Page 1

MARCH 2017

VOTE

MOST ADMIRED WOMAN

2017

TODAY’S FAMILY

MAGAZINE INSIDE

GROW YOUR OWN

GOOD LUCK


oman

TODAY’SW MARCH 2017 / CONTENTS

4

Secrets to Success p.6

JUST ASK JOYCE p.28

Her Go-Tos p.33

FINDING A WAY p.28

FEEL CONNECTED

p.34

Welcome Home p.16

BRING LUCK YOUR WAY p.36

25 Things to Appreciate p.10

What to Do in Jamaica p.44

VOTE FOR A

MOST ADMIRED WOMAN p.8

CREATIVE TOOLS THAT WORK p.46

Treat Yourself — to Picnic and Painting p.48

She Transformed Their Living Space p.20

WHY SELF LOVE MATTERS p.24 What this Artist is Reading and Listening To p.30 Try this Hair Styling Trick p.26

Today’s Family magazine AFTER PAGE 32

A JEWELRY JUNKIE FINDS HER POSITIVE PLACE p.34

Go From Frumpy to Fabulous p.33 Courtney Glenny’s Best Advice p.46 LINDSEY MANGO’S COVETED FASHION STAPLE p.26


DID YOU FORGET TO WATER SOMETHING?

MARCH 2017 • VOL. 27 / NO. 4

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lucy M. Pritchett Miranda G. Popp miranda@todayspublications.com COPY EDITOR/DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com

S

ometimes I forget to water my plants. I figure I am not alone. Lots of things get neglected in our daily quest of living. But what if the beautiful things are those that we forget to take care of — including the things that can bring us future joy. Consider some ways to water something new: • Water a future career: She decided to leave her position at the bank, because she was burned out and wanted to do something more creative. (page 24) • Water a future family: “It’s amazing how fast a family will appreciate wife/mom when she goes on strike. Drastic? Perhaps. It is, however, life-changing. You will be setting the pace for how your children will treat their spouses.” (Joyce Oglesby, page 28) • Water a future relationship: “The more I commune with myself on the inside, the deeper my relationships with others become.” (Bob Mueller, page 24) • Water tomorrow: “...I realize that if I don’t get my mind together before I go to bed, I’m not going to sleep, I’m going to have a bad morning, and I’m going to react off emotions throughout the day.” (Jessica Taylor, page 28) Sometimes you might not even know what seeds to plant, but take a chance, and start watering an area of your life where you would like a change. May your luck start to grow! — Anita Oldham

ON THE COVER: Becky Conner’s luck led her to the love of her life. Find out how it happened on page 36. Dress, $298, available at Monkee’s of Louisville, 3624 Brownsboro Road 502.897.1497 Photo: Melissa Donald Makeup: Denise Cardwell, Image Works Studio Illustration: Silvia Cabib

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com Jennifer Wilham jennifer@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/PHOTO EDITOR Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Amanda Peyton officeadmin@todayspublications.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Ann Hurst ann@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Donna Piercy donna@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion Today’s Woman is published monthly by: Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 todayswomannow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2017 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todayspublications.com.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues.

BBB RATING

4

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


SURVIVAL SKILLS

SECRETS TO SUCCESS

B

lessings in a Backpack began in Louisville in 2005 under the umbrella of Kentucky Harvest, incorporated in 2008, and is now a nationwide non-profit that eases weekend hunger by sending kids home with a backpack of food on Friday afternoons. Nikki Grizzle joined Blessings in a Backpack in 2011 as the chief marketing officer and works from the Louisville offices in St. Matthews. The organization has seen incredible growth over the last eight years. “We began by serving 50 children at Roosevelt Perry Elementary in Louisville. Today we feed 90,000 kids in 48 states and Washington, D.C.” Although she is based in Louisville, Nikki is responsible for all national branding, social media, and marketing for Blessings. At present, there are 1,000 school programs in operation, and Nikki assists individuals in charge of marketing in their local communities. Nikki is a busy parent to three young children (ages 6, 3½, and 20 months) with her husband Josh, and she is also stepmom to a 14-year-old. She drives carpool, attends athletic and school events, and chairs a major school fundraiser at the Jewish Community of Louisville each year. I asked Nikki how she manages to get through a

By Megan S. Willman Photo Submitted

regular day, and she shared the “blessings” that she considers her secrets to success: 1. A Great Boss. “Her philosophy is that we get the work done — from the office, from home, even from the car. That means I can drive the kids to school and to dance class on Wednesday nights. I even work from home on Fridays, an imperative so we have clean clothes.” 2. A Pack of Volunteers. “These are the people who build our program by filling backpacks, sharing the kids’ stories, and advocating for the program.” There are 4,000 of them, and counting, in Louisville and Floyd County, Indiana.

most

! E T O V 8) age p e (se

6

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

3. A Sense of Purpose. Nikki felt called to leave corporate marketing after her first child was born, even if it made some things more difficult. “Our life is insane and crazy, we’re always tight on money, but we want to teach our kids what’s important and to live by our values. The work has to be meaningful.” 4. Appreciating the Chaos. “I hope the kids will realize one day I’ve tried to keep things balanced. I don’t want to live my life just getting through it.”

2017

SEARCH: Nikki Grizzle

Wow, Grass Roots Org that’s now National...Truly making a difference...Bravo...Godspeed! — Unknown via todayswomannow.com

ADMIRED woman

Nikki Grizzle keeps everything in perfect balance between motherhood and managing Blessings in a Backpack.


