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ur Plan yo holiday o. naps, to

V

is for

The ABCs of Thankfulness

GIFTS &

PARTIES

+

A Caregiver’s

GUIDE


NOVEMBER 2017 / CONTENTS

INTRO p.6

M is for Motivation p.30

A IS FOR ADVENTURE p.8

N IS FOR NOT NODDING OFF p.30

B is for Bow Ties p.10

O IS FOR OPPORTUNITY p.32

C is for Changing Direction p.10

P is for Prayer p.34

Q is for Quit Hiding p.34

D IS FOR DISTILLERY p.12 E is for Energy p.14 F is for Fashion p.14

R IS FOR RELAX p. 36

S is for Service p.38

T is for Twenty-Five Years p.40

G IS FOR GIFTS

p.16

H is for Having it All (Kinda) p.22 I IS FOR INTERNET p.24

J is for Jumping into Something New p.24

U is for Underwear and Umbrellas p.42 V IS FOR VELVET p.44 W is for Weddings p.46 X is for ‘X’-traordinary Holiday Gathering p.48 Y IS FOR YOWZA AND YOUR BEST BODY p. 52

Z IS FOR ZEN THANKSGIVING p.54

CaregiverGUIDE

K is for Kickboxing p.26

Knowing when a loved one needs help is not always clear. Sometimes just a little daily assistance is needed. Sometimes, a person is living alone and their situation has become dangerous. Whether it happens suddenly or develops slowly, for many of us there comes a time when someone in our lives needs extra help.

L is for Louisville Visual Art Association and Loving Lou With Yarn p.28

Caregiver Guide p. 59

This section introduces options to consider when looking for caregiving help. If you want or need more detailed information, go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com or pick up a copy of the latest Today’s Transitions magazine. We started that magazine 15 years ago to provide a comprehensive look at area senior health communities and services as well as an in-depth look at subjects about quality-of-living decisions for aging loved ones.

Illustration Silvia Cabib Stories and Photos Aubrey Hillis

TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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Professional Connections presents

CALENDAR

Networking and careerbuilding opportunities for women around town

Athena’s Sisters – For Military Women Every 2nd & 4th Mon. • 6-8pm 201 South Peterson Avenue Lindsay Gargotto 502.489.0956 info@athenassisters.us

Legal Assistants of Louisville Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30am Bristol Bar & Grille 614 West Main Street Mary Ruckriegel 502.429.6184 Mruck23@att.net

Southern Indiana Women’s Networking Group Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30am Holiday Inn-Lakeview 505 Marriott Drive, Clarksville info@soindwng.org

WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30am Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Country Club Lane Gretchen Mahaffey 502.451.0600 gmahaffey@kfg.com

BPW - Business & Professional Women of River City Quarterly • 11:30am Networking Noon Meeting & Program The Bristol - Downtown 614 West Main Street bpwrc.org or bpwreserve@gmail.com

MLWPC - Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 4th Mon. • 5:30pm University Club U of L Belknap Campus Virginia Woodward 502.361.4866 mlwpc2011@gmail.com

The Democratic Woman's Club of Jefferson County Third Monday of every month from March thru December at 5:15 All Wool & A Yard Wide Democrat Club, 1328 Hickory St. Lou. KY 40217. Mary Allgeier 502-550-1611 adelineallgeier02@twc.com

WIN - Women in Networking V Every 2nd Thurs. • 11:30am Roosters 10430 Shelbyville Road #7 Kim Hogle kim.hogle@proforma.com

Bridge the Gap Professional Women Every 5th Sun. Heyburn Building 430 W. Muhammad Ali, Suite 24A Hazel Parrish, Chapter President 502.417.2566, hazelp17@gmail.com CBPW - Christian Business & Professional Women 2nd Thurs: May, July, Sept, Nov • 11:30am Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Sharilyn Unthank 502.297.3508 cbpweast@gmail.com Church Women United Hill United Methodist Church, 201 South Peterson Avenue Peggy Arthur 502-551-6670 peggy.arthur@att.net Distinctive Women, Entrepreneurial Women Making a Difference Every 1st Thurs • 6:30-8pm Email for meeting location Deleskia Butler 502.509.5521 distinctivewomen2013@gmail.com EWI - Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tues. • 5:30pm Contact for information & reservation Christy Smallwood 502.595.7157 • ewikentuckiana.com christy@arkhamexec.com League of Women Voters Every 3rd Mon. • 6pm Lang House, 115 S. Ewing Avenue Pat Murrell 502.895.5218 info@lwvlouisville.org

NAWBO - National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tues. admin@nawbolouisville.org 502.625.0248 nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Mon. • 5:30pm Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121 National Association of Women MBAs - Louisville Chapter Location & event vary. Details on mbawomen.org/chapter/louisvillekentucky *MBA not required for membership National Council of Negro Women, Inc. - Louisville Section Every 4th Thurs. • 6pm Main Library, 301 York Street Cassandra Lasley 502.650.6602 lasley5514@twc.com NEW - Network of Entrepreneurial Women Every 2nd Wed. • 6-8pm Location varies. See nentw.com for details. Network Now Every 2nd Fri. • 11:30am Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Marie Butler 502.231.1918 Savvy Women in Business Every 1st Wed. • 6:30pm Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Brenda Daisey 502.742.4505 bdaisey@cruiseplanners.com

The Ninety-Nines, Inc. International Assoc of Women Pilots Every 2nd Saturday 11am Various airports around Kentucky and Southern Indiana Erin Thompson 502.428.1713 eblisst@windstream.net Top Ladies of Distinction Inc. Every 2nd Tues. • 6:30pm Hotel Louisville 120 W. Broadway, Suite 930 Mamie L Maxwell 502.767.4180 ms.maxwell@twc.com WAI - Women in Aviation Every 3rd Thurs. • 6pm Hanger 7 2720 Cannons Lane Crystal Korff 502.608.6524 superdpilot@yahoo.com WIN - Women in Networking Every 2nd Wed. • 11:15am Holiday Inn Hurstbourne 1325 S Hurstbourne Parkway Laura Ridge 502.491.7877 lridge@oxmoorcountryclub.com WIN - Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30am Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Road Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tues. • 11:30am BJ's (Oxmoor Mall) 7900 Shelbyville Road Sharon Woodward 502.931.8432 skoch@primelending.com

WIN - Women in Networking VI Every 2nd Tuesday • 11:30am Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane Vicki Stanley 502.533.7356 vickistanley04@aol.com WIN - Women in Networking VII Every 2nd Tuesday • 11:30am Republic Bank’s conference room 13330 Main Street (Middletown) Johanna Wheatley 502.303.3843 jwheatley@republicbank.com Women on the Front Line Every 5th Sat., 4-5:30pm Bridge the Gap Addiction and Mental Health Services 2629 Slevin Street Hazel D. Parrish 502.417.2566 Women’s Business Center of KY

funded in part by a cooperative agreement with the SBA

Every 4th Fri. Roundtable • 8:30am Call for meeting location Phyllis Alcorn, 859.234.0054 x 1033 palcorn@cvky.org

Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:30am Big Spring Country Club 5901 Dutchmans Lane Elizabeth Monarch 502.551.1286 Elizabeth@elizabethmonarchgroup.com Women’s Republican Club of Louisville Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:15am University Club 200 E. Brandeis Avenue Marva Rudolph 502.899.1999 or 502.459.4929 marva.rudolph@yahoo.com ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thurs. • 6pm Holiday Inn – Louisville Airport 447 Farmington Avenue Joyce Seymour 502.553.9241 jespud@bellsouth.net

Listings are repeated monthly. To list or update your meeting for free, email your meeting date, time, location, contact info and website to Joyce@TodaysPublications.com or call 502.327.8855. Deadline for inclusion in next issue is 11/6.

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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NOVEMBER 2017 • VOL. 27 / NO. 10

WE ARE THANKFUL FOR YOU

E

njoy the journey through the ABCs of thankfulness in this issue. Taking time for gratitude for the good things in our lives, past and present, is one way of making sure we are fully living in the moment. In this moment, we are thankful for you, our readers and advertisers. This month marks the end of our 25th year of publishing Today’s Woman magazine. In our dedication to our mission of informing, inspiring, and encouraging this community through local stories of women of all shapes, color, and walks of life, we have reaped the benefits of your consistent engagement and support. Thank you. — Anita Oldham

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lucy M. Pritchett Miranda G. Popp miranda@todayspublications.com COPY EDITOR/SR GRAPHIC DESIGNER April Allman april@todayspublications.com DESIGNER/PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jill Cobb jill@todayspublications.com

Y

DIGITAL DESIGNER/EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Aubrey Hillis aubrey@todayspublications.com

is for

You

PHOTOGRAPHER/PHOTO EDITOR Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Scheri Stewart Mullins officeadmin@todayspublications.com

Photo of Brittany Mills Schmeltz

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com

you, Thanks to y to we are read other celebrate an birthday!

ON THE COVER: When Theresa Reno-Weber needs a break from the busyness of work, she and her husband Ben will spend a weekend in Napa Valley. “The most luxurious thing we’ve ever done was hire a driver and then you can go and do a wine tasting. You go to three or four vineyards and have a great meal.” Read more about her on page 44. Photo Melissa Donald Makeup Gretchen Krammes, Marie Fulkerson Makeup Styling Aubrey Hillis

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PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com

NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Rachel Reeves rachel@todayspublications.com SENIOR MEDIA CONSULTANTS Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion Today’s Woman is published monthly by: Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 todayswomannow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2017 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todayspublications.com.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues.


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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A

is for

Adventure

“IT’S ME TIME” By Megan M. Seckman Photo Michele Korfhage

l

“Traveling alone allows me to face my fears, to recharge and reground myself, and helps me keep sane in an insane world. I get to be an artist — to truly be independent. I know that the only co-dependency that I have, when I come back from an adventure, is with my camera.”

W

hen Michele Korfhage was 21, she found herself newly laid off, with a slice of time on her hands and just enough cash to do something about it. Armed with a pager, some camping supplies, an unemployment check, and a halfway reliable car, she took off on her first solo road trip. High atop the Smoky Mountain peaks, through the lens of her trusty camera, she realized this type of travel, independent and adventurous, spoke to her free spirit and calmed her wanderlust. Decades later, Michele continues to travel alone, deep into the woods, under waterfalls, and through small towns along backroads and

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

byways. It has been her goal for years now to experience all 50 states in this fashion. Number 42: Vermont, a place where Michele spent six days traversing the entire tiny, yet majestic state in her diesel VW adventure wagon (where she spent most nights sleeping in the back). A professional photographer with an artist’s heart and eagle’s eye, Michele was able to document 825 miles of backroads through the state, hike 20 miles, climb four mountain summits, and experience the awe of nine breathtaking waterfalls. Throughout the state, she captured a total of 2,130 magical moments through her lens.

