20,379

28,336

23,471

30,000

30,000

20,000

0%

Fieldhouse - Admissions Fieldhouse - Concessions

95,959 -

101,542 -

107,502 -

80,000 -

90,000 -

95,000 50,000

0%

185,383

156,872

198,470

190,000

190,000

195,000

1%

Fieldhouse - Equipment Rentals

3,207

3,404

5,079

3,000

3,000

3,000

-2%

Fieldhouse - Merchandise Sales Fieldhouse - Advertising

2,374 14,650

3,093 27,017

3,223 25,660

2,500 20,000

3,000 20,000

3,000 20,000

6% 8%

Vending Machine Specialty Fitness

Fieldhouse - Facility Rentals

Fieldhouse - Hosted Special Events

-

-

48,403

54,770

79,241

55,000

55,000

55,000

3%

Fieldhouse - Day Camp Program

431,652

426,152

470,723

435,000

500,000

500,000

4%

Fieldhouse - Sports Instruction

189,307

150,715

201,801

175,000

200,000

175,000

-2%

H2O - Pool Admission Fees

151,827

141,931

132,763

147,000

120,000

133,000

-3%

H2O - Pool Rental Fees H2O - Concession Income H2O - Season Passes H2O - Merchandise Sales Discovery Park - Admissions Discovery Park - Concessions Personnel Training Tot Programs

26,352

21,496

23,819

20,000

25,000

23,000

-3%

116,747 16,117

119,827 15,284

119,562 12,607

110,000 10,000

110,000 10,000

45,000 10,000

-21% -11%

1,598

1,615

1,599

2,000

2,000

2,000

6%

-

-

-

-

75,000

110,000

4,000

30,000

202,389

-

208,543

-

214,630

-

210,000

-

210,000

220,000

2%

62,711

82,496

108,478

73,000

95,000

100,000

12%

Special Interest Programs Adult Sports Programs

33,136 291,362

30,410 253,360

29,885 274,257

32,000 310,000

38,000 275,000

38,000 285,000

3% -1%

Youth Sports Programs

978,265

919,518

839,182

600,000

695,000

695,000

-8%

2,185

6,707

6,983

7,500

7,500

8,000

38%

-

-

59,024 (270)

330,000 75,000

290,000 55,000

290,000 55,000

Therapeutic Recreation Programs Contracted Youth Sports Field Rentals Other Total Charges for Services

Budget Detail

25,004

26,100

4,439,552

4,379,865

(40,054) 5,429,513

200

74,500 4,906,500

(40,440) 5,693,060

45,200

16%

5,834,700

7%


Recreation Fund (continued)

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Miscellaneous Interest Earnings

4,948

5,457

13,559

2,300

15,000

15,000

32%

Other

2,555

3,345

14,381

-

30,100

5,000

18%

Total Miscellaneous

7,503

8,802

27,940

2,300

45,100

20,000

28%

1,066,500

1,855,500

1,228,900

2,820,100

2,820,100

2,208,900

20%

5,528,555

6,262,017

6,696,353

7,748,900

8,568,260

8,083,600

10%

1,171,383

1,191,766

1,399,094

1,049,932

1,049,932

1,524,786

7%

20,383

207,328

Transfer In From Parks and Recreation Fund Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

(349,162)

$ 1,191,766 $ 1,399,094 $ 1,049,932 $

(207,734)

474,854

842,198 $ 1,524,786 $

(666,145) 858,641

-8%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances Expenses 

Purchased Services - The primary drivers of the $500,000 increase include pool deck maintenance at H2O’Brien Outdoor Pool, full year operations at Discovery Park and purchase of a new vehicle to support Day Camp activities. Capital Outlay - Renovations at the Fieldhouse were completed in 2017 with fewer and less costly projects planned for 2018.

Revenues   

Memberships - Since the expansion in 2015, memberships have been on a consistent upward trajectory. Vending Machine Income – Contracted vending services to an outside contractor. Facility Rentals - Additional programming has minimized the availability of rental space.

Budget Detail

201


Recreation Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Authorized FTE positions Administration Parks and Recreation Director

0.25

0.25

0.25

0.25

0.25

Deputy Recreation Manager

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

-

Facility Coordinator

1.00

1.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

-

Administrative and Retail Coordinator

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

-

1.60

1.60

Concessions and Vending Coordinator

0.25

Program Registration Coordinator II Marketing Supervisor

1.00 -

1.00 -

1.00 -

1.00 -

1.00 -

1.00

Recreation and Community Marketing Coordinator II

0.25

0.25

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

Manager on Duty/Events Supervisor Childcare Coordinator

0.80

0.80

0.50

0.80

0.80 0.80

-

Guest Services Representative II

0.80

0.80

0.25

0.80

0.80

-

Maintenance & Facility Attendant Sports and Leisure Programs

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

-

Recreation Manager Recreation Supervisor - Sports

0.90 1.00

0.90 1.00

0.90 1.00

0.90 1.00

0.90 1.00

0.90 1.00

Recreation Coordinator II - Sports Recreation Supervisor -Sports Programs

2.00 1.00

3.00 1.00

3.00 1.00

3.00 1.00

3.00 1.00

3.00 1.00

0.65 -

0.80 1.00

0.80 1.00

0.80 1.00

0.10

0.10

0.10

0.10

0.10

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Customer Service Specialist Manager on Duty/Special Events

-

-

Special Interest Programs Recreation Manager

0.10

Therapeutic Rec/Senior Prog Coord Recreation Center

-

Deputy Recreation Manager Program Registration Coordinator II

-

-

-

-

-

1.00 1.00

Administrative and Retail Coordinator Administrative and Retail

-

-

-

-

-

1.00

Assistant Coordinator Manager on Duty/Events Supervisor

-

-

-

-

-

1.60 0.80

Childcare Coordinator Guest Services Representative II

-

-

-

-

-

0.80 0.80

Facility Coordinator

-

-

-

-

-

2.00

Maintenance & Facility Attendant

-

-

-

-

-

1.00

Aquatics Recreation Supervisor - Aquatics

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Recreation Coordinator I - Aquatics Water Safety Instructor

1.00 -

2.00 -

1.00 -

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

Fieldhouse Recreation Supervisor - Fieldhouse

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Recreation Coordinator II - Events Recreation Coordinator I - Fieldhouse

1.00

1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 0.25

1.00 0.80

1.00 0.80

1.00 0.80

Recreation Coordinator I - Faciltiies Party Event Supervisor

-

-

Marketing Supervisor Guest Services Representative

1.00 -

1.00 -

1.00 0.50

1.00 0.80

1.00 0.80

0.80

Day Camp Day Camp Coordinator

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

0.50 1.00

1.60 1.00

1.60 1.00

1.60 1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Day Camp Assistant Day Camp Coordinator Fitness Programs Fitness / Wellness Coordinator Youth Programs Recreation Coord II - Youth Enrichment Total

Budget Detail

1.00

1.00

0.80

0.80

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

19.90

22.90

27.40

33.95

34.75

34.75

202


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS General   

 

Successfully acquired Douglas County Mill Levy funds once for Therapeutic Recreation in the amount of $20,000. The Parker Parks and Recreation Scholarship Program provided 15 families with financial assistance to participate in Recreation programs or services in 2017. The total amount of assistance topped $1000. The Ice Trail at Discovery Park generated just over $97,000 in revenue last season. Over 8,500 people skated at the new seasonal ice trail in its inaugural year. With a longer season ahead in 2017/2018, we expect a significant increase in visits. Just over 12 months into the CAPRA Accreditation process, the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Department has worked diligently to complete over 100 of the 151 standards. Began work on a master plan that will help guide management, operations and development of Parks and Recreation resources for years to come. A completed plan is expected in early 2018.

Fitness Division  

Group Fitness - 18% increase in class participation compared to 2016; 43% increase in class participation when compared to numbers prior to the expansion Personal Training Services - 28% increase in clients compared to 2016; PT Annual Survey indicated 98% of clients ranked their trainer either very good or excellent

Budget Detail

203


 

Pilates Reformer and Wellness Services:  Highest demanded fitness program/service in 2017  24 classes a week being currently offered compared to 6 in 2016  300% growth in class offerings and program participation Specialty Fitness - 2,140 class enrollments in 2017; 27% increase in fee based fitness classes compared to 2016. CancerFit® - 66% program growth since 2016

TR/Senior Programming    

Adult Dances - In surveys completed by caregivers, 90% rated dances as exceeding expectations Game Nights - Program participation is up 200% compared to 2016 Active Aging Adults/SilverSneakers® - 22% increase in membership check-ins compared to 2016 Aquatic Therapy - 3,700 visits recorded in either 1-1 Aquatic Therapy sessions or group classes; 2017 CPRA Columbine Award Winner for Programming

Fieldhouse 

The mezzanine level was renovated to add a space for the Parker Fieldhouse Day Camp program. New multi-purpose room provides over 1,400 square feet of room for Day Camp, other programming and community rentals. It has also opened up the activity rooms downstairs for additional programming, rentals and meeting space. The other major component of the renovation was the addition of office space. The new office space provides workstations for 6 staff members, features a filing room, and a large community office ideal for team collaboration.

Day Camp  

YTD revenues are up 6% from last year as of November 1, 2017. Currently brought in $475,920 and are on pace for a first year of exceeding $500,000.

Budget Detail

204


 

Total participants served this year is 710, which is an all-time high and an 8% increase from 2016. The Before and After program has serviced 178 campers and that is a 14% increase from 2016.

Events    

Non-hosted swim parties increased from 40 in 2016 to 135 in 2017. Fieldhouse Fright Night had over 1,200 people in attendance. Barker Days saw a record number of attendees, 1,300. Chauncey Billups Basketball Academy featuring Isaiah Thomas increased enrollment from 2016 by 38%.

Races    

Love ‘Em or Leave ‘Em Valentine’s Day 5K/10K: $6,100 net income, 462 participants Cattle Crossing 5K & Family Fun Trek: $3,400 net income, 163 participants Kids’ TRY-athlon: $2,300 net income, 182 participants So Long to Summer 5K/10K/Family Fun Trek: $6,900 net income, 359 participants

Parker Recreation Center 

Since the 2015 renovation we have the seen a significant increase in overall participation. We have sold 600 more Annual Household Memberships since 2015, and Memberships revenue will hit the $2 million mark by year end. We expect to match 2016 Facility Rentals totals. Budget 2017 Memberships: $1,250,000 Daily User fees: $185,000 Facility Rentals: $30,000

Budget Detail

Actual 2017 (YTD) $1,885,713 $289,525 $65,503

205

Budget 2016 $1,122,000 $170,000 $30,000

Actual 2016 $1,482,917 $256,253 $71,043


Aquatics Division 

The program served over 2,200 participants in 2017. With the addition of a full-time Coordinator (February 2017) no classes have been canceled due to lack of instructors. Program was very well organized by the coordinator and customer satisfaction has increased dramatically. Recruitment efforts for Lifeguard Staff seemed to have been successful with staff numbers up 30% from Summer 2016.

Sports  

Youth Fall Baseball was added with 200 kids in 2 divisions. The Rose Taylor arena, at the Salisbury Equestrian Park, was heavily used in 2017, with over 30 horse events taking place from April-October. Participants from all over the state participated in these shows offered by the Parker Trail Riders, Aurora Horsemen Association, Colorado Driving School, Rocky Mt. Iberian Horse Club, and the Sweethearts of the West organization.

Kids’ Zone  

Record number of attendance in Princess Ball and summer camps. Projected Revenue for 2017 to exceed budget by approximately 50%.

Kids' Zone Revenue Comparison 2017 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 Budget

YTD 2016

Budget Detail

Year End 2017

206


2018 GOALS    

Become a CAPRA Accredited Agency. Begin researching methods to compile an Asset Management Plan for Parks, Recreation, Open Space and Trails. Implement a more streamlined and sophisticated day camp check-in and tracking application utilizing tablets. Begin implementing findings and major themes from the 2017 Master Plan.

Budget Detail

207


CAPITAL RENEWAL AND REPLACEMENT RESERVE FUND

ABOUT CAPITAL RENEWAL AND REPLACEMENT RESERVE The Capital Renewal and Replacement Reserve Fund accounts for funds that are transferred in from other funds, which can be used to fill budgetary gaps related to the renewal and/or replacement of aging equipment, facilities and other types of assets or other similar type future needs.

Budget Detail

208


Capital Renewal and Replacement Reserve Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Projected Budget

Compound Annual Growth

Revenue Miscellaneous Interest Earnings

6,014

6,013

12,114

9,900

14,000

15,000

-

25,478

-

-

-

-

26%

Transfers In From Police Station/PACE Center Construction Fund Total Transfers In Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) expenditures Ending Fund Balance

Budget Detail

-

25,478

-

-

-

-

6,014

31,491

12,114

9,900

14,000

15,000

1,941,781

1,947,795

1,979,286

1,991,400

1,991,400

2,005,400

1%

6,014

31,491

12,114

9,900

14,000

15,000

26%

$ 1,947,795 $ 1,979,286 $ 1,991,400 $ 2,001,300 $ 2,005,400 $ 2,020,400

1%

209

26%


Budget Detail

210


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS SUMMARY

Budget Detail

211


Capital Projects Funds Summary 2014 Actual Beginning Fund Balances

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

$ 16,823,755 $ 24,128,165 $ 19,664,491 $ 19,731,732 $ 19,731,732 $ 11,395,899

Compound Annual Growth -9%

Revenues Taxes Intergovernmental Miscellaneous Transfers In Other Financing Sources Total Revenues

6,115,758 2,865,855 3,454,523 315,000 13,204,976 25,956,112

4,751,483 3,060,654 3,037,472 191,370 11,040,979

5,781,671 3,129,090 4,360,805 1,594,748 14,866,314

3,794,600 3,216,500 2,072,732 3,100,000 12,183,832

6,537,800 3,266,500 2,144,457 3,100,000 15,048,757

6,030,000 3,996,000 1,163,800 1,750,000 12,939,800

0% 9% -24% 54%

Expenditures Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Transfers Out Total Expenditures

18,109,741 31,961 510,000 18,651,702

11,554,653 3,950,000 15,504,653

13,976,966 234,107 588,000 14,799,073

20,627,982 3,318,000 23,945,982

19,284,690 4,099,900 23,384,590

5,515,000 2,150,000 7,665,000

-26%

$ 24,128,165 $ 19,664,491 $ 19,731,732 $ 7,969,582 $ 11,395,899 $ 16,670,699

-9%

$ 23,280,413 $ 8,965,422 $ 12,031,322 $ 10,646,432 $ 11,992,257 $ 10,378,300 2,674,423 2,074,855 2,833,767 1,536,400 3,055,000 2,560,000

-18% -1%

Ending Fund Balances

Revenue by Fund Public Improvements Excise Tax Police Station/PACE Center Construction Parkglenn Construction Total Revenues Expenditures by Fund Public Improvements Excise Tax Police Station/PACE Center Construction Fund Total Expenditures

Budget Detail

-16%

43% -20%

660 616 25,956,112

156 546 11,040,979

1,225 14,866,314

1,000 12,183,832

1,500 15,048,757

1,500 12,939,800

25% -16%

17,825,039 510,000

11,500,243 3,950,000

14,211,073 588,000

20,627,982 3,318,000

19,284,690 4,099,900

5,515,000 2,150,000

-25% 43%

316,663 54,410 $ 18,651,702 $ 15,504,653 $ 14,799,073 $ 23,945,982 $ 23,384,590 $ 7,665,000

-20%

212


Budget Detail

213


PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS FUND

ABOUT PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS The Public Improvements Fund is for streets capital projects and is primarily funded by 75 percent of the 0.4 percent county sales and use tax that is collected within the Town and shared back to the Town, as well as a 2.5 percent Town use tax on building construction materials. Streets capital projects include Town-constructed road and bridge additions, extensions and expansions, traffic signal installations and median landscaping.

Budget Detail

214


Public Improvements Fund

Expenditures Economic Development Incentives Capital Outlay Total Expenditures Revenue Taxes Use Tax Excise Taxes - Electric Undergrounding Total Taxes Intergovernmental Grants Roads Sales Tax Shareback Roads Use Tax Shareback HUTF - FASTER Funds Total Intergovernmental Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Contributions Total Miscellaneous Transfer In From Excise Tax Fund From Parkglenn Construction Fund From General Fund Other Financing Sources Certificates of Participation Issued Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

2014 Actual

$

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

31,961 $ $ 234,107 $ $ $ 17,793,078 11,500,243 13,976,966 20,627,982 19,284,690 5,515,000 17,825,039 11,500,243 14,211,073 20,627,982 19,284,690 5,515,000

Compund Annual Growth

-25% -25%

3,097,710 362,232 3,459,942

2,328,037 358,622 2,686,659

2,613,852 369,780 2,983,632

1,930,800 392,800 2,323,600

3,145,000 392,800 3,537,800

3,130,000 400,000 3,530,000

0% 3% 1%

11,766 2,218,219 353,022 282,848 2,865,855

2,413,380 352,832 294,442 3,060,654

2,532,893 293,528 302,669 3,129,090

2,635,400 275,000 306,100 3,216,500

2,635,400 325,000 306,100 3,266,500

640,000 2,740,800 300,000 315,200 3,996,000

172% 5% -4% 3% 9%

47,057 3,387,583 3,434,640

52,868 2,973,871 3,026,739

114,905 4,173,747 4,288,652

35,000 1,971,332 2,006,332

100,000 1,987,957 2,087,957

100,000 1,002,300 1,102,300

21% -26% -25%

315,000

191,370

1,500,000

3,100,000 -

3,100,000 -

1,750,000 -

13,204,976 23,280,413

8,965,422

11,901,374

10,646,432

11,992,257

10,378,300

-18%

11,710,098 17,165,472 14,630,651 12,450,900 12,450,900 5,158,467 5,455,374 (2,534,821) (2,309,699) (9,981,550) (7,292,433) 4,863,300 $ 17,165,472 $ 14,630,651 $ 12,320,952 $ 2,469,350 $ 5,158,467 $ 10,021,767

-19% -3% -13%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Capital Outlay - The 48 percent decrease is due to fewer and smaller construction projects being budgeted in 2018 than in 2017.

Budget Detail

215


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Enhance Economic Vitality Support an Active Community  Commenced the construction of the widening of Jordan Road between the Hess Road and Bradbury Parkway intersections. 2017 work included construction of two (2) retaining walls, grading and storm drain improvements. Scheduled to be completed by June of 2018.  Chambers Road widening improvements were completed in the spring of 2017 with remaining asphalt work and other temperature sensitive work being completed in June. The median landscaping was completed via a separate contract between the Hess Road and Heirloom Parkway intersections.  Completed the construction of the extension of Summerset Lane east of Pine Drive.  Completed a missing sidewalk segment on Riva Ridge Drive from Omaha Avenue to the Sulphur Gulch Trail. These improvements were done in conjunction with the Douglas County School District’s Pioneer Elementary School.  Completed approximately $900k in repairs to the Chambers Road/Happy Canyon bridge to extend the life of the structure.

