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JUNE 2016 • VOL. 26 / NO. 7 PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lucy M. Pritchett Miranda G. Popp miranda@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/FOOD WRITER/ PHOTO EDITOR Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com

Most Admired Woman 2016 6 Arts............................................................ Melody Welsh-Buchholz

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Amanda Peyton officeadmin@todayspublications.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com

10 Athletics/Fitness..................................... Crystal Kelly

Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com

14 Beauty/Fashion....................................... Julene B. Samuels

Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com

18 Business Owner....................................... Diane Medley

Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com

22 Community/Nonprofits......................... Vicky Weber

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

26 Corporate................................................. Laura Melillo Barnum

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com

30 Education................................................. Angela Parsons

STYLIST Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com

34 Food/Entertainment.............................. Adrienne Holland 38 Health/Fitness......................................... Kim Tharp-Barrie 42 Home/Homestyle.................................... Mary Ann Dallenbach 46 Media......................................................... Angie Fenton 50 Political..................................................... Ellen Hesen 54 Hall of Fame 64 What's Happening on TodaysWomanNow.com

CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion EDITORIAL INTERN Anna Patterson Today’s Woman is published monthly by: Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 todayswomannow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2016 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todayspublications.com.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues.

BBB RATING

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2016 Most Admired Woman Written by: YELENA SAPIN * Photos by: MELISSA DONALD Makeup by: DENISE CARDWELL, BLADES SALON & SPA Furniture provided by: CONTEMPORARY GALLERIES, 220 N. Hurstbourne Parkway

Announcing the 2016 Most Admired Woman winners! Their interests and talents are as varied as their professions. We were really impressed with each of them and think you will be, too. Here are this year’s Most Admired Women, by the numbers.

1

orchid “doctor”

2

raised in the South End

3

current Indiana residents

4

former teachers

5

play musical instruments

6

live in Louisville Metro

7

different instruments played

8

were born in Kentucky

9

total post-graduate degrees earned

10 grew up in Kentuckiana

11 equines owned (including 1 donkey)

12 Most Admired Women!

The Most Admired Woman 2016 nominees were selected by the editorial board of Today’s Woman magazine. Reader votes determined the winners.

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Most Admired Woman MELODY She WELSHDoesn’t BUCHHOLZ

PLAYS

IN THE

PIT Passionate About Gardening

Miss a Practice

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LOUISVILLE YOUTH ORCHESTRA

Rides Dressage


ARTS Melody Welsh-Buchholz: Executive Director of Louisville Youth Orchestra HOME LIFE Originally from Vincennes, Indiana, Melody and her husband, Dennis Buchholz, live in Crestwood, Kentucky. WHAT’S IN A NAME? Whether it was intuition or self-fulfilling prophecy, Melody’s mother — a pianist and piano teacher — chose well when naming her daughter. “I knew I was going to go into music by eighth grade,” Melody says. “At first my mother was giving me piano lessons, but as is typical in these motherdaughter situations, it did not go well. So in an effort to keep the music going, I said, ‘I’m going to play the clarinet,’ and ended up in my band program all through middle school and high school.” Melody later took up the saxophone so she could play in the jazz band, then added flute to her repertoire.

she says. “In my fifth year there, I was offered the position of executive director, and I haven’t looked back.” Although she doesn’t always enjoy the desk-bound aspects of her position, Melody loves being around the creative energy of the students. “Sometimes professional musicians can get a little jaded after many years of playing the same thing over and over again, but with the Youth Orchestra, it’s always exciting. The kids are there because they want to continue to grow and learn their craft and to be part of this unit that makes great music. And every year it’s a changing ensemble as some students graduate and new ones come in.”

“I wasI knew going to

DANCES WITH HORSES When she’s not perfecting her music, Melody works on perfecting a different skill. “I ride dressage,” she says. “A lot of people might be surprised by that because they know how horribly unathletic I am, but I just got my bronze medal this past year.” Melody didn’t start riding until her mid-40s, but she quickly got hooked. “Dressage so very much mirrors music. It’s like dancing with your horse, and the moves have to be precise and on target. You have to practice and do them over and over again until they’re perfect. It’s just like when you’re practicing an instrument as a professional musician — all of these little things coming together to make that presentation just right.”

go into music by eighth grade.

THE BEAT OF HER OWN DRUM Few people supported Melody’s choice of career path when she was young. “My father said he wanted me to have one other option besides music, but I couldn’t pick anything because I had always just wanted to be a musician. I finally settled on pharmacy, which was something I plucked out of the air to make my father happy, but I obviously didn’t go in that direction.” Melody stayed the course and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music at the University of Louisville. “Once I was in the business, both my father and my mother were very supportive of my choice,” she says. After teaching music in area schools for several years, Melody moved into the private teaching sector. She also performs with the Louisville Orchestra and as a pit musician for PNC Broadway in Louisville, playing several instruments including clarinet, saxophone, flute, and oboe. “I had toyed with the idea of going to New York, but then I decided that I really didn’t want to wait tables while I was trying to make my big break,” she says. “I stayed here in Louisville, and it’s been very good.” MUSIC TO HER EARS Melody first joined the Louisville Youth Orchestra in 1985. “I started out as the wind/ brass coach, then kind of moved up the ranks,”

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HANDS IN THE DIRT Growing up, Melody loved to spend weekends on her grandmother’s farm. “I helped her do things like milk the cows and churn the butter, and I would spend all day playing with my cousins in the dirt,” she says. Watching her grandmother work the earth inspired Melody’s passion for gardening. “As soon as I had a home that had a little bit of dirt, I started growing vegetables.” Melody now actively works a 75-by-100-foot vegetable garden on her 10-acre property. “I have way too many vegetables for just me and my husband to eat,” she says. “I end up giving 90 percent of it away, but I’m still out there every year doing more and more. I’m terrible with flowers, but I love vegetables.”