“So far, besides Kentucky, this has been my favorite state,” Michele says. “The air is clean, there are no billboards along the highways, the water has a crystal clear 20-foot visibility.” Michele’s six days of outdoor heaven cost her around $400: $165 in diesel, a few campground fees, one night in an incredible hostel at the base of Warren Falls for $30, an $80 dinner with a friend in Burlington, a few beers at a microbrewery, and some groceries. Almost a week for less than $500. (See all her tips online.) SEARCH: Michele Korfhage


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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B

is for

Bow Ties

After seven years of making men’s accessories as a side gig while working various other jobs, Elizabeth Peake finally took the leap to pursue her passion full-time. Her business, Peake Ties, specializes in bow ties, neckties, lapel flowers, and pocket squares.

C

is for

Changing Direction

SEARCH: Laura Rice

THIS LAWYER TURNED REALTOR By Megan S. Willman Photo Melissa Donald

Photos Sunni Wigginton

L Elizabeth admits she is a low-maintenance gal, and since her studio is located in her friend’s basement, she also enjoys the luxury of wearing whatever she feels like.

SEARCH: Elizabeth Peake

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

aura Rice describes herself as an idealist. After graduating from the University of Louisville’s Brandeis School of Law in 2004, she worked for the next nine years as a successful attorney in Louisville. She went to law school in order to make a positive change in the world, but after nearly a decade she found herself discouraged by the justice system that made getting closure for her clients extremely difficult. “I was suddenly wondering, ‘What now?’” Laura and her husband happened to be selling their house at the time. Her realtor, who knew Laura was unhappy in her law practice, suggested she get a realtor’s license. Laura laughed at first. “I’m no salesperson. I couldn’t even sell candy bars for middle school band when I was a kid,” Laura says. Today, four years after obtaining her realtor’s license, Laura feels a new sense of purpose. She offers a few survival tips for making the leap.

EMBRACE YOUR DISCOMFORT. “Suddenly, I was a ‘salesperson’ who had to drum up business for herself. That was really scary to me, so I started by contacting friends. I just kept repeating to myself, ‘What’s the worst thing that could happen?’”

BE PATIENT “It’s important to stay the course and figure out if this career change is right for you. There are significant growing pains. I made very little money in my first year, but by the third, I was making more than I ever made practicing law.”

TAKE A TEST “I decided to take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and was shocked to see that sales was a top career suggestion for me. I encourage people to not overlook something in which they might really excel simply because it falls outside of their expectations.”


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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MOTHER-DAUGHTER DISTILLERY DUO By Megan Seckman Photos Trina Whalin

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oyce Nethery, coowner and master is for distiller of Jeptha Distillery Creed Distillery, is raising a glass to her future while honoring the past. Opened in November 2016, Jeptha Creed Distillery is nestled among the rolling hills of Shelby County, just minutes from their 1,000-acre family farm. The distillery is stunning and surrounded by 64 acres of blackberries, apples, strawberries, mint, grain, and their signature bloody butcher corn. Inside, stone walls and exposed wooden beams hold the production facility, a cocktail bar, gift shop, and an event space complete with a giant stone fireplace. Joyce, who has a chemical engineering A magnificent event space houses degree, and her daughter, Jammin’ at Jeptha every Friday Autumn, run the business night complete with food trucks, live music, corn hole, and, of course, where every aspect is done cocktails from their signature spirits, on site from harvesting distilled by Joyce the chemist. the grain to the final bottling. While at the University of Kentucky, Autumn the best corn and local produce took a semester at sea where she around. She experimented with observed distilleries all around non-GMO yellow corn and an the world. Upon graduation, it was heirloom variety, known as settled. The mother/daughter pair “bloody butcher corn” that is as would combine their talents and red as, well, the name suggests. open a distillery where Joyce could The bloody butcher product was put to use her roots in chemistry, smooth as silk, picking up the engineering, and agriculture while natural sweetness of the corn. Autumn could run the marketing Joyce and Autumn have and creative side of the business. shared an office and a neverThe ode to history and the land ending workload this year but can also be seen in their product. are looking forward to creating While gardening over the years, their own piece of history with Joyce realized the majesty inside their distillery dedicated to heirloom varieties of vegetables. bygone days. “I get to watch my They simply tasted better. So, when daughter grow and develop. It is a devising the flavor profiles for wonderful thing to see.” their spirits, Joyce wanted to sip a bourbon that was made with simply

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SEARCH: Joyce Nethery


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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SEARCH: Nicole Atkins

E

is for

Energy

BEST BODIES In 2017, we have featured 18 Best Bodies — women from age 27-65. And, almost all of them talk about the energy and change exercise plays in their life. It is not all about having the perfect body, but the best body for yourself. If you would like to participate in Today’s Woman’s Best Bodies 2018, enter at TodaysWomanNow.com.

F

is for

Fashion

Approachable Business Looks By Kerri Foy Photo Sunni Wigginton

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or Nicole Atkins, president and CEO of Unique Management Services, she walks a fine line with her love for dressy clothes in an ultra-casual work environment. Since high school, Nicole has been naturally attracted to a more sophisticated look, but she also wants to dress so that she looks accessible. “Sometimes people in a suit come off as a little unapproachable,” Nicole says. As for shopping, Nicole keeps it simple. “I buy what I like,” says Nicole, who adds something new to her wardrobe weekly. She doesn’t discriminate against any

NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

retailer, but she also doesn’t shop at any one in particular. She doesn’t mind buying from online sellers, department stores like Dillard’s or big box retailers like Wal-Mart. It’s about the fit and the way it looks.” Even more than clothes and shopping, Nicole is passionate about her high heels. Heels may be the one style statement Nicole can’t live without. “I’m more comfortable in heels than in flats,” Nicole says. To prove it, she shared stories about cleaning her church’s toilets in 5-inch heels, going to her son’s football games in heels, and even running in heels.


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G

is for

Gifts

25 THINGS (Why 25? Because we are 25 years old!)

Happenings, news, and tidbits that caught Today’s Woman’s eye this month By Anita Oldham

Louisville-Focused Art

{

5 Each day comes

}

bearing its own gifts. Untie the ribbons. ~Ruth Ann Schabacker

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LOUISVILLE CITY GRID NECKLACE $45, Revelry

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LOUISVILLE PRINT $25 unframed, Revelry

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LOUISVILLE PRINT $25, Revelry

Where we shopped:

BROWNSBORO HARDWARE 4858 Brownsboro Road, Louisville J.MCLAUGHLIN 3931 Chenoweth Square, Louisville MAHONIA 806 East Market Street, Louisville POSH HOME 3626 Brownsboro Road, Louisville REVELRY GALLERY 742 East Market Street, Louisville SCOUT 720 East Market Street, Louisville

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LOUISVILLE MAP $199-$549 by size and other cities available, Posh Home


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25 THINGS

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STAGHORN FERN $48, Mahonia

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7

10

Nature Inspired Gifts

7 OFF-CENTER BIRD MINI-PRINT $34, Scout 8 DINO-SUCCULENT $30, Revelry 9 FEATHER CANDLE HOLDERS $15-$20, Posh Home 11 WALL PLANTER $16-20, Mahonia 12 SUCCULENT PRINT $25, Scout 13 DANDELION PRINT $25, Scout 14 GOLDEN BUG JEWELRY $58-$75, Scout

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HANGING TERRARIUM $20-$50, Mahonia


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25 THINGS

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ORNAMENTS $8.99-$15, Brownsboro Hardware

Cooking Related Gifts

17 FULL LEATHER APRON $195, Scout 18 YETI COOLERS OF ALL SIZES $269-$449, Brownsboro Hardware 19 HORSE SALT AND PEPPER $45, MOUSE CHEESE SERVER $7, PINK MARBLE $47, Scout 20 PIG SALT AND PEPPER $21, Scout 21 BOURBON BARREL SMOKING CHIPS $3.99/lb, Brownsboro Hardware 22 CUP AND SAUCER WITH STRAINER $24, Posh Home

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SERVE DISH $29, Posh Home

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20 21

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Style Related Gifts 24 POUF HAT $68, J.McLaughlin 25 RED SWEATER $198, J.McLaughlin

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NECKLACE $55, Scout

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TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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H

is for

Having it All (Kinda)

O

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Photo Patti Hartog

ne topic my girlfriends and I talk about on a regular basis is how we struggle, almost daily, with how to be a “boss” at our jobs and still be the best mom and wife on the planet. No pressure, right? In 2014 career strategist and author Megan Dall-Camina surveyed 1,000 women in the workforce about their well-being. Seventy percent of those surveyed believe the concept of success at home and work were a myth. Forty percent told Dall-Camina they were hanging on by a thread. Count me in that 70 percent — and the 40 percent. My whole life I heard the phrase “You can have it all.” These are words my parents instilled in me. These are words society told me over and over again. This is what I truly believed. Until I grew up. Instead of the phrase, “having it all,” I think it should be “living your best life possible.” That’s what I try and do and is part of the reason I am thankful to now be working on Good Morning Kentuckiana (GMK). I worked on this show many years ago and was not quite ready for the position. Now is the perfect time to be back on the team. Anchoring the 11pm news had been my dream for a while so when that opportunity came around two years ago, I was thrilled. I knew it meant being away from my kids at night, but I didn’t realize how much I would be sacrificing in the process. My oldest child will soon be going to middle school and the other two are 7 and 4 years old. The afternoon crunch was becoming more difficult. My wonderful husband was juggling everything like a pro, but I was missing so much by working during the evenings.

Renee Murphy enjoying the outdoors with her children.

So when the opportunity for Good Morning Kentuckiana came around a second time, I was ready. I may have to get up at 2am, but what I get in return is extremely rewarding. I can now meet my kids at the bus in the afternoon, have dinner with them, and do homework with them (although that is not my strength). In the morning I get to cover all the big stories of the day and work on developing new ideas. It’s not exactly how I thought things would turn out, but sometimes it’s the unexpected that turns out to be better than you could have imagined. My days are mapped out to the minute. They have to be if I want to get to bed by 8 in the evening. My house is never clean. Sometimes I give my kids hot dogs and broccoli for dinner (protein, starch and veggies, right?). There are days I go in the bathroom and close the door and pray that I did everything to the best of my ability.

Is that having it all? I don’t know. I have some if it, some of the time. Sometimes I am on point with my mom skills, but that could be a day when I am struggling at work and have gained five pounds. Then there are the days I make it to crossfit and am eating lean and green, but then I am cranky with my child. I was the kid that always had the plan written out in great detail, and now, I am constantly juggling and figuring things out on the fly. The plan changes quicker than I can keep up. I have a chalkboard in my kitchen where I write down the events of the day so the whole family can see it. It is purposely in chalk so I can erase, change, and rearrange. Sometimes I will drop the ball, but you know what? I will pick it right back up when it bounces. — Renee Murphy SEARCH: Renee Murphy


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I

is for

Internet

Story and Photo By Miranda Popp

Whether you’re scrolling through your social media newsfeed or running around town, you’re likely to see someone in an outfit that Britney Renbarger has pulled together. She’s taking the internet by storm with her curated fashion collection. Britney found herself being frequently asked by friends about her wardrobe selection and where she purchased her clothes, so after her younger daughter was born, she made the decision to stay at home with her children and start her own business, Pink Tag Boutique, an online clothing boutique.