Budget Detail

216


Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Enhance Economic Vitality  Completed the construction of a traffic signal on Crown Crest Boulevard at the Parker Adventist/Life Time Fitness entrance.  The 2017 Reconstruction project removed and replaced the thirty year old concrete pavement on J Morgan Boulevard between the Parker Road and Cody Avenue intersections with a composite asphalt pavement/ aggregate base course pavement section.

Budget Detail

217


EXCISE TAX FUND ABOUT EXCISE TAX The Excise Tax Fund accounts for the accumulation of new development excise taxes and the transfer of funds to other funds for the purpose of financing roads, parks or municipal facilities. Revenue from the Development Excise Tax Fund may be expended for the following purposes only: capital improvements for major streets necessary to meet the health, safety and welfare of the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, expansion of the Town's street network and capital equipment; parks and recreation purposes necessary to meet the health, safety and welfare of the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, the expansion of regional parks and associated infrastructure and capital equipment; expansion of administrative facilities; the provision of law enforcement services, including facilities; cost accounting, management and government of the Development Excise Tax Fund; and payment of obligations issued for major street purposes, parks and recreational facilities, administrative facilities or law enforcement facilities.

Budget Detail

218


Excise Tax Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Actual Budget

Compund Annual Growth

Expenditures Transfers Out

$

510,000 $ 3,950,000 $

588,000 $ 3,318,000 $ 4,099,900 $ 2,150,000

43%

Revenue Taxes New Development Excise Tax Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

2,655,816

2,064,824

2,798,039

1,471,000

3,000,000

2,500,000

-2%

18,607

10,031

35,728

65,400

55,000

60,000

34%

2,674,423

2,074,855

2,833,767

1,536,400

3,055,000

2,560,000

-1%

4,544,443 2,164,423

6,708,866 (1,875,145)

4,833,721 2,245,767

7,079,488 (1,781,600)

7,079,488 (1,044,900)

6,034,588 410,000

7% -34%

$ 6,708,866 $ 4,833,721 $ 7,079,488 $ 5,297,888 $ 6,034,588 $ 6,444,588

-1%

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Transfers Out - 48 percent or $1.95 million reduction is due to fewer/less expensive capital projects occurring in 2018.

Budget Detail

219


PARKGLENN CONSTRUCTION FUND

ABOUT PARKGLENN CONSTRUCTION The funds in the Parkglenn Construction Fund are held in escrow for a future traffic signal at Parker Road and Parkglenn Way.

Budget Detail

220


Parkglenn Construction Fund

Revenue Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Total Revenue

2014 Actual

$

616 $ 616

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

546 $ 546

1,225 $ 1,225

2017 Amended Budget

1,000 $ 1,000

2017 Projected Actual

1,500 $ 1,500

2018 Adopted Budget

1,500 1,500

Compund Annual Growth

25% 25%

Beginning Fund Balance

198,957

199,573

200,119

201,344

201,344

202,844

0%

Revenue over (under) expenditures Ending Fund Balance

616 199,573 $

546 200,119 $

1,225 201,344 $

1,000 202,344 $

1,500 202,844 $

1,500 204,344

25% 1%

$

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

No significant fund variances to be discussed.

Budget Detail

221


Budget Detail

222


DEBT SERVICE FUNDS

Budget Detail

223


GENERAL DEBT SERVICE FUND

ABOUT GENERAL DEBT SERVICE The General Debt Service Fund accounts for payments of principal and interest on the 2014 Certificates of Participation issued to finance construction of the public works operation center.

Budget Detail

224


General Debt Service Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compund Annual Growth

Expenditures Principal

$

478,500 $

488,400 $

451,068 $

451,068 $

445,612

261,021 261,021

462,895 941,395

453,325 941,725

489,205 940,273

489,205 940,273

497,511 943,123

17% 38%

From General Fund

209,600

755,940

756,205

755,068

755,068

757,294

38%

From Stormwater Utility Fund Total Revenue

51,421 261,021

185,455 941,395

185,520 941,725

185,205 940,273

185,205 940,273

185,829 943,123

38% 38%

Interest Total Expenditures

-

$

Revenue Transfers In

Beginning Fund Balance

-

-

-

-

-

Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

-

-

-

-

-

Budget Detail

$

$

$

225

$

$

$

-


RECREATION DEBT SERVICE FUND

ABOUT RECREATION DEBT SERVICE The Recreation Debt Service Fund accounts for payments of principal and interest on the sales and use tax bonds and Certificates of Participation issued to finance construction of recreation capital projects. The Town issued Certificates of Participation in 2014 to finance a portion of the recreation center expansion. The Town issued a refunding note in 2015 for the outstanding 2006 revenue bonds used to finance the construction of the Parker Fieldhouse and to refund the outstanding revenue bonds issued in 1993 to construct the Parker Recreation Center.

Budget Detail

226


Recreation Debt Service Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2016 Actual

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compund Annual Growth

Expenditures Principal

$

Interest Other Debt Costs Total Expenditures

745,000 $ 1,021,500 $ 1,146,600 $ 1,173,400 $ 1,173,400 $ 1,200,200

13%

616,166 150

687,899 137

436,920 -

409,300 2,000

409,300 2,000

384,300 2,000

-11% 91%

1,361,316

1,709,536

1,583,520

1,584,700

1,584,700

1,586,500

4%

1,361,316 1,361,316

1,709,536 1,709,536

1,583,520 1,583,520

1,584,700 1,584,700

1,584,700 1,584,700

1,586,500 1,586,500

4% 4%

Revenue Transfers In From Parks and Recreation Fund Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

Budget Detail

$

-

$

-

-

$

227

$

-

$

-

$

-


Budget Detail

228


ENTERPRISE FUND

ENTERPRISE FUND

Budget Detail

229


STORMWATER UTILITY FUND

ABOUT STORMWATER UTILITY This fund was established and accounts for fees collected from residential and commercial properties to ensure that stormwater systems are properly planned, constructed and maintained within the Town. The utility provides overall stormwater management to prevent flooding, protect water quality and to preserve the natural creeks and gulches throughout the Town.

Budget Detail

230


Stormwater Utility Fund

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Projected Budget

Compund Annual Growth

Expenditures Salary and Benefits

762,111

3%

9,448

11,465

8,384

13,350

13,050

12,550

7%

Purchased Services

419,073

425,614

419,304

548,363

508,663

591,762

9%

Capital Outlay

215,523

640,850

320,600

989,655

780,060

2,290,000

81%

Transfers Out

51,421

185,455

185,520

185,205

185,205

185,829

38%

1,380,240

1,922,083

1,565,353

2,477,723

2,215,298

3,842,252

29%

10,108 47,065

6,943 54,650

8,532 49,804

57,800 46,400

8,000 60,000

8,000 55,000

-6% 4%

Supplies

Total Expenditures

$

684,775 $

658,699 $

631,545 $

741,150 $

728,320 $

Revenue Charges for Services Grading Permit Fees Engineer Review Fees Commercial Stormwater Utility Fees

740,642

796,102

823,608

836,600

889,500

890,000

5%

Residential Stormwater Utility Fees Prior Year Refund

1,071,241 (4,390)

1,129,155 -

1,162,997 -

1,205,700 -

1,205,700 -

1,250,000 -

4%

Total Charges for Services

1,864,666

1,986,850

2,044,941

2,146,500

2,163,200

2,203,000

4%

11,657 375,369

9,671 817,133

24,378 314,674

57,300 215,000

30,000 215,900

30,000 1,500,000

27%

Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Other Total Miscellaneous

387,026

826,804

339,052

272,300

245,900

1,530,000

41%

2,251,692

2,813,654

2,383,993

2,418,800

2,409,100

3,733,000

13%

Beginning Fund Balance

4,041,439

4,912,891

5,804,462

6,623,102

6,623,102

6,816,904

14%

Revenue over (under) Exp

871,452

891,571

818,640

Total Revenue

Ending Fund Balance

(58,923)

193,802

(109,252)

$ 4,912,891 $ 5,804,462 $ 6,623,102 $ 6,564,179 $ 6,816,904 $ 6,707,652

8%

Authorized FTE positions Engineering & Public Works Director

0.20

0.20

0.20

0.20

Manager of Engineering and Stormwater Stormwater Project Engineer

1.00 1.00

-

1.00 1.00

-

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Environmental Program Manager

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Stormwater Engineering Technician

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Stormwater Crew Leader Stormwater Equipment Operator

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

Maintenance Worker 1/2

1.00

1.00

1.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

Maintenance Worker 3

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Total

8.00

8.00

7.20

8.20

8.20

8.20

-

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Purchased Services: The increase from the 2017 Amended Budget is primarily driven by a vacuum truck rental to clean storm pipe.

Budget Detail

231


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Performed 3,367 infrastructure inspections and 1,354 maintenance activities through November 2017.  Performed 1,172 development project inspections and issued 34 grading permits through November 2017.  Completed construction of Parker Square Drive drainage improvements.  Completed construction of Newlin Gulch drainage improvements at the East/West Trail.  Completed design of Newlin Gulch improvements at Heirloom Parkway.  Started design of Lemon Gulch improvements downstream of Crowfoot Valley Road.  Co-sponsored the annual Household Chemical Roundup. Approximately 882 households dropped off items at the event resulting in more than 48 tons of materials being collected, including approximately 42,000 pounds of paint materials, 199 tires and 3,334 pounds of batteries.

2018 GOALS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community  Update Stormwater Utility needs assessment study to include all infrastructure constructed from 2006 to 2017 and plan for needs for the next 10 years. Budget Detail

232


Manage over 80 grading permits related to development construction activities to ensure compliance with Town requirements.  Co-Host the 2018 Household Chemical Roundup alongside Tri-County Health Department. Innovate with Collaborative Governance  Continue working with the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District and the Cherry Creek Basin Water Quality Authority to investigate opportunities for long term sustainability of managing Stormwater runoff and water quality. 

Budget Detail

233


Budget Detail

234


INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS SUMMARY

Budget Detail

235


Internal Service Funds Summary 2014 Actual Beginning Fund Balances

$

380,926 $

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

459,139 $

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

918,989 $ 1,341,825 $ 1,341,825 $ 2,207,505

Compound Annual Growth 55%

Revenues Charges for Services Miscellaneous Total Revenues

4,924,054 66,021 4,990,075

7,413,685 147,403 7,561,088

9,463,309 129,081 9,592,390

9,847,570 33,300 9,880,870

10,067,570 70,939 10,138,509

10,670,772 14,600 10,685,372

21% -31% 21%

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Utilties/Insurance Capital Outlay Transfers Out Total Expenditures

1,832,683 321,516 1,642,582 1,115,081 4,911,862

1,814,836 373,946 1,793,246 1,779,591 1,324,619 15,000 7,101,238

2,220,414 444,710 2,499,305 2,391,978 1,613,147 9,169,554

2,223,222 473,050 2,873,592 2,200,000 1,432,885 9,202,749

2,240,991 489,744 2,808,709 2,355,500 1,377,885 9,272,829

2,387,451 536,295 2,730,957 2,725,000 1,477,000 9,856,703

7% 14% 14%

19%

Ending Fund Balances

$

918,989 $ 1,341,825 $ 2,019,946 $ 2,207,505 $ 3,036,174

60%

Revenue by Fund Fleet Services Technology Management Facility Services Medical Benefits Total Revenues

$ 1,654,900 $ 1,584,764 $ 2,230,679 $ 2,344,700 $ 2,401,539 $ 2,534,400 2,597,209 2,793,580 3,820,201 3,857,120 4,016,520 4,149,002 737,966 918,639 944,480 894,600 941,000 991,800 2,264,105 2,597,030 2,784,450 2,779,450 3,010,170 4,990,075 7,561,088 9,592,390 9,880,870 10,138,509 10,685,372

11% 12% 8%

Expenditures by Fund Fleet Services Technology Management Facility Services Medical Benefits Total Expenditures

1,679,202 2,481,313 751,347 $ 4,911,862 $

10% 9% 7%

Budget Detail

459,139 $

7%

2,006,187 2,503,689 793,020 1,798,342 7,101,238 $

2,363,935 3,259,395 984,491 2,561,733 9,169,554 $

236

1,781,846 4,168,983 891,920 2,360,000 9,202,749 $

1,746,475 4,066,651 935,703 2,524,000 9,272,829 $

2,419,216 3,556,087 990,700 2,890,700 9,856,703

21%

19%


Budget Detail

237


FLEET SERVICES FUND

ABOUT FLEET SERVICES Fleet services is responsible for the acquisition, maintenance, record keeping and disposal of the Town of Parker’s fleet of cars, trucks, and heavy and light equipment. Fleet services works closely with its customers to meet their changing and growing needs, finding innovative ways to reduce costs, while keeping the service at the highest of standards.

Budget Detail

238


Fleet Services Fund

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total Expenditures

2014 Actual

$

Revenue Charges for Services Internal User Charges Lone Tree Fleet Services Total Charges for Services Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Contributions/Insurance Recoveries Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance Authorized FTE positions Engineering & Public Works Director Facilities/Fleet Manager Fleet Maintenance Master Technician Fleet Crew Leader Fleet Maintenance Worker 3 Fleet Maintenance Worker 2 Total

$

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compund Annual Growth

366,124 $ 358,800 $ 447,950 $ 411,122 $ 429,701 $ 458,842 6,649 7,541 11,528 9,900 9,900 12,600 445,980 506,915 612,846 507,339 508,389 515,774 860,449 1,132,931 1,291,611 853,485 798,485 1,432,000 1,679,202 2,006,187 2,363,935 1,781,846 1,746,475 2,419,216

6% 17% 4% 14% 10%

1,505,976 86,769 1,592,745

1,427,446 66,301 1,493,747

2,018,345 90,065 2,108,410

2,222,700 121,900 2,344,600

2,222,700 121,900 2,344,600

2,412,400 121,900 2,534,300

13% 9% 12%

155 62,000 1,654,900

210 90,807 1,584,764

(376) 122,645 2,230,679

100 2,344,700

100 56,839 2,401,539

100 2,534,400

-10%

166,963 115,184 282,147

16%

90,880 (24,302) 66,578 $

66,578 (421,423) (354,845) $

(354,845) (133,256) (488,101) $

(488,101) 562,854 74,753 $

(488,101) 655,064 166,963 $

0.40 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.40

0.40 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.40

0.33 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.83

0.10 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.60

0.10 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.60

11%

43%

0.10 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.60

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances 

Capital Outlay – The 80 percent increase reflects the implementation of a fleet replacement program that requires some catch-up from previous years.

Budget Detail

239


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Engaged in an Intergovernmental Agreement with Douglas County for the use of their fuel and wash facility located adjacent to the Town’s Public Works facility.  Established a baseline average of 4.1 days to complete work orders for fleet equipment.  Completed an average of 93% of scheduled Preventive Maintenance Inspections for the year.

2018 GOALS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Improve fleet availability percentages through communication, planning, and fleet management best practices.  Improve on the average time to complete a work order with a goal of less than 4 days.  Improve the completion of scheduled Preventive Maintenance Inspections with a target goal of 95%.

Budget Detail

240


TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT FUND

ABOUT TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT The Information Technology Department is responsible for computer maintenance and replacement, software management, network administration, data security, data backup and recovery, GIS mapping, end user support and technical support for all Town departments. The purpose of this internal service fund is to provide these services, replacement of aging technology and software licensing costs.

Budget Detail

241


Technology Management Fund

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Transfers Out Total Expenditures

2014 Actual

$

Revenue Charges for Services Internal User Charges External User Charges Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance Authorized FTE positions Information Technology Director Senior Systems Administrator Systems Administrator Police Systems Administrator Programmer Analyst System Specialist GIS Coordinator GIS Administrator Network Administrator Total

$

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compund Annual Growth

985,595 $ 960,052 $ 1,091,569 $ 1,178,250 $ 1,178,250 $ 1,266,529 280,005 318,333 381,627 424,400 429,566 467,045 961,081 1,044,923 1,464,663 1,986,933 1,879,435 1,777,513 254,632 165,381 321,536 579,400 579,400 45,000 15,000 2,481,313 2,503,689 3,259,395 4,168,983 4,066,651 3,556,087

6% 14% 17% -35%

2,445,729 147,806

2,642,075 147,374

3,634,488 174,279

3,856,520 -

3,856,520 150,000

3,989,002 150,000

13%

3,674 2,597,209

4,131 2,793,580

11,434 3,820,201

600 3,857,120

10,000 4,016,520

10,000 4,149,002

28% 12%

436,478 726,369 1,287,175 1,287,175 1,237,044 289,891 560,806 (311,863) (50,131) 592,915 726,369 $ 1,287,175 $ 975,312 $ 1,237,044 $ 1,829,959

40% 50% 43%

320,582 115,896 436,478 $

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 10.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 12.0

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 12.0

9%

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 12.0

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Supplies: Increase is due to including computer monitors in this budget line. Capital Outlay: 92 percent decrease is due to completion of several large projects in 2017 and fewer/lower cost projects in 2018.

Budget Detail

242


2017 Accomplishments Innovate with Collaborative Governance:  Implemented the redesigned wide area network for each Town facility for redundancy and high availability. The project included re-engineering the Town fiber traffic network and full time performance monitoring.  Implemented the Town’s private enterprise cloud (co-location) to be a complete disaster recovery and business continuity solution.  Continued developing Microsoft SCCM to improve our hardware and software delivery model.  Completed the Mobile Device Management project for improved security.  Worked with the Police Department to evaluate replacement solutions for the Records Management System.  Replaced the current Exchange email system with a cloud based Microsoft Office 365 email solution.  Completed remediation steps from the PCI/DSS compliance assessment.  Worked with the design and construction teams to successfully complete the technology portions of the Fieldhouse remodel and the Schoolhouse remodel.  Conducted a bandwidth utilization study for the guest WiFi in all facilities.  Replaced the multifunction printer/copier fleet. Budget Detail

243


2018 Goals Innovate with Collaborative Governance:  Finish implementing redesigned Virtual Server infrastructure to better balance processing and memory needs, and to have a more resilient model for recovering from server failures.  Complete a network infrastructure replacement for Town Hall and the Police Department that takes the network to 1Gbps speeds at all the edge ports.  Implement a new archiving system to reduce data on the Storage Area Network.  Complete the Police Department Asset Tracking system.  Complete the server patch management policies and procedures using RMM.  Replace all of the KVMs at each Town facility.  Upgrade the A/V system in the Pikes Peak Community Room to make it easier for guests to connect to the projection system with their mobile devices for presentations.  Continue rollout of Windows 10 to the desktops.