It’s your turn to vote for the women you admire in the Louisville/Southern Indiana area. These women were nominated for the 15th Today’s Woman Most Admired Woman Award by the editorial staff of Today’s Woman.

most

ADMIRED woman 2017

Vote online for one person in each category once per day per email address at TodaysWomanNow.com DEADLINE: MARCH 22

ARTS ❒ KIM BAKER

Kentucky Center for the Arts

❒R  OBBIE BARTLETT Entertainer

❒ THERESA BAUTISTA Moving Collective

❒K  AREN BOONE Karen Boone Design

❒S  UREKHA KULKARNI Beaded Treasures Project

❒P  ENELOPE PEAVLER Frazier History Museum

ATHLETES/FITNESS

SPONSORED BY BB&T

❒D  ELESKIA (DONNA) BUTLER WorkOut Boutique

❒ L AUREN EIRK

Yoga Integrated Science Wellness Center

❒K  ATY HEARN

Katy Hearn Fitness

❒ KELLY MCCORMICK

Special Olympics Kentucky

❒ ROSIE NAPRAVNIK Former Jockey

❒M  ARIA WHITLEY Shine Studio

BEAUTY/FASHION ❒ JOCELYN DAVE Tou-che’ Boutique

❒ KENZIE KAPP Kenzie Kapp, LLC

❒ BRITNI KNABLE Headcandi

❒ FRANCES LEWIS

Ann DeEvelyn Clothing Co.

❒ WENDY LYTLE

Apricot Lane Boutique

❒ DENISE ZEYDEL Z Salon & Spa

BUSINESS OWNERS

SPONSORED BY VEIN TREATMENT CENTER

❒ TERESA DANIEL KOPS, Inc

❒ DIANE FISCHER

L & D Mail Masters, Inc.

❒ L YNDA FORTNER Evans Construction

❒ AMY NEWBANKS LETKE Integrity HR, Inc.

❒ BETH PEABODY

Stegner Investment Associates, Inc.

❒ JANUARY TAYLOR-MILLS MetroMedical Solutions

CORPORATE

SPONSORED BY WOMEN INFLUENCING LOUISVILLE

❒ DANA BOWERS Venminder, Inc.

❒N  IKKI JACKSON

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

❒ LEIGH PITTMAN Brown-Forman

❒ ANN COWLEY WELLS

Commonwealth Bank & Trust

❒ JALEIGH WHITE HIlliard Lyons

❒ TAMMY YORK-DAY Delta Dental

EDUCATION

SPONSORED BY MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER

❒ JOYCE FLETCHER

Oldham County Board of Education

❒ ANNE GLOSKY

Kentucky Country Day School

❒ DEBBIE HOUSTON Virginia Chance School

❒ JANET PAGE

New Albany High School principal, retired

❒ DR. CAROLE PFEFFER Bellarmine University

❒ DIANE PORTER

Jefferson County Board of Education

8

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT ❒ DIANE CHRISTOPHER Sweet Stuff Bakery

❒ KATHY HENSLEY The Silver Spoon

❒ KYE HOEHN Kye’s

❒ MOLLIE TURNIER Creation Gardens

❒ BROOKE VAUGHN Please & Thank You

❒ KAREN WILLIAMS

Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau

HEALTH/HEALTHCARE

MEDIA

SPONSORED BY SEMONIN REALTORS

❒ ANN BOWDAN-WILDER WLKY

❒ VALERIE CHINN WDRB-TV

❒ SARAH KELLEY Insider Louisville

❒ CONNIE LEONARD WAVE 3

❒ LAURA SHINE WFPK

❒ LAURA UNGAR

Courier-Journal/USA TODAY

SPONSORED BY CLARK MEMORIAL

NON-PROFIT

❒ MAGGIE GALLOWAY

❒ KARINA BARILLAS

❒ TERRI GRAHAM

❒ KARYN HASCAL

❒ KRISTINE KRUEGER

❒ JEANIE KAHNKE

❒ SARAH MOYER

❒ LARA MACGREGOR

❒ JENNIFER NOLAN

❒ LINDA SPEED

❒ KIM WICKLIFFE

❒ MIMI ZINNIEL

SPONSORED BY L&N FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

HOME/HOME STYLE

POLITICAL

❒ MONICA BOHN

❒ VICKI CARMICHAEL

Inscope Medical Solutions Hosparus Health

University of Louisville Physicians Sarah S. Moyer, MD, MPH KentuckyOne Health

Kentuckiana Nursing Service

Century Mortgage/Century Lending, Century Entertainment and Furnishings

❒ AMY DEMPSEY WAGNER

Reflections of You, by Amy Staging & Design

❒ MERRY DOUGHERTY

Merridian Home Furnishings

❒ JOY EBERENZ

Joy Eberenz Realtor & Associates

❒ ANN GREGORY

Door Store and Windows

❒ CHERAMI THOMAS

Urban Farmhouse Designs

La Casita Center

The Healing Place

Muhammad Ali Center Hope Scarves

Community Foundation of Southern Indiana Olmsted Parks Conservancy

Clark County Circuit Court

❒ DENISE HARPER ANGEL Commonwealth of Kentucky

❒ TINA LENTZ

Louisville Metro Community Services

❒ GRACE SIMRALL

Louisville Metro Government

❒ VICKI AUBREY WELCH Louisville Metro Council

❒ ERICA LEE WILLIAMS

District Court Judge, Jefferson County


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

11


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

13


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

15


Welcome

HOME DECOR

Home

Make your home your sanctuary. Today’s Woman goes inside some local homes to discover insider tips on the newest and the smartest in home decor. Whether your home is large or small, new or old, there are things you can do to make your home more about living beautifully. (Top right) Private study on the second floor was designed by J. Waddell Interiors: Joan Waddell and Krista Newton. (Bottom left) When decorating your rooms, focusing on the small details — as seen with this shelf — helps tie everything together. Designed by Carriage House Interiors. (Bottom right) — Make your outdoor area a comfortable space for entertaining or relaxation.