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT As a working musician, Melody has to carve out time to practice for performances. “It’s a constant process of keeping up your chops,” she says. “There’s a saying in the business that if you miss one day of practice, you know it; if you miss two days of practice, your friends know it; and if you miss three days of practice, everybody knows it.”


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ATHLETES/FITNESS Crystal Kelly: Bellarmine University Women’s Basketball Assistant Coach HOME LIFE Crystal was born and raised in Louisville, but she spent time away while playing professionally in the WNBA. She has worked at Bellarmine University for four years but recently accepted a position as an assistant coach at Tennessee Tech University. LOVE OF THE GAME Crystal’s love affair with basketball began at home. “Both of my parents played — my mom in high school and my dad when he was younger. I would go to the park with my mom when I was little, and we would shoot the ball. I just fell in love with it.” Crystal was one of the few girls on the co-ed basketball team in elementary school but didn’t realize she had a talent for the sport until middle school. “I wanted to go to practice and loved being in games,” she says. “It’s never been a chore. But mostly I played because my friends played, and I wanted to hang out with them. And then people started telling me I was good, and I thought, ‘This is all right. I guess I’ll stick with it.’”

CREATIVE SIDE Crystal enjoyed photography classes in high school, so she considered majoring in photojournalism. But she couldn’t make it work with her basketball schedule. “School was a priority, but I also had other things I wanted to do,” she says. “I didn’t want to do something halfway and not give it my all. Going into public relations instead allowed me to have a really good balance with everything.” Crystal still enjoys spending time with her camera and has a wall full of photos in her apartment. “It’s pretty much all my family and friends. I really like pictures of people surrounding me. It makes me feel comfortable.”

Coaching “brought my life

back into color. I think this is what I’m called to do.

BALL IN HER COURT By the time Crystal was finishing high school, it was clear that a future in basketball was hers for the taking. She was named Kentucky Miss Basketball her senior year at Sacred Heart Academy and participated in the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association All-America game. “I was getting these college recruiting letters all the time, but my focus was to get an education,” Crystal says. “I wasn’t even thinking about getting drafted or playing pro.” Choosing to stay closer to family and home, Crystal enrolled in Western Kentucky University where she continued to shine on the court while earning a degree in public relations. She then spent several years playing professionally in the WNBA with the Sacramento Monarchs and San Antonio Silver Stars, and joined the Bellarmine coaching staff in 2012. “I love it,” she says. “When I was playing professionally, I was getting to the point where I was questioning if I wanted to do it. But coaching brought my life back into color. I think this is what I’m called to do.”

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ONE-TRICK PONY “It’s funny — I was voted most athletic in school, but I am terrible at every sport except basketball,” Crystal says. “I tried volleyball in school, and it was a mess. I’m really a one-trick pony.” Crystal still occasionally joins the girls she coaches in a workout on the court, but she primarily keeps fit by going to the YMCA. “I do step class, boot camp, Zumba — I love all the classes. As an athlete in a team sport it’s hard for me to go to the gym by myself, but in that group setting I can keep up with the class, or pick one person and say, ‘All right, it’s me and you.’ Now that I’m not playing, I feel much better — I’m not hurting every time I get out of bed — but I still like the competition and camaraderie.”

POSITIVE THINKING Crystal credits her parents with raising her to be a capable, self-confident woman. “I got a lot of love from my mom and dad, and I always felt like I could do anything because they believed in me. They also taught me that whatever happens, whatever obstacles may come your way, you’ve got to figure it out and do it.” Crystal tries to impart that same philosophy to the girls she coaches. “I also talk to them about the importance of positive self-talk and about correcting those negative thoughts when they creep up and not letting them grow. Everyone struggles with that, and it’s something I’ve gotten better at as I’ve gotten older.”

TIME OUT When things get hectic, Crystal makes sure to take time out to recharge. “I will go take a nap when everything is going crazy or if I need to do something at night,” she says. “I know that I can get overwhelmed when I try to do too much at once, which isn’t effective.” She also loves going to the movies or out to dinner with friends. “I understand how important it is to disconnect and take time away from things. Whatever you have to do will still be there.”


BEAUTY/FASHION Julene B. Samuels: M.D., Owner of A Woman’s Touch HOME LIFE Originally from Danville, Kentucky, Julene did her medical residency in Dallas, then moved to Louisville with her husband Tom to be closer to their Kentucky family. After living in the Highlands for many years, they built a new home in Prospect. They have 19-year-old twin daughters, Lexie and Kaitlyn, who are students at the University of Kentucky.

she says. “Or I’ll do a procedure on a patient and she’ll bring her mother in for something, too. It’s kind of like being a family physician. And it’s rewarding having people come with an issue that is a big deal for them and being able to offer a solution that just takes it off their plate. Sometimes people don’t realize how much negative energy they spend obsessing about something that can be easily and safely changed.”