Budget Detail

244


FACILITY SERVICES FUND

ABOUT FACILITY SERVICES The Public Works Department maintains all of the Town facilities, including building maintenance and janitorial services of approximately 28 sites. Two divisions, Custodial Services and Facility Maintenance, can be found in the Facility Services Internal Service Fund. It is the responsibility of both divisions to keep the Town’s facilities in prime condition. The staff provides an exceptional level of customer service to their coworkers located at the various Town facilities and to members of the community.

Budget Detail

245


Facility Services Fund

Expenditures Salary and Benefits Supplies Purchased Services Capital Outlay Total Expenditures

2014 Actual

$

Revenue Charges for Services User Charges - Custodial User Charges - Facilities Total Charges for Services Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Contributions/Miscellaneous Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance Authorized FTE positions Engineering & Public Works Director Facility/Fleet Manager Facility Customer Service Specialist Facility Supervisor Facility Maintenance Tech 1/2 Facility Maintenance Tech 3 Total

$

2015 Actual

2016 Actual

2017 Amended Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

Compund Annual Growth

480,964 $ 34,862 235,521 751,347

495,984 $ 47,328 223,401 26,307 793,020

680,895 $ 49,273 254,323 984,491

633,850 $ 38,750 219,320 891,920

633,040 $ 47,778 254,885 935,703

662,080 54,150 274,470 990,700

8% 12% 4%

272,487 465,287 737,774

268,455 650,000 918,455

297,606 646,119 943,725

265,200 626,900 892,100

313,300 626,900 940,200

346,700 644,100 990,800

6% 8% 8%

192 737,966

(158) 342 918,639

555 200 944,480

2,500 894,600

800 941,000

1,000 991,800

8%

(30,536) (13,381) (43,917) $

(43,917) 125,619 81,702 $

81,702 (40,011) 41,691 $

41,691 2,680 44,371 $

41,691 5,297 46,988 $

0.40 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 7.40

0.40 1.00 0.50 1.00 2.00 4.00 8.90

0.33 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 2.00 4.00 9.33

0.10 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 2.00 4.00 9.10

0.10 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 2.00 4.00 9.10

7%

46,988 1,100 48,088

0.10 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 2.00 4.00 9.10

Explanation of Significant Budget Variances  

Supplies: The 40 percent increase reflects the expected increase in general supply expense for maintaining Town facilities. Purchased Services: The 25 percent increase is due to the increased cost of third party custodial service costs for Town facilities.

Budget Detail

246


2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Completed upgrades to the operations center for Parks and Forestry. Projects included the installation of a mezzanine for material storage, roof replacements on two of the structures, replacement of outdated HVAC equipment, and the installation of a screening system to minimize water damage and overspray from the site’s pressure washing area.  Successful completion of several security enhancement projects including; upgraded core and key system at Town Hall, and electronic access enhancements at the Parker Recreation Center and Fieldhouse facilities.  On average, completed customer requested work in 3.35 days. This is an established baseline for future efficiency goals.

2018 GOALS Promote a Safe and Healthy Community:  Manage multiple Capital Improvement Projects throughout the Town’s facilities. Projects include energy/ lighting enhancements, HVAC equipment replacement, lightning protection, outdated mechanical equipment replacement, and facility structures. It is essential to manage these projects to meet time schedules, minimize operational impacts, and complete within the appropriate budgets.  Improve on the established time to complete customer work requested items. The 2018 goal is set at 3 days. Budget Detail

247


MEDICAL BENEFITS FUND

ABOUT MEDICAL BENEFITS Beginning in 2015, the Town moved from fully-insured medical benefits to partially selffunded. The Medical Benefits Fund accounts for the payment of medical claims for employees and their covered dependents. Funding is obtained through monthly premiums charges to each department based on the type of coverage and number of employees. The Town self-insures claims up to $75,000 per covered individual. Stop-loss insurance policies have been purchased to cover losses above the $75,000 limit.

Budget Detail

248


Medical Benefits Fund

Expenditures Supplies Purchased Services Insurance

2014 Actual

$

-

2015 Actual

$

2016 Actual

2017 Original Budget

2017 Projected Actual

2018 Adopted Budget

744.00 $ 2,282.00 $ $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 18,007 167,473 160,000 166,000 163,200 1,779,591 2,391,978 2,200,000 2,355,500 2,725,000

Capital Outlay Total Expenditures

-

1,798,342

2,561,733

2,360,000

2,524,000

2,890,700

Revenue Charges for Services User Charges - Town Premium User Charges - Employee Contibution

-

1,767,892 444,142

2,084,346 507,227

2,211,000 552,750

2,200,000 576,250

2,374,503 632,167

-

2,212,034

2,591,573

2,763,750

2,776,250

3,006,670

-

1,661 50,410

2,957 2,500

20,700 -

3,200 -

3,500 -

-

2,264,105

2,597,030

2,784,450

2,779,450

3,010,170

465,763

501,060

501,060

756,510

35,297 501,060 $

424,450 925,510 $

255,450 756,510 $

119,470 875,980

Total Charges for Services Miscellaneous Interest Earnings Contributions Total Revenue Beginning Fund Balance

-

Revenue over (under) Exp Ending Fund Balance

-

Budget Detail

$

$

465,763 465,763 $

249

Compund Annual Growth


Budget Detail

250


CAPITAL BUDGET

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

251


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2018 Capital Budget and Ten Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP)

BACKGROUND For the 2018 budget, staff has updated the Ten Year CIP that includes the following:    

Summary List of all capital improvements for the current budget year and the subsequent nine years Cost estimates, justification and methods of financing The estimated annual impact on the operating budget of operating and maintaining the facilities to be constructed

The Town of Parker CIP provides a ten year horizon for capital improvement planning and provides Town Council the best cost estimates for every project on these ten year spreadsheets. Cost estimates for each project are a best-guess estimate and detailed engineering has generally not been completed. The items listed for 2018 become the capital budget. Every project in other future years represents only a plan. Council appropriates funds only for 2018 after listening to citizen input, prioritizing based on Council goals and debating and potentially changing any or all of these items. Capital spending under this CIP is controlled through separate funds:       

General Fund Public Improvements Fund Parks and Recreation Fund Recreation Fund Stormwater Utility Fund Information Technology Fund Fleet Fund

The multi-fund structure is required by the need to account for various dedicated revenue streams and is also useful in helping the Town maintain a broad focus across of the needs of the community. It is especially important the Stormwater operations be managed as an independent business as required by governmental accounting standards for enterprise funds. This summary highlights funds directed at existing infrastructure and new projects and the reasons why they are included in the CIP. Debt service is not included in the CIP since it is accounted for in a separate Debt Service Fund and the principal and interest payments are included in the Town’s operating budget. New capital for 2018 is $2,015,000, replacement and maintenance of existing capital is $10,944,045 and machinery, equipment and software is $2,300,500 for a total proposed 2018 capital budget of $15,259,545.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

252


NEW CAPITAL Public Works Projects Traffic Signal at Canterberry/Idyllwilde $295,000 In 2016, the Town completed a new traffic signal warrant analysis of the Canterberry Parkway and Idyllwilde Drive intersection. This was an update on a warrant analysis that was performed several years prior. The 2016 warrant analysis did not show the need for a traffic signal at this intersection but there was increased vehicular and pedestrian traffic over the prior analysis. Due to continued development of the Idyllwilde subdivision, there is anticipated to be increased traffic on both roadways which is currently projected/anticipated to meet Federal MUTCD (Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices) warrants for installation of a traffic signal in 2018. Jordan Road/Parkerhouse Road $20,000 Due to the continued economic development of the Jordan Road/E-470 area, traffic has continued to increase in the area. This traffic signal will support this continued economic development of the area. Parks and Recreation Projects Auburn Hills North/South Trail Connection $350,000 Completion of the north/south trail connection along the old Newlin Gulch Road right-of-way from Mainstreet to the existing East/West Regional Trail. Bar CCC Sports Lights/Paved Parking/Playground $975,000 Construction of an asphalt parking lot and preparation of lighting infrastructure to accommodate future lighting for both the parking lot and the existing sports field.

Transition Parker Recreation Center Rink to Pickleball $35,000 Re-surfacing and re-striping of the existing outdoor inline rinks at the Recreation Center to accommodate pickle ball use (four courts). E470 Regional Trail Crossing at Parker Road $50,000 Funding to initiate conceptual trail alignment and Parker Road overcrossing study. Stormwater Projects McCabe Meadows Detention Pond Retrofit $40,000 This project is located northwest of the intersection of Parker Road and Indian Pipe Road, adjacent to the McCabe Meadows trail head parking lot. The detention pond serves part of Parker Road as well as the Parker United Methodist Church on the east side of Parker Road. The Church is currently expanding their parking lot and, as a result, is required to construct needed improvements to the detention pond to accommodate the water quality and increased runoff. The Town has elected to allow the Church to provide the Town cash in lieu of performing the improvements. This will allow the Town to implement additional retrofit improvements to bring the infrastructure up to current industry standards for water quality. Sierra Middle School Pond Repair $150,000 The detention pond adjacent to Sierra Middle School experienced heavy damage to the leading drop structure during the major storm events in September 2013. The failed drop structure is a safety hazard due to an abrupt drop off and open cavities under the boulders. The detention pond also requires frequent maintenance as the earthen invert erodes causing sediment to migrate to the outlet structure during runoff events. The pond requires a forebay and concrete trickle channel to discourage sediment from accumulating in the outlet structure so frequently. Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

253


Lincoln Avenue Pond Retrofit $100,000 The detention pond serving Lincoln Avenue near Ponderosa Drive is not functioning as intended by holding runoff water rather than slowly releasing the water. The pond currently has a stand pipe with perforations that is used as the means of draining the water. Over time, the gravel around the pipe has accumulated mud and sediment. This does not allow for release of water and is causing standing water in the pond and drowning the native vegetation.

REINVESTMENT IN EXISTING CAPITAL Public Works Projects General Street Improvements (Construction) $1,750,000 Reconstruction efforts consist of fully removing the roadway pavement section and replacing it. This is considered a capital outlay as the original investment is being replaced. Town roadways are typically designed with a 30-year design life assuming routine maintenance is used. As roadways reach the end of their design life, they become very distressed and complaints increase due to ride and noise issues. Roadways at the end of their design life can also impact economic development. In addition when a roadway is reconstructed, it may need to be brought up to current Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. Jordan Road Widening to Hess Road $300,000 This project will landscape the raised medians on Jordan Road between the Hess Road intersection and the Bradbury Parkway intersection. “Parker� style 5-globe lighting and irrigation taps for the median landscaping are being installed with the 2017 roadway widening project. Kings Point Way $1,200,000 Due to the continued development of the Crown Point development and the proposed Kings Point development, a roadway parallel to Parker Road is needed to support the anticipated traffic. In order to address this anticipated increase in traffic, a parallel roadway to the east of Parker Road will provide alternative routes for traffic in the area. The construction of Kings Point Way between Cottonwood Drive on the south and the proposed Aurora Parkway on the north will be a community enhancement to support the economic development of this area. Mostenbocker Widening - Clarke Farms to Todd Drive $250,000 In the prior decade, Town Council approved development agreements with both the NeuTowne subdivision and the Overlook at Cherry Creek subdivision. Both of these development agreements contemplated widening Motsenbocker Road between the existing Clarke Farms subdivision to the Todd Drive intersection as a residential boulevard collector section. The intent of these agreements was that the Town would complete the roadway widening following payments from the proposed developments per their respective agreements. The widening of Motsenbocker Road will be a community enhancement that is driven by the adjacent development. Parker Road Sidewalk Project $1,000,000 There is currently no continuous sidewalk on the east side of Parker Road (State Highway 83) between Plaza Drive and the Sulphur Gulch trail (south of Mainstreet). Town Staff applied for and received approval Federal funding for the construction of a 10-foot wide multiuse sidewalk/trail adjacent on the east side of Parker Road as part of the DRCOG transportation funding process. The Federal funds will be administered through the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT). The approved split for construction is an 80% Federal and 20% local (Town) match.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

254


J. Morgan Extension $200,000 In the prior 15-years, Town Council has approved development agreements with numerous developments adjacent to J Morgan Boulevard and Stroh Road intersection. In addition, the planned development of Anthology and Hess Ranch will add additional traffic to the area. The extension of J Morgan Boulevard will be a community enhancement that is driven by the regional development. Sidewalk Gap Closures $100,000 Since this annual fund was established by Town Council in 2006, the Town has eliminated several sidewalk gaps via this annual funding source. This has in turn increased the pedestrian connectivity and safety within the Town. Elimination of a sidewalk gap adjacent to Hilltop Road between the Pine Hill Crossing development (at Pine Drive) and Tallman Drive is planned for 2018.

Roadway Safety Enhancements $100,000 Over the past several years, the Town has been addressing roadway safety concerns/issues via this annual funding source. The big push with this annual project the last couple of years has been intersection sighttriangle improvements and intersection lighting installations. The intersection sight-triangle concerns are typically related to relocation/replacement of landscaping at or near intersections. The biggest goal of this annual program is community enhancement by increasing safety of the Town’s roadways. Medians and Entryways $300,000 In 2013, Town Council provided direction that the next unfinished median to be landscaped following the work on Lincoln Avenue east of Parker Road (State Highway 83) was to be the Lincoln Avenue median between Keystone Boulevard and Jordan Road. This median is fairly substantial in size and work will continue into 2018. A water source for this location will need to be acquired from the Stonegate Village Metropolitan District (SVMD). 2018 funding is for landscaping of the median. Parks and Recreation Projects Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreational Opportunities $210,500 Annual funding contribution for the Rueter-Hess Recreation Authority per Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA).

the approved

Harvie Open Space Planning and Development $1,600,000 Funding for design, engineering and construction of various on-site improvements in addition to enhancement of the existing intersection at Canterberry Parkway and Mainstreet, which will provide vehicular access to the Harvie property trailhead parking lot.

Ongoing Trails Development $100,000 Funding to support construction of minor trail connections or improvements not addressed as part of the larger Capital Outlay for major trail projects. Sulphur Gulch Trail Enhancement $100,000 Completion of the final phase of improvements and enhancements to the Sulphur Gulch Trail crossing at Pikes Peak Drive in downtown. Site Signage $10,000 Funding to address additional park identification signage at Discovery Park in addition to other parks and recreational facilities.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

255


Contingency $100,000 Funding to supplement approved capital projects on an “as-needed” basis. Stormwater Projects Cherry Creek at KOA $250,000 The Town has worked with Urban Drainage to stabilize portions of Cherry Creek in the past and this project will continue to implement the master plan for the creek, thereby stabilizing the drainage way. The Creek has experienced channel aggradation causing sedimentation and widening. The bank vegetation is sparse due to suffocation of aggraded sediment. If Dransfeldt Road were extended and crossed Cherry Creek, the Creek would need to be channelized and re-formalized to provide a feasible means of crossing the creek. Lemon Gulch $1,500,000 The Town of Parker Municipal Code and Storm Drainage and Environmental Criteria Manual require implementation of the major drainage master plan improvements for all development directly adjacent to major drainage ways. Lemon Gulch is identified as a major drainage way with required improvements for long term stabilization. Rather than requiring the developer adjacent to Lemon Gulch design and construct the improvements, the Town and Urban Drainage believe it is in both entities best interest to accept cash in lieu and directly coordinate the design and construction as a capital improvement project. Newlin Gulch at Heirloom Parkway $200,000 The Parker Homestead developer installed a sheet pile check structure in this location as a part of the development obligations to construct major drainage way infrastructure identified in the adopted master plan. Since the check structure was installed, the master plan has been updated with new recommendations to retrofit the check structure into a drop structure. Since the check structure was installed, the channel has also eroded due to the increase in base flow from the adjacent developments. This further supports the new recommendation to retrofit this check structure into a drop structure. Facilities Projects Town Hall Carpet Replacement $30,000 This capital outlay provides funding for a general carpet replacement program in 2018. The scope for 2018 provides completion of a phased carpet replacement program for Town Hall. Areas addressed include:  Upper landing and Balcony hallway  Council Chambers Motsenbocker Roof Top Unit Replacement $30,000 The funding for this project provides for the replacement of two remaining roof top units (RTU) on the administrative building at the Motsenbocker Complex. These units were originally placed into service in 1996 and have exceeded their useful life. These units provide conditioned air to two separate office spaces within the facility. Failure of either unit would create a deficiency in conditioned air within the facility. Motsenbocker Gate Operator $17,500 This capital outlay provides funding to replace the existing vehicle gate operator at the main gate of the Motsenbocker complex. The existing operator is 14 years old and reached the end of its useful life. Parts for this operator are now obsolete, making repairs and servicing difficult. This is a planned replacement of the operator with a similar style operator. Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

256


Motsenbocker Fleet Shop LED Light Upgrade $10,300 This capital outlay provides funding to install upgraded lighting technology for the fleet maintenance shop. Existing lighting in this facility is in the form of 4-foot fluorescent fixtures approximately 20 feet off the floor. Light provided be these fixtures tends to be inadequate for performing vehicle maintenance. LED technology is a proven substitute, which provides an increase in lumen output, reduced maintenance cost, and reduced energy consumption. The payback for this facility is anticipated at 1.5 years. Design for Building Automation System Upgrade $10,000 The Town currently has two Building Automation Systems and each facility on the system is accessed separately. Phase one of this project provides funding to deploy a town wide standard system with all facilities being accessible through one gateway. Phase two of the project focuses on upgrading hardware within each facility. Town Hall LED Lighting Conversion $45,000 This capital outlay provides funding to upgrade lighting at Town Hall to LED fixtures. The scope of this outlay focuses on common open areas, such as hallways, cubicle spaces, and copier rooms. LED technology is a proven method to reduce energy costs in a facility. The anticipated return on investment for this project is 1.5 years. Additional efficiencies include a reduction in time spent replacing burnt out lamps and ballasts in the existing fluorescent fixtures. Old Town Hall Furnace Replacement $24,720 This capital outlay provides funding to replace two furnace/condenser units serving the upper level of the Old Town Hall facility. The existing units were installed in 1996 and are at the end of their useful life. There are seven units, which serve this facility with all units being of the same age. However, the lower level is not occupied. Plans for replacement of the lower level will be performed on an as needed basement due to unit failure. Failure to replace the existing units may result in an inability to provide conditioned space for occupants in this facility. Demolition of Pine Curve Structures $200,000 This capital outlay provides funding to demolish the two home structures located on the east side of Pine Drive and Mainstreet. The Town owns these properties, which are unoccupied. There are no plans to renovate or occupy these facilities. Typically, unoccupied facilities become unstable, places of unwanted activity, and an eyesore in the community. Recent observations indicate that these locations are known as opportunity properties with an increase in unwanted activity (vagrant use, damage, trespassing inside of the facilities, etc.) The budget allocation provides for scope to remove the structures, address abatement issues, and remove utilities (above and below surface), backfill as needed, seed with natural grasses and erosion control measures. Shade Structures at Discovery Park - $20,000 Discovery Park has proven to be a popular destination for families in the summer. Currently there is little shade available and the Town has received feedback from citizens that they would like to see more shade now. When the landscaping matures, trees will provide relief to park users, but to increase enjoyment now, shade sails are a viable semi-permanent option. Keiffer’s Tunnel Repair - $25,000 Approximately ten years ago, ceramic tiles were installed throughout Keiffers tunnel as part of a school art project. Unfortunately the tiles are continually broken by vandals and entire sections are beginning to fail and fall off. Generally these tiles are replaced in ‘groupings’ by Parks staff. The broken tiles create a Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