16

Find these and other home decor photos on Find more help from our Home Advertisers: TodaysWomanNow.com • Frank Otte: Frankotte.com (p.17) and click on the • Posh Home: poshhomelouisville.com (p.17) Home/Travel/Food • Screens of Kentucky: screensofkentucky.com (p.19) tab. • Semonin Realtors: semonin.com (p.22) MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

17


HOME DECOR

FOUR WAYS TO DECORATE FOR ENTERTAINING By Keri Foy Photo Melissa Donald

F

or Jan Hyland, her home is dedicated to the art of hosting. She and her husband, Mark, find themselves as the go-to party house for their circle of friends — and Jan wouldn’t have it any other way. “I like my home to be comfortable for people to come to and have fun,” Jan says. “I love entertaining.” To her, living beautifully is about the company she keeps and how comfortable her guests feel in her home. She makes decorating decisions based on the philosophy of helping her friends cozy up and make memories. “I want my house to be a statement,” Jan says. Jan has taken her house and steadily made it a home. She updates her house room by room and then does it all over again. Here are a few of those renovations and advice for entertaining:

• Perfect Outdoor Area: Jan and her husband have

the backyard for entertaining. The huge, covered patio is affectionately nicknamed “The Hut.” The Hut has a sectional that seats at least eight to 10 with room for more. They have a covered built-in grill, a fireplace with a TV mounted above, and an outdoor bathroom. A little artwork in the lavatory keeps the mood fun — “Beer bellies are the keeper of memories,” a reminder that good times with friends are the foundation for a good life.

• A Party Basement: The basement is undergoing a

makeover to make it more guest-friendly. “I want to open it up to make it easier for more people to get down there,” Jan says. The couple is moving the bar to the other end of the room to create space for more seating around pub tables. The Kentucky-based theme — University of Louisville, bourbon, and horse racing — is proving easy to decorate. Jan has found decor matching her theme in several local stores.

18

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

TOP PHOTO: The Hut has become their outdoor entertainment hub. LEFT: Jan made a shower curtain and window treatment for her bathroom. She hung the window treatment on a bowed rod so that the shutters can open and close without hitting the window treatment.

• An Updated Dining Room: The current dining room

table is getting the boot. “I’m getting a round table so more people can sit down for dinner,” Jan says. She is also prepping to cover the walls with wainscoting she fell in love with at Tassels.

• Fabric: Since Jan does custom drapery (Sew Jocked

Up), she’s a die-hard fan of heavy-weight fabric. After eight years, the fabric she’s used on her stools that surround her spacious, square granite kitchen island is just now showing signs of wear. “I’d rather have stuff that is going to last…and don’t choose white if you have kids. Choose colors that can hold up,” Jan advises. SEARCH: Jan Hyland

Beautiful… — Judy Jupin via todayswomannow.com


HOME DECOR

DECORATING FOR TRANSITION By Brigid Morrissey Photo Patti Hartog

T

he stark contrast between her corporate IT career and her volunteer work in social services hasn’t fazed Micki Thomas. Upon retirement from her position with Yum! Brands, Micki has beautifully transitioned into helping fellow community members who are going through transitions themselves. As a consultant and interior designer within Volunteers of America, Micki volunteers most of her 10-15 hours a week at the Freedom House, which focuses on pregnant women and their recovery from addiction. Micki’s eyes lit up like one of her pop art paintings when the subject arose.

“One of the unique aspects of the Freedom House is that the women can bring their other children with them. You don’t see that at other places. I’ve continually been impressed with the staff and their track record of success.” You don’t need a certain set of qualities to make a difference, just come as you are. “The things I’ve done volunteering are so different than what I’ve done my whole career. It’s about the impact you’re making in the community and with individuals, and it’s such a different way to look at your work.”

SEARCH: Micki Thomas

Totally awesome! Bravo! — DoveNative via todayswomannow.com

Consider How You Use Your Space Ali Hawthorne says changing the design of their deck allows them to see the whole backyard from their deck and created more play space for their three small children. “When we moved into the house, the deck had a waist-high rail all around it, and we didn’t have a lot of yard space. Now, it is a big, open platform. The deck had a dinner table and four chairs around it which took up all of the space on the deck, but we wanted to make it more of a loungey, casual area. We replaced the table and chairs with couches and more plush seating options and added high top bar stools. It (deck) is much more open and flexible. The furniture is more casual and makes the whole backyard feel bigger. This was our way of making the most out of what we had.”

SEARCH: Ali Hawthorne

20

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

The common living room area of Freedom House 2.

By Tiffany White Photo Melissa Donald


HOME DECOR

22

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


By Brigid Morrissey Photo Melissa Donald

ONE NUMBER CHANGED EVERYTHING KIMBERLY HARROD 235. That’s a number that makes Kimberly Harrod shudder. As a mother of four adult children, she had fallen victim to what many stay-at-home moms do: she put her family first and neglected herself. “Sometimes we’re programmed to do one or the other, either take care of our family or take care of ourselves. That was my biggest downfall. Before you know it, the weight creeps up very quickly.” So when she finally stepped on the scale and saw that number, it was enough to spark a new outlook and make some changes to her current lifestyle.