UP FOR THE CHALLENGE Taking the easy path has never been Julene’s style. “I’ve always been pretty focused,” she says. “If someone said, ‘This is really hard,’ I’d say, ‘Sign me up!’” She decided early on in high school that she wanted to be a doctor because it was so difficult. “I did try to talk myself out of it for a time. I thought, ‘I don’t know if I want to do all that training,’ so I did pharmacy as an undergrad. But I just couldn’t get it out of my system and went on to medical school.”

BEAUTY ON THE INSIDE People are often surprised to find out that Julene leaves her plastic surgeon’s eye at the office. “I’m a very observant person, but when I’m out in public or at a social venue, I don’t look at people and think about what they can do to ‘look better.’ I try to focus on a person’s positives and feel that what makes people beautiful or attractive comes from inside. I do, however, notice poor plastic surgery work that leads to distortion. That jumps right out at me.”

It’s rewarding “having people

come with an issue that is a big deal for them and being able to offer a solution.

FINDING HER CALLING Julene planned to specialize in general surgery and trauma, but as her training progressed, she started to question how she would manage the demanding schedule while raising a family with her husband. The answer came in the fourth year of her residency program when she began a plastic surgery rotation and found it to be the perfect fit. “I love taking care of women — not that men don’t do it, but plastic surgery patients are mostly female — and I don’t miss the adrenaline of trauma because plastic surgery is so challenging. It’s detail-oriented and precise, requires a really good anatomic knowledge of the entire body, and there are always new techniques and technologies to learn. And while there’s certainly trauma in plastic surgery as well, for the most part, it’s happy surgery. It’s making a difference in women’s lives.” A WOMAN’S TOUCH In her solo private practice, Julene values the opportunity to take care of patients and their families over time. “A woman might first come to me for a breast augmentation, then return for body contouring or a tummy tuck after having children, and come back for a facelift later on,”

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NOBODY’S PERFECT One thing Julene struggles with is not letting her professional perfectionism seep into her personal life. “I have to have control when it comes to surgical results or bad things can happen. So, I’m always thinking ahead about possible outcomes and planning what I will do. But in my private life, I can’t control everything. I have to let people be imperfect and let circumstances lead to inefficiency. And that’s hard for me.” SADDLE UP Julene is an avid equestrian. She rode horses growing up, and she bought a Thoroughbred when she moved back to Kentucky. “My girls ride, too — they compete — and it’s been something we do together,” she says. “We now have six horses between us. I try to ride several times a week, and I also like to fox hunt when I get the chance.” With three of their horses kept on the property, Julene spends a lot of her free time at the barn. “I go out first thing in the morning to clean their stalls and get everything ready for the day, then come home after work and do it again. It’s a lot of physical labor, but I love everything about being with the horses.”

HIT THE ROAD When she needs to relax, Julene gets moving. She’s competed in several marathons and half-marathons, but now that she’s older, she prefers to just run recreationally. “I’ll do an occasional 10K with one of my daughters who has taken up running, but I don’t want to do marathons anymore,” she says. She also bikes to keep up her fitness. “I love to travel while I’m exercising. I have a group of girlfriends who are really good bikers, and we ride together in Louisville and sometimes in Indiana. I would love to do some long-distance biking, like one of those really cool trips where you stay in a five-star place but you’re biking all day.”


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Most Admired Woman CHARTING HER OWN

DIANE MEDLEY BUSINESS OWNER

N NDE DEPE AN IN

REBEL AT HEART

COURSE INTERNATIONAL

WOMEN’S

FORUM

MANAGING

PARTNER

ACCOUNTING FIRM

MOUNTJOY CHILTON MEDLEY

T

THINKER


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BUSINESS OWNER Diane Medley, Managing Partner of Mountjoy Chilton Medley, LLP HOME LIFE Diane grew up on a farm in Meade County, Kentucky, where she still lives with William, her husband of 42 years. They have four grown children and five grandchildren. THE FARMER’S WIFE Diane was not interested in earning a college degree when she was young. “I was valedictorian of my high school class, but I was totally burned out,” she says. “Women were going to college at that time — in the ‘70s — but not necessarily women from Meade County. I was also a bit rebellious and thought I didn’t need it. I got married, and I was going to be a farm wife. I thought I would be just fine without college.”

I’m an “independent

qualities combined with a drive to be the best are what helped my career take off.” IT TOOK A VILLAGE While there are many women in accounting, only a handful rise to top leadership positions in their field. Currently, Diane is one of only three female managing partners among the 100 largest U.S.-based accounting firms, “Getting to the top requires a very strong focus on your career for many, many years,” she says. “There are lots of long hours, and many women are not able, or not willing, to do that.” Diane’s passion for her work helped her maintain a focus on her career while raising four kids, but she couldn’t have done it without her family. “My husband was very supportive, and I had a lot of help from my mother.”

thinker, and I have confidence in my abilities and in my decisions.