257


safety hazard due to their sharp edges and the art is no longer continuous or aesthetically pleasing. The tiles all need to be removed, followed by resurfacing and painting, which could possibly include a painted art mural. While vandalism could still occur, paint is more cost effective and quicker than removing and replacing tiles. Salisbury Equestrian Park Repair - $35,000 The main horse arena at Salisbury is 11 years old. On a weekly basis throughout the summer there is daily drop-in use of the site, plus scheduled events every weekend. The arena hosts rodeo, dressage, jumping events, and lessons. The footing is a mix of crumb rubber and sand. Between eleven years of use and washout from weather, the material has sunk low enough that horse hooves are digging into the subsurface creating not only poor footing conditions but possible safety issues. The arena material needs to be removed and replaced, and the drainage system needs to be updated to minimize material lost due to weather events. Schoolhouse Lightning Protection $18,025 This project allocates funds to address a deficiency in the lightning protection system of the Mainstreet Center facility. Lightning protection assists in mitigating damage to mechanical equipment associated with the facility. A lightning strike may cause damage to one or more pieces of mechanical equipment located on the roof or within a facility costing substantially more to repair than the initial cost of the protection system. The scope of this project provides for the purchase and installation of an engineered lightning protection system for the rooftop located on the flat roof between the historical portion of the building and the annex. Schoolhouse Roof Top Unit $25,000 This capital outlay provides funding to replace an existing roof top unit (RTU) at the Mainstreet Center. The existing unit is 20 years old and is at the end of its useful life expectancy. This unit provides tempered/conditioned air to the facility. Delaying replacement of an RTU typically results in a loss of efficiency, additional maintenance and repair expenses, increased downtime due to part availability and impact to a facilities operation. North Plaza $500,000 Convert the existing asphalt driveway between the Schoolhouse and Ruth Chapel into an all season plaza. Schoolhouse Parking Lot Repair $500,000 Repair the parking lot including laying new asphalt and replacing the lights. The parking lot is severely cracked and water collects in low spots, creating water and ice hazards. The lighting is insufficient, creating a safety hazard at night. Recreation Center HVAC $51,000 This capital outlay provides funding to replace 16 HVAC reheat boxes in the Parker Recreation Center. This project scope includes replacement of 5 units located on the upper level and 11 units on the main level of the facility. The timeline for this project spans two years; 2018 and 2019 to allow for ongoing use of the facility during the replacement. The existing units are in various states of inoperability and do not efficiently provide tempered air to the areas which they serve. This puts additional strain on the associated air-handling units. Recreation Center Boiler $80,000 This capital outlay request provides anticipated funding for the replacement of the pool boiler at the Parker Recreation Center. Installation of the existing boiler occurred in 2011. The life expectancy for this type of Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

258


boiler is typically 20 years. However, this boiler encountered several major failures in its shorter life resulting in a reduced capacity. This unit serves the lap pool and downtime is detrimental to patron use of the pool. Facilities and staff recommend replacement of this unit. Typically, boilers are manufactured at the time of order and takes upwards of two months to ship. A major concern is the impact of having the lap pool inoperative for an extended period and the loss of patrons as a result. Fieldhouse Exterior Drainage $30,000 This capital outlay provides funding designed to address facility drainage issues. The Fieldhouse incorporates a large roof surface area with multiple down drains. The drains are open to the environment and in certain storm situations create unwanted conditions on the exterior walkways of the facility. Additionally, the drainage at one section on the west side of the facility is insufficient. Water draining from this roof section is beginning to affect a vertical wall. Failure to address this situation may expedite the deterioration further, requiring additional repairs. To address the down drains, the existing openings shall be sealed using sheet metal painted to match. Onsite fabrication of the sheet metal is required to provide a finished appearance. Corrective measures for the west side drainage incorporate a grate style drain placed in the concrete to take the water out to the parking lot. Fieldhouse LED Conversion $22,000 Lighting provisions in all three areas incorporate metal halide and fluorescent fixtures. Metal halide lights have two major disadvantages; they require a substantial amount of energy to provide ample light, and they require time to illuminate to useful light. Fluorescent fixtures, although they require less energy, have a shorter life and require ballast replacement creating an ongoing maintenance resource need. There are 160 metal halide fixtures throughout these areas. The existing fixtures are rated at 1,000 watts each. The LED replacement fixtures require only 230 watts to provide the same light output. This upgrade provides a 77% energy savings. There are 480 fluorescent lamps included in this project with a total wattage of 27,216 to provide light in the noted areas. Conversion of these fixtures to LED lamps will reduce the energy consumption by approximately 48%. The anticipated payback in energy savings for this project is 1.5 years.

MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE General Fund Expenditures Five Police Department Vehicles to Include the Following for $308,000 K9 patrol vehicle – With the addition of a K-9, a vehicle is required to accommodate the needs of the handler and canine. Unmarked police car for School Resource Officers - Two unmarked patrol cars that were kept to support the school marshal program are in need of replacement. This program, in place for 4 years, is in partnership with the Douglas County School District and required unmarked cars. Because this was a new program that came up outside of the budget cycle in 2013, it was decided the best course of action was to extend the use of two existing vehicles to support the program. The School Marshall program has been a big success, and these two cars are in need of replacement. Since they are extended life vehicles, they are not covered by the replacement budget. One of the current vehicles is a 2007 model and the other is a 2008. Each has traveled over 100,000 miles at this point. Neighborhood services vehicle - One new animal services truck is needed due to the transfer of neighborhood services to the Police Department and its combined role with animal services. A third animal carrier vehicle is needed to support the mission of neighborhood services and the animal control needs of the community. Neighborhood services has an existing pick up due for replacement in 2018. Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

259


Funds from the replacement budget ($30,000) for a new pick up will be applied to the purchase of the new animal carrier. This request is for the additional funding needed to obtain an animal services truck which is more expensive. A pickup truck isn’t nearly as useful for the newly combined functions. The estimated cost includes the vehicle, equipment, radio, disguised lighting, and installation as appropriate. Administrative vehicle - One unmarked administrative vehicle that is in need of replacement. The existing vehicle is an extended life vehicle and is not covered by the replacement budget. This vehicle is used to support Professional Standards and Administration. This vehicle is currently a 2005 model and is nearing 100,000 miles and has been experiencing frequent maintenance issues. 911 Communications Phone System $183,000 The Town is entering into a four year agreement to replace the existing 911 communications phone system. 2018 is year two of the agreement. The 911 Authority is contributing 100% of the cost of the phone system. Cement Storage Silo $40,000 Street maintenance placed a site mix concrete truck asset into operation in the late fall of 2016. Since implementation, the vehicle has been loaded manually by loader and supersack Portland cement. The addition of a storage silo will significantly improve the safety of the cement loading operation as well as help to realize a savings on the purchase of bulk Portland cement powder. Portable Truck Scales $15,000 Street maintenance work requires the frequent hauling of heavy spoils materials to area recycling and landfill facilities. The purchase of these scales will permit Streets to accurately weigh vehicles before they leave the PWOC facility to insure that legal load limits are not exceeded, which otherwise could result in overweight fines and accelerated pavement damage along the haul route. Signal System for Traffic Control $45,000 Expanded signal system feature of traffic response control Traffic Department Vehicle – F350 4x4 $45,000 The Traffic Services Division is responsible for providing operation and maintenance for 86 traffic signals, hundreds of 5-globe and decorative lights and over 5000 signs in Parker. As part of Traffic Services operations, replacement of damaged equipment is frequent. Traffic signal cabinets can be knocked over blacking out the signal or light poles can be knocked down. Current equipment is tasked to specific duties. When Traffic needs to respond to an emergency repair, our current trucks need to be unloaded before new equipment can be loaded and moved. A new truck will speed the delivery of repair parts. Walk Behind Turn Aerator $11,500 The equipment will be used to aerate small sections of turf, such as all the facility grounds and smaller areas of park turf where a tractor-pulled aerator cannot fit or is inefficient to use. Aerating turf on a frequent basis is the best way to promote turf health without increasing water, fertilizer, or pesticides. Aerated turf allows moisture, air and nutrients to reach plant roots and reduces compaction from foot traffic. There is currently no equipment in the Town’s equipment inventory to adequately meet this need. Recreation Fund Recreation Center Treadmills $84,000 Treadmills continue to be the most used piece of equipment at the Recreation Center. The current treadmills have an average of 11,000 miles a year per machine. Once a treadmill reaches 25,000 miles, Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

260


they need to be replaced to safely operate and prevent any major repairs. Twelve treadmills need to be replaced. Fieldhouse Treadmills $42,000 Treadmills continue to be the most used piece of equipment at the Fieldhouse. The current treadmills have an average of 11,000 miles a year per machine. Once a treadmill reaches 25,000 miles, they need to be replaced to safely operate and prevent any major repairs. Six treadmills need to be replaced. Stormwater Enterprise Fund F550 Pickup with a Dump Bed $50,000 This will allow the crew to access areas that are too tight for the large type of dump truck which will greatly increase the productivity of the crew as they are currently shuttling the material to a location where a large dump truck can be staged. These areas are also normally wet and soft, environments that are not conducive for driving a large dump truck. Fleet Services Internal Fund Fleet Replacements $1,400,000 The fleet is one of the major tools that staff uses to provide services to our citizens. The goal of the proposed amount is based on the existing replacement needs for the Town's vehicles based on factors determined in the fleet replacement policy and the Fleet Services division. Tire Mount and Balance Machines $24,000 The existing tire mounting and tire balancer units are past their useful lifes and unable to perform with several of the new sizes of tires in the Town's fleet of equipment. Vehicle Diagnostic Tool $8,000 The current Town fleet includes many pieces of equipment incorporating computer management systems. Proper troubleshooting requires the use of a scan tool. Information Technology Internal Fund Keyboard, Video, Mouse (KVM) Replacements for each Facility $45,000 Seven KVMs need replacing due to existing models having reached end of useful life. KVMs are consoles that are used for the technology team to access virtual and physical servers in each facility.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

261


Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

262


TOWN OF PARKER CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN SUMMARY 2018 BUDGET

Description

Public Works Infrastructure

New Capital Replacement/Maintenance of Existing Capital Machinery, Equipment and Software Total Expenditures

$

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

Parks and Recreation

Stormwater Utilities

Facilities

Other Capital

Total

315,000 5,200,000 -

1,410,000 2,120,500 -

290,000 1,950,000 50,000

1,673,545 -

2,250,500

5,515,000 $

3,530,500 $

2,290,000 $

1,673,545 $

2,250,500 $ 15,259,545

263

2,015,000 10,944,045 2,300,500


TOWN OF PARKER CAPITAL PROJECTS - PARKS & RECREATION FUND TEN YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2018-2027

DESCRIPTION

P&R Revenue Available for Capital Intergovernmental - Open Space Funds (a) Contributions Transfers In from Other Funds Debt Issuance Total Revenues

PROJECTED APPROVED ACTUAL 2014 ACTUAL 2015 ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL 2018 BUDGET

2019

2,277,741 301,865 7,000,000 9,579,606

1,642,142 2,900,000 24,390 10,965,000 15,531,532

2,515,096 55,000 421,505 600,000 3,591,601

2,226,383 550,000 542,500 3,318,883

2,573,014 1,900,000 375,000 4,848,014

2,701,665 550,000 400,000 3,651,665

7,439,931

7,867,593

54,531

-

-

105,585 49,428 95,117 16,650 8,235 -

582,982 8,000 20,689 25,000 29,329 39,840 -

278,623

210,500 1,600,000 100,000 100,000 10,000 -

500,000 600,000 100,000 -

-

356,113 11,593 -

-

350,000 975,000 35,000 50,000 100,000

150,000 -

19,903 -

32,000 778,500 210,500 90,000 210,000 23,000 1,197,300 7,741 8,581 67,500 30,000 -

50,000 1,500,000 100,000

Total Expenditures

7,734,849

8,941,139

10,014,947

2,655,122

3,530,500

3,000,000

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds

1,844,757

6,590,393

(6,423,346)

663,761

1,317,514

651,665

Ending Available Resources

7,012,239

13,602,632

7,179,286

7,843,049

9,160,563

9,812,228

Parker Recreation Center Expansion FFE - Recreation Center Expansion Norton Farms Trail Improvements DC Library / Town Park MP & Entitlements Adaptive Playground at Salisbury Park East/West Regional Trail Salisbury Park North Master Plan Bradbury Hills Trail Gaps Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreational Opportunities Harvie Open Space Planning and Development Ongoing Trails Development Sulphur Gulch Trail/Pikes Peak Crossing Bradbury/PSCO. Trail Site Signage Dog Park / Disc Golf MP & Entitlements Dog Park / Disc Golf Construction Bar CCC Guardrail repair Discovery Park Project O'Brien Park/Mainstreet Ped Fence Stroh Ranch Parking Lot Improvements The Plaza on Main FFE, IT & Art Salisbury Park North Construction Parker Road Landscape Edge Improvements Concrete Trail - Salisbury Sports & Equine Park Auburn Hills North/South Trail Connection Bar CCC Sports Lights/Paved Parking/Playground Transition PRC Rink to Pickleball O'Brien Park North Updated MP O'Brien Park North Construction East/West Trail Undercrossing of Jordan Rd (PSCo) Completion of Bradbury Park (PSCo) Rowley Downs Trail Extension (PSCo) Mid-block Olde Town East/West Trail Connection (PSCo) Expansion/Renovation of H2O'Brien Pool Competitive Pool Facility (Reata West) Second Recreation Center (Reata West) Completion of Reata West Recreational Site Kinney Creek Trail Alignment Study E-470 Trail Overcrossing/Parker Road Machinery & Equipment Contingency

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

264

171,157 9,400 26,361 7,466 381,617 8,143,942 66,901 542,536 322,843 9,570 -


2021

2022

2023

2,836,748 550,000 400,000 3,786,748

2,978,585 550,000 400,000 3,928,585

3,127,515 550,000 400,000 4,077,515

3,283,890 550,000 400,000 4,233,890

3,448,085 550,000 400,000 4,398,085

3,620,489 550,000 400,000 4,570,489

3,801,514 550,000 400,000 4,751,514

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,000,000 100,000 -

100,000 -

100,000 -

100,000 -

100,000 -

100,000 -

100,000 -

-

9,000,000 -

-

9,000,000 -

-

9,000,000 -

9,000,000 -

7,000,000 100,000

25,000,000 100,000

10,000,000 100,000

100,000

* 100,000

* 100,000

100,000

1,710,500 2,200,000 1,000,000 100,000 10,000 44,150,000 350,000 975,000 35,000 50,000 5,100,000 7,000,000 25,000,000 10,000,000 1,575,000 1,000,000

14,325,000

16,200,000

25,200,000

19,200,000

200,000

9,200,000

9,200,000

200,000

100,255,500

(10,538,252)

(12,271,415)

(21,122,485)

(14,966,110)

4,198,085

(4,629,511)

(4,448,486)

4,741,589

(726,024)

(12,997,439)

(34,119,924)

(49,086,034)

(44,887,949)

(49,517,460)

(53,965,947)

(49,224,357)

8,000,000 5,100,000 25,000 100,000

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

2024

265

2025

2026

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

2020

2027

3,991,589 550,000 400,000 4,941,589

100,000

-

32,363,094 6,850,000 3,975,000 43,188,094


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: E-470 Regional Trail Crossing at Parker Road Total Project Cost: $1,550,000

2018 Cost: $50,000

2019 Cost: $1,500,000

Operational Impact: Maintenance and repair costs

Purpose: The proposed trail improvements will encourage greater trail use and improved trail access for both local residents and the entire metro area.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community The completion of the E-470 Regional Trail at this location, including the planned overcrossing of Parker Road, will provide an important trail connection that not only serves local pedestrians, runners and cyclists, but also serve as a critical regional trail project within the Metro area. This trail project is also an important trail connection that will directly serve and benefit Parker residents as noted and described in the Town’s Open Space, Trails and Greenways Master Plan.

Description/Discussion: The E-470 Authority as part of their recent widening project has designed, funded and constructed the regional trail from Quincy Avenue to approximately the county line between Arapahoe and Douglas Counties. The regional trail is planned to continue due west near this location and cross through the Kings Point development in Aurora including a grade separated overcrossing of Parker Road (see map). The trail will connect with the existing Cherry Creek Trail. This alignment will ultimately provide a much safer crossing of Parker Road, than an at-grade crossing near Cottonwood Drive to the south. Staff with Arapahoe County, Parker, Aurora, and Douglas County are all working together to get this critical phase of the E-470 Regional Trail designed, funded, and constructed, including the over pass of Parker Road, over the next several years.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

266


Parks and Recreation Fund Capital Project: Facility Site Signage—Discovery Park and other facilities as needed Total Project Cost: $10,000 (includes offsetting revenue) Operational Impact: Gener al maintenance and repair of var ious signs

Purpose: The proposed Discovery Park sign will enhance the ability of residents and drivers to locate and safely access this park site.

Council Goals Achieved Foster Community Creativity and Engagement The installation of various facility signs in addition to the project identification sign at Discovery Park, will provide easy identification of Town facilities, enhance the ability of residents to navigate and locate Town amenities, and provide a consist “branding” of various facilities throughout the Town.