STAYING MOTIVATED

The first thing Kimberly did was clear her calendar for daily gym time. “What made me successful was setting my time. Nothing could infiltrate that hour, and nothing took me out of it.” Apart from the physical changes Kimberly saw from her gym routine, she also changed her mindset. “The biggest thing I had to learn is that I’m worth that time. There’s no reason we shouldn’t dedicate an hour for ourselves everyday.”

24

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

BIG WIN

After losing over 80 pounds in three years, Kimberly realized there were so many things she couldn’t do when she was overweight. Working at an OBGYN office has shown her the conditions that could be prevented simply by taking care of ourselves. “I am a believer that we were intended for activity, that our body is made to move. If there was one gift I could give, I would give the gift of living a healthy lifestyle.”

FITNESS ROUTINE

She keeps her workouts fresh by working out with a trainer and focusing on toning with weights rather than cardio. “My trainer doesn’t allow me to talk very much. I have shorter rest periods and a higher rep range. Sometimes he even picks which weights I work with. It’s really challenging.”

Check out other fit women at todayswomannow.com. Want to be featured as a Healthy Best Body? Enter at TodaysWomanNow.com.

SEARCH: Best Bodies


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

25


DRESS FOR YOUR DREAMS By Keri Foy

Photos Sunni Wigginton

What’s your brand? I’m not talking about your favorite brand of makeup or jeans.

E

very person is his or her own brand, and what you wear reflects that,” says Lindsey Mango, who recently left a position as a recruiter for Northwestern Mutual to follow her passion for life coaching. “Although fashion isn’t everything, and who you are as a person is the bigger matter — how people show up is a reflection of how they feel as a person on the inside.” Lindsey believes in dressing to be the highest version of yourself. “If, all of the sudden, the CEO of your company walks in, and you’re dressed your best, you’re ready for the opportunity,” she says. Lindsey wears business professional attire, but that doesn’t burden her. This achiever obviously believes confidence in your style builds confidence in the job.

You won’t catch Lindsey working without wearing one of her six blazers. “A blazer is an accent piece to the outfit,” says Lindsey. “It elevates the professionalism.” Her two favorite blazers are a scalloped-edge one from Pitaya and an edgier black, peplum blazer from H&M. Her local favorite shops include Pitaya, Darling State of Mind, and Blush.

Hair is “Your Personal Accessory” You know her as Tropikana, the on-air radio personality weekday afternoons on B96.5 FM. In her words, she’s “Cleveland made, but Louisville built,” and we love hearing that. Having been in Louisville for a little more than a year, she’s made a home for herself and her baby boy and also has left a huge impression on our community. Whether she’s on the mic in the studio or running around town with her son, she sports the most beautiful hairstyles. “Your hair is your personal accessory,” she says. “Be versatile, daring, and confident with your style.” SEARCH: Tropikana

26

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

SEARCH: Lindsey Mango

Story and Photo By Miranda Popp Tropikana’s extensions from Cleveland Virgin Hair Divas were sewn in and ombrecolored in brown tones by Tomeka Shelton of Lux Salon in Louisville. To add a daily, soft, heatless curl, she uses a Paul Mitchell sculpting foam, divides her hair into four sections, and rolls each section onto a Flexi Rod. She leaves them in for an hour and unrolls for perfect curls that last two days without any other products.


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

27


FINDING A WAY By Yelena Sapin Photo Sunni Wigginton

J

essica Taylor switches between heels and tennis shoes several times throughout the day. Juggling her job as director of urban promotions for Alpha Media radio’s Louisville market, her philanthropy work as founder of the non-profit P.A.T.H. Foundation, and life as a single mom to 10-year-old daughter Kyersten, Jessica is always on the go. “I wear heels to work, but I throw on my Nikes as soon as I get in my car to run around with my daughter. And if I have a meeting, I slip on my heels again. My ‘In Her Shoes’ is one foot in a heel and the other in a tennis shoe!”

SEARCH: Jessica Taylor

When she does get a chance to unwind, she likes to take a shower, turn everything off, light a few candles, and sit down to write out her thoughts. “It helps me clear my mind. As I get older I realize that if I don’t get my mind together before I go to

bed, I’m not going to sleep, I’m going to have a bad morning, and I’m going to react off emotions throughout the day.” (Jessica also blogs at BeingJT.com.) Jessica tries to keep her schedule open every other weekend to do something special with Kyersten, preferably out of town. She also loves to shop at local consignment and thrift stores and squeeze in a bike ride whenever she can. “I love riding my bike. It’s a whole other world, a feeling like I’m free — just me, my adrenaline, and the wind hitting my face.” But finding that balance between work, motherhood, and personal time is tough, she admits. “I’m a very competitive person, so I do everything at 110 percent. And that can be very exhausting.”

My Family is Not Working Right Q: “My family is a mess. My husband is unkind, my children disrespect me, and none of them appreciate what I do for them to make life work day in and day out. I am simply going through the motions, and I’m exhausted.”

Joyce: Unfortunately, many women feel your pain. What is it about women that causes us to accept behavior such as you’ve described? Love. We love; therefore, we hurt. And because we love, we can allow it to drive us into the ground. Secondly, we sacrifice. Women do that best. Motherhood in and of itself is a tremendous sacrifice. However, is it reason enough to allow someone we love to hurt us? I would emphatically tell you NO! Pain comes with love. But excessive, repetitive or abusive pain is absolutely not a way to love, nor to receive it.