CHANGING COURSE Diane was working on the farm and already had two young children when she decided to enroll at the University of Louisville. “The economics of farming were getting bad, and I was feeling the stress of that lifestyle,” she says. “I was worried about being able to provide for my kids. But my general curiosity — about learning, and about what a college degree could mean for me and my family — was also a part of my decision to go to school.” The experience taught her a valuable lesson: “It doesn’t matter how hard you work or how well you think you’re doing, sometimes circumstances require that you adjust your career path. And I learned that I can adjust, that I don’t have to have it all figured out, and that I can chart my own course as I go.” ADDING IT UP Diane discovered a passion for accounting while in college and became a CPA. “I love the way the numbers show the ‘why’ of things,” she says. “They tell the story of why one business is successful while another is not, why one person is wealthy and another one not.” In 1988, Diane and business partner John Chilton started a company that eventually became MCM. “I worked hard. I think we women always feel that we have to be extra good. But we are also naturally good listeners and good thinkers, and I think these

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STRIKING A BALANCE Diane is careful to get her rest so she can keep up with her busy schedule. She maintains an exercise routine, makes sure she takes a lunch break at work, and schedules regular vacations. “I’m a member of a group called the International Women’s Forum, and I love attending their overseas conferences,” she says. “I’ve been to Morocco, South Africa, and Berlin, and this year I’m looking forward to going to Israel.” Her daily trips to and from Meade County are another source of relaxation. “People probably think it’s crazy that I commute an hour each way, but it allows me to just turn on the radio and let everything go.”

LEAST LIKELY Looking back, Diane would have considered her 18-year-old self least likely to be where she currently is. “I’m surprised that I’m doing what I’m doing,” she says. “Partly because of where I grew up, partly because I got started a little bit late, partly because I already had two children when I started.” She attributes her success to her rebellious streak and to a certain amount of stubbornness. “I’m an independent thinker, and I have confidence in my abilities and in my decisions. Some women might think they can’t get to the top because of their disadvantages, so they just decide to be satisfied with slightly less. But I’m never satisfied with slightly less, so I keep pushing myself.”

THE HUMAN TOUCH Diane enjoys the people side of business. “Every client is different,” she says. “I love getting to know them personally and helping them achieve their goals.” She also believes in supporting and empowering her co-workers. “Some accountants won’t trust anyone else to help them with a client, which doesn’t allow opportunities for other people in the company to learn and grow. But I trust every person in the firm to do their best. If someone brings me a problem, then I’ll deal with it. But I don’t try to control everything. I think that’s why the firm has been able to grow from five people in 1988 to nearly 300 today.”


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COMMUNITY/NONPROFITS Vicky Weber: Senior Vice President of Business Relations and Marketing at Kosair Charities HOME LIFE Vicky is a native Louisvillian. She and Rick, her husband of 42 years, whom she calls a rock star, live in Jeffersontown. They have “two incredibly successful children and the four cutest grandkids ever” who call her Vivi. “I absolutely love my grandmother name,” she says. “It’s so fun!” IT’S BEEN GREAT Vicky spent the bulk of her working life in government and community development, during which time she rose from being “the Queen of Typing” in the Jefferson County judge’s office to serving as president of the Jeffersontown Chamber of Commerce for more than 13 years. She never thought she’d end up working for a nonprofit organization. “I loved my job at the Chamber,” she says. “But when I got the call from Kosair Charities' president Randy Coe to come aboard eight years ago, I walked out the door and said, ‘It’s been great.’ There’s no better way for me to finish my career than by helping kids, so I’m going to end it on a high note.”

can run circles around me, and I’m looking forward to seeing what their futures bring.” MOVING FORWARD Vicky says she doesn’t believe in standing still or resting on one’s laurels. “I’m a huge proponent of change. In fact, I believe that if something is not broken, you change it anyway. In marketing especially, you always have to step outside of the box and look at things from a different perspective.” Shaking things up can sometimes ruffle people’s feathers, but Vicky has learned that respectful dialogue is the best way to approach differences of opinion. “That’s very important in my job. I don’t always agree, but I always agree to disagree agreeably.”

I have fun “watching the team I put together grow, mature, and become the next generation of leaders.

HAVING FUN To Vicky, having fun is synonymous with being good at what she does. “If I’m not having fun, then you’re not getting out of me what you hired me to do. I have fun now with our events and with creating new and different ways to attract donors to help Kosair Kids. I have fun watching the team I put together grow, mature, and become the next generation of leaders. And I get to go to work and feel that maybe just one child was helped because I was there. I’ve met so many children with special needs who have transcended great obstacles. Knowing that Kosair Charities was a pivotal part of that — that’s when you realize you’ve landed in a great place.” TEAM PLAYER You wouldn’t know it now, but Vicky wasn’t always so self-assured. “I used to second-guess myself,” she says. “Leadership roles were difficult for me in the beginning, but by the time I got to the Chamber, I realized that I can make good, solid decisions and put together a great team. Now at Kosair Charities I have a team of young women who

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LOOKING AHEAD Vicky doesn’t know exactly what she’ll do when she retires, but she knows that she’ll keep busy. “I believe in giving back, so when I retire, I will not be sitting in a chair,” she says. “I’ll be the best volunteer ever.” She also looks forward to spending more time doing things together with her family. “My husband and I love to walk, and we love having sleepovers with all four grandkids. They jump on pillows and just destroy the house — it’s great! And I’m blessed to have eight of my nine brothers and sisters still alive, so I get to go see them, too.” Vicky loves to read, write, and do yoga, but she is helpless in the kitchen. “I’m not a very domestic person. I can’t cook worth a darn. I can’t even boil water. My husband has always done all of the cooking, and he’s a really great chef.”