Description/Discussion: The initial use of these funds will be the fabrication and installation of a second facility identification sign at Discovery Park to assist residents and drivers approaching downtown from Pine Drive to easy identify and locate this park. This sign will be identical to the existing sign located near the Discovery Park Plaza only with slightly larger font size to enhance visibility from Pine Dive. This sign will be non-illuminated and approximately two feet high and 21’ in length. It will be located on east side of the existing band shell building.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

267


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: Auburn Hills North/South Train Connection Total Project Cost: $350,000 Operational Impact: Maintenance, repair and replacement

Purpose: This trail will increase connectivity in this portion of the community, while also providing an all-weather trail surface verses the current dirt path. It will also complete the connection to the East/West Regional Trail.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Citizen Surveys conducted by the Town over the last several years have indicated that residents place a high priority on trails and new trail construction. As the Town has grown over the last decade, the need for trails for both recreational and commuter purposes, has also increased. The proposed Auburn Hills North/South Trail connection, will increase trail access for the communities located in the area as well as providing additional recreational and commuter opportunities for residents throughout the Town.

Description/Discussion: This new trail, which will be approximately 1,700 feet in length, will complete the connection between the East/West Regional Trail and Mainstreet. The trail will run north/south between the Bradbury Hills and Regency communities, and consists of a 10’ wide concrete surface. The alignment will follow the old Newlin Gulch Road right-of-way.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

268


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: Bar CCC Parking Lot Improvements Total Project Cost: $975,000 Operational Impact: Increased maintenance and repair costs associated with an asphalt versus the existing gravel lot, plus new parking lot landscape maintenance. Purpose: The proposed improvements will allow increased use of the park for various special events, community activities, sports programming, etc., especially during the winter months.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Bar CCC Park is one of Parker’s most visible and accessible parks. Although recent improvements to the park over the last six to seven years have included enhanced pedestrian access and improved baseball facilities, parking can still be challenging with the exiting unimproved parking area and minimal vehicular access off of Twenty-Mile Road. By improving the existing parking lot and adding an additional access drive, safety and functionality of the park would be greatly enhanced; more efficient use of the parking would result, and an increased variety of community activities and events could be programmed at this location. The new parking lot will also be designed and prepared to accommodate lighting in the future.

Description/Discussion: In 2009, improvements were completed to Bar CCC Park including a newly renovated ball field and backstop, a new picnic shelter and internal paths connecting the new amenities. These improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in use of the park for a variety of activities. Although the park is now improved, the adjacent parking lot is in poor condition and difficult to use for winter events. Staff is proposing that the prior construction plans be updated and construction of the parking lot improvements scheduled for 2018.

Existing Parking Lot

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

269


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: Harvie Open Space Property Total Project Cost: $2,200,000 2018 Cost: $1,600,000 2019 Cost: $600,000 Operational Impact: New maintenance costs and additional open space and passive par k maintenance Purpose: Acquisition of the Harvie property will substantially increase the Town’s inventory of natural open space that will be protected and maintained in perpetuity based upon the requirements of the existing conservation easement. Preparation of the various planning and entitlement documents will ensure that development of the site reflects the values and vision that residents have for this portion of the Parker community.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Citizen Surveys conducted by the Town over the last several years have indicated that residents place a high priority on the preservation of open space including access to these areas. As the Town has grown over the last decade, the desire for additional open space throughout the community has also increased. The Harvie open space property (approx. 72 ac), located along Mainstreet on the east side of Town (see attached map), will serve numerous community needs including, maintaining that small Town feel, preservation of natural and environmentally sensitive areas, a community separation buffer, plus incorporation of trail and wildlife corridors.

Description/Discussion: The project entails preparation of a number of entitlements subsequent to the transfer and preparation of the Master Plan. These include annexation, zoning, platting, and coordination with PW&SD regarding inclusion in their district. In addition there is some remaining clean-up to perform on the property including razing several small structures. The requested funding will allow staff to move forward with these various tasks in 2018 and construction in 2019.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

270


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: Rueter-Hess Recreation Authority 2018 Costs: $210,000 2019 Cost: $210,500 Beyond: TBD Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance and improvements

Purpose: Implementation of the Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreation Master Plan provides an excellent opportunity for the Town, along with other Authority members, to participate in the future planning and development of this unique regional recreation amenity.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Over the last several years citizens have shown an interest in the potential recreational opportunities at RueterHess Reservoir. While actual recreational uses may be limited there’s still an opportunity to develop various recreational amenities that complement the Town’s existing inventory of recreational facilities. Build-out of the various recreational amenities as envisioned in the approved Master Plan will provide our residents with a wide range of water-based and land-based recreational opportunities currently unavailable within the Town.

Description/Discussion: The Master Plan approved in 2015 outlined preferred amenities with approximate cost and phasing. Monies allocated in 2018 would cover the Town’s pro-rata share for preparation of various entitlement approvals and construction documents with actual construction improvements phased over several years beginning in late 2018. Justification/purpose: Implementation of the Rueter-Hess Reservoir Recreation Master Plan provides an excellent opportunity for the Town, along with other Authority members, to participate in the future planning and development of this unique regional recreation amenity.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

271


Parks and Recreation Fund

Capital Project: Sulfur Gulch Trail Enhancements 2018 Costs: $100,000 Operational Impact: Repair and replacement costs.

Purpose: The proposed project will provide a safer and more visually appealing trail crossing at this location, consistent with other existing pedestrian and trail crossings in the downtown area.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Citizen Surveys conducted by the Town over the last several years have indicated that residents place a high priority on the development and expansion of our trail system, including measures to ensure trail users safety. As the Town has grown over the years, the desire for additional safe trail connections throughout Town, especially in the downtown area, has also increased. This project addresses this need.

Description/Discussion: The project previously realigned the trail to the south of its current location including the approach from the west to slow cyclist as they approach Pikes Peak Drive. This new configuration has allowed better visibility of cyclists by drivers approaching this crossing from the north especially with the construction of the new multi-family residential development (Parker Flats) along the east side of Pikes Peak Drive. The trail realignment, along with enhanced pavement treatments, increased landscaping, plus widened trail approaches on both sides of Pikes Peak Drive, has increased safety at this crossing while also providing an entry demarcation into downtown Parker. The additional funding will complete the various landscaping and hardscapes on both the east and west trail approaches to Pikes Peak Drive, as originally envisioned.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

272


Parks and Recreation Fund Capital Project: Improvement of outdoor hockey area at the Recreation Center for pickleball 2018 Costs: $35,000 Operational Impact: Nor mal maintenance and repair

Purpose: The proposed improvements will allow greater programming of these outdoor courts for pickleball games and tournaments.

Council Goals Achieved Support an Active Community Citizen Surveys conducted by the Town over the last several years have indicated a growing demand for both indoor and outdoor pickleball courts, especially for our senior populations. Transitioning and improving the current outdoor hockey area at the Recreation Center to pickleball courts will help meet this growing demand while also providing increased recreational opportunities for the Town’s seniors.

Description/Discussion: While the current inline rink is striped to accommodate four pickleball courts, the existing concrete surface is not well suited for pickleball play, especially for senior populations. As part of this project the old lines will be ground off, the concrete surface shot-blasted, and a new more resilient color surface applied. The new surface will be striped to accommodate four pickleball courts including nets, net-posts, and center straps.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

273


TOWN OF PARKER CAPITAL PROJECTS - PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND TEN YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2018-2027

DESCRIPTION REVENUES: Use Tax Excise Tax - Electric (25% Share of Total) Federal Grants Road Sales Tax Shareback Road Use Tax Shareback Parker Homestead Metro District (Chambers Road) (Per Annexation Agreement) Parker Homestead Metro District (Chambers Road/Homestead Signal) Cottonwood Highlands (Powerline Undergrounding Fee Per Permit $400k) Anthology Development (Hess Road Widening - '12) (Current Court Case) Compark Annexation (Original & 2013) Single Family Grasslands Clarke Farms Commercial (20-Mile & Pony Express Traffic Signal) Cottonwood Development Funds (Parkerhouse Signal - Tentative) rcrr Jordan Crossing Escrow Funds Anthology Development Funds (Tentative) Village on the Green Escrow, Reata West & Woody Creek (Tentative) - Traffic Signal Only Douglas County Escrow Funds - Lincoln Creek Development Cottonwood Drive - Condos Contribution Stroh Road Contributions - PWSD & Village on the Green Hess Road Bridge - Parker Water & Sanitation District IGA Park Glenn Improvement District Fund - Parker/Parkglenn Traffic Signal Motsenbocker Widening - Clarke Farms to Todd Drive (Neu Towne) (a) Motsenbocker Widening - Clarke Farms to Todd Drive (Overlook at Cherry Creek) (a) Douglas County Contribution - Todd Drive (b) Douglas County Contribution - Chambers Widening (South of Mainstreet) Parker Rd & Woodman Turn Lane Vantage Point Compark Village Douglas County School District Douglas County School District Villages of Parker F30 Creekside HOA Dransfeldt right of way - Dransfeldt Development LLC Carousel Farms F1 - Century Communities Pine Bluff Ped Signal Hilltop Rd & Legend HS Access Cottonwood King Soopers Signal at 20 Mile and Watermark II - Thompson Thrift Signal at Laceleaf and Cottonwood Dr - Lennar Misc Contributions Debt Issuance Transfer from General Fund (c) Transfer from Parks and Recreation Fund Transfer from Parkglenn Capital Fund Douglas County Contribution - PW Facility Douglas County Library - EastMain Site Development Misc Grants Interest & Earnings FASTER (CDOT) TOTAL REVENUES

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

Public Improvements Fund

ACTUAL 2014

ACTUAL 2015

PROJECTED ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET

3,097,710 362,232

2,328,037 358,622

2,613,852 369,780

3,145,000 392,800

2,218,219 353,022 393,230

2,413,380 352,832 1,215,573

2,532,893 293,528 191,197

2,635,400 325,000

3,130,000 400,000 640,000 2,740,800 300,000

35,200

16,400 500,000

27,300 -

2019

2,029,000 430,300 2,868,300 243,500

500,000

124,250 100,000

380,000 202,943

353,079 135,707

125,000

75,000

1,091,332

850,000

3,100,000

1,750,000

924,597 600,000 1,750,000 300,000

142,078 941,240 92,500 200,000 38,892 1,421 446,773 228,429

30,000 148,110 250,000

224,420 13,204,976 315,000

162,092 191,370

68,750 55,000 22,074 1,500,000 94,748

1,750,000

1,039,630 11,766 47,057 282,848

54,065 294,442

252,376 302,669

100,225 306,100

100,000 315,200

35,000 324,700

23,280,413

8,965,422

12,031,322

11,992,257

10,378,300

8,280,800

274

39,548


Public Improvements Fund

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

2,080,200 452,667

2,133,000 476,200

2,187,600 500,967

2,245,268 524,000

2,304,456 548,100

2,364,400 573,300

2,425,900 599,700

2,489,000 627,300

23,388,824 5,132,534

3,017,500 249,600

3,174,400 256,000

3,395,000 262,500

3,496,850 269,400

3,601,756 276,500

3,709,808 283,700

3,821,102 291,100

3,935,735 298,700

500,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

2,500,000

33,761,252 2,731,000 27,300 5,000,000 100,000 70,000 100,000 250,000 125,000 850,000 22,500,000 185,000 3,593,716

70,000 100,000 250,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

2,750,000

2,750,000

50,000 334,400

344,500

354,800

364,202

373,854

383,761

393,930

404,369

8,854,367

8,884,100

9,700,867

9,649,720

12,104,665

9,814,969

10,281,733

10,505,105

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

275

97,814,626


DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2014

ACTUAL 2015

APPROVED Fund Public PROJECTED Improvements 2018 ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL

BUDGET

2019

EXPENDITURES: Debt Issuance Costs Facility CIP: Publics Works Facility FFE-Public Works Facility Art and Signage Public Works Photovoltaics (solar panels) PW Facility The Plaza on Main - Site Development Roadway CIP: Street Improvements (Reconstruction) Bayou Gulch - Crowfoot to Southern Town Limit (Phase 2) Chambers Widening - Mainstreet to Hess (Phase 2) Chambers Widening - Hess to Stroh Chambers Widening - Stroh to Crowfoot (Phase 2) Cottonwood Widening - Jordan to Cherry Creek Crowfoot Valley Widening - Stroh to Southern Town Limit Crown Crest Roundabout Modification Dransfeldt Extension - 20-Mile to Motsenbocker Road Dransfeldt Widening - Lincoln to Mainstreet Dransfeldt, Motsenbocker,Todd Roadway Alignment Hess Road Widening / Bridge(Cherry Creek) - Nate to Mots. Hess Widening - Great Plain to Western Town Limit Hess Widening - Motsenbocker to Great Plains Jordan Road Widening to Hess Road (south of Main) Jordan/Lincoln Intersection Improvements Kieffer Crossing Improvements (Approach) Kings Point Way Kings Point Way - North (to Aurora Parkway) Lincoln Widening - Keystone to Parker Road Mainstreet Master Plan Implementation Mainstreet North Side Sidewalk (T&C Area) Mainstreet West Streetscape Improvements Mainstreet Safety Enhancements and Circulation Mainstreet Safety Enhancements and Circulation (Phase 2) Motsenbocker Widening - Clarke Farms to Todd Drive Motsenbocker Widening - Todd Drive to Stroh Ranch Parker Road and Woodman Turn Lane Parker Road Corridor Implementation Parker Road Sidewalk Project (East Side - Sulphur Gulch to Plaza) Parker Road Sidewalk Project (Ongoing) Parker Road/Lincoln Deceleration Lane Parker Road Widening - Cottonwood to Lincoln - Joint Project with CDOT Parker Road/20 Mile Road/E-470 Mobility Improvements Parkglenn Way - South of Longs (to Brownstone extension) Pikes Peak Ave Ext (Town hall East) Pikes Peak Court Extension Pikes Peak Drive (Mainstreet/Sulphur Gulch) Streetscape Improvements Pilgrims Place Pine Lane Widening - Jordan to Wintergreen Power Line Undergrounding Stroh Rd. Widening - J. Morgan to Motsenbocker Summerset Lane Extenstion J Morgan Extension J Morgan Extension (Phase 2) - Extension to Reata Property Todd Drive (Jordan to Motsenbocker) Misc. Sidewalk Gap Closures Roadway Safety Enhancements Median/Entryway Lighting & Landscaping Townwide Sign Program

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

131,001

-

-

9,611,594

5,265,726

258,358

189,900

1,919,215

2,043,732

286,624 3,970,501 2,256 -

178,909 153,275 -

1,480,068 8,310,954 350,046 3,176 157,716 -

-

-

-

-

140,000 20,000 10,000 -

1,450,000 2,600,000 618,000 5,427,300 886,240 50,000 -

1,750,000

1,750,000

9,500,000

300,000

1,200,000 1,300,000

1,500,000 148,628 -

442,078 -

11,041 56,675

3,088,900 75,000

1,000,000

1,159,875 958,944 -

3,200 686,506 12,981

45,498 17,650 297,056 155,816 -

660,000 1,741,200 450,000

200,000

8,799 210,178 129,486 23,982 177,504

100,000 209,400 300,000 800,000

429,184 43,681 24,757 517,538 142,374

276

1,425,399 201,149 198,511 34,485

250,000

150,000

100,000 100,000 300,000

100,000 100,000 300,000 50,000


Public Improvements Fund TOTAL 2018 2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TO 2027

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

350,000

5,000,000

500,000

2,500,000

2,500,000 *

2,750,000 *

2,750,000 *

450,000

7,500,000

500,000

* * 300,000 900,000

* *

* *

300,000

400,000

17,500,000

4,000,000

1,300,000

150,000

4,500,000 *

750,000

9,000,000

1,000,000 * * 700,000

6,500,000 *

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000 * *

400,000 *

* 200,000 650,000

1,500,000

7,500,000

2,000,000 * 100,000 100,000 300,000

100,000 100,000 300,000 50,000

100,000 100,000 300,000

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

100,000 100,000 300,000 50,000

100,000 100,000 300,000

277

100,000 100,000 300,000 50,000

100,000 100,000 300,000

100,000 100,000 300,000

22,500,000 5,850,000 8,450,000 9,800,000 18,200,000 4,900,000 1,300,000 300,000 4,650,000 1,200,000 1,300,000 9,750,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 250,000 7,200,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 400,000 1,700,000 8,150,000 150,000 2,200,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 200,000


DESCRIPTION Traffic Signal CIP (Standalone & Not In Roadway CIP Listing Above):

School Zone Safety Flasher Pine Drive/Summerset Hilltop and Legend HS Access Pine Drive/Dewberry Parker Road/Parkglenn Way Chambers Road/Compark Boulevard Cottonwood Drive/Cottonwood Way Redundant Fiber Project Chambers Road/Cottonwood Dr Crowncrest/Hospital Signal Vantage Point Signal Modification Canterberry/Idyllwilde Chambers Road/Grasslands Drive Dransfeldt Road/Parkglenn Way Hess Road/Country Meadows/Peppy Blue Dot Access Hess Road/Great Plain Way Jordan Road/Cedar Gulch Parkway Jordan Road/Cottonwood Subdivision Mid Block Pedestrian Crossing Jordan Road/Parkerhouse Road Jordan Road/Todd Drive Lincoln Avenue/Village Creek Pkwy (Lincoln Creek) Motsenbocker Road/French Creek Avenue Parker Road/Longs Way Parker Road/Rancho Caballo/Christensen Road Stroh Road/J. Morgan Boulevard Twenty Mile Road/Pony Express Drive Equipment Contingency Economic Incentives TOTAL EXPENDITURES

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds ENDING FUND BALANCE

ACTUAL 2014

APPROVED Fund Public PROJECTED Improvements 2018 ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL

BUDGET

2019

148,317 20,472 -

13,090 55,057 8,332 265,086 261,567 (50) -

5,312 2,864 69,672 161,384 -

3,650 110,000 275,000 120,000 50,000

7,432 31,961

375,725 -

234,107

100,000 -

17,825,039

11,500,240

14,211,074

19,284,690

5,515,000

15,400,000

5,455,374

(2,534,818)

(2,179,752)

(7,292,433)

4,863,300

(7,119,200)

17,165,472

14,630,654

12,450,902

5,158,469

10,021,769

2,902,569

25,000

295,000

Note: Asterisk (*) Projects Listed in 2023 are outside the timetable provided. (a) The Town is currently holding $75,000 in escrow related to the Motsenbocker Widening (Clarke Farms to Todd Drive) project. Contributions based on development agreements with Neu Towne and Overlook at Cherry Creek will be $1,700,000 and $800,000 respectively. (b) The Town anticipated 50% of the project costs for Todd Drive to be contributed by Douglas County (c) The transfer from General Fund in 2014 consists of $315,00 for the Public Works facility