By Joyce Oglesby

28

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

• Love yourself. Often, we expect others to love us, yet we exemplify no signs of caring for ourselves. I’m not suggesting you’re incapable of loving unless you love yourself, because I know many people who do. The message it conveys is you are willing to become the dumping ground for the family’s frustrations. It is not selfish to

She seems to have it all together! — Unknown via todayswomannow.com

SEARCH: Just Ask Joyce

love yourself. Your world will become more stable, your future brighter, and life more meaningful. Try it on for size. I believe you’ll like how it fits. • Expect respect. Most people find themselves disrespected because they don’t demand esteem from others, especially the ones they love most. Sadly, family is typically where we get the least respect. Draw your lines of how your children will regard you, how your husband will speak to you, and how you will respond to both. The response element is critical. This might look different for you than me. Families never intend to get off track in the ways we express our love and appreciation, but we do. This year will only improve if you decide to stay in love by getting out of the ways it’s being expressed. Send questions to Joyce@ JustaskJoyce.com


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

29


WHAT THIS ARTIST IS READING AND LISTENING TO By Megan M. Seckman Photos Melissa Donald

C

lare Hirn never considered art to be a viable career. That is why she split her studies as an undergrad at Indiana University between biological sciences and fine arts. The two worlds of arts and sciences are reflected in her expansive art career: she illustrated an Abiocor artificial heart that appeared on the cover of The New York Times, and she paints majestic murals that bring the vibrant natural world inside otherwise sterile environments. Her murals can be seen locally at Waterfront Park Place, UK Chandler Hospital, and UofL Healthcare Outpatient Center. She is an environmentalist and an artist. “My work is nature-oriented with the running theme of connectivity to the planet. My parents always had land, and as a child, I always waded through creeks. I could sit and observe nature for hours; I’ve always been passionate about our planet,” Clare, 52, recalls.

[

30

Reading

• The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wulf. This is the story of Alexander von Humboldt, a German naturalist who influenced the likes of Darwin, Muir, and Thoreau. He explored the world in the 18thcentury, noting various species and the interconnectivity of our planet. He predicted the human impact on climate change, but this father of environmentalism was almost forgotten by history. Clare’s favorite quote from the book: “Nature everywhere speaks to man in a voice that is familiar to his soul.” • Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges by Amy Cuddy. This book explores how body language impacts those around us and reflects our own self-esteem. • “As I work toward my goal of placing more of my artwork into

SEARCH: Clare Hirn

non-profit spaces or healthcare facilities so that my art does real good in the community, I will be reading the Business Model Canvas for Social Enterprise PDF. socialbusinessmodelcanvas.com

Listening

• Michael Franti & Spearhead: SoulRocker. “This has been a staple of my listening for 15 years, and I’ve seen him in concert at least nine times. I think he is a modernday prophet of sorts.” • “This is rather boring, but I’m an NPR news junkie. I love Morning Edition, Diane Rehm, Terri Gross, and All Things Considered.” • This was recommended recently to Clare and is making its way into her routine: On Being with Krista Tippett (http://itunes.apple.com/ us/podcast/on-being-with-kristatippett/id150892556?mt=2)

TodaysWomanNow.com has a new story every day — with more photos than we can run in print. Also, you can be part of the story by adding a comment!

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

The pulse of nature is alive and well in Clare’s style, which she describes as being “kept on the abstract level with moments of detail,” because she is “an old-school, hand-drawn kind of girl.” She often uses a charcoal underdrawing with acrylic paint on top so that the drawing aspect can be seen through the soft, natural colors — much like a field of tall grass filled with tiny, busy life, only there to witness if you are truly paying attention.

]


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

31


HER GO-TOs

L

emon water. Adriena Dame lives by this simple, yet highly detoxifying and invigorating habit, having a glass upon waking each morning and one right before she goes to bed each night. “Ultimately, the act of drinking lemon water is one of many simple daily practices that give rise to my gratitude for having this complex human experience, and for all of the love, joy, and laughter that contributes to the sacred nature of this journey here on earth,” she says. She credits both lemon water and coconut oil as her go-to beauty products. While the lemon water detoxifies and cleanses from the inside, she relies on coconut oil to moisturize and purify the outside. “I also plop a bit into my morning smoothies to glean a myriad of other health benefits,” she says. Adriena is an experienced healing artist, writer, and intuitive vegan chef. She co-owns LOVAFARE, a vegan, live-well kitchen located at 2009 Highland Avenue in the Highlands. When she’s not mixing up a Sassy Kale Salad behind the counter, she’s offering Tibetan acupressure, guided meditation experiences, and spiritual counseling. A “Jill” of all trades, if you will.

By Brittani Dick

Photos Sunni Wigginton

SEARCH: Adriena Dame

Feeling Frumpy? Do you need some help with looking your best? How frumpy are you? We are looking to turn Frump to Fab. Send a photo and 200 words or less to anita@todayspublications.com with the subject line “Frumpy.” Hair/makeup by Strandz and Threadz TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