J

is for

Jumping into Something New

“Set our intention and go” By Bella Portaro Kueber Photo Aubrey Hillis SEARCH: Britney Renbarger Her personal style as a wife and busy mom of two daughters, Kenlea, 7, and Karsyn, 15 months, can be defined as classy with a little edge, yet conservative. “I like clothes that are comfortable and still stylish, basically clothes that don’t scream, ‘I’m a mom.’”

Visit TodaysWomanNow.com to read more about any of these stories or to make a comment!

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

L

ifestyle coach Stephanie Wheeler explains it’s our first chapter that usually ends with a turbulent experience, leaving us with the options to pick ourselves up and put together a life that we want, or let the experience defeat us and be stuck in a chapter that never progresses. When Stephanie’s second chapter began, she was a stay-at-home mom with two small children. She didn’t know exactly where she was going, but she knew that doing yoga and lifting weights were two things she could control. “My baby steps were to get my physical training certification, yoga certification, and Precision Nutrition training,” Stephanie says.

Stephanie is a massage therapist at Core Chiropractic Center in St. Matthews, a CrossFit instructor at CrossFit the Ville, and a consultant for doTERRA Essential Oils. She also works with individual clients. “In our day-to-day life it’s so easy for us to overlook the milestones we’ve accomplished when our to-do list is never-ending. But when you pause to look at where you started and where you are now, it’s astonishing. We just have to set our intention and go. The universe truly does have our back.”

SEARCH: Stephanie Wheeler


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K

is for

Kickboxing

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“KICKBOXING GIVES ME A WORKOUT FOR MY MIND AND MY BODY. I HAVE TO STAY FOCUSED AND THINK ABOUT MY FORM, THE SEQUENCE OF PUNCHES AND KICKS, AND IT KEEPS ME FULLY PRESENT IN THE MOMENT, SO I’M NOT JUST GOING THROUGH THE MOTIONS.”

PATTY PAYETTE AGE 51 JOB Executive director of the quality enhancement plan at University of Louisville WORKOUT SPOT Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center HER PASSION In my twenties and thirties, I was an avid exerciser. I loved high-impact cardio classes like aerobics. When I hit 40, and I had two small kids and a demanding job, exercise fell off the radar. By the time I was in my mid-forties, I was feeling draggy and missed exercise but I could never find the time to do it. Five years ago, I was desperate to get back to it, so I joined an accountability and exercise program involving 6am boot camp classes. It was rough at first, but I came to love waking up at 5:30am, throwing on workout clothes, and getting done with a challenging class by 7am that left me feeling strong and accomplished. After two months, I no longer needed the accountability piece: I was hooked on early morning workouts. MOTIVATION I make sure to keep my schedule clear so it doesn’t interfere with my exercise classes. I prioritize that as part of my week as much as possible. Additionally, I make sure I go to bed by 10:30 the night before my early workouts and that my workout clothes are at arm’s reach so I’m committing to the workout the night before, which helps get me in the right state of mind when the alarm goes off so early.

BEST BODIES


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L

is for

Loving Lou With Yarn

By Lucy M. Pritchett Photo Patti Hartog

L

is for

Louisville Visual Art Association

Marti Kuehn’s Turning Points hinged on her affinity for saying Yes, Yes, and once again, Yes.

While some of us might spend our days simply spinning our wheels, Lindsey Hoehn spends her days spinning yarn.

By Lucy Pritchett Photo Patti Hartog

W

hen she tells you she is on her third career, you know there have been a few defining moments in her life. Marti spent 22 years in education as both teacher and principal, moved on to a successful 10-year career in real estate, and when she and husband Henry relocated from Evanston, Illinois, to Louisville in 2007, said Yes again to her dream of being an artist. “We used to visit our daughter while she was living in Louisville and came to like it,” Marti says. “We decided to move here and looked at 60 houses before we found the right one. The day after we bought the house, I leased an art studio and began meeting the community of artists. “I made it a point to meet artists, visit galleries, attend openings. I wanted to learn what was going on in the art community,” Marti says.

{

After moving her studio from Mellwood Arts Center to Nulu, she and her paint brushes have finally come to rest in her current studio/ gallery in historic Hope Mills. She is currently the president of the Louisville Visual Arts board. “I’m proud of what the LVA is doing in the community and for the community. Our new space in Portland (1538 Lytle Street) will enhance our mission and be a community base. I believe that Portland will be a visual arts destination for the city.” Marti and her husband are enthralled with their adopted city — especially after dealing for years with Chicago’s high taxes and heavy traffic. She got all that just for saying Yes.

}

One of the LVA’s most popular fundraising events, held in partnership with the University of Louisville Hite Art Institute, is the upcoming Open Studio Weekend November 4-5. “This is the fifth year of Open Studio. Eighty studios and 110 artists are on the scavenger hunt for art. The studios are laid out by neighborhood and include makers of all sorts including fiber artists, sculptors, painters, and photographers.

TICKETS: $20 each or $30 for two CONTACT: louisvillevisualart.org

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SEARCH: Marti Kuehn

NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

Lindsey is the owner of A Yarn Crossing on Frankfort Avenue, which she and friend Tina Taylor opened three years ago. The shop sells yarns, knitting, and crocheting supplies, and spinning fibers. It is a place of vibrant colors and good feelings. Lindsey started knitting 10 years ago when she was in college. “I went to a craft store, bought a few supplies, and taught myself to knit and crochet. After a few years, I taught myself how to spin yarn.” The good feelings of the shop come from the several groups that meet there. One group, the Knocker Knitters, knit soft cotton breast prostheses for women who have undergone mastectomies. There are also a multi-craft fiber arts group, a Spanish-speaking knitting group, and the Louisville Knitting Guild that gather at the shop. Lindsey keeps stocked a free pantry, which is located in a bright blue cupboard in the front yard. “It is important to us to support the community that supports us,” Lindsey says. SEARCH: Lindsey Hoehn


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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Photo Melissa Donald

N

is for

Not Nodding Off

By Brittani Dick Photo Melissa Donald

M

is for

Motivation

“I would want 90-year-old Hollis to high-five me for what I’m doing today,” says Hollis Edwards, 34. “I’m always doing something that keeps me healthy later in life.” When Hollis began at Crossfit, she weighed 225 pounds, but she has lost 60 pounds. By Brigid Morrissey

I

t wasn’t easy. It took patience, accountability, and significant changes in Hollis’ eating habits. “It’s 90 percent diet,” she says. “I didn’t lose weight for a while until we started the nutrition challenge. It was based on a daily point system. If I cheated, I lost points, and I wasn’t going to lose points. I’m too competitive for that.” Finding the Strongman Team has made the difference for Hollis. Unlike the name suggests, there are several women who belong to the group. “The Strongman Girls just get each other. They’re the best.” They get each other, because each one has felt the guilt when they skip workouts, the disappointment when they don’t give it their all, and the frustration when they can’t find the motivation to change their cycle. “When they expect you to be there and you don’t show up,” says Hollis, “they’ll want to know where you are. That helps.” SEARCH: Hollis Edwards

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

Jorja Magley, 26, has mastered the night shift as hospitalist physician assistant at Norton Brownsboro Hospital, working 7pm to 7am. Jorja (pronounced “Georgia”) is the go-to woman when a patient becomes ill during the night. “If a patient starts to become sick, their blood pressure spikes, or heart rate drops, then I am the one the nurse calls. I also care for patients who require additional medical care and need to be admitted to the hospital from the Emergency Department. I order additional tests and lab work and take care of these patients throughout the night,” she explains. A normal workday for Jorja requires waking up around 3pm, diving into a cup (or three) of coffee, and eating breakfast. “At least five days a week, I try to make it to the gym after breakfast. If I am more crunched for time, I will go on a quick run outside,” she states. After her daily exercise, Jorja has her “lunch” and heads into work for the night. SEARCH: Jorja Magley


TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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Two years ago Amber couldn’t buy her kids bananas — “and this year I took them to Disney World” By Lucy M. Pritchett Photos Patti Hartog

H

er Turning Point begins with a toddler meltdown over bananas and ends with her own meal-prepping business. It seems fitting that Amber Peppers’ new life as an entrepreneur began at the grocery store. “I was 25, divorced, and had two kids,” Amber recalls. “I had been a stay-at-home mom. I had no college and no plan. I had lost my home, my car, and I was trying to get out of debt.” Amber says she started cooking for herself and a friend simply to make her grocery purchases last and to be able to feed her kids. She also wanted to lose weight so she was preparing healthy meals. She and the friend were splitting the grocery bill. Then her friend’s roommates wanted in. Now she was cooking for four. “I would borrow money on Friday, shop, cook the meals, and was basically getting my food for free. I was charging $3 for each meal. Someone in the group said, ‘You’re cooking 10 hours on Fridays for a bunch of people that you don’t really know and aren’t making any kind of a profit.’ After that, I started doubling the price per meal.

“I was really uneducated about the food business, but it kept growing. Suddenly I was cooking 100 meals a week, and then it was 300 meals, and now I’m preparing 1,000 meals a week.” What prompted this woman who now radiates good health, strength, and enthusiasm to set off on her journey? Back to the grocery store. It was the day she was shopping with her two children and she had $12 to buy food. She left the store without buying bananas, which were her son’s favorite. He had a meltdown right there. He was not happy. “That’s when I said, ‘I am not going to do this anymore. I am not going to be the mom who can’t afford bananas for her kids. I went from feeling sorry for myself to ‘What do I need to do to make this better?’” Since April 2017 Amber has run her Prepping with Peppers meal preparation business full time. Starting on Friday afternoons she does the shopping and starts cooking on Saturday and Sunday to fill the orders. She offers four different healthy meal choices each week plus one breakfast meal. Her clients, she now has over 300, order on Thursdays and pick up their meals on Sunday.

Your comments at TodaysWomanNow.com are always welcome! Amber is the best. She’s an amazing friend, an inspiration, and the strongest woman I know. She empowered herself, and is such a strong supporter of empowering other women. Love her and love this article! — Vanessa Grossman via TodaysWomanNow.com

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

O

is for

Opportunity

Amber Peppers built her success from the ground up.

“Social media has helped push the business. My dream is to own the largest meal prepping company in the world. I tell my kids, ‘Dream hard. If your dreams don’t scare you, you’re not dreaming hard enough.’” What did Amber hold onto while she was simmering and sauteing in those early months?

“I told myself, and now I tell others, ‘There are better things ahead than anything you may leave behind.’ This helped me to move forward with the business. My kids are my motivator. Two years ago I couldn’t buy them bananas, and this year I took them to Disney World.” SEARCH: Amber Peppers

I found her on Facebook. After a few friends mentioned the healthy meals, I had to check it out! Just delicious! And buying local is always a plus! She is going to do big things!

Amber, you’re such an inspiration. You’re as great as your meals are. Keep cooking, Girl!!!

— Harmony Saunders via TodaysWomanNow.com

You go, girl!