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

ACTUAL 2015

278

25,000 25,000

20,000

25,000 150,000 275,000 25,000

100,000


Public Improvements Fund TOTAL 2018 2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TO 2027

300,000

285,000 25,000

325,000

285,000 25,000

325,000

285,000

285,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

300,000 300,000 325,000 *

25,000

285,000

100,000

100,000

9,515,000 (660,633) 2,241,936

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

12,510,000

15,250,000

13,325,000

27,125,000

5,325,000

17,350,000

3,850,000

(3,625,900)

(5,549,133)

(3,675,280)

(15,020,335)

4,489,969

(7,068,267)

6,655,105

(1,383,964)

(6,933,097)

(10,608,377)

(25,628,712)

(21,138,743)

(28,207,010)

(21,551,905)

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

279

325,000 295,000 310,000 350,000 310,000 350,000 310,000 150,000 295,000 310,000 325,000 325,000 350,000 310,000 900,000

125,165,000


DESCRIPTION Traffic Signal CIP (Standalone & Not In Roadway CIP Listing Above):

School Zone Safety Flasher Pine Drive/Summerset Hilltop and Legend HS Access Pine Drive/Dewberry Parker Road/Parkglenn Way Chambers Road/Compark Boulevard Cottonwood Drive/Cottonwood Way Redundant Fiber Project Chambers Road/Cottonwood Dr Crowncrest/Hospital Signal Vantage Point Signal Modification Canterberry/Idyllwilde Chambers Road/Grasslands Drive Dransfeldt Road/Parkglenn Way Hess Road/Country Meadows/Peppy Blue Dot Access Hess Road/Great Plain Way Jordan Road/Cedar Gulch Parkway Jordan Road/Cottonwood Subdivision Mid Block Pedestrian Crossing Jordan Road/Parkerhouse Road Jordan Road/Todd Drive Lincoln Avenue/Village Creek Pkwy (Lincoln Creek) Motsenbocker Road/French Creek Avenue Parker Road/Longs Way Parker Road/Rancho Caballo/Christensen Road Stroh Road/J. Morgan Boulevard Twenty Mile Road/Pony Express Drive Equipment Contingency Economic Incentives TOTAL EXPENDITURES

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds ENDING FUND BALANCE

ACTUAL 2014

APPROVED Fund Public PROJECTED Improvements 2018 ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL

BUDGET

2019

148,317 20,472 -

13,090 55,057 8,332 265,086 261,567 (50) -

5,312 2,864 69,672 161,384 -

3,650 110,000 275,000 120,000 50,000

7,432 31,961

375,725 -

234,107

100,000 -

17,825,039

11,500,240

14,211,074

19,284,690

5,515,000

15,400,000

5,455,374

(2,534,818)

(2,179,752)

(7,292,433)

4,863,300

(7,119,200)

17,165,472

14,630,654

12,450,902

5,158,469

10,021,769

2,902,569

25,000

295,000

Note: Asterisk (*) Projects Listed in 2023 are outside the timetable provided. (a) The Town is currently holding $75,000 in escrow related to the Motsenbocker Widening (Clarke Farms to Todd Drive) project. Contributions based on development agreements with Neu Towne and Overlook at Cherry Creek will be $1,700,000 and $800,000 respectively. (b) The Town anticipated 50% of the project costs for Todd Drive to be contributed by Douglas County (c) The transfer from General Fund in 2014 consists of $315,00 for the Public Works facility

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

ACTUAL 2015

280

25,000 25,000

20,000

25,000 150,000 275,000 25,000

100,000


Public Improvements Fund TOTAL 2018 2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TO 2027

300,000

285,000 25,000

325,000

285,000 25,000

325,000

285,000

285,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

300,000 300,000 325,000 *

25,000

285,000

100,000

100,000

9,515,000 (660,633) 2,241,936

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

12,510,000

15,250,000

13,325,000

27,125,000

5,325,000

17,350,000

3,850,000

(3,625,900)

(5,549,133)

(3,675,280)

(15,020,335)

4,489,969

(7,068,267)

6,655,105

(1,383,964)

(6,933,097)

(10,608,377)

(25,628,712)

(21,138,743)

(28,207,010)

(21,551,905)

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

281

325,000 295,000 310,000 350,000 310,000 350,000 310,000 150,000 295,000 310,000 325,000 325,000 350,000 310,000 900,000

125,165,000


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Canterberry/Idyllwilde Traffic Signal 2018 Costs: $295,000 Operational Impact: Monthly repair and maintenance of the tr affic signal plus electr icity.

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Due to the continued development of the Idyllwilde development area, traffic has continued to increase in the area. This traffic signal will support this continued development of the area.

Description/Discussion: Construction of a mast arm traffic signal at the Canterberry Parkway and Idyllwilde Drive intersection. In 2016, the Town completed a new traffic signal warrant analysis of the Canterberry Parkway and Idyllwilde Drive intersection. This was an update on a warrant analysis that was performed several years prior. The 2016 warrant analysis did not show the need for a traffic signal at this intersection but there was increased vehicular and pedestrian traffic over the prior analysis. Due to continued development of the Idyllwilde subdivision, there is anticipated to be increased traffic on both roadways which is currently projected/ anticipated to meet Federal MUTCD (Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices) warrants for installation of a traffic signal in 2018. This is assuming that the proposed development continues to occur as currently anticipated in the area.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

282


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: J Morgan Extension 2018 Costs: $200,000 2019 Costs: TBD Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs.

Purpose: The proposed improvements will allow greater programming of these outdoor courts for pickleball games and tournaments.

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth In the prior 15-years, Town Council has approved development agreements with numerous developments adjacent to J Morgan Boulevard and Stroh Road intersection. In addition, the planned development of Anthology and Hess Ranch will add additional traffic to the area. The extension of J Morgan Boulevard will be a community enhancement that is driven by the regional development.

Description/Discussion: The design of the extension of J Morgan Boulevard (collector roadway) south of Stroh Road. The intent of the proposed 2018 budget is to conceptually design approximately 1,500 linear feet of J Morgan Boulevard south of Stroh Road to the Town’s property south of Kinney Creek. The roadway for J Morgan Boulevard will be a non-residential collector (3-lane) section with sidewalks and bike lanes. Ultimately the extension of J Morgan Boulevard will act as a needed secondary access point to the Town’s property south of Kinney Creek. This conceptual design will also include preliminary design of the proposed bridge over Kinney Creek.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

283


Public Improvements Fund Capital Project: Jordan Road Widening to Hess Road (south of Mainstreet) 2018 Costs: $300,000 Operational Impact: New maintenance costs

Purpose: Beginning in 2002, Town Council provided direction that Town capital improvement roadway projects with raised medians be landscaped following the construction of the roadway. This has been done on several roadway projects and with the Jordan Road widening project underway in 2017, it is anticipated that the Town would landscape the medians in 2018 (assuming funding is appropriated).

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth All Town capital improvement roadway projects with raised medians be landscaped following the construction of the roadway. This was done on Hess Road following the roadway widening between Motsenbocker Road and Hess Road in 2012 (landscaping in 2013) and the Hess Road bridge widening over Cherry Creek in 2014 (landscaping in 2015). Median landscaping on the Chambers Road widening project was completed in 2017. The median landscaping and lighting lets people know that they are in Parker due to the use of the “Parker style� 5-globe lighting. The biggest goal of this median landscaping project is community enhancement.

Description/Discussion: The median landscaping of the portion of Jordan Road from the Hess Road intersection to the Bradbury Parkway intersection.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

284


Public Improvements Fund Capital Project: Jordan Road & Parkerhouse Road Traffic Signal 2018 Costs: $20,000 2019 Costs: $275,000 Operational Impact: Repair and maintenance costs for the new signal plus electr icity.

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Due to the continued economic development of the Jordan Road/E-470 area, traffic has continued to increase in the area. This traffic signal will support this continued economic development of the area.

Description/Discussion: Design of a mast arm traffic signal at the Jordan Road & Parkerhouse Road intersection. It is currently anticipated that there will be continued development in the Cottonwood Highlands area and on the east side of the Jordan/Parkerhouse intersection in 2018. This development will result in the intersection potentially meeting Federal MUTCD (Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices) warrants for installation of a traffic signal in 2019. The 2018 requested funding is for the design of the traffic signal. The Town should anticipate reimbursement for the traffic signal installation as development occurs adjacent to the intersection.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

285


Public Improvements Fund Capital Project: Kings Point Way Collector Roadway Constr uction 2018 Costs: $1,200,000 Beyond: TBD Operational Impact: Repair and maintenance costs for the new signal plus electr icity.

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Due to the continued development of the Crown Point development and the proposed Kings Point development, a roadway parallel to Parker Road is needed to support the anticipated traffic. In order to address this anticipated increase in traffic, a parallel roadway to the east of Parker Road will provide alternative routes for traffic in the area. The construction of Kings Point Way between Cottonwood Drive on the south and the proposed Aurora Parkway on the north will be a community enhancement to support the economic development of this area.

Description/Discussion: Construction of Kings Point Way (a collector roadway) between Cottonwood Drive and proposed Aurora Parkway. Ultimately a half-mile (2,600 feet) of collector roadway will be constructed to link Cottonwood Drive with proposed Aurora Parkway. The roadway will be a three (3) lane non-residential collector roadway with bike lanes and sidewalks.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

286


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Medians and Entr yways 2018 Costs: $300,000 2019 Costs: $300,000 Beyond: $300,000 Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Since this annual fund was established by Town Council in 2002, the Town has completed the median landscaping and lighting on several Town roadways. These include (but not limited to) Hilltop Road (Parker Road to Hidden River Lane), Mainstreet east of Town Hall and Mainstreet between Cherry Creek and Stage Run. In 2002, Town Council directed the completion of the median landscaping with new roadway projects and established the annual fund to “catch up” with the roads that were already built. In 2009, the annual project funding was frozen due to economic contingency planning but it was resumed in 2012 with median work on Jordan Road between Lincoln Avenue and E-470. In 2013, the next programmed area of Lincoln Avenue between Parker Road (State Highway 83) and Pine Drive was commenced and was completed in 2014. The next programmed area is Lincoln Avenue between Keystone Boulevard and Jordan Road. Progress on this section of Lincoln Avenue was delayed due to Douglas County maintenance work in the area but this project was anticipated to take two (2) years to complete with the currently anticipated $300,000 annual funding level. The median landscaping and lighting lets people know that they are in Parker due to the use of the “Parker style” 5-globe lighting. The goal of this project is community enhancement.

Description/Discussion: Installation of median landscaping on Lincoln Avenue between Jordan Road and Keystone Boulevard.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

287


Public Improvements Fund Capital Project: Motsenbocker Widening-Clarke Farms to Todd Drive 2018 Costs: $250,000 2019 Costs: $200,000 Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth In the prior decade, Town Council approved development agreements with both the NeuTowne subdivision and the Overlook at Cherry Creek subdivision. Both of these development agreements contemplated widening Motsenbocker Road between the existing Clarke Farms subdivision to the Todd Drive intersection as a residential boulevard collector section. The intent of these agreements was that the Town would complete the roadway widening following payments from the proposed developments per their respective agreements. The widening of Motsenbocker Road will be a community enhancement that is driven by the adjacent development.

Description/Discussion: The widening of Motsenbocker Road to a residential boulevard collector roadway section between the Clarke Farms subdivision and the Todd Drive intersection.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

288


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Par ker Road Sidewalk Project 2018 Costs: $1,000,000 Offsetting Revenue: $640,000 Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Since the sidewalk was completed on the west side of Parker Road several years ago between Mainstreet and Lincoln Avenue, the Town has received numerous compliments on the addition from a pedestrian connectivity standpoint. There is current a dirt “social path� on the east side of Parker Road that shows the need for this sidewalk. This project will be a community enhancement by increasing pedestrian connectivity and safety.

Description/Discussion: Construction of a ten (10) foot wide multiuse sidewalk/trail adjacent to the east side of Parker Road (State Highway 83) between the Sulphur Gulch trail and the Plaza Drive intersection. There is currently no continuous sidewalk on the east side of Parker Road between Plaza Drive and the Sulphur Gulch trail (south of Mainstreet). Town Staff applied for and received approval for Federal funding for the construction of a 10foot wide multiuse sidewalk/trail adjacent on the east side of Parker Road as part of the DRCOG transportation funding process. The Federal funds will be administered through CDOT (Colorado Department of Transportation) and are part of their 2018 fiscal year (which commences 07/01/2017 but the Federal funds are also tied to the Federal fiscal year which commences on 10/01/2017). This funding was formalized as part of an intergovernmental agreement (IGA) that Town Council approved in November of 2016. This Federal funding will only be for the actual construction of the sidewalk and not for design, easement acquisition, construction administration, inspection or construction management. The approved IGA split for construction is an 80% Federal and 20% local (Town) match.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

289


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Roadway Safety Enhancements 2018 Costs: $1,000,000 2019 Costs: $100,000 Beyond: $100,000 Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Over the past several years, the Town has been addressing roadway safety concerns/issues via this annual funding source. The big push with this annual project the last couple of years has been intersection sighttriangle improvements and intersection lighting installations. The intersection sight-triangle concerns are typically related to relocation/replacement of landscaping at or near intersections. Several intersections have had luminaires installed at them with this annual program including intersections on Hilltop Road, Lincoln Avenue, Parker Road, Canterberry Parkway and Dransfeldt Road. The goal of this annual program is to increase safety of the Town’s roadways.

Description/Discussion: The plan for funding in 2018 is to address the lack of intersection lighting on Jordan Road. Several of these intersections lack any lighting which increases the potential for vehicle/vehicle or vehicle/pedestrian incidents. With the Cottonwood Highlands development under development, the northern Jordan Road corridor will see increased vehicular and pedestrian traffic. This annual fund allows the Town to be proactive and flexible in the application of these safety related funds. Based on past experience, landscaping sight distance issues will come up in 2018 as have in past years that will need to be addressed in a timely manner.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

290


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Sidewalk Gap Closures 2018 Costs: $1,000,000 2019 Costs: $100,000 Beyond: $100,000 Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Since this annual fund was established by Town Council in 2006, the Town has eliminated several sidewalk gaps via this funding source. This has in-turn increased the pedestrian connectivity and safety within the Town. The listing of sidewalk gaps in the community is extensive and will take a long-term (annual funding) approach to address the gaps. Some of the sidewalk gaps will be eliminated in the future by development but there need may be a need to address some of them now with the plan to seek reimbursement from the development in the future. The biggest goal of this project is community enhancement by increasing pedestrian connectivity and safety.

Description/Discussion: Elimination of a sidewalk gap adjacent to the west of Jordan Road between Cottonwood Drive and Parkerhouse Road plus the elimination of a sidewalk gap on the north side of Longs Way that is west of Parker Road The annual sidewalk gap closure program is reviewed on a semi-annual basis with the goal of improving pedestrian connectivity and providing “safe routes� to school. Due to the recent plating of the Cottonwood Highlands development, the Town now has the right-of-way to address the Jordan Road sidewalk gap. This section of sidewalk is the responsibility of the adjacent proposed development but plans to accelerate construction in advance of the adjacent development. The Town will seek reimbursement for the construction of the approximately 1,000 foot section of sidewalk by the development when it occurs on the adjacent property.

Longs Way Sidewalk Gap Vicinity Map Jordan Road Sidewalk Gap Vicinity Map Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

291


Public Improvements Fund

Capital Project: Street Reconstr uct Projects 2018 Costs: $1,750,000 2019 Costs: $1,750,000 Beyond: $2,000,000 + Operational Impact: Long-term maintenance costs

Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Town roadways are typically designed with a 30-year design life assuming routine maintenance is used. As roadways reach the end of their design/service life, they become very distressed and complaints increase due to potholes plus ride and noise issues. Roadways at the end of their design life can also impact economic development. The Town has a fiduciary responsibility to maintain the transportation investment made previously.