ADVOCATE FOR WOMEN There have been several important women in Vicky’s life who have served as role models and mentors, and she believes in paying it forward. “I’m happy that I’ve been able to mentor a lot of women in my career,” she says. “We might have broken through that glass ceiling, but there are still fragments everywhere that need to be picked up. But women are great leaders, and I think men are starting to see and accept that. And those of us who have that drive and perseverance and passion will make it even better for other women who will follow.”

ALL IN THE FAMILY Work-life balance is not really something Vicky struggles with, she says. “I do step back, but don’t think for a minute that I’m not checking my email or text every 10 minutes no matter where I am. It means so much to me that I’m available 24/7, especially if it’s to help a child. But it’s not a hardship for me because I have great support at home.” In fact, being involved in Kosair Charities is a tradition in the Weber family. “My husband is usually there helping out when we have an event, or I’ll grab my grandchildren and say, ‘Come on, you’re volunteering today.’”


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CORPORATE Laura Melillo Barnum: Executive Director of Yum! Brands Foundation and Global Community Investment HOME LIFE Born and raised in Louisville, Laura worked in Washington, D.C., and New York City before a job opportunity brought her back home more than 20 years ago. Her family includes her husband Campbell, their two sons, Keefer, aged 17 and Baylor, 14, and their 11-year-old daughter, Brooks. BIG MOVE Laura majored in mass communication at Miami University of Ohio and planned to go into broadcasting. “I wanted to be Walter Cronkite,” she says. After college, she interned at WLKY in Louisville, then switched gears and went to Washington, D.C., to work in the United States Trade Representative’s Office. “I’ve always loved politics. We had political discussions in our house growing up, and my father would add some contextual substance to those conversations so we would understand the significance of events. I think it’s really due to my parents and their worldly vision that I was able to make the transition from Kentucky to a national and global arena.”

loved New York, she couldn’t pass up the chance to come home and work for Yum Brands, where she now manages the company’s community involvement and its partnerships with charitable organizations both locally and worldwide. “Having an opportunity to effect change and to help those in need while also maintaining a corporate role is a dream job for me,” she says. BALANCING ACT Laura’s personal struggle is familiar to all mothers. “It’s an ongoing challenge to be the mom you want to be and also to satisfy the side of you that needs to continue to grow and learn and develop intellectually,” she says. She credits the assistance she gets from family and friends and the supportive environment at Yum Brands in helping her find that balance. “I love to work. I need to work. It’s fulfilling and is a source of energy for me, and my children know that. But I try to structure it so that I can see them and be there for those important family events.”

Having an “opportunity to

effect change and to help those in need while also maintaining a corporate role is a dream job for me.

MEET THE PRESS Bringing together her love of politics and interest in media, Laura left her U.S. Trade Representative’s Office for a position in the White House press office, where she served under two presidents. “I was the single holdover from the Reagan to the Bush administration in the press office,” she says. She was also the youngest special assistant to the president and deputy press secretary in the history of the White House up to that point. While there, Laura witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. “I feel I had an incredible opportunity to be there at an incredible time in history.” DREAM JOB When George H.W. Bush left the White House, Laura took a public relations executive position with Macy’s in New York City. “We laugh in my house that I rode in Air Force One, then I was responsible for the Thanksgiving Day parade. Could I get better jobs than that?” she says. The answer, it turned out, was yes. As much as Laura

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PHOTO OP Not one to take herself too seriously, Laura is the first to laugh at her own goofs. One standout is from her time in the White House press office. “I was in a photo shoot with Mikhail Gorbachev and President Bush, and Gorbachev suddenly stopped to have his interpreter ask the president what was on the back of my dress. Everybody turned around, and I looked back to see it was toilet paper. Here I was with the leader of the free world and Gorbachev, and they’re talking about toilet paper on my dress! I have a lot of other stories, but that might have been one of my finest moments.”

WORDS TO LIVE BY “Chance favors the prepared mind” is one of Laura’s favorite quotes. “I started in broadcast, then went to politics and the corporate arena, and now I’m in the philanthropic sector,” she says. “It all goes back to putting together your diverse experiences and being ready for the moment when it arrives. I firmly believe that, regardless of what those experiences are, the sum is always greater than the parts. Collectively, one plus one equals three.”

GOLDEN RULE Kindness and authenticity are two qualities Laura admires in other women. “A big part of that is about being supportive of people without judging them, and treating everyone with equal dignity and respect,” she says. “My father always taught us to never look up, never look down, but always look straight ahead. I’ve tried to do that my whole life.”