33


A JEWELRY JUNKIE FINDS HER POSITIVE PLACE

By Megan M. Seckman Photo Sunni Wigginton

I

t took having a baby for Katie Judah, 38, to slow down enough to find her passion. After the birth of her daughter, Miriam, now 10, Katie found herself looking for something to do while her infant napped. She began the quiet hobby of jewelry making, which she hadn’t done since her high school days. After stockpiling hordes of necklaces and earrings, she decided to start selling. Katie connected with Mary Levinsky, proprietor of Block Party Handmade Boutique, which is an artist co-op: artists volunteer to work in the store for eight hours per month and in turn receive a higher percentage of the sales. It also teaches artists the retail and merchandising aspect of the business. “I applied to be featured in the shop and got in about three years ago but continued to work my job at the bank.” After time, though, Katie decided to leave her position at the bank, because she was burned out and

wanted to do something more creative. She took the leap and called Mary to ask if she had any advice. It just so happened, Mary was looking to open a second location on Frankfort Avenue and needed someone to run the store. It was fate. For a year and a half, the two women have been running the two locations (2916 Frankfort Ave. and 560 S. 4th St.) together and have become fast friends and synchronistic business associates. “I train new artists, help them get set-up, and handle the retail and operations of the store. It is incredibly positive — everyone is always in a good mood — it’s a wonderful environment to work in every day. It may not be less stress than the bank, but I’m so happy.”

SEARCH: Katie Judah

Katie makes jewelry under the name of Adelle Rose, the middle names of her two daughters.

“When you learn to feel lovingly connected on the inside, you’ll find it much easier to forge a bond with others.” By Bob Mueller

SEARCH: Bob Mueller

The more I commune with myself on the inside, the deeper my relationships with others become. Today, my life overflows with opportunities for profound human connection. Over the years, I’ve seen abundant evidence that our relationships with other people always reflect our internal relationships with various parts of ourselves. If you have trouble connecting with people on the outside, it may be because you aren’t communing with yourself on the inside. When you learn to

feel lovingly connected on the inside, you’ll find it much easier to forge a bond with others. If you feel disconnected with your true self, you can expect your interpersonal relationships to suffer from disconnection as well. If you want your human relationships to be more loving and accepting, you must learn to love and accept more aspects of yourself. Bob Mueller is the vice president of Development at Hosparus.

I think this is the best I have ever read. You keep getting better and better. — DoveNative via TodaysWomanNow.com

34

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


HOW TO BRING

YOUR WAY

SEARCH: Luck Your Way

By Carrie Vittitoe Photos Melissa Donald Illustrations Silvia Cabib Makeup Denise Cardwell, Image Works Studio

“The best luck of all is the luck you make for yourself.” — Douglas MacArthur

How much of what we consider luck is pure serendipity, and how much is hard work and the efficient utilization of our talents and resources? Are there steps we can all take to make ourselves more lucky? Some Kentuckiana women who’ve been lucky in love, in their line of work, and in the attainment of “loot” share what they’ve learned. 36

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

LUCKY IN LOVE

Becky Conner of Prospect and her husband, Mike, consider themselves very lucky for having met each other, but it was bad luck in past relationships that helped bring them together. “What we both have gone through made us ready for each other. We were able to appreciate each other,” she says. Both had been hurt as a result of marital infidelity in their mid-30s, but they had reached a point where they were ready to put themselves out there again. When they met, Becky, 43, was dating someone. Not only did she not like the idea of dating two men at once, she also says there were no sparks on her end when she met Mike. When Becky’s relationship ended, and she and Mike reconnected at the gym, there was definitely electricity passing between them. They moved in together and had a beach wedding on February 27, 2015, on Grand Cayman Island. Becky says it was “pure dumb luck” that brought them together, especially since Mike isn’t the type of man she would have normally found herself attracted to. He is an avid outdoorsman and conservative, while she is more liberal-minded and an urbanite. Although very different people, they share an enjoyment of spur-of-the-moment, adventurous activities and similar religious views. Their openness to new experiences is part of what brought them, and keeps them, together.


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

37


LUCKY IN LIVELIHOOD

Shelley Moats of Middletown is the founder, executive director, and one of the pediatric audiologists at Little Ears Hearing Center, a local nonprofit that helps children improve hearing difficulties. She had been employed in a public university setting, but due to cutbacks that kept her from helping as many people as she wanted, she was set to move to Cincinnati to take another position in April 2010. She planned to commute from Louisville where her husband Troy and their two children would remain until the school year ended, but within two weeks, Shelley knew the Cincinnati position wouldn’t put her in contact with patients as much as she wanted. Shelley returned to her previous job as a contract worker and says her patients kept calling her to request help. She felt there was a need that she wanted to meet so in June 2010, she began sharing space at an adult audiology practice and seeing pediatric patients one or two days a week. What began with herself and a part-time office person has grown to include two additional audiologists, two early interventionists, an office manager, and audiology residents. “I saw a need, and I ran with it. And it just happened to work,” she says. Of course, Shelley, 43, admits that part of her luck is that she saw opportunities to connect with people, especially in the creation and growth of the Little Ears Board of Directors. “I talked to everybody and asked a lot of questions,” she says. She would meet people and say, “Here is my mission. Do you want to be a part of it?” She has been fortunate to find attorneys, accountants, and pediatricians, in addition to activist parents, who have wanted to join her in her journey. “I have these great people who believe in what we’re doing,” she says. An abiding passion for what she does also explains Shelley’s luck. She loves helping others and is committed to being as knowledgeable as possible in her field. She is the only boardcertified pediatric audiologist in Kentucky and is on the Board of Governors for the American Board of Audiology.