Description/Discussion: Improving the Town’s roadway network through annual reconstruction efforts. These annual funds would be utilized for roadways approaching or exceeding their design/service life. This will be an ongoing annual project as the Town has numerous roadways approaching their original design life. 2018 budget funds are anticipated to be used in 2018 for reconstruction of the pavement on Cottonwood Drive west of Cherry Creek. This work needs to be completed concurrently with the Cottonwood bridge widening project. As of compiling this budget request, other areas anticipated that this funding could be utilized for are the reconstructing roadways in the Stroh Ranch area. Several areas in Stroh Ranch are being considered including J Morgan Boulevard north of Stroh Road.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

292


AP-

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

293


TOWN OF PARKER CAPITAL PROJECTS - STORMWATER UTILITY TEN YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2018-2027

DESCRIPTION REVENUES: Stormwater Utility Fund Escrow from Parker Homestead SIA Urban Drainage Contribution Sulphur Gulch Stabilization - Thompson Thrift Meritage homes - Lemon Gulch at Meadowlark TOTAL REVENUES

ACTUAL 2014

ACTUAL 2015

1,064,978 22,000

1,389,388 143,037

1,086,978

1,532,425

-

75,000

PROJECTED ACTUAL 2016 2017 ACTUAL

831,091 200,000 108,151

1,139,242

758,862 -

680,747 -

215,000

1,500,000

973,862

2,180,747

EXPENDITURES: Stormwater Infrastructure Retrofits/Additions Miscellaneous Drainage Capital Improvements Cherry Creek at Cottonwood Phase 1 (a) Cherry Creek at Cottonwood Phase 2 (a) Cherry Creek at KOA (a) Cherry Creek at Lincoln (a) Cherry Creek at Mainstreet (a) Cherry Creek at Norton Open Space (a) Cottonwood Storm Infrastructure Replacement Crown Point Regional Detention Pond Hilltop Road Water Quality Improvements Happy Canyon Creek Improvements at Compark (a) Lemon Gulch at Meadowlark Schoolhouse Parking Lot McCabe Meadows Newlin Gulch South of Mainstreet Newlin Gulch (a) Newlin Gulch Crossing at East-West Trail (a) Newlin Gulch Crossing at Parker Homestead (c) Newlin Gulch at Lincoln (a) Oak Gulch (a) Oak Gulch Improvements (a) Parker Square Drainage Improvements Parkglenn Trickle Channel Pine Bluffs F2 Sub-Regional Detention Pond Pine Gulch Regional Detention Pond (a)(b) Potestio Brothers Drainage Improvements (a) Robinson Ranch Drainage Improvements Sara Gulch (a) Sierra Middle School at Pine Lane Elem Drainage Sierra Middle School Pond Sulpher Gulch at Canterberry Parkway (a) Sulpher Gulch at Canterberry Trail (a) Sulphur Gulch at Riva Ridge (a) Sulphur Gulch Downstream of Canterberry Parkway (a) Tallman Gulch at Hidden River (a) Tallman Gulch at Wanderlust (a) Tallman Tributary (a) Lincoln Avenue Pond Retrofit Mower Pipe Inspection Camera Plate Compactor Attachment Overseeder Attachment Rototiller Attachment Dump Trailer F550 Pickup with Dump Bed Single Axle Dump Truck TOTAL EXPENDITURES

6,124 9,399 215,523

4,900 640,850

13,319 320,600

780,060

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds

871,455

891,575

818,642

193,802

4,912,894

5,804,469

6,623,111

6,816,913

ENDING FUND BALANCE

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET

2019

714,784 -

714,784

30,000 200,000 -

200,000 160,340 75,610 -

-

125,000 -

285,434 12,325 (60) 9,582 -

65,000 50,000 215,000 40,000 160,000 160,060 50,000 40,000 -

250,000 70,000

1,500,000 40,000 200,000

50,000

150,000 -

-

50,000

100,000

294

50,000 2,290,000 (109,253) 6,707,660

170,000 544,784 7,252,444


2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

750,524 -

788,050 -

827,452 -

868,825 -

912,266 -

957,879 -

1,005,773 -

1,056,062

750,524

788,050

827,452

868,825

912,266

957,879

1,005,773

1,056,062

31,500

33,075

34,729

36,465

38,288

40,203

42,213

44,324

60,000

650,000 50,000

500,000

400,000 50,000

200,000 500,000

50,000

250,000

70,000

400,000

50,000 50,000

250,000

35,000

250,000

50,000

400,000

50,000

250,000

200,000 35,000

150,000

50,000

250,000

200,000

75,000

700,000

450,000

225,000 610,000

710,000

810,000

850,000

720,000

900,000

50,524

338,050

217,452

158,825

102,266

107,879

285,773

156,062

7,302,968

7,641,018

7,858,470

8,017,295

8,119,561

8,227,440

8,513,214

8,669,276

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

295

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

8,562,363 1,500,000 10,062,363

330,797 710,000 550,000 250,000 470,000 250,000 500,000 300,000 1,500,000 40,000 470,000 200,000 100,000 300,000 285,000 150,000 450,000 250,000 300,000 185,000 200,000 300,000 100,000 75,000 50,000 225,000 8,210,000


Stormwater Utility Fund Capital Project: Lemon Gulch downstream of Crowfoot Valley Road 2018 Costs: $1,500,000 Operational Impact: N/A The project will be eligible for Ur ban Dr ainage Maintenance Assistance and Stormwater Utility Maintenance Program Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Promote a Safe and Healthy Community This project will provide channel/bank grading and grade control structures on Lemon Gulch to provide channel stability. These improvements will stabilize Lemon Gulch and safely convey the full spectrum of flood flows adjacent to properties within the Town and prevent future erosion.

Description/Discussion: This project is located in Lemon Gulch just east of Crowfoot Valley Road. The project consists of channel and bank grading including grade control structures to stabilize Lemon Gulch. The Town and Urban Drainage have adopted a master plan for Lemon Gulch and this area was identified as needing a channel for stabilization. Design was funded in 2017, with construction funded in 2018. Lemon Gulch is identified as a major drainageway with required improvements for long term stabilization. Rather than requiring the developer adjacent to Lemon Gulch design and construct the improvements, the Town and Urban Drainage believe it is in both entities best interest to accept cash in lieu and directly coordinate the design and construction as a capital improvement project.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

296


Stormwater Utility Fund

Capital Project: Lincoln Avenue Pond Retrofit 2018 Costs: $100,000 Operational Impact: N/A, The project will be retrofit to an existing detention pond that is currently eligible for Town maintenance. Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Retrofit of this detention pond will promote healthier vegetation in the pond and improve the aesthetics as it is highly visible from Lincoln Avenue. These improvements will enhance the function of the detention pond serving Lincoln Avenue right-of-way.

Description/Discussion: The Detention pond serving Lincoln Avenue near Ponderosa Drive requires a retrofit of the existing outlet pipe. The current configuration is a perforated pipe installed vertically in the bottom of the pond. The pipe will be replaced with an outlet structure designed in accordance with the Town’s Storm Draiange Criteria Manual to slowly release the stormwater runoff. The pond is also lacking a forebay and trickle channel and these elements will be considered during the design of the retrofit.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

297


Stormwater Utility Fund

Capital Project: Newlin Gulch at Heir loom Par kway 2018 Costs: $200,000 Operational Impact: N/A, the project will be eligible for Ur ban Dr ainage Maintenance Assistance and the Town’s Stormwater Utility Maintenance Program Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Promote a Safe and Healthy Community This project will provide a grade control structure on Newlin Gulch to provide channel stability. The improvements will also stabilize Newlin Gulch by completing a grade control structure and prevent future erosion.

Description/Discussion: This project is located in Newlin Gulch just east of Chambers Road approximately at Heirloom Parkway (extended). The project is a grade control structure within Newlin Gulch. The Town and Urban Drainage have also finalized a master plan for Newlin Gulch in 2015 and this area was identified as one location for grade control needed in the channel for stabilization. The total funding included design in 2017 and construction in 2018. The Parker Homestead developer installed a sheet pile check structure in this location as a part of the development obligations to construct major drainageway infrastructure identified in the adopted master plan. Since the check structure was installed, the master plan has been updated with new recommendations to retrofit the check structure into a drop structure. Since the check structure was installed, the channel has also eroded due to the increase in base flow from the adjacent developments. This further supports the new recommendation to retrofit this check structure into a drop structure.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

298


Stormwater Utility Fund

Capital Project: Sier r a Middle School Pond Repair 2018 Costs: $150,000 Operational Impact: N/A, the project will be retrofit to an existing detention pond that is currently eligible for Town maintenance Council Goals Achieved Develop a Visionary Community Through Balanced Growth Promote a Safe and Healthy Community Repair of this detention pond will eliminate safety hazards associated with the storm damage. These improvements will enhance the function of the detention pond serving a regional watershed.

Description/Discussion: The Detention pond adjacent to Sierra Middle School requires repair of a drop structure on the upstream side of the pond. The grouted boulders have been undermined and have failed. The pond bottom also requires a concrete trickle channel as the earthen channel is too unstable to resist shear stresses from the water causing erosion and sediment transport downstream. The grouted boulders will be removed, re-set and re-grouted in accordance with the original design. A forebay and concrete trickle channel will also be constructed to discourage sediment transport downstream to the micro-pool of the outlet structure.

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

299


CAPITAL PROJECTS - FACILITES TEN YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2018-2027

DESCRIPTION REVENUES: Charges for Services: General Fund Parks and Rec Fund Cultural Fund Transfer in School House Grant Funding (a)

TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES: General Gov't. Carpet Program Reconfiguration/Updates to Motsenbocker Facility Motsenbocker Chemical storage container Motsenbocker Mezzanine Storage Motsenbocker Office Bldg. roof (Flat) Motsenbocker Office Bldg. RTU's Motsenbocker Facilities Bldg. Roof Motsenbocker Gate Operator Motsenbocker Fleet Shop LED Light Upgrade Motsenbocker Facilities HVAC unit Public Works/Parks Fiber Connection - Mots Town Hall Bldg. Controls Town Hall Variable Frequency Drives Town Hall Door Hardware Town Hall Breakroom remodel Town Hall Upgrades Town Hall LED Lighting Conversion Old Town Hall Furnace Replacement Town Hall Boilers Town Hall Roof Town Hall Chiller Plant Town Hall VAV Zone Valves Town Hall RTU's Town Hall Expansion Townwide Storage Facility Demolition of Pine Curve Structures Police Departmental Expansion Mainstreet Decorative Festoon Lighting Police Interview Recording System Police Station AV Upgrade Police Station Security Component Upgrade PD Cooling Tower for A/C Units Concrete removal and enhancement of Old Town Hall patio Concrete trail improvements for Stroh Soccer Park Shade Structures at Discovery Park Keiffer's Tunnel Repair Salisbury Equestrian Park Repair

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

ACTUAL 2015

PROJECTED PROJECTED 2017 ACTUAL 2016

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET

2019

420,678 35,000 109,975 200,000

157,955 194,601 5,600 872,562 243,685

843,600 483,400 2,597,170 200,000

447,520 183,000 1,043,025

145,000 50,000 1,723,000

765,653

1,474,403

4,124,170

1,673,545

1,918,000

30,000 351,296

26,857 49,841 14,200 -

30,000 37,500

30,000

-

30,800 35,000 45,000 100,000

30,000 17,500 10,300

-

28,122 -

22,800 10,000 22,000 55,000 33,000

25,000 10,000

38,935 45,000 24,720 -

-

39,000 -

-

-

11,486 27,896

-

131,000 170,000 57,500 25,000 -

55,000

65,000

200,000

20,000 25,000 35,000

300


2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

770,000 85,000 50,000 -

6,600,000 50,000 -

600,000 50,000 -

85,000 50,000 -

50,000 -

145,000 50,000 -

900,000 50,000 -

905,000

6,650,000

650,000

135,000

50,000

195,000

950,000

600,000 145,000 70,000 400,000

6,600,000 900,000

75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

301

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

2027

10,451,120 836,400 400,000 5,363,195 200,000 -

-

-

17,250,715

30,000 30,000 17,500 10,300 25,000 10,000 45,000 24,720 55,000 600,000 145,000 135,000 7,000,000 900,000 200,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 20,000 25,000 35,000


DESCRIPTION School House Non-historic Annex Office Reconfiguration School House Non-historic Annex Shared Walkway School House Non-historic Annex Bathroom Upgrade School House Lightning Protection School House Rm 300 Lighting School House Exterior Lighting School House Baseboards School House Non-historic Annex RTU School House Non historiec annex - Theater seats and risers School House Non historic annex - remodel North Plaza on Mainstreet (Schoolhouse & Chapel) School House (Old School House) Heating unit -boiler (a) School House Dry Valve (Fire Sprinkler) School House Electrical Upgrade School House Fire Alarm Panel School House Fire Sprinkler Head Replacement School House Foundation School House Gym Demolition School House Old School House Rehab (a) School House Parking Lot Replacement and Lighting School House Sewer Line replacement Analysis School House historic - Construction warranty and mitigation Ruth Chapel Front Steps Ruth Chapel Seal Foundation Walls Townwide Public Art Fieldhouse Electrical Surge Protection Fieldhouse Bldg. Controls Fieldhouse Reroof O'Brien Pool Bldg. Doors Replace existing portions of flooring in Recreation Center Renovating the public equip storage Group Fitness Studio Carpet Replacement at Fieldhouse Fieldhouse Playground Area Renovation Refinish Gym Floor at Fieldhouse Replace Gym Wall Pads at Fieldhouse Replastering of H20’Brien Pool Rec. Center Roof Rec. Center RTU's Rec. Center Group Cycle Room Floor Rec. Center Gym Curtain Rec. Center HVAC Rec. Center Boiler Fieldhouse Exterior Drainage Fieldhouse LED Conversion Salisbury Concession/RR's HVAC Unit Salisbury Equestrian HVAC

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

ACTUAL 2015 -

PROJECTED PROJECTED 2016 2017 ACTUAL 160,000 291,500 38,000

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET

2019

18,025 -

-

10,000 86,000 213,975 -

150,000 109,941 180,000 676,306 -

35,000 -

5,600 5,999 30,175 15,000 33,677

-

109,750 -

14,900 5,200 175,370 781,900 1,269,800 -

25,000

25,000

500,000

1,698,000

500,000

10,500 50,000 50,000 443,900 32,000 7,500 51,000 80,000 30,000 22,000

-

765,653

-

1,474,403

-

4,124,170

1,673,545

1,918,000

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds

-

-

-

-

-

ENDING FUND BALANCE

-

-

-

-

-

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

302


2020

2021

50,000

2022

50,000

2023

50,000

50,000

2024

50,000

2025

2026

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

2027

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

195,000

950,000

18,025 50,000 2,198,000 500,000 400,000 100,000 51,000 80,000 30,000 22,000 35,000 35,000 -

50,000

35,000 35,000

905,000

6,650,000

650,000

135,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

303

13,126,545


TOWN OF PARKER CAPITAL OUTLAY - MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE TEN YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2018-2027

DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2015

PROJECTED PROJECTED 2016 2017 ACTUAL

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET

2019

REVENUES: General Fund LEAF Fund Cultural Fund Recreation Fund Information Technology Fund Fleet Fund Facilities Fund TOTAL REVENUES

727,094 110,483 201,500 1,091,164 26,307

1,190,929 195,637 516,800 1,360,000 -

3,575,600 225,000 115,848 579,400 798,485 -

647,500 126,000 45,000 1,432,000 -

1,040,000

2,156,547

3,263,366

5,294,333

2,250,500

2,640,000

1,600,000 -

EXPENDITURES: Agenda Management Software Financial software upgrade - Caselle One (1) Sergeant patrol vehicle Administrative Vehicle (2) Animal Service Vehicle K-9 Five (5) Portable Radios Wearable Camera System (5 units) Police Mobile Command Center Two (2) Additional Police Vehicles Razor ATV Type Vehicle and Trailer Three (3) Additional Police Vehicles K9 Patrol Vehicle 2 Unmarked Vehicles for SROs and 1 for Admin Animal Services Truck Vehicle for new Patrol FTE - will be removed by amend Tyler/Brazos E-Citation Licenses and Hardware PD RMS Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) - 2nd Phase Dispatch Radio System Replacement 911 Authority VIPER System Truck for Building Inspector Roadway Widener Skid Steer Loader Attachment Single Drum Vibratory Roller Concrete Breaker Backhoe Attachment Backhoe Random Crack Router Drag A Box - Military Pickup Spreaders Mastic Machine Skid Mount Portable Mixer Tandem Dump Truck w/Snowplow Front End Loader (4 CY) Pickup Trucks w/Snowplow

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

20,000 185,000 55,044 50,520 45,766 38,967 -

10,000 34,429 184,237

40,000 -

900,000

69,000 169,000 35,000 35,000 120,000 -

5,548 125,045 -

11,000 1,799,000 120,000 345,000

0 23,584 17,000 42,241 101,492 246,853 -

30,000 249,500 105,000

183,000 113,780 -

304


2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027

425,000

560,000

490,000

630,000

120,000

740,000

1,030,000

480,000

1,000,000 -

1,900,000 -

2,000,000 -

1,500,000 -

1,400,000 -

1,000,000 -

3,200,000 -

2,500,000 -

6,162,500 126,000 45,000 17,532,000 -

1,425,000

2,460,000

2,490,000

2,130,000

1,520,000

1,740,000

4,230,000

2,980,000

23,865,500

280,000

300,000

50,000

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

350,000 400,000 55,000

60,000

305

900,000 69,000 169,000 35,000 35,000 183,000 930,000 400,000 165,000


ACTUAL 2015

DESCRIPTION Portland Cement Storage Silo Crash Attenuation Trailer Cushman 1200 Gas Hauler 1200 Zero Turn Mower MgCI2 Storage Tanks (2 new) MgCI2 Storage Tanks (2 replacement) Regenerative Air Street Sweeper Vehicle Radios Present Weather Detectors For Town RWIS Sites Travel Time Feedback System Bucket Truck Portable scales Traffic Signal System Replacement Signal System for Traffic Control F350 4x4 Traffic Signal Cabinet (Replacement) Signal Pole Replacement Traffic Detection Equipment Replacement/Upgrade Utility Platform Truck Toro Versa-Vac Turf Sweeper John Deere 1585 Parks Vehicles - Two (2) Pickups Kubota/John Deere Tractor Mezzanine Storage Unit Approximately 1,000 ft of Temporary Event Fencing Enclosed Event Trailer Walk Behind Turn Aerator ADA Accessibility Compliance- Parks/Trails Batting cage for Bar CCC Parks Walk-behind Ryan Mataway Overseeder Playground equipment updates for O'Brien 10x10 Commercial Grade Pop-up Tents Ryan Renovaire 72 tow aerator with ¾" coring tines Two (2) License Plate Recognition (LPR) units Audio & Lighting Equipment and Scissor Lift for New Band Shell Two (2) Precor Adaptive Motion Train Octane LateralX Elliptical Trainer Precor 835 Treadmills (12) Stairmaster Stepmill (3) Electronic Gymnasium Basketball Hoop system (6) Parks & Recreation Management Software Betco Stealth ASC20BT Auto-Scrubber Three (3) Balanced Body Pilates Reformers with Tower Three (3) Cybex ARC Trainers Three (3) Precor Elliptical trainers Four (4) Precor AMT's TKO Weight Plates, Trees, DB, Racks Cybex Power Rack Two (2) Cybex Half Racks Cybex Smith Machine Cybex Bravo Functional Trainer

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

-

PROJECTED PROJECTED 2016 2017 ACTUAL 25,000 15,000 15,000

261,945 -

-

-

220,000 36,500 144,000 -

250,000 28,300 220,000 60,000 30,800 13,000 14,000

2,931 5,842 5,463 12,427 8,411 5,999 70,920 13,085 26,478 -

45,000 20,000 5,800 15,155 17,000 16,000 -

225,000 26,400 35,100 5,000 11,580 5,000 8,000

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET 40,000

15,000 45,000 45,000

11,500

306

2019

45,000 30,000 15,000 50,000


2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

50,000 55,000 275,000

500,000

500,000

150,000 20,000

30,000 15,000 50,000

45,000 15,000 75,000

300,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000 120,000

75,000

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

307

45,000 60,000 75,000

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027 40,000 50,000 55,000 275,000 1,000,000 150,000 15,000 320,000 45,000 90,000 375,000 105,000 625,000 120,000 11,500 -


DESCRIPTION Recreation Center Treadmills Security Cameras Refurbish the SCS play structure at H20’Brien pool ADA Lift Cybex DB and Racks Fieldhouse Treadmills Two (2) Adaptive Motion Trainers for Parker Fieldhouse Vehicle Alignment Machine Fleet Replacements Tire Mount and Balance Machines Vehicle Diagnostic Tool Software Upgrade for Bridgeware Antennas Point-to-Point and Port-to-Multiport RF Antenna Links Pikes Peak A/V Replacement SAN Switches Firewall Project PD SANS PD Internal Affairs interview room video server Field House Security Camera System Upgrade Town Hall VMware host cluster build-out VMware virtual host primary cluster replacement Network Equipment for Redesign Redesign Fiber Network Multi-factor Authentication SAN Maintenance Switch Replacement Email Replacement Project Data Aggregation Software Mobile Device Management Solution Keyboard, Video, Mounse Replacements for each facility Facilities 1-Ton Service Van

ACTUAL 2015

PROJECTED PROJECTED 2016 2017 ACTUAL

APPROVED 2018 BUDGET 84,000

2019

-

29,682 33,000 -

9,768 15,000

1,091,164

14,000 60,000 1,300,000

798,485

19,500 30,000 32,000 120,000 -

40,000 15,000 38,000 78,500 97,000 193,350 19,950 17,000 18,000 -

15,000 308,500 108,000 82,900 65,000

26,307

-

-

2,156,547

3,263,366

5,294,333

2,250,500

2,640,000

(Use)/Accumulation of Surplus Funds

-

-

-

-

-

ENDING FUND BALANCE

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

42,000

1,400,000 24,000 8,000

1,600,000

45,000

308


2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

1,000,000

1,900,000

2,000,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,000,000

3,200,000

2,500,000

1,425,000

2,460,000

2,490,000

2,130,000

1,520,000

1,740,000

4,230,000

2,980,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

309

TOTAL 2018 TO 2027 84,000 42,000 17,500,000 24,000 8,000 45,000 23,865,500


TOWN OF PARKER N ON -ROUTIN E CAPITAL IMPROVEMEN T PROJECTS WITH A SIGN IFICAN T IMPACT ON THE OPERATIN G BUD GET 2018-2027

Capital Project and Description of Impacts

Operating Fund Impacted

2018

2019

2020

2021

General $ 88,700 $ 91,400 $ 94,100 $ 96,900 Public Works Facility With any new facility, there w ill be ongoing utility and m aintenance costs. Pend ing approval of the d esign bud get (2013 supplem ental bud get request), it is unknow n at this tim e w hat the exact costs are anticipated to be, but estim ated costs are includ ed and w ill be upd ated as m ore inform ation becom es available. The site land scaping w ill be as xeric and low m aintenance as possible. The build ing is anticipated to be precast concrete w hich w ill help m inim ize m aintenance costs. General $ 23,000 $ 23,000 $ 23,000 $ 23,000 D iscovery Park Com pletion of this project w ill result in increased m aintenance costs associated w ith the site but until the d esign is com pleted , the best estim ated costs have been includ ed .