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EDUCATION Angela Parsons: Principal of The Brown School HOME LIFE Angela lives in Valley Station, Louisville, with her husband Ted, and their younger son Caleb, 13. “I’m a South End girl, and I’ve lived there most of my life,” she says. “I really love the community.” Her passion for education is infectious: Angela’s husband became a teacher after marrying her, and their older son, Chandler, 19 — a rising college sophomore — plans on teaching, as well. FAMILY TRAILBLAZER Angela’s is the first generation in her family to graduate from high school and college. “As a kid, I felt amazed when I would get good grades,” she says. “I didn’t have anybody in my family as a role model, so I really didn’t think that I would be able to finish school and go through college.” It wasn’t until she participated in the Governor’s Scholars Program in high school that she realized she could actually go to college. “I think I just had tremendous teachers. They really pushed me.” Angela went on to earn a bachelor’s degree, two master’s degrees, and a doctorate from the University of Louisville in the fields of business and educational leadership. WORK ETHIC “I’m one of those people who refuses to quit. Once I start something, I keep going until it’s finished. That focus is especially important if you’re pursuing higher education. You have to make it your number one priority and remain focused to persevere.” Angela credits her parents for instilling in her the qualities she has relied on to achieve her goals. “My mom and dad are the hardest-working people I’ve ever met. And it’s important to me to make them proud.”

HIDDEN TALENT

accounting, and business law.” Angela served as assistant principal at The Brown School for seven years and became principal in July 2015. UPS AND DOWNS Morning is Angela’s favorite part of the work day. “I like to stand out on the front sidewalk before school when our families are dropping off their kids. It’s my time to have some conversations, and it’s wonderful to see the happy kids come in. I get a lot of hugs. It’s kind of magical.” Not so magical is the five-minute interval when the students transition to lunch. “We like to be up in the building when that happens to make sure it flows. When you’ve got 700 bodies moving at once, it’s a little bit chaotic. It’s probably my least favorite part.” TIME OUT “We’re a smaller school and keep many of the students for 13 years, so they really become a part of our family. I enjoy my job passionately. I love it so much that it can quickly take over my life.” To make sure she gets some downtime, Angela schedules time to exercise. “The elliptical is my main go-to. I get on and listen to music or watch TV, and all those cares just go away.” Angela and her husband are also involved in their younger son’s lacrosse and orchestra activities. “I love being with my family. I try to balance time with them and time with my school family.”

I feel like my “spiritual gifts are in administration. ”

THE BUSINESS OF EDUCATION “I had thought about teaching when I was in high school, but my dad thought that going into something else would be a better career decision financially,” Angela says. Taking her father’s advice, she turned to business and marketing. “I worked in retail management for seven years, but I was not really happy with that field. What I did really like about it was training and motivating people, so I thought I would like to go into teaching after all.” Angela’s previous experience was put to good use during her years as a business education teacher in the Jefferson County Public Schools system, but she came to realize she could do more in a leadership position. “I feel like my spiritual gifts are in administration. I guess that’s why I taught subjects such as business management,

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MORNING RITUAL Angela’s family likes to start the day early so they’re not in a rush. “I get up at 5:15, and my son gets up at 5:30. We have a hot breakfast every day — oatmeal with fruit or omelets — which is probably unusual. I like to watch the morning news with my husband and my son, and we enjoy having time to start the day off peacefully.” Angela usually cooks breakfast, but she and her husband take turns with dinner. “I don’t really like to cook,” she admits, “but the worst thing in the world is buying groceries.” ROOFTOP DREAMS If she had unlimited financial resources, Angela says she would use it for the school. “I would put some money into an auditorium renovation and pour the rest into building a soccer field and playground on the roof for the students to enjoy. It would be incredible! I’m really passionate about students getting out and being physical, but we’re an urban school and don’t have any green space.”

“I can’t dance, but I can roller skate. I was on a team as a kid and skated competitively all over the country for six years,” Angela says. She looks forward to the school’s skating parties. “A lot of the parents are surprised when I put on a pair of skates and go out there with the kids. But the only thing I can do now is spin. I don’t try any other tricks — I’d be afraid to break something at my age!”


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FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT Adrienne Holland: Owner of Adrienne & Co. Bakery and Cafe HOME LIFE Originally from Niagara Falls, New York, Adrienne moved to Kentucky after college to be closer to family. “My parents were pastors, and they got transferred to a church in Owensboro,” she says. After briefly living in Louisville, she put down roots in Jeffersonville, Indiana, where she lives with her husband Howard, and 11-year-old daughter, Gigi. THE SWEET SPOT Adrienne set out to be a teacher while making cakes on the side but quickly realized the classroom wasn’t for her. As demand for her creations grew, Adrienne decided it was time to set up shop. “It had snowballed to where I had no food in my refrigerator — it was all cake — and there was always a mountain of dishes when my husband got home. And there wasn’t enough room in the apartment. I would cover my washer and dryer in plastic wrap and use that as my workspace.” Adrienne & Co. bakery opened in downtown Jeffersonville in 2001. With multiple blue-ribbon wins at the Kentucky State Fair and a growing customer base that includes Muhammad Ali, Adrienne expanded her offerings and added a Floyds Knobs, location several years later. A third location recently opened in New Albany.