Amber, you are absolutely amazing. Mary and I are very proud of you! No excuses, just hard work determination and DREAM! WOW! You go girl, become the BIGGEST meal prep business in the world. — Gary and Mary Drechsel via TodaysWomanNow.com

— Tammie Martin via TodaysWomanNow.com

— Brittany Braden via TodaysWomanNow.com

What a great article! I love my Prepping With Peppers meals; I cannot wait to see what Amber does next! — Amanda J. via TodaysWomanNow.com


P

is for

Prayer

‘EVERYBODY STRUGGLES WITH SOMETHING. . .’ By Ashli Findley Photo Patti Hartog

A

pproximately one in five U.S. adults experiences mental illness in a given year, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. So why is it that our society is afraid to talk about it?

Q

is for

Quit Hiding

That’s what Army veteran Carolyn Furdek is on a mission to change.

Tanisha Hackett uses meditation and faith to cope with her disease.

Carolyn served three tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq in the early 2000s, but it wasn’t until that third tour that she struggled mentally with her time from war.

LIVING WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

As her unit’s intelligence officer, Carolyn experienced an event Carolyn Furdek has written a book, that caused her to Locked-In: A Soldier and Civilian’s Struggle with Invisible Wounds to share “shut down.” Shortly her experience and provide a voice to thereafter, she was those who are also struggling. medically discharged from the military, but her reaction to that situation would be a personal battle for over a decade.

By Ashli Findley Photo Melissa Donald

L

ife can seem overbearing for patients dealing with sickle cell disease (SCD). Tanisha Hackett was diagnosed with the blood disorder at age 9. “That doctor talked to me and taught me how to meditate,” says Tanisha about her initial diagnosis. He asked her, “What is something that you really enjoy? What do you like?” She told him she loved the sound of rain, With sickle cell that it calmed her. disease, red blood “The doctor said whenever I was cells take on a sickle or “I saw dozens of physicians but was never really able crescent shape instead of the having a sickle cell crisis, focus on to get an answer,” says Carolyn on trying to find a healthy donut shape, causing hearing the ocean or the rain on the blockages in the blood that stop diagnosis. “I just really struggled. I didn’t want to window pane,” Tanisha says. “From the blood from carrying oxygen talk to anybody. I was just embarrassed and scared to different parts of the body that day up until now, I still do that.” while bringing about extreme and paranoid and fearful. I would withdraw from Tanisha’s type is hemoglobin SC, the pain in the bone, tissue, people. That was my way to cope with my struggles.” second most severe. Once afraid to be and joints. a burden to others, this 45-year-old wife In 2015, her mental health provider led her to psychiatrist and mother of four now comfortably relies on Dr. Rifaat El-Mallakh at the University of Louisville, who her family for support. Most markedly, Tanisha says recognized Carolyn’s struggle as cycloid psychosis and it is her faith that has helped her cope. Being in a started her on a treatment plan to help curb the symptoms and lead a life without continual problems. For Carolyn, relationship with Christ, meditating on the promises of that treatment plan includes anti-seizure medicine and the Bible, and praying work best in keeping her calm and cognitive therapy. alleviating pain during a crisis. “I truly believe it’s only because of God’s grace that I’ve been able to get through “Everybody struggles with something. The more you talk this and still have what I call a pretty normal life.”

about your struggles, the more normal it becomes to break that stigma and you can just pick yourself up and move on.”

Tanisha, your faith in God and ability to cope with this disease is a testament to others who face similar challenges in life. Praise God for you!

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— Betty Laswell via TodaysWomanNow.com


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R

is for

Relax in a New Home

This home in Norton Commons will be raffled off for Norton Children’s Hospital.

T

o benefit Norton Healthcare’s NiCU, you can enter a raffle to win this $600,000 Norton Commons home. Tickets are $100 each and can be purchased at HomeandBMWRaffle.com. The grand prize is the home, and first place is a BMW plus $10,000. The winning tickets will be drawn November 18. Even if you don’t win, here are some tips by Leslie Cotter Dorazil, of Leslie Cotter Interiors, who created the interior design for the home. “My philosophy is to enhance functionality while integrating timeless elegance with a thoughtful and creative approach,” says Leslie, who has been in the industry 11 years.

1 “When designing for an open floor plan, find a common color, texture, or detail and repeat it thoughtfully in each room. A dose of black in the dining room wallpaper, the foyer lampshade, kitchen island pendants, and living room fireplace creates continuity by rhythmically leading your eye through each space.” You can view 2 “Don't be afraid to mix metals. Chrome, the home polished, and antique brass merry Saturdays and beautifully. The key is to establish Sundays, noon-6pm, consistency in the application. I chose through polished chrome for the kitchen faucet, Nov. 12. polished brass for the cabinet hardware, and antique brass for the drapery rods. There has to be a methodology for the effect to be eclectic; not cluttered.” 3 “Your home should reflect your personality in a way that can evolve with you. Wallpaper is a great resource to make a not-so-permanent statement. Wall space in this open dining room was limited so I felt going with a bold pattern in Mylar would have just enough impact while a flood of natural light accentuates the wallpaper's reflective quality.” 4 “A room's function is defined by furniture placement; choose flexible seating to maximize space. A swivel chair in a sleek silhouette beside the sofa is inclusive of the leather seating flanking the fireplace, but also affords the option to turn toward the kitchen. Ottomans are another way to create multipurpose seating in a space that suggests more than one conversation grouping.” 5 “The most interesting spaces to me are rooms that crossover style genres and combine unexpected elements. This home is rooted in traditional Victorian architectural detail: mouldings, arched openings, and grand ceilings. Those features are accented by the juxtaposition of modern lighting, moody abstract artwork, and a whimsical foyer console. Don't let convention confine you.”

Interior Design Leslie Cotter Interiors Photos Tim Furlong Jr. Built By Ramage Company Furnishings Provided By Market On National.

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TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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S

is for

Service

These Places Need Your Help Too THE HEALING PLACE Focus: Provides drug rehabilitation program and services. Healingplace.org

Laura Thomas read an article about the Hildegard House and instantly felt called to volunteer.

THEY DON’T LET ANYONE DIE ALONE By Brigid Morrissey Photo Aubrey Hillis

N

o one wants to imagine dying alone, and Hildegard House, located at the former convent on the St. Joseph campus in Butchertown, has made it its mission to extend end-of-life services and provide a way to “die with dignity” to people at the end of life who have no loved ones or home. “I was in a doctor’s office, and Karen Cassidy (Hildegard House executive director) was on the cover of one of the magazines. I read the article and called Hildegard House that night,” says volunteer Laura Thomas. “I loved its mission — that no one should die alone.”

Since January, Laura is a key component of an especially invested group of volunteers called compassionate companions. This title is earned after completing training — and just a kind and gentle spirit willing to take on whatever role the patient needs. Hildegard House welcomes volunteers with any and all skill sets. “Volunteers can bring in meals, garden, donate health supplies, furniture, or anything it takes to run a house. Fund raise, give massages, manicures, or haircuts — you can do it here,” Laura says.

A beautiful woman inside and out! Thank you, Laura, for being a part of our Hildegard House family! — Karen Cassidy via TodaysWomanNow.com

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

MARYHURST Focus: Provides services for abused and neglected children. Maryhurst.org DREAMS WITH WINGS Focus: Provides services to children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and autism. Dreamswithwings.org HEARTLAND EQUINE RESCUE Focus: Fosters and trains horses in Southern Indiana and the surrounding states. Heartlandequine.webs.com HOSPARUS HEALTH Focus: Provides support for advanced illness, palliative care, hospice care. Hosparushealth.org

Go to TodaysWomanNow.com and look under the Community tab to find other places to volunteer.


T

is for

Twenty-Five Years! 20tH AnniversAry issue

APRIL 2011

SEPTEMBER 2011

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

OctOber 2012

OCTOBER 2011

C o n n e c t i o n s

e l l n e s s

Celebrating 20 Years

DeceMBeR 2011

NOVEMBER 2011

i

C o n n e c t i o n s P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C

t i o n s

P o w e r

S t y l e

n

o

u

r

a

g

too stressed?

Derby Issue

April 2013

I

C E L E B R AT I N g 2 1 Y E A R s

n

o

r

m

Way To Go Woman! Honorees

August 2013

I

n

s

Breast Cancer

C E L E B R AT I N g 2 1 Y E A R s

p

i

r

e

c

o

u

r

a

g

e

I

n

f

o

r

m

SEPTEMBER 2013

I

n

s

I

Hair WHat it Means

21 Men You sHould KnoW

FABulouS

o

r

?

m

BEAUTY

Man

Issue

Fantasies

CHANGES

The

Facial

f

m

BIG

and recipes

Issue

n

r

Life

WorKouts

Best Husbands

o

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 1 Y E A R S

p

spicY guYs oFFering

The

f

Breast Cancer Awareness Special

Bride of Frankenstein Gets Fashionable

since the beginning of time (really, since 1991)

~ Best Books for Gift-Giving~

Fighting

n

from Busyness

Helping women

Heels for the Holidays!

Find Your Courage, Find Your Happiness, Find Your Life!

i

EscapE

Are you

Kick up your

Take the Wheel!

Desserts to Die For!

tips

The

e

c t i o n s

Insider

MAKEOVERS

Winners of

WAY TO GO WOMAN!

the

BEFORE/AFTER issue

FURNITURE

Re-Dos

This issue marks the end of our 25th Year. Thanks to all of you who have shared a bit of your lives to help us all grow, care, and learn more together. Our goal is to continue to inform, inspire, and encourage local women.

BE PART OF THE STORY! MAKE A COMMENT ON TODAYSWOMANNOW.COM STEP 2: STEP 1:

Use the Search Subject to find the extended article on TodaysWomanNow.com and leave a comment.

Look for the search subject with the story.

Your online comment may appear in the print edition of the magazine!

SEARCH: Subject here.

— YOU via TodaysWomanNow.com

MD’s glow + more red / deeper red

OCTOBER 2014

DECEMBER 2015

DECEMBER 2014

How to wear the

NEWEST TRENDS

Stop the

Fighting

READY TO

WORRY CYCLE!

Breast Cancer

Let go of what holds you back

FEAR

Challenges

A PERFECT ENDING to 2015

HOLIDAY BITES

IT’S

How to not panic in a relationship

for you

Ideas inside!

+ BEST

CONFLICT? IT’S OK!

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3/24/16 11:17 AM

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U

is for

Umbrellas and Underwear

WE DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO ISN’T THANKFUL FOR UNDERWEAR AND UMBRELLAS — INCLUDING DAVID GARVEY, WHO HAD NEVER HELD AN UMBRELLA BEFORE THIS PHOTO SHOOT. Although David, 34, doesn’t feel comfortable being in the spotlight, he is letting it shine on him. David, who works in administration at Aguiar Injury Lawyers, participated — for the first time — as a model showcasing auction items at the annual “Misters for MS” fundraising event this year and plans on participating in 2018. David says he got satisfaction from being able to help the National Multiple Sclerosis Society while also working on his personal growth. “I am pretty shy and insecure so this was a good way to try to get out of that box and try to do something I normally wouldn’t do,” he says. And his penchant for self-deprecating humor has peaked the interest of more than 400 followers on his Table_for_5 Instagram feed. Table_for_5 chronicles David’s life as a single man with his married friends. “The two couples I am with, we always hang out and do stuff together, and I think one of us took a picture one day and thought: ‘Hey, this is kind of funny because I am always the fifth wheel.’ You have to be able to laugh at yourself so we had fun with it,” he says.