General $ $ 1,000 $ Trail Connection Salisbury Park Construction of this trail w ill result in approxim ately one ad d itional m ile of trail to repair and m aintain.

1,000

$

1,000

Recreation $ 39,100 $ 40,300 $ 41,500 $ 42,700 Recreation Center Expansion The expansion w ill ad d 25,000 sq.ft. of space. Major com ponents that w ould be includ ed in the proposed expansion includ e, expand ed leisure pool w ith various aquatic am enities, therapy pool for senior therapeutic need s and injury rehabilitation, fam ily changing room s to serve a broad er d em ographic segm ent of our com m unity, ad d itional activity room s for youth, ad ult, and old er ad ult fitness/ enrichm ent classes, and an im proved lobby area that is m ore custom er friend ly and serves as a com m unity gathering space. This ill increase for the facility. $ $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 Parker RoadwSidew alk utilities and m aintenance costsGeneral Construction of this sid ew alk w ill result in approxim ately one ad d itional m ile of sid ew alk to repair and m aintain.

General $ 38,000 $ 38,000 $ 38,000 $ 38,000 Harive Open Space Maintenance of open space w ill result in approxim ately 70 acres to m aintain. The ad d itional m aintenance w ill require the ad d ition of one new parks position in 2016

General $ 100,000.00 PD RMS System Ongoing annual m aintenance for the new record s m anagem ent system .

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

General $ $ $ $ Rueter-Hess Reservoir Rec Opportunities When the recreational opportunities are fu lly im plem ented in 2020, there w ill be a need for staff tim e and m aintenance at the reservoir

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

310

-


Estimated Operating Impact Per Year 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

$

99,800

$

102,800

$

105,900

$

109,100

$

112,400

$

115,800

$

23,000

$

23,000

$

23,000

$

23,000

$

23,000

$

23,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

44,000

$

45,300

$

46,700

$

46,700

$

46,700

$

48,100

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

1,000

$

38,000

$

38,000

$

38,000

$

38,000

$

38,000

$

38,000

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$ 100,000.00

$

$

$

$

$

$

50,000.00

50,000.00

50,000.00

Capital Budget and 10 Year CIP

50,000.00

50,000.00

311

50,000.00


APPENDIX

Appendix

312


Appendix 19,858,597 38,772,420 48.78%

18,116,284 36,301,545 50.10%

15,820,918 33,153,841 52.28%

14,682,794 30,981,914 52.61%

13,637,174 28,862,771 52.75%

12,986,281 26,341,878 50.70%

12,609,405 24,975,871 49.51%

11,941,760 24,418,900 51.10%

12,572,258 23,904,250 47.41%

11,275,863 23,247,649 51.50%

Aggregate all other filers

Total sales taxes

Source: Town of Parker Finance department

2015 Top ten filers in alphabetical order: Costco Wholesale #1022, Douglas County, Walmart Stores Inc, The Home Depot USA Inc, Dillon Companies Inc 214, Dillon Companies Inc 213, Target Corporation, Dillon Companies Inc 9546, Intermountain Rural Electric Association, Lowes HIW Inc

Top ten filers as a percentage of total sales tax

2016 $ 18,913,823

2015 $ 18,185,261

2014 $ 17,332,923

2013 $ 16,299,120

2012 $ 15,225,597

2011 $ 13,355,597

2010 $ 12,366,466

2009 $ 12,477,140

2008 $ 11,331,992

2007 $ 11,971,786

TYPE OF INDUSTRY Aggregate top ten filers

TOWN OF PARKER, COLORADO Principal Sales and Use Tax Payers Last Ten Years

PRINCIPAL SALES AND USE TAX PAYERS

313


Appendix

314 8 9 4,079 8,572

6

21,408

53,569 6,003

175

232 $67,334,924 3 $ 618,078 582 $75,476,426

8 9 5,440 8,319

2

17,694

55,721 5,516

227

142 $45,050,250 $ 615 $45,345,961

2008

8 14 6,195 8,754

14

18,122

65,821 4,841

513

43 $16,005,637 $ 631 $41,666,769

2009

7 15 5,874 8,813

12

14,490

63,995 4,379

458

112 $32,509,630 7 $ 1,295,564 466 $36,123,583

2010

8 17 5,556 8,438

6

16,061

58,009 4,431

333

183 $55,076,498 7 $ 1,338,620 416 $25,251,892

2011

Source: Various Town of Parker departments.

* Parker Police Department reports incidents based on the National Incident Based Reporting System. The totals shown are based on charges, not the number of incidents that occurred. It is possible, even likley, that an incident had more than one Colorado State Statute or Municipal charge associated with it. Crime Statistics are by nature dynamic, which allows for additions, deletions and modifications at any time.

Parks and Recreation Recreation: Adult sports leagues Youth sports leagues Adult league attendance Youth league attendance

Highways and Streets Streets: New roadway additions (miles)

Building Inspection: Total building inspections

Public Safety Police: Calls for service * Total charges *

Tax and Licensing: Business licenses issued

General Government Building Permits: Single-family residential units Valuation Multi-family residential units Valuation Total commercial new, remodel and other Valuation

2007

TOWN OF PARKER, COLORADO Operating Indicators by Function Last Ten Years

8 17 6,584 9,360

1

34,622

60,084 5,325

749

381 $119,581,591 38 $ 7,420,142 515 $ 19,139,318

2012

8 23 6,036 10,576

2

27,238

65,122 5,218

631

332 $117,231,450 $ 628 $ 27,232,684

2013

8 24 5,183 11,083

2

25,170

65,987 5,696

487

347 $119,630,934 9 $ 34,373,298 637 $ 88,644,852

2014

7 26 5,306 10,047

2

29,015

68,577 5,813

492

312 $106,788,354 23 $ 49,091,908 489 $ 56,552,496

2015

28 30 5,997 10,442

3

27,707

73,133 5,183

482

291 $104,587,047 39 $ 46,291,379 779 $ 74,862,413

2016

OPERATING INDICATORS BY FUNCTION


Appendix

315

Source: Town of Parker

Parks, culture and recreation Ruth Chapel Mainstreet Center PACE Center Recreation Center with indoor pool Fieldhouse Outdoor pool Parks Regional Local 1 1 1 1 1 2 11

2 10

1 145

1

1 1

2008

1 1 1 1 1

1 143

1

Public safety Police station

Public works Facilities Miles of roadway

1 1

General government Town hall Other office buildings

2007

2 11

1 1 1 1 1

1 159

1

1 1

2009

2 11

1 1 1 1 1

1 171

1

1 1

2010

1 11

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 177

1

1 1

2011

TOWN OF PARKER, COLORADO Capital Assets by Function and Program Last Ten Years

1 11

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 178

1

1 1

2012

1 12

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 180

1

1 1

2013

1 13

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 182

1

1 1

2014

2 14

1 1 1 1 1 1

2 184

1

1 2

2015

2 14

1 1 1 1 1 1

2 187

1

1 2

2016

CAPITAL ASSETS BY FUNCTION


Appendix $

51.9% 2.3%

Bachelor's degree or higher - persons age 25+

Unemployment rate

316 $ 2,636,027

62,633

$ 2,833,767

$

3.0%

56.0%

96.0%

34.50

2.85

45,244

16,451

20.20

2008

62,500

$ 2,828,688

$

5.0%

45.3%

97.0%

35.40

2.85

45,259

16,508

20.50

2009

65,874

$ 2,983,895

$

5.2%

45.3%

97.0%

36.60

2.85

45,297

16,620

20.50

2010

Source: Town of Parker, Douglas County, Nielsen Claritas Site Reports, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Total personal income (in thousands)

58,305

97.0%

High school graduates - persons age 25+

Per capita income

34.50

Median age

45,211

Population 2.88

16,184

Housing units

Average persons per household

19.70

Area in square miles

2007

71,463

$ 3,270,004

$

6.3%

46.9%

97.1%

36.10

2.84

45,758

16,731

20.80

2011

TOWN OF PARKER, COLORADO Demographic and Economic Information Last Ten Years

75,317

$ 3,533,798

$

5.9%

47.5%

97.2%

35.80

2.84

46,919

17,133

21.20

2012

79,127 $ 3,784,091

$

5.0%

48.5%

97.5%

34.40

2.84

47,823

17,451

21.20

2013

82,938 $ 4,046,462

$

3.6%

50.2%

97.4%

34.70

2.84

48,789

17,798

21.28

2014

86,749 $ 4,396,179

$

2.7%

53.5%

97.7%

34.90

2.80

50,677

18,752

21.54

2015

97,824 $ 4,991,274

$

2.1%

52.6%

97.7%

34.60

2.68

51,023

19,011

21.78

2016

DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC INFORMATION


BUDGET ORDINANCE

Appendix

317


Appendix

318


Appendix

319


Appendix

320


Appendix

321


MILL LEVY ORDINANCE

Appendix

322


Appendix

323


Appendix

324


GLOSSARY

Accrual Accounting – A basis of accounting in which revenues and expenditures are recorded at the time they are earned or incurred as opposed to when cash is actually received or spent. For example, in accrual accounting, revenue which was earned in December but not collected until January is recorded as revenue of December rather than January. Adopted Budget – Budget amounts approved by the Town Council and the budget document which consolidates all operating and capital appropriations. Amendment One – Also known as “TABOR” or Taxpayers Bill of Rights. This is an amendment of the constitution of the State of Colorado which basically limits annual increases in revenues and expenditures and requires voter approval for any tax rate increase or multi-year debt of financial obligation. The increase in spending and revenue is limited to an index based on the Denver-Boulder Consumer Price Index plus a local growth factor determined by percentage change in actual value of all real property. Appropriation – The legal authorization of a specific amount of money made by the Town Council which permits the Town to incur obligations and to make expenditures of resources in the various funds. Assessed Valuation – The value that is established for real or personal property by the County Assessor for the purpose of levying property taxes Bond – An interest bearing note issued to borrow monies on a long term basis. Budget – A financial plan for a specified period of time (the fiscal year) that balances projected revenues and fund balance appropriations to estimated expenditures and operating transfer obligations. Budgetary Legal Level of Control – The legal level in which expenditures cannot exceed total appropriations. For the Town of Parker, that is at the fund level. Budget Procedure – Requirements of the Parker Town Charter Section 9.2 of the Parker Town Charter states “A proposed budget for the ensuing fiscal year shall be presented to the Council on or before the fifteenth day of October of each year”.

Section 9.5 of the Parker Town Charter states “Not later than the 15th day of December of each year, the Council shall adopt on final reading an ordinance for the budget and an ordinance for the annual appropriations”. This budget and the process for public hearing and Council adoption far exceed the requirements of Article XI. All of Council has copies of the Parker Town Charter, and it is widely available for public review. Article IX provides for amendments of this Budget after adoption in Section 9.12.

Appendix

325


Capital Asset or Fixed Asset – An asset that is acquired, purchased or constructed with a cost or fair market value (at the time of acquisition) greater than or equal to $5,000 and a useful life of more than one year. Equipment, furniture, fixtures, artwork, buildings, land and infrastructure that have a useful life of more than one year and cost greater than $5,000 are all examples of capital assets. The cost of a capital asset includes all amounts incurred to acquire the asset and any amounts that can be directly attributable to bringing the asset into working condition. Directly attributable costs include costs for delivery, site preparation, installation and professional services such as legal, architectural, engineering and project management. Capital Expenditure or Outlay – Expenditure for the acquisition or addition of a capital asset. Capital Improvement Project, Capital Project, Public Improvement Project – A permanent addition to the Town's assets, which includes design, construction and purchase of land, buildings and facilities. CCBWQA – Cherry Creek Water Quality Basin Authority Charges for Services – The amount the Town receives for the provision of services and commodities or the performance of specific services benefiting the person charged. This is also known as user charges. Conservation Trust – State of Colorado lottery funds remitted to the Town for Parks and Recreation expenditures. Contingency – An appropriation of funds to cover unforeseen events that occur during the fiscal year. Debt Service – Principal and interest due on long-term debt such as loans, notes and bonds incurred by the Town. Expenditure – Payment for goods or services, including operating expenses that require the current or future net current assets, debt and capital outlay. Fiscal Year – The 12-month period to which the annual budget applies. This is January 1 to December 31 for the Town of Parker. Fixed Charges – Expenditures which are constant from one period to another, i.e. annual lease payments. Fringe Benefits – Costs associated with Town employee labor. These include Social Security and Medicare; Retirement; and Health, Life and Disability insurance. Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) – The conversion of staff time into the decimal equivalent. One full-time position (1.0 FTE) is defined as containing 2,080 hours; a half-time position (.5 FTE) requires 1,040 work hours. Fund – An accounting entity that has a set of self-balancing accounts and that records all financial transactions for specific activities or governmental functions. The funds used by the Town are General fund, Special Revenue funds, Capital Project funds, Debt Service funds, Enterprise fund, Internal Service funds, and a Custodial Fund.

Appendix

326


Fund Balance – Generally, fund balance is the difference between a fund’s assets and liabilities. For a given year, on a budgetary basis, the beginning fund balance plus estimated revenue less budgeted expenditures equals ending fund balance. Maintaining an adequate fund balance is important for reasons that include having funds available for emergencies, unexpected events and to maintain a strong financial position. General Fund – The General Fund is the general operating fund of the Town. It is used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in other funds. General Fund revenues include sales and use taxes, property taxes, licenses and permits, intergovernmental and other types of revenue. This fund includes most of the basic operation services including police, public works, finance and general administration. Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) – a state-wide lottery program approved by Colorado voters in 1992 to provide increased funding for parks and open space throughout the State. These funds are allocated through a competitive grant program administered by GOCO staff. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) – the market value of all goods and services produced within a country. Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) – an agreement between two or more governments to cooperate in some specific way, i.e. working together on a streets project Infrastructure – Public domain fixed assets such as roads, bridges, streets, drainage systems and similar immovable assets. Intergovernmental Revenues – Revenue from other governments, such as federal, state and county grants. Levy – To impose taxes, special assessments or service charges for the support of Town services Objective – The planned attainment of a certain condition or specific accomplishment which is an integral part or phase of a strategy that contributes to accomplishing a goal. An objective should be stated in terms of results, not processes or activities, and should reflect a reasonable estimate of what is practical. Operating Expense – Those costs, other than capital improvements and debt service, necessary to support the primary services of the organization. PACE Center – Parker Arts, Cultural and Events Center

Parker Authority for Reinvestment (PAR) – An urban renewal authority in the Town Personal Services – The cost of wages and benefits for elected officials and Town employees. Program – A specific set of activities directed at attaining specific objectives. Proposed Budget – The recommended Town budget annually submitted by the Town Administrator to the Town Council by October 15. Purchased Services – The cost to obtain the efforts of individuals or businesses who are not on the Town payroll and who can provide a service not available through the Town's own resources.

Appendix

327


Reduction of Appropriations - If at any time during the fiscal year it appears probable to the Mayor that the revenues available will be insufficient to meet the amount appropriated, he shall provide a report to the Council without delay indicating the estimated amount of deficit and his recommendations as to any steps to be taken. The Council shall then take such further action as it deems necessary to prevent or minimize any deficit, and for that purpose it may by ordinance reduce one (1) or more appropriations. Revenue – Income received by the Town government in support of the government's program of services to the community. It includes such items as sales tax, property taxes, fees, user charges, grants and fines. Request for Proposal (RFP) – An early stage in a procurement process, issuing an invitation for suppliers, often through a bidding process, to submit a proposal on a specific commodity or service.

Supplemental Appropriation The Council may make additional appropriations by ordinance during the fiscal year for unanticipated expenditures required of the Town. Such additional appropriations shall not exceed the amount by which actual and anticipated revenues of the year exceed the revenues as estimated in the budget, unless the appropriations are necessary to relieve an emergency endangering the public peace, health, safety or property. Supplies – The cost of goods acquired for consumption or resale. Transfers – The movement of monies from one fund to finance activities in another fund. The monies are considered a financing source for the receiving fund and a financing use for the originating fund. Transfers are at Council’s discretion and for an appropriate purpose, such as to support other funds and legal debt service agreements. Transfer of Appropriations - The Council may by resolution transfer any unencumbered appropriation, balance or portion thereof from one (1) department, office or agency to another. UDFCD – Urban Drainage and Flood Control District

Appendix

328


Appendix

329

Profile for townofparkerco

Town of Parker 2018 Annual Budget  

View the Town of Parker's 2018 Annual Budget

Town of Parker 2018 Annual Budget  

View the Town of Parker's 2018 Annual Budget

Advertisement