HAVING HER CAKE Adrienne was creative as a child and loved art classes. She sees cakes as her art medium and does the more complicated decorations herself. Wedding cakes are her exclusive personal domain. “I like the whole process, from the beginning until the end, because everyone coming in for a wedding cake consultation is happy. The whole family comes, including the groom. He may not want to go to visit other vendors, but he’ll come to taste cake. AND EATING IT TOO Taking care of her health includes watching what she eats, but temptation is always there. “Sometimes as I’m baking or carving, I’ll put some pieces in a box and stick it in the refrigerator. I’ll be really good all week, then I kind of save it up like a squirrel and eat it all over the weekend,” Adrienne says.

I like the whole “process, from the beginning until the end, because everyone coming in for a wedding cake consultation is happy.

BEYOND DESSERT Coming from a large Italian family where food was important, Adrienne knows her way around the kitchen. “My grandmother taught me how to make fresh pasta, and my father taught me how to make a mean meatball. I can make basically all the Italian dishes — chicken parmesan, gnocchi, pizza, my own sauce — but I don’t really cook at home since we cook everything at the restaurant. My husband always says that for having a bakery and a restaurant, we never have any food in our refrigerator.”

THE FAMILY THAT BAKES TOGETHER Adrienne and her brother had lived and worked together in Louisville. “The first job that we took out of college was at Ermin’s bakery. They promoted him to manager and me to front manager, and we kind of ran that bakery for a year.” The ‘Company’ in Adrienne & Co. actually refers to the entire family. Adrienne’s brother is coowner, and the Floyds Knobs shop is run by their mother and stepfather. Over the years, more family members came aboard. “My daughter is kind of a fixture at the bakery,” Adrienne says. “I worked all through my pregnancy, and when she was born, we made a playroom for her there. Now she’s 11 years old, so this summer we’re going to give her little jobs to do at the bakery. She’s actually pretty good at decorating cakes.”

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THE SHOW MUST GO ON Of all her projects, Adrienne remembers one that almost didn’t happen. “Kings Island commissioned us to do something cool for a big event, and we decided to make a working volcano. We rigged it up with fish tank tubes and air pumps so it would bubble red corn syrup. It worked fine at the bakery, but when we got there, it didn’t work. So my brother and I sat under the table during the event and took turns blowing into the tube, switching off when one of us was going to pass out. It actually worked out perfectly. We’d blow into the tube really hard to get it going whenever we heard people approaching, and we could hear all the ‘oohs’ and ‘ahhs.’ And nobody ever knew we were under there.”

CHILDHOOD PASSION Adrienne grew up around cakes. “My mom was a schoolteacher, but she (made) cakes out of the house when I was a little girl. She used to also teach cake decorating classes, and I would go with her as a kid to all of the sessions. By age 11, I was teaching women how to ice cakes and make roses. I always knew that I loved to do it, I just never knew I could make a living at it.”


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HEALTH/HEALTHCARE Kim Tharp-Barrie: Vice president of Norton Healthcare’s Institute for Nursing HOME LIFE Born in Leitchfield, Kentucky, Kim grew up in Louisville and moved with her husband, Jon Barrie, to Sellersburg, Indiana, more than 20 years ago. They have four grown children and are expecting their second grandchild. THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The first person on both sides of her family to go to college, Kim credits her mother with priming her for achievement. “She didn’t give me a choice,” Kim says. “She said, ‘You will go to school, and you will get an education.’” To date, Kim has received a bachelor’s degree in biology and education, become a registered nurse, added bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing to her résumé, earned a doctorate in nursing practice, and undergone training to receive Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) certification. “Education was always my mother’s goal for me. It was the most important thing next to family and faith.”

fondly recalls the nurses who took care of her and entertained her when her mother was at work. “They would braid my hair and paint my fingernails and toenails, bring me magazines, and spend time with me,” she says. “I realize now how much I must have been influenced by the nursing profession when I was growing up.” NEVER AGAIN As a young nurse, Kim remembers seeing many instances of seasoned nurses mistreating newcomers. “It was accepted, and when I spoke up, people would simply make excuses for them,” she says. “But the day it happened to me, when I was mistreated by another nurse to the point that I felt a patient’s care was being compromised, I said, ‘Never again. I’m going to be a leader, and I’m going to change this.'” Since then, Kim held several key patient care and nursing staff leadership positions in area hospitals. She joined Norton Healthcare in 2002. The early lessons of her nursing career have stayed with her, and she remains passionate about the importance of women helping other women. “A lot of my public speaking has been about mentoring, lateral violence (between colleagues), and women being good to each other. After all, the nursing profession is 90 percent female.”

A lot of my “public speaking

has been about mentoring, lateral violence (between colleagues), and women being good to each other.