His favorite underwear: “Boxers...they’re comfortable.” The one thing he can live without: “I have never owned an umbrella. If it’s raining, I’ll just get wet. It is the stubbornness in me.” What he looks for in a woman: “Someone who can get the joke and give a joke.” Photo Melissa Donald

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TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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V

is for

Velvet

Velvet adds the perfect luxe to holiday dressing. Here Theresa Reno-Weber models a few looks.

T

heresa Reno-Weber, CEO and president of the the Metro United Way, is on the fast track to meeting an aggressive goal that she and her team have set for the organization — all while gearing up for a momentous occasion. Last month, the organization celebrated its 100th anniversary, and in recognition of this huge milestone, it will be having its Metro United Way 100th Anniversary Gala. “This is a one in 100th year event. This is really a signature event to mark the 100th anniversary and to set the stage for the next 100 years,” says Theresa, who is in her tenth month with the nonprofit. As part of the celebration, the Metro United Way wants to hit its $1 billion fundraising mark in its 100th year and needs $36 million to do it. Theresa says the support they are receiving from donors is helping them close the gap quickly. “Matt Thornton, who is our campaign chair, and his wife Fran, have committed the first $1 million this year, which was a huge way to kick us off,” she says.

THERESA IS WEARING: Bobeau green velvet slip dress, $68; Cristabelle necklace, $34.97, available at Nordstrom Rack 4600 Shelbyville Road, 502.899.4940. Velvet pumps, $32.99, available at Target 4174 Westport Road, 502.992.1039.

Photos Melissa Donald Makeup Gretchen Krammes, Marie Fulkerson Makeup Chair Contemporary Galleries

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

Metro United Way 100th Anniversary Gala WHEN November 11, 6pm-midnight TICKETS $300 per person

THERESA IS WEARING: JWLA Johnny Was Sassi velvet pull-on tunic, $108; Calvin Klein Suchi suede block heel sandals, $60.97; hematite beaded teardrop earrings by Panacea, $14.97, all available at Nordstrom Rack 4600 Shelbyville Road, 502.899.4940. Leggings, $16, available at Target 4174 Westport Road, 502.992.1039.


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TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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W

is for

Weddings

CELEBRATIONS By Brigid Morrissey Photos Alex R. Hall

S

hayla Delilah Menville and Chris Ring married earlier this year in an afternoon wedding at Morehead, Kentucky for 125 guests. “Our wedding was meant to be carefree and fun. We didn’t want to spend a lot of money, but wanted it to be elegant. We achieved that with the help of talented and generous friends.” Best money-saving tip from Shayla was to bulk order and design your own flowers. “I’m a DIY bride and we made most of our decorations. We were also very blessed with talented and thoughtful friends that contributed to our wedding. We wanted to make the inside feel like a garden. Friends collected wine and beer bottles and jars of all shapes and sizes. We painted them coral, white, and a soft pink. We also used faux greenery and garland on the tables and throughout the ceremony and reception spaces. Our favors were wild seed packets that affectionately said “Let Love Grow, Shayla and Chris. April 29, 2017.”

“Chris and I are animal lovers, and there is no animal we love more than Maggie. This image is so special to us because this is where our family is beginning.”

“My bouquet, which I arranged myself, was wrapped in a piece of a quilt that my great-grandmother made. It was my something old and was beautifully sentimental.”

Read more details online at TodaysWomanNow.com. “We had a sparkler send off. We had originally planned to have Chinese lanterns, but with somewhat dry conditions at the time and our wedding being in the center of the Daniel Boone National Forest, we made a game-time decision to switch it up. We are so happy with the results and pictures!”

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X

is for

‘X’-traordinary Holiday Gathering

HOST A SNOW GLOBE

Soiree Story and Photos by Sara Floyd

O

Get together with friends and capture your family moments in personalized snow globes you make together.

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NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

ne particular December several years ago, I was watching through the front window as my children played in the snow. Their squeals of delight were muffled behind the panes of glass, but their joy was palpable. Their tiny red noses, their little bodies thick with layers, and the snowflakes falling from the sky like powdered sugar made my breath catch in my throat. A real-life snow globe scene was unfolding in front of me. As I pressed my face to the window to take it all in, an idea was born. I would recreate this scene and preserve it so that the moment would never be lost. After gathering a few supplies, I went to work creating a snowy setting using a photo of each child and copious amounts of faux snow. I was delighted with the outcome and the kids were mightily impressed to see themselves in the middle of a winter wonderland encased in a spaghetti sauce jar. page 50>>


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Interested in creating one for yourself or making a girls' night of it? Here's how: 1. Think about what you'd like your scene to look like and then snap a full body photo of each child. I usually have my children wear their coats and hats so that they look the part. When I first started making these, I just had each child pose as if they were standing out in the snow. Over the years, as the idea has evolved, I work hard to pose them for the scene I'm hoping to create. For instance, if I want the end result to be the three of them having a snowball fight, I might pose one child with his hand up as if he is throwing a baseball. The next child could be photographed ducking down or with hands positioned to catch the incoming snowball. The third child might be laughing or pointing or even positioned as if to hold a bucket of snowballs. The possibilities are endless and can be as simple or as detailed as you prefer. 2. Print the photos. A 4x6 size print usually works well. Closely cut the body out making sure to stay right on the lines of the clothing. No background should be included at all. The exception to this is leaving a small tab under the shoes so that you have something to glue down allowing your photo to stand up. Laminate the photo. This step is optional, but I feel like it protects the picture while also making it a bit sturdier. 3. Using your trimmed photos to guide you, choose a jar or glass container. We started out using actual food jars with the labels removed. Each year, our jars get fancier and more elaborate. Sauce jars work just fine for single children while bigger, lidded containers work best for snow globes that will contain more than one child. No matter what type you plan to use, it is important to make sure that your photos will fit comfortably. I suggest taking the photos with you while you shop so that you can easily tell whether or not they will fit. (Note that a nicer jar will be a better quality of glass and will provide a more clear, undistorted view of the contents.) 4. Purchase fake snow. There are many different types available at craft stores or through Amazon. While snow is the only thing you actually need, it is also fun to shop for other accessories to create your scene. Christmas trees, tiny light strands, and little wrapped gifts all add a pop of color and interest. 5. Use hot glue to adhere everything into place. Once the glue is dry, sprinkle in the snow. 6. Choose a special and safe place to display your snow globe(s).

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Plan the poses in your pictures to make creative scenes your children will love to look at every year. Look for more of Sara’s party ideas on her instagram @makeitmomma.

<<page 48 The following winter, as I pulled out boxes of decorations, I unpacked my jars and found that I loved them even more. The kids had grown and changed since then, but just as I had hoped, a moment of their childhood sat unchanged beneath the glass. I decided then and there to make it a yearly tradition and to share the idea with my closest mom friends. I've been hosting a Snow Globe Soiree ever since. Friends show up at my door on the designated evening with their jars and other tiny accoutrements. We gather in the kitchen to drink wine, munch on appetizers, and assemble our wintery scenes. Snow and accessories are swapped and shared, and we ooh and ahh at the cuteness of our children. Everyone steps back out into the cold night carrying with them a snow globe and a moment that they'll forever cherish.

Friends come over for wine and appetizers and work on their snow globes together.


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Y

is for

Yowza! and for

Your Best Body

ALISON CARDOZA

AGE 35 JOB Certified Personal Trainer and Hip Hop Group Exercise Instructor at Baptist East Milestone Wellness Center MOTIVATION Alison says that measurable goals are part of her motivation, and she “strives to reach a new, realistic goal for myself. I keep it simple.” Here are her monthly goals for the next few months: November: Get eight hours of sleep a night. “Sleep is so important in maintaining good health!” December: 30 pullups and 30 pushups daily. “When the weather gets cold it’s easy to slow down on my workouts. I want to make sure I stay motivated, and these two goals require me to continue staying active and pushing myself in a positive way.” January: “Stretch after every single workout and meditate and relax before I go to bed. January can be a stressful time of year for me since I’m a personal trainer and the gym is busy! Stretching helps release tension, and meditation before I go to bed relaxes me.” February: (heart-health) Eat fruits and vegetables and nuts for my snacks and only lean meat for my main meals and only water to drink. “I make sure I eat six small meals a day so I am not hungry, and I’m fueling my body properly.” March: Ab month. “I try to do 200 crunches along with my regular cardio daily and weights every other day.”

Want to be a featured Best Body in 2018? Sign up at TodaysWomanNow.com.

Photo Melissa Donald

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TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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Z

is for

Zen Thanksgiving

3 MAKE-AHEAD DISHES (THAT ARE EVEN BETTER THE NEXT DAY) Story and Photos by Paige Rhodes

H

osting Thanksgiving is stressful enough without having to worry about making everything the day of. Save yourself a ton of trouble by prepping and cooking foods such as vegetables, desserts, and baked goods ahead of time. These three recipes can be started even a couple of days before Thanksgiving to give yourself ample time to deal with that turkey and dressing.

TIP: Buy pre-shredded Brussels sprouts in a bag to make the dish even easier.

Brussels Sprout Salad With Pomegranates and Candied Pecans Ingredients 1 pound Brussels sprouts, cleaned and shredded 1 cup pomegranate arils 2/3 cup chopped candied pecans 4 ounces crumbled goat cheese Pomegranate-Orange Vinaigrette 1/4 cup freshly-squeezed orange juice 1/4 cup olive oil 2 tbsp pomegranate or apple cider vinegar pinch of salt and pepper Instructions Toss all of the salad ingredients together in a large bowl until combined. Whisk all of the vinaigrette ingredients together until combined. Drizzle the vinaigrette over the salad and serve immediately. If making ahead of time, combine only the Brussels sprouts and vinaigrette, and top with cheese, pecans, and pomegranate right before serving. page 56>>

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Brussels Sprout Salad With Pomegranates and Candied Pecans can be made in advance of the big day.


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<<page 54

Apple Layer Cake With Bourbon Butterscotch Buttercream Ingredients For the Cake: 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 tsp baking soda 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground allspice 1 tsp ground cloves 1½ cups unsalted butter, cut into small cubes, at room temperature 2½ cups granulated sugar 2 eggs 2 1/2 cups unsweetened applesauce 1 cup packed, shredded apple For the Buttercream: 9 ounces Butterscotch Sauce (store-bought or homemade) 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup brown sugar 1 cup egg whites 4 sticks unsalted butter at room temperature 1 tbsp vanilla extract 2 tbsp bourbon Instructions Bourbon Butterscotch Buttercream: Whisk Butterscotch Sauce, sugars, and egg whites together in a steel bowl. Over medium heat, simmer a couple inches of water in a similarly sized pot. Make sure that your bowl fits well over the top and doesn’t touch the water. Continuously whisk the mixture until the sugars have dissolved and everything is well combined. Transfer to the fridge and chill in the freezer for 15-20 minutes until it is cooled.