38

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


LUCKY IN LOOT

Monica Weakley of Middletown recognized that her neighbor’s home needed some TLC and told her husband, Steve, “If that house ever comes on the market, we need to buy it and get it up-to-date.” In September 2014, their neighbor’s son said he was going to put it on the market because his elderly mother would be moving into a nursing home. Monica told him, “You may not have to work with a realtor,” and explained her idea to purchase the house. Most people would not have ventured into this project, especially if they were in Monica’s and Steve’s shoes at the time. A fire of undetermined origin had begun in their own home on September 1, 2014, which made their home unlivable for eight months. Within a week of the fire, someone they knew broke into their damaged home multiple times, which Monica says bothered her more than the fire. Although Monica and Steve were in the midst of terrible bad luck regarding their own home, they were lucky that they were able to get a good deal on their neighbor’s home, which they closed on in December 2014. Monica and Steve hired Todd and Lisa Heckel, the owners of Southern Comfort Homes, for their fire restoration project. They had worked with the Heckels on various home improvements and trusted them, so it seemed a natural step to ask for their help in flipping for resale the neighbor’s house, as well. Monica told Lisa, “We’ll fund it, but I want to use your good eye and subcontractors.” Flipping the neighbor’s house was definitely hard work, but Monica, 51, says it was also great therapy for her. She was next-door to her own home during all the restoration, which provided her a sense of comfort. She could keep an eye on things as work progressed. Doing demo work, painting, laying laminate flooring, and doing tile work kept Monica’s mind busy. “The decisions we were making on the flip house kept my mind off what was going on next door,” she says. In the end, Monica and Steve made a profit on the house and gained some great new neighbors in the process. Plus, Monica says she learned some home improvement skills that she will use when she feels like making updates down the road in her own home.

40

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

41


Luck isn’t as elusive as you might think. These three women prove luck can find you if you’re open to the possibilities. SHE FOUND A NEW CAREER

LUCKY IN LIFE

Shelley Williams, 37 of Fern Creek, defines her luck as the time when preparation met opportunity. “Before I started working, I prepared by finishing my master’s degree as a literacy specialist in hopes of having a job as a reading interventionist. However, interventionist jobs are difficult to obtain so I became a classroom teacher. I shared with my principals how I hoped to become a reading interventionist if a position ever came open. I explained how and why I thought my school would benefit from an additional reading interventionist,” she says. Shelley’s luck in getting a position as a reading interventionist at Blue Lick Elementary was due in large part to advocating for herself.

SHELLEY WILLIAMS

TRACEY COOK

LOVE BLOSSOMED

Happy accidents have begun many loving relationships, including that of Tracey Cook, 50 of Clark County, Indiana, who has been married to her husband, Dan, for almost 19 years. “Our jobs crossed paths every day. He was recently divorced, and I was separated. After trying to set him up with a friend, I’m the one who ended up going out with him due to a lack of a sitter on her part,” she says.

Liz Kaelin, 45 of Jeffersontown, unhappiness as an RN led her to take active steps to change her professional luck. “I researched the tools I would need in order to lift myself from my dead-end job and found eligibility requirements in education and employment. I completed and submitted an application to test for complex case manager certification. Once I received my approval in January 2012, I purchased study guides and began to actively study for the exam. My husband and children (ages 5 and 10 at the time) were super supportive in my quest, and their care became a ritual. “[The kids] would help their Dad make dinner and then set the table for me, complete with lit candles in the center.” Liz went on to acquire a position with Humana in 2012, working to help those with an illness navigate discharge and care. Some might say getting this new position was lucky, while others might attribute it to her motivation and determination to find an employer and a position she loved.

Asking questions, taking chances, and learning at every opportunity are just some of the things these Kentuckiana women did to bring luck their way. What are you doing?

42

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN


TRAVEL

YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE

PHOTO: JAMAICA TOURIST BOARD

W

SEARCH: Kendra Garvin

44

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

By Megan M. Seckman Photo Melissa Donald

hen Kendra Garvin, 44, was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer five years ago, she knew she had a choice to make. Kendra had worked for 15 years as a cancer registrar, where it was her job to collect and record the tragic accounts of deceased cancer patients. She knew exactly what was ahead and the grim outcome of her diagnosis. She knew she could choose to succumb to being sick after the chemo, radiation, and immunotherapy to come, or she could truly live. It took a cancer diagnosis for this island skipper to find her wings and choose to live. “I want to live with no regrets. I don’t want to sit in a chair with this cancer and wish I would have done more. I don’t let cancer tell me what to do. Nah, it’s just a hump in my road, and I gotta keep on movin’!” she says on a rainy afternoon with a heap of sunshine in her smile. “I’ve lived more in these last five years than ever before. I didn’t even have a passport five years ago, but in these past five years I’ve been to California three times, Turks and Caicos, the Virgin Islands, on a Puerto Rican cruise, New York City, the Bahamas three times, Las Vegas, and Jamaica twice! And I’m leaving in 16 days to take my goddaughter, who now lives with me, to Disney (World) — but that’s another story,” she says with a sly wink. Kendra’s favorite destination from her recent years of YOLO travel has been Jamaica. “I just love Jamaica. The people have so little — they live in their houses while they are waiting to fix them up, one section at a time, so they might not have roofs or walls while they’re saving up to complete their projects — but they are so happy! We’re so ungrateful here. I think I could live in Jamaica.”

Kendra recommends Jamaica to couples or groups of friends and went on both of her Jamaican trips with a group of girlfriends: once with her book club and the other time with 800 members of the women empowerment group “Power to Exhale.” Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean and is the birthplace of reggae, Rastafari, and all-inclusive resorts. Most visitors tend to stay at the resort for the duration of their vacation instead of exploring the large island. There are three resort destinations to choose from: Montego Bay in the northwest is beloved by golfers; Ocho Rios in the northeast appeals to adventurous types; and Negril is popular for beaches and upscale resorts. If you are considering a trip to the land of coffee, Bob Marley, and sugarcane, here are few of Kendra’s recommendations.