Meanwhile, beat the butter in a mixer for 2 minutes on high until it is lighter in color and fluffy. Add in the cooled syrup in two additions, beating 1 minute after each addition. Add the vanilla and bourbon and beat 30 seconds until smooth. For the Cake: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Grease three 8-inch round cake pans, line the bottoms with a round of parchment paper, grease the parchment, then flour the pans, tapping out any excess. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, allspice, and cloves. Using a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment beat the butter on medium speed until creamy, about 4 minutes. Add the sugar and beat until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs and beat until combined. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the flour mixture to the mixer bowl in three parts, alternating with the applesauce, beginning and ending with the flour mixture. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and fold in shredded apple until well combined. (Don’t overmix.) Divide the batter evenly among the prepared pans and smooth the tops. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans halfway through

Apple Layer Cake With Bourbon Butterscotch Buttercream.

the baking time. Transfer the pans to a wire rack and cool for 20 minutes. Turn the cakes out onto the rack, remove the parchment, and allow to cool completely. Trim off the top to create flat surfaces. Place one cake layer on a serving platter. Spread 1/3 of the frosting on top. Add the next layer and top with another 1/3 of the frosting. Add the third layer on

top and spread a very thin layer of frosting over the sides and top of the cake. I wanted mine to look more “naked,” but you can adjust as you like. Decorate the top of the cake with mini apples or a drizzle of additional butterscotch sauce, if desired. The cake can be kept in an airtight cake stand at room temperature for up to three days.

No-Knead Artisan Rolls Ingredients 3 cups all-purpose flour 2-3 tsp kosher salt 1/2 tsp active dry yeast 1 1/2 cups warm water Instructions In a large bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and yeast. Stir in water using a wooden spoon until the mixture forms a shaggy dough. Don’t overwork the dough — you want it to be just combined. No-Knead Artisan Rolls

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temperature for 8-24 hours to rise. I like to store mine in an “off” oven.

remove Dutch oven. With floured hands, place in dough balls.

After the dough has risen and has little air pockets, preheat oven to 450 degrees. Place your Dutch oven into the preheated oven for 30 minutes. Do not skip this step.

Replace cover and bake for 30 minutes covered. Carefully remove the cover and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes, uncovered. I find that mine takes about 12 minutes, but just keep an eye on them.

While your Dutch oven preheats, turn dough out onto a well-floured surface. With floured hands, form the dough into a ball. Divide into 6 equal-sized pieces and gently form into round balls. Cover dough loosely and let rest. After the 30 minutes are up, carefully

Allow them to cool slightly and transfer to a cooling rack. Slice in half horizontally to use as a burger or sandwich roll or cut in vertical diagonal slices for crostini. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days.


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CaregiverGUIDE Knowing when a loved one needs help is not always clear. Sometimes just a little daily assistance is needed. Sometimes, a person is living alone and their situation has become dangerous. Whether it happens suddenly or develops slowly, for many of us there comes a time when someone in our lives needs extra help. This section introduces options to consider when looking for caregiving help. If you want or need more detailed information, go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com or pick up a copy of the latest Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Transitions magazine. We started that magazine 15 years ago to provide a comprehensive look at area senior health communities and services as well as an in-depth look at subjects about quality-of-living decisions for aging loved ones.

Illustration Silvia Cabib Stories and Photos Aubrey Hillis

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Is Your Loved One Safe Living Alone? Watching loved ones age is tough, but watching them become less independent is even harder. Many families will be faced with the decision to place a loved one in assisted living, but when is the right time to make that transition? Answering these 10 questions along with expert advice from Patti Naiser, president and founder of Senior Home Transitions and Ginger Jones, president and co-owner of Diversified Nurse Consultants, could help determine the safest living arrangements for your loved one. Each time I visit my loved one she… A. Looks healthy and seems to maintain her weight. B. Has lost some weight but nothing drastic. C. Has lost a considerable amount of weight without a reasonable explanation. My loved one’s social life is… A. Active with frequent visitors and social activities. B. Somewhat active with occasional visitors and social activities. C. Isolating with no social activities at all. My loved one still has a driver’s license and he… A. Never needs directions when navigating to his usual places. B. Sometimes asks for directions to get to a place he visits often. C. A lways gets lost or wanders around his town without clear direction. My loved one has… A. Never had a fall when alone in their home. B. Has stumbled on furniture, but never taken a serious fall. C. Has had one or more serious falls in their home that have led to a broken bone. When it comes to hobbies, my loved one… A. Is always engaged in the things she loves. B. Sometimes engages in her hobbies, but not as often. C. Has stopped all the hobbies she used to enjoy. MOSTLY A’S It seems as though your loved one is thriving independently. Patti Naiser says to visit your loved one often to keep them socially active and monitor any changes. Some changes Patti suggests to look for are: weight loss, forgetting medications, depression, poor hygiene, or an untidy house.

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My loved one is prescribed daily medication and he… A. Takes the medication without being reminded. B. Takes the medication, but needs a timer to remind him. C. Never remembers his medication and someone must administer the medication to him. When it comes to personal hygiene, my loved one… A. Takes showers and brushes their teeth regularly. B. Needs a reminder to take daily showers. C. Doesn’t understand why they need to shower and refuses. My loved one’s finances are… A. A lways in order without a penny missing. B. Somewhat in order with just a few dollars unaccounted for. C. D windling with large amounts missing. My loved one’s energy level during the day is… A. High with little rest. B. Somewhat high, but seems to tire easily. C. Low with no strength to carry out simple tasks. Lately, my loved one’s demeanor is... A. Pleasant and always acts like herself. B. Pleasant, but unusually withdrawn. C. Changing with each visit, sometimes becoming angry.

MOSTLY B’S Living alone can be a possibility even for those who show signs of struggle. “Ninety percent of the population wants to live at home,” says Ginger Jones. “You can make a home safe by checking on them regularly, removing throw rugs, making clear paths throughout the house, ensuring that there are railings along any stairs, and installing a grab bar in the shower.” Taking extra steps to ensure the safety of your loved one can keep them independent longer.

NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

MOSTLY C’S Witnessing extreme changes in your loved one can be a sign of a cognitive issue or an acute illness. “If you’re seeing major behavior changes,” says Patti, “then you have waited too long. With dementia, you lose the ability to reason; like going out without a coat or wandering. At this point they will need 24-hour care. Being in assisted living could lower your loved one’s stress level and give them a better quality of life.”

How to Start the Conversation Explaining to your loved one that they are no longer safe living alone could prove to be a difficult conversation to start. Remember the following tips to help ease the strain for you and your loved one. “Remind them that they are not doing what they love anymore,” says Patti Naiser, president and founder of Senior Home Transitions, “and having help with household chores could reserve some of their energy.” Patti also recommends letting your loved one know what they will be gaining when moving to assisted living such as friends, social activities, and someone to have a meal with. Additionally, she suggests not approaching anyone with late-stage dementia but rather have a professional help with this transition. “There is not a one size fits all conversation,” says Ginger Jones, president and co-owner of Diversified Nurse Consultants. “It may depend on their cognitive level on how you should approach them. Those in the early stages of dementia get angry easily, so be prepared to be met with some resistance. Start with statements like: I am concerned about… Make sure to take their wishes into consideration and let them help you with the decision making.” Ginger also says to educate yourself on the options offered so that you can choose the best possible living situation for your loved one or have an aging life professional guide you along the way.


CaregiverGUIDE

HOW WE CAN HELP

One Place to Get Many Levels of Care

I

f your loved one enjoys the classic historical beauty featured in some of Louisville’s most stunning homes, then he or she would love residing at The Altenheim. The Altenheim, which translates in German to “Caring for Elders” is an aging in place senior health care community. Located on Barret Avenue in the Highlands, the building itself was a retirement home dating back to 1906. The Goodwill Circle of St. John’s Evangelical church recognized the need for a home to care for elders in their community that prompted the purchase of the Stewart family home and its four surrounding acres. More than a century later, The Altenheim moves forward with the same purpose it was founded for. The building itself has gone through a great many renovations and modernizations. Mary Jo Coker, the administrator at the Altenheim, has ensured that the history of the building is kept alive through the character of the architecture and decor of the facilities.

Having been a caregiver to her own mom and dad, Mary Jo says “The hardest decision for a caregiver or family member to make is admitting that the loved one needs more than (the family) can give, it’s about planning ahead and knowing when it’s time to seek that help.” The Altenheim is a nonprofit healthcare community, with a CNA staffing ratio of 1 to 7. With residents ranging in age from 63 to 98, the aging-inplace program at The Altenheim walks with your loved ones through all the stages of care, including independent living, personal care, and long term health care. They have made it their mission to offer quality compassionate care to residents, as well as their families who choose to entrust the care of their loved ones to them. Through the option of independent living, residents can enjoy the traditions and freedom of living at home, while the everyday household chores are provided by caregivers on staff. If a resident needs a little more help managing the day-to-day tasks, such as bathing and dressing, the Altenheim offers their personal care program where medications can be administered by licensed professionals. Their long-term health care community offers 24-hour nursing care, where those with dementia or other chronic illnesses can feel safe and secure, and enjoy the many activities The Altenheim offers.

Mary Jo Coker, administrator at The Altenheim, says it can be hard to admit your loved one needs more help.

936 Barret Ave. | Louisville

thealtenheim.org | 502.584.0638

– PROMOTION –

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The Transition to a New Place By Carrie Vittitoe Illustrations Silvia Cabib

Once a loved one has decided to move to a retirement community and selected the one to call home, the hard work of “rightsizing” begins. This is the process of going through the house and belongings to find what will work in one’s new home and lifestyle. The process can be physically and emotionally grueling, but taking some of the following ideas into consideration will make the process feel much more manageable. >>> page 64

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CaregiverGUIDE

HOW WE CAN HELP

The Right Help at the Right Time

T

aking on the role of being a caregiver for a loved one can be difficult, and relationships can become strained. Realizing when it’s time to reach out for help shouldn’t add to the turmoil. “I believe we have a responsibility to make sure our loved ones are properly cared for,” says Becky Beanblossom, founder and owner of Home Instead Senior Care Louisville East. “But I do not believe we have to do all of the direct care ourselves.”  While in college, Becky had first-hand experience caring for her grandfather who had suffered a severe stroke.  When she decided to start a business, she knew senior home care was the perfect fit.  Since starting Home Instead eighteen years ago, Becky has been working tirelessly to provide quality care, keeping seniors in the comfort of home as long as possible.  She and the rest of the employees at Home Instead are committed to exceeding industry standards.  Their highly-trained staff serve clients with the skill set necessary to handle complex situations, including those experiencing Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, or those who are approaching the end of life.  Becky employs a team of Nurse Case Managers, led by Amy Southworth, the company’s Director of Nursing, who visit every client on a routine basis.  “Keeping an eye on every client is important to our ability to provide better care, respond to each client’s change in condition, and build stronger relationships with each client and their family,” Amy added.  Beyond the focus on quality, Becky says Home Instead is committed to responding quickly.  When a new or existing client is suddenly in need of help, a caregiver can be there within one hour of the call. “One of the guiding principles of our company is to help people when they need it, not when it’s convenient for us,” Becky says. “It’s our job to put the systems in place to put clients’ needs first.”  Along with the ability to respond quickly is the company’s promise to guarantee coverage.  When a caregiver isn’t able to make it to their scheduled shift, Home Instead’s promise is to get another qualified caregiver there, no matter what.  “This is where the rubber meets the road.  If we say we’ll be there, we’ll be there,” Becky said. For as little as one hour, up to 24 hours per day, every day, Home Instead Senior Care is the answer when you can’t be there.  Don’t let stress and worry put strain on some of your most important relationships, let Home Instead and its compassionate caregivers help when you need it most.

Becky Beanblossom ensures that her employees have the resources they need to provide the best care to clients.

4101 Taylorsville Road, Suite 200 | Louisville

louisvillehomecare.com | 502.515.9515

– PROMOTION –

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<<< page 62

Selecting Your Living Space Even if the retirement community has been decided upon, selecting the right room or apartment within the community can be a difficult decision. Harriette Friedlander, who is happily retired after 43 years working in aging services, says, “It’s an exploration of what is important to that person.” She says someone with ambulatory difficulties may want to be close to the center of activities and the dining room, while someone who loves to read may wish to be close to the community library. A very private, introverted person would likely not want to be near the hub of activity. Friedlander says if a person knows someone at the community, that also may influence their choice of rooms or apartment. She says

that caregivers should consider the personality of their loved one. “Who is that person? All the questions revolve around that question,” she says. Barbara H. Morris, owner of Smooth Transitions, says most communities have floor plans that potential residents can see, which will help them begin the next step after selecting their room or apartment, which is determining what possessions will move with them.

Determining What You Have When working with her clients, Morris encourages them to begin with the rooms they actively use now rather than starting with the attic, basement, or a den they only vacuum periodically. In each room, they should write down what they actually have. How many sets of sheets? How many forks, spoons, knives, serving plates? How many blankets, wall hangings, picture frames, and sets of china? This process doesn’t have to be a whirlwind of activity. Morris says it can be as simple as doing one drawer at a time while sitting down in front of the television. Morris has created a workbook to help individuals who are not using her services to begin deciding what they have and what they need for their new living space (movingforseniors.com/ workbook.html). >>> page 66

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CaregiverGUIDE

HOW WE CAN HELP

Making People “Feel Safe and Whole”

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andy Ballinger is a caregiver who specializes in memory care at Forest Hills Commons. After 17 years of working in memory care, Sandy joined the American Senior Communities family in the fall of 2016, right after the Forest Hills Commons location opened. “I love working in memory care with the residents in every stage of their life, doing whatever it takes to make them feel comfortable, safe, at home, and loved,” says Sandy. She approaches each day at the community with open arms, ready to embrace the residents as she would her own family members in making sure they “feel safe and whole.” Sandy adds that strategies focus on the wellness of individuals, rather than the illnesses. Caregivers at Forest Hills Commons provide the personalized support each individual needs through physical, social, intellectual, spiritual, emotional, occupational, and environmental care. As a community centered around enabling a person to experience a greater sense of purpose, their mission is to leverage and support an individual’s story. They do this by gathering knowledge about a resident’s past, and by building relationships with residents and their families to ensure the emotional well-being and enriched living. These personal relationships give the caregivers the chance to create and develop, what they refer to as a “personal oasis” for residents. A “Personal Oasis” is made up of sensory-based activities with the purpose of restoring a sense of calm in moments of anxiety due to memory gaps and disorientation associated with dementia.

Sandy Ballinger believes developing a nurturing relationship with residents is valuable to their quality of life.

One thing that really allows Forest Hill Commons to stand out is the science they put into the design of their memory care neighborhood. The architecture is influenced by psychological research to help residents in the neighborhood maintain their independence and navigate more freely. This intimate knowledge helps us adapt activities and responses that can reduce anxiety, improve emotional well-being and enrich living. Helping your loved ones shouldn’t be a maze, and when it comes to memory care, Forest Hill Commons is helping families confidently navigate through all of life’s stages.

9107 Taylorsville Road | Louisville

ascseniorcare.com/location/ forest-hills-commons/ 502.499.5533 – PROMOTION –

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<<< page 64

Measuring the New Space Morris recommends measuring furniture with butcher paper and tape and seeing how it will lay out in the new living quarters. Furniture may technically fit the new space, but not well and may require some creativity. An item may need to be used in a new way from how it is currently used. For example, an end table in the living room that has been passed down and has special meaning may become a bedside table in the retirement community apartment. Morris says, “You also want to allow space for future needs,” like a walker or other medical equipment.

Determining What Goes Where Once a client knows what she or he actually has, Morris says it is essential for someone who is moving to ask themselves, “What is special? What brings joy and has meaning to my life?” An individual might own a lot of stuff, but asking this question helps pare down what is special from what has simply been accumulated. If an individual owns collections, it might be necessary to take only two or three of the items in the collection and take pictures of the others before dispersing to family or selling at auction. Morris asks her clients to think about what they are realistically going to use in their new living space. She says, “If all meals are going to be provided, you don’t need to take a lot of kitchen items, especially bigger items like baking pans and roasters.” When it comes to linens, she typically tells clients to take two

sets of sheets and two sets of towels. This purging of items can be tricky for family members to navigate with their loved ones. The person who is moving into a retirement community may want to hold onto many items that have sentimental value, which can be frustrating to their caregivers. One of the benefits of hiring an objective party to help organize and dispose of items is that it can reduce friction between the individual who is moving and the family members who are helping with the process. “We’re Switzerland, we’re neutral,” Morris says about herself and other professionals like her.

What Do You Do With What You’re Not Keeping Morris stresses that people need to have realistic expectations about what money they may get from their furniture and household items that are for sale or auctioned off. “Just because something is appraised for a certain value doesn’t mean you can get that,” she says, and adds that yard sales can be very demoralizing. She is reluctant to recommend Craigslist or ads in the newspaper simply because of the potential of unscrupulous people. There are auction houses and consignment shops around town, but there are some furniture pieces for which there is little local need or desire. “You can’t give dining room sets away,” Morris says. Friedlander says many people who rightsize ask family members to hang onto special items or pieces of furniture so that the items stay within the family. Many people who have rightsized more than once try to sell their items

the first time but realize it is a lot of work that doesn’t always pay off financially. “When I move people the second time, they don’t bother sending items for auction; they just donate them,” Morris says.

Give Yourself Permission to be Flexible When a loved one moves into the new living space, whatever furniture arrangement they first choose doesn’t have to be the arrangement they stick with forever. Friedlander says it may be a good idea to go into the new apartment or room with the idea that this is the furniture arrangement for a month to see how they like it and how it works with their lifestyle. If an individual is going to slowly clean out their former home, they have some flexibility to change furnishings around if they want to.

Help the Staff Understand Your Loved Ones Needs One of the most important things caregivers can do to help transition their loved one is to help the staff of the retirement community learn the needs, likes, and dislikes of the new resident. Being an advocate for your loved one and allowing them to feel in control of their life is critical. Even though rightsizing can be a positive change, it also means loss, which you can’t sweep under the rug. “Most important is to respect their autonomy and keep them making decisions. If it is too much, then slow down,” says Friedlander.

Most important is to respect their autonomy and keep them making decisions. If it is too much, then slow down.

— Harriette Friedlander

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Photo Melissa Donald

CaregiverGUIDE HOW WE CAN HELP

Susanne Howe meets with residents Don Lurding and Dorothy McCrocklin.

Music Brings Back Memories When it comes to care, the Treyton Oak Towers activity coordinator loves finding ways to bring out the best in people. Susanne Howe is the healthcare center activity coordinator at Treyton Oak Towers. She learned early on that music is the “go-to” most effective way to get residents to engage. Residents may suffer from cognitive, physical, or mental issues and then they light up when listening to music. They will sing along to old favorites like Let Me Call you Sweetheart and By the Light of the Silvery Moon. Exercise seems less of a chore to residents when active music is played. “I may barely be able to get them to do 10 repetitions without music, but it can easily double when they are singing their favorite tunes,”Susanne says. “We’ve also found that music can be extremely helpful for residents who are on Hosparus care as a comforting and pleasant distraction.” When patients with dementia become agitated, they are often soothed quickly with a song, says Susanne, who adds that studies show that music of their courting years (18- 30 years) is usually the most beneficial. “I recently spent several hours on a lengthy car trip with my parents, and what could have been a tedious and stressful ride was made much more relaxed and fun by playing my father’s favorite music, especially the greatest hits of Nat King Cole, says Susanne. “It gave both of us a chance to laugh and sing along. Another benefit of music is increased confidence. Women and men feel smarter when they can recall and sing along to a tune

they enjoy. It allows both sides of their brain to be exercised.” The best attended activities at Treyton Oak are when they have scheduled local musicians to perform. Some of the favorite local entertainers include: Dan Colon, acoustic guitar and David Shapero, pianist (who both are members of Moondance); David Goddard, rock ‘n roll & oldies piano/vocals; Misha Feigin, piano and guitar; and Kim Brown, southern gospel pianist. Susanne views caregiving and engaging with my residents as a blessing. “It warms my heart to see people relive some of their youth with laughter and smiles.”

211 West Oak Street | Louisville

treytonoaktowers.com | 502.589.3211

– PROMOTION –

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Is it the Doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fault or Yours? Getting the Most Out of Your Appointment By Carrie Vittitoe Illustrations Silvia Cabib

Whether you are caregiver to a child, an aging parent, or a spouse, it can be a difficult job. Few things are more frustrating than when a loved one is sick or in pain. During those times, we want to access medical care as quickly and easily as possible. Fortunately, new technologies and some tried-and-true caregiver experience can help pave the way for faster and better medical care for your loved one. >>> page 70

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CaregiverGUIDE HOW WE CAN HELP A New Community in Prospect Exceptional Senior Living built a retirement community for residents looking to stay in or join the Prospect community. It brings to mind a luxury hotel, from the artwork on the walls to the layout of the dining room and suites. They even have a putting green. Lucy Emmil, director of Memory Care and Life Enrichment, invests herself into the relationships she has with residents to make sure life is enjoyable. Lucy discovers the smallest details, such as how each resident takes her coffee, and tailors a lifestyle and routine based on past profession, family life, interests, and routines. "We really hone in on their emotional and social needs," says Lucy. Having worked in memory care for more than 25 years, Lucy says a routine is good, but she emphasizes a need for flexibility to help residents maintain a positive outlook on life and not get bored. The Memory Care Neighborhood is designed to provide seniors with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, or other memory challenges a safe, comforting environment to continue socialization and learning.

6901 Carslaw Ct | Prospect

exceptionalseniors.com 502.907.3778

Lucy Emmil says she is always looking for new ideas and activities to enhance a resident's life.