What to do

• Snorkeling (Kendra tried this on her last trip, despite the fact she can’t swim!) • A dolphin excursion • Kayaking, parasailing, cream-colored beaches, waterfalls, blue mountains, and of course, reggae • Eat at “Scotchies” • Must see: Dunn’s River Falls, a famous waterfall in Ocho Rios

How to get there

• Kendra flew Southwest with a stop in Atlanta; entire flight from Louisville was only 2.5 hours

Where to Stay

• Hotel Riu Palace: Although this adults-only all-inclusive hotel in Montego Bay retails for around $400 per night, Kendra was able to reserve a room for $150 through her “Power to Exhale” group (the group of 800 rented out the entire hotel).

Price range

Kendra guarantees it’s cheaper than Disney World. According to the U.S. News Travel Guide, it is the third most affordable Caribbean destination, just a smidgen more than Puerto Rico (and you’ll need a passport).


TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

45


CREATIVE TOOLS THAT WORK

S

he works at one of the most peaceful spots in Louisville. Her desk overlooks the lake where generations of families have come to relax and feed the ducks. A place where one can have a moment of quiet reflection in the midst of a bustling urban environment. Cave Hill Cemetery may not be one’s first choice as a workplace, but for Kayla Wessling, who just turned 27, it almost seems a logical one. Kayla is originally from Batesville, Indiana, a town known for its manufacturing of caskets and cremation urns. Both her mother and father work for Batesville Casket Company, as well as a sprinkling of other relatives. Kayla has parlayed her degree in design and visual communications from Bellarmine University into a job in typographic and graphic design. She creates in-house materials, invitations to special events, and posters for the historic cemetery. “Cave Hill is the most beautiful and amazing place. People make pilgrimages to the

graves of Muhammad Ali and Colonel Sanders and also the National Cemetery dedicated to those who have served in the military.”

By Lucy M. Pritchett Photo Patti Hartog

SEARCH: Kayla Wessling

Her creative tools

• I carry my Moleskine Sketchbook with me everywhere. It is always in my satchel. I use it to capture both work and personal ideas. The Moleskine has dotted pages, which helps me keep the spacing and balance within the letter forms. • I have five writing implements that I prefer: the Sakura Pigma Graphic pen, which I use to fill in letter forms; a Prismacolor .005 in black for adding details; a Sakura 127 mechanical pencil for sketching out a design; and the Pilot Parallel pen, which I use as a calligraphy pen. My favorite one — it is the workhorse — is the Pentel Touch Brush pen. It comes in various ink colors. I love this pen.

Her Place in the Local Arts “Find your people and collaborate often. It helps you grow as an artist and most successful folks have a mentor or communities they are involved with that gave them opportunities to grow. While being an artist often means spending hours alone practicing lines or music, you can’t forget that a lot of art is a team process.” By Bella Portaro Kueber Photo Melissa Donald

46

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

SEARCH: Courtney Glenny

Courtney Glenny is manager of corporate and employee engagement for Fund for the Arts.


LUNCH PLUS ONE

W

here can you go when you want more than lunch with your friends, parents, visitors for a lunch plus one other activity?

N W

E WHET YOUR PALETTE

S

The Lunch

Take yourself out of the city for the day and go on a Picnic. Located in the village of Anchorage, Picnic is situated next to the Village Anchor in the old train depot. As you enter Picnic, the staff and chef Lindsay greet you with a warm welcome. Behind the counter several beautifully designed signs list the menu items.

Picnic

11505 Park Road Anchorage, Ky. Hours (for winter): Tuesday-Friday, 7am-4pm; Saturday and Sunday, 9am-12pm

All lunch sandwiches are $10 and include Picnic’s house-made potato chips (made fresh daily). For $1.50 more, choose from three different side items including the potato salad. This is not your ordinary potato salad. Light, fluffy, and creamy with a special dressing and topped with real bacon pieces, the potato salad is my favorite side! For $5 you can get a green side salad. Soup is also available by the cup ($4) or bowl ($6).

48

MARCH 2017 / TODAY’S WOMAN

PICNIC

ANCHORAGE


(PICNIC + PAINTING)

Story and Photos By Melissa Donald

The Plus One

After lunch, head over to Whet Your Palette to create your own piece of art. No painting experience necessary. Located behind Picnic and less than half a mile away is Whet Your Palette. A paint-your-own canvas studio with plenty of inspiration cards to help you fashion your masterpiece. Wake up your inner artist in its comfortable, home-like atmosphere. A $10 drop-in fee at Whet Your Palette includes an 8-inch by 10-inch canvas, paints, apron, brushes, inspiration cards, and partial guidance. An additional fee applies if you choose a larger canvas. The perfect activity after your lunch at Picnic and a fun way to spend the day in Anchorage.

Great article, except you left out how Lindsay Hankins thinks up the menu items from her inner creative genius! A truly gifted chef and baker — her food tastes soooo good! Picnic is worth the drive to Anchorage. — Lchankins1960 via todayswomannow.com

Really nice! — best electric griddle via todayswomannow.com

Whet Your Palette

1415 Evergreen Road Anchorage, Ky Hours: Monday-Saturday, 10am-10pm; Sunday 12pm-7pm

SEARCH: Lunch Plus One

TODAY’S WOMAN / MARCH 2017

3


Today's Woman March 2017  

Did you forget to water something? Lots of things get neglected in our daily quest of living. But what if the beautiful things are those tha...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you