CaregiverGUIDE HOW WE CAN HELP Helping Seniors Buy and Sell Homes Real estate transactions and transitions after age 55 can be overwhelming. Kent Lee, a Realtor specializing in transitioning seniors, knows that it helps to have someone who understands the next steps of life. When Kent Lee joined The Nick Peskoe Real Estate Group, part of the Keller Williams Louisville East Brokerage, he was in the process of transitioning his mother from being a homeowner to residing in an assisted living community. It was through this transition that Kent Lee says he had his "Aha moment" in realizing that many people going through this phase needed more help, they needed a network of resources. In 2016, with a new passion to find a way to better serve the senior community, Kent earned his Senior Real Estate Specialist, SRES designation. He also began building his network so when there is a real estate transaction with seniors, he can provide references to much-needed resources.

9911 Shelbyville Rd, Suite 100 Louisville

louisvillesres.com 502.649.5921 – PROMOTION –

Kent Lee is a Senior Real Estate Specialist, SRES within the Greater Area Association of Realtors and part of the 1 percent with certification in specializing in transitioning seniors to a new home. TODAY’S WOMAN / NOV 2017

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Wait Times “It is extremely frustrating to have to wait three to six months to get an appointment for certain specialists, such as a neurologist or sometimes even a dermatologist. Long waits in the waiting room are also a pet peeve.” — Dan Heins (Board VP, Parkinson Support Center) Technology is making it easier for patients to not only make appointments with the ease of an app, but even to see a physician or without leaving home. Norton Healthcare utilizes My Norton Chart which, according to Norton Medical Group vice president and pediatrician, Dr. Josh Honaker, has five primary functions: schedule appointments, access lab results, pay bills, access medical records, and communicate with physicians. My Norton Chart also gives patients the opportunity to have a video visit or an e-visit with a nurse practitioner. A video visit is a face-to-face appointment over a secure network for patients in Kentucky and Indiana ages 2 and older with non-urgent health concerns like sinus infections and rashes. Patients complete a questionnaire and then receive a telephone call from a Norton nurse practitioner. Rachel Alexander, APRN, Norton eCare’s program coordinator, says e-visits are only

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available to Kentucky residents who are ages 18 and older and cost $35. Alexander notes “If we cannot help them and have to refer them on, we do not charge them.” Honaker says some patients are skeptical at first of a video or e-visit, but they quickly change their minds. “It is such a novel and innovative approach to delivering care,” he says. “Patients love it.” Another option for homebound or home-limited patients is MD2U, that provides home-based primary care. Jessica Dsouza, vice president of clinical operations at MD2U, says, “We have a great group of nurse practitioners who are good at managing chronic diseases and have more time to spend with patients.” Not only can MD2U perform full health assessments, lab work, ultrasounds, X-rays, and echocardiograms at patients’ homes, they also help patients get other social needs met, such as helping them access counseling services or food bank assistance. Dsouza says in rural areas of the state, like Somerset and Madisonville, it makes a huge difference because patients have to travel for doctor appointments.

Communication “It is best to take someone along (to the appointment) to record for you. It’s important to always have a list of questions, preferably prioritized in the order of importance.” — Deborah Tuggle (clinical care nurse specialist) While My Norton Chart gives patients the chance to access their medical notes and email questions if they think of them after the appointment, it is far more efficient and reassuring to get accurate and complete information during the visit with a doctor or nurse practitioner. It is important to ask specific questions. “Questions should include where to find information and what is the worst thing that would happen if I do nothing. So often the answer is surprisingly refreshing!” says Tuggle. Most states allow patients to record doctor visits, but it is in everyone’s

best interest if the patient asks permission first. I have found that to be extremely useful on initial visits when there is so much new information to be reviewed,” says Heins. In some cases, it may be necessary to switch physicians if the communication isn’t up to par. Lucy Martin, IT manager at United Parcel Service, Inc. says, “I think the most important thing is to have the right doctor. I accompanied my mother to her primary care physician for a year before insisting that she change doctors. Her previous doctor was annoyed by my questions and even asked if I would not attend! They preferred to listen to her heart and provide the same prescriptions without really talking about my mother’s health or quality of life. I found a doctor that specializes in adult care, with an emphasis on seniors. Everything changed.”

Handling Hospitalizations “(Missing doctors when making hospital rounds) is a challenge and takes strategy. I ask the nurses on duty what the doctors’ schedules are. They can advise you when to be there, and it usually works. If you continually miss them, I ask a nurse to call them and relay my questions.” — Lucy Martin When a loved one goes into the hospital, it can be frustrating to keep missing doctors when they make their daily rounds, especially when a caregiver is trying to maintain some semblance of self-care. One of the most important things a caregiver can do is learn the schedule of the hospitalist. The Society of Hospital Medicine defines hospitalists as “Physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to hospital medicine.” Caregivers and patients can feel bothersome asking nurses to page doctors, but Tuggle is clear: “Never hesitate to have them paged or called to speak to you! They are your employee.”


CaregiverGUIDE HOW WE CAN HELP Preserving Your Assets — When It’s Happened to You Your loved one is no longer able to care for themselves and now they need home care givers, assisted living, or nursing home care. How long can they pay for this? Frequently many people who lose a lifetime of savings when faced with nursing home costs of about $100,000 a year. There is help! Keibler & Associates Inc. is a financial service firm that works to make sure that you and your loved ones do not experience extreme financial loss when transitioning a loved one because of long term care needs. His firm commonly saves their clients 50% to 100% of their assets instead of them losing it to the high cost of long term care.  When his own mother was in the position of needing care, Roy began to look for solutions to help seniors keep their assets. He found that repositioning assets into specific financial vehicles can allow people to qualify for benefits so they do not lose all their assets. Now, for the last 17 years, his firm has focused on helping individuals with Nursing Home care, Medicaid, V.A. Aide and Attendance, and Wealth transfer — and is one of the few Southern Indiana firms to do so.

New Albany, IN

keiblerandassociates.com | 812.948.9288

Roy Keibler says, “You don’t have to lose assets because of caregiver expenses.”

CaregiverGUIDE HOW WE CAN HELP When You Need to Make Decisions Today’s Transitions magazine was created 15 years ago with the intention to help anyone who needs information about aging issues. Half of the magazine focuses on living with everyday fun and healthful decisions. The articles feature locals who have found solutions to caregiving issues as well as solutions to specific healthcare problems. The other half of the magazine contains a comprehensive list of aging and caregiving communities to help anyone who needs to be able to navigate the sometimes overwhelming amount of information.

Owner Cathy Zion with the latest copies of Today’s Transitions magazine.

Also you can get online help and information at TodaysTransitionsNow.com. The site allows you to read back issues of the magazine as well as stories that can help you or your loved one find answers that work for you. The magazine is available at all Kroger supermarkets, senior communities and local hospitals.

Zion Publications 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 | Louisville

TodaysTransitionsNow.com | 502.327.8855 – PROMOTION –

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Innovative Healthcare Services

Innovative Therapeutic/ Mobility Services

Innovative Support Services

Innovative Structural Design

WINNER: Belmont Village Senior Living

WINNER: Frazier Rehab Institute

WINNER: Masonic Homes of Kentucky with Senior Care Experts

WINNER: The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, Jeffersontown

Masonic Homes of Kentucky is working with Senior Care Experts to support its homedelivered meals program for homebound seniors. Prior to their partnership, Senior Care Experts, an organization providing support services to seniors, had been using various food providers for the service, which limited meal options. But partnering with Masonic Homes has broadened its reach. “We are able to accommodate such a large capacity in the kitchen on our Louisville campus, and we are already designing meals specific to residents in the aging population. By Senior Care Experts bringing it into one location, we are able to offer more meal selections,” says Nicole Candler, senior vice president of communications and marketing at Masonic Homes of Kentucky. People can call Senior Care Experts to request meals. All meals are customized based on dietary restrictions and allergies. Masonic Homes has plans of expanding its meals program to Shelbyville and Frankfort.

Good Samaritan Society gives rehab patients a safe environment for easing themselves back into their daily tasks. Its post-acute center provides an entire living area designed to help patients regain the independence they need before returning home. The center’s therapy gym has multiple outdoor walking surfaces for learning to adjust to walking on brick, gravel, grass, and sloped areas. Good Samaritan has an indoor garage for rehab patients. “They can bring their own vehicle from home so they can learn to get in and out of their vehicle post surgery,” says Bill Shoulta, director of community relations at Good Samaritan Society — Jeffersontown. The gym’s bathroom also includes a standardized tub, grab bars, and a bench for patients who might need extra help stepping into the tub. Instead of staying in their room, patients can prepare meals in the fully operational kitchen. “They can get their own snacks. So it’s not like they have to push a button to get waited on. The whole concept is to help them develop a sense of self sufficiency,” Shoulta says.

Innovation: Circle of Friends, focusing on mental fitness and physical activity for seven days a week for those with dementia. Belmontvillage.com Type: Alzheimer’s Care Size: 110 residents

Circle of Friends is a program developed at Belmont Village Senior Living to help reduce apathy in people with mild to moderate dementia. Beverly Sanborn, LCSW, MSW gerontologist and vice president of program development at Belmont Village Senior Living, says the program builds cognitive reserve, which appears to delay symptoms. “You have extra capacity available in your brain. This is called cognitive reserve. If you develop the extra capacity, according to researchers, you could lose brain cells, but your brain could still function longer,” she says. The benefit, Sanborn says, is residents become more engaged with their peers and feel valued. “The program breathes life back into the residents. They will come to the group on their own. The group is their therapy and they love it,” Sanborn says. Belmont Village Senior Living hopes to incorporate dance and music into the program in the future. Sanborn also says she would like for their Circle of Friends model to be replicated in other facilities.

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Innovation: MoRe combines physical, occupational, and speech therapy with intensive cognitive behavioral therapy in one intensive week. Kentuckyonehealth.org/ frazier-rehab-institute Type: Rehabilitation Size: 1,769 (inpatients); 9,529 (outpatients) “The innovation is that we are able to systematically align all of these rehabilitation services and provide a heavy dose over a brief period of time, which lends itself to a successful outcome for most of our patients,” says Abbey Roach, Ph.D., director of psychology and neuropsychology at Frazier Rehab Institute. One of the biggest advantages, Roach says, is patients with functional movement disorders receive four hours of therapy each day, which is significantly more than what long-term care communities offer. The intensity of the program has been life-changing for patients who’ve either had to quit their job or limit their daily tasks. “We have had wheelchair bound (patients) who have been able to ambulate and walk distances of many ranges before they left the hospital within a one-week period,” Roach says. Frazier hopes to increase the capacity of their program and collaborate with community providers.

NOV 2017 / TodaysWomanNow.com

Innovation: Meals Program to Homebound Masonic Homes masonichomesky.com Senior Care Experts Srcareexperts.org Type: Aging-in-place and support services Size: 130—150 meals per day

Innovation: Occupational Therapy Mimics Home Good-sam.com Type: Nursing/Rehab Size: 76 residents (skilled care); 22 (post-acute rehab)


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Today's Woman Magazine November Issue  
Today's Woman Magazine November Issue