CALLED TO CARE Kim was in the final year of her pre-med program at Transylvania University when an incident during an animal physiology lab project made her realize she did not want to go to medical school. “Some of my fellow students were being a little crude with some animal parts, and it really bothered me,” she says. “It was like a wake-up call. I remember leaving the lab, walking across campus to my adviser’s office, and having a meltdown. I said, ‘I don’t think I want to be doctor. I don’t know what I want to do.’ So I was sitting there, obnoxiously blowing my nose and crying, and he picked up the phone and, without even asking me, called the nursing school in Louisville and said, ‘I have someone who would make a great nurse.’ Then he said something that moved me from feeling like a loser to feeling like a very special person. He said, ‘Don’t be hard on yourself. There are those who cure, and those who care.’ I feel so blessed that he was there at that time to help me see that I was very capable — and could do whatever I wanted to do — but that I was just being called to care instead of to cure.” THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS Diagnosed with lupus at the age of 14, Kim was often in and out of hospitals as a young girl. She

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TURTLE TIME As someone who wants to “save the world,” Kim is trying to get better at saying “No” and not taking on too much. “I think many nurses are called to the profession because we like to care for others, and it leaves very little time for self-care,” she says. Kim tries to eat right, exercise, get enough sleep, and carve out time to be in her “happy place,” which for her is at home with her husband and family and in the barn with her horses. “I rode as a young girl, and three years ago we bought two colts. Now every day I have to have my barn time. It’s where I do my best thinking. I find that I can muck away just about any problem I have.” Kim has also learned to listen to her body and take time out to pause and replenish when she’s tired. “We call it ‘turtle time’ at work. I’m blessed to have a great boss who’s also my friend and who challenges me not only to be better at work, but also to be better at taking care of myself.”

DO THE RIGHT THING Never a follower, Kim has been willing to take chances in order to do what she felt was right. She remembers sitting with the new girl in the cafeteria and picking the obese girl that everyone made fun of to be on her kickball team in sixth grade. “We would still win because I would strategically place her where she wouldn’t have to run fast,” Kim says. “I learned early on that there’s a difference between doing what’s right and doing the right thing.”


HOME/HOMESTYLE Mary Ann Dallenbach: Owner of St. Matthews Feed & Seed HOME LIFE Mary Ann was born in New Jersey, grew up in Lexington, and moved to the Louisville area after graduating from the University of Kentucky. Work took her to Atlanta for several years, but for the last two decades she’s been living on her farm in Shelby County. Mary Ann has two grown children and three grandchildren. ROOTS IN BUSINESS Having parlayed her political science major into a successful career in the financial and consulting sector, Mary Ann bought St. Matthews Feed & Seed in 2002. “I was working at JP Morgan at the time, and I saw it as a good investment opportunity,” she says. “I thought that maybe in the future when I retired, it might be something nice for me to do, but I fully expected to stay in the corporate world until they booted me out.” Several years later, however, Mary Ann decided to leave her “day job” to take over the day-to-day operation of the store full-time. “I loved my corporate experience, but now I get to use my business skills while having fun with and learning more about plants, which is my passion.”

go down. “Sunset at the farm is spectacular. It’s so peaceful seeing the colors and hearing the birds having their last dining-out experience. It’s amazing how quickly you can decompress just sitting on the porch for 10 minutes at sunset.” A HAPPY AWAKE Although she puts in a lot of hours at the store, Mary Ann looks forward to going to work every day. “Running my own business is hard, but it’s fun and rewarding,” she says. “People who come in are in a good mood because they like to garden and they’re excited to do something to improve their space. We can talk about plants, and I get to help them figure out what they need and make them happy. People say I’m a workaholic, but I’m doing something I love and something I’m excited about. It may keep me awake at night, but it’s a happy awake.”

I love being “outside. After work, I’ll go home and play in the dirt in my garden. It’s therapeutic.

GREEN THUMB Mary Ann likes growing things. “When I was little I’d grow corn, tomatoes, and flowers in the backyard,” she says. “I remember being so proud getting my first ear of corn. I must have been around 4 years old. It was so fun, and I really enjoyed being outside and digging in the dirt. And I think my parents liked that it kept me busy.” Mary Ann continued gardening whenever she had space and time, and she now enjoys having a whole farm to work with. “I have wheat in right now, then I’ll put in corn. Next year, it will be soybeans.” SUNRISE, SUNSET A self-described morning person, Mary Ann likes to start her days with coffee and exercise before she goes to work. “I’ll do a few yoga positions on the floor, go for a run, ride my stationary bike, or take a walk. In the summer, I’ll water the plants.” Morning may be her favorite time of day, but she also loves to watch the sun

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BALLS IN THE AIR Depending on the day, Mary Ann considers multitasking either her strength or weakness. “I feel like I’m always keeping lots of balls in the air,” she says. “I’ve been doing that all my life, from when I first started juggling clients at work to later juggling life as a single working mother. I wish I could have spent more time with my kids when they were younger, and I wish there were more hours in the day — everybody probably says that — but I like where I am in my life. There are always new things. Some things I like better than others, but I’m never bored.”

LIFE ON THE OUTSIDE If you’re looking for Mary Ann, more often than not you’ll find her outdoors. “I love being outside,” she says. “After work, I’ll go home and play in the dirt in my garden. It’s therapeutic. I can think and work out my problems or chop down some weeds and get my aggression out. I also love to go bicycling, and I scuba dive. I’m thinking about getting a convertible for my next big birthday, too. I’ve never had one, and I don’t know what I would do with it that I can’t do with any other car, but it could be fun. Or I may drive it around for a month and change my mind once the novelty wears off and the bugs fly in and my hair looks terrible.”

GROWING SUCCESS Mary Ann has experimented with many different plants over the years. “I’ll try growing anything once. I’ve had a lot of flops, but also some successes. I love growing vegetables — I eat really well — and I’m learning about trees now. I love flowers, too. Hydrangeas are probably my favorite. They’re so pretty, and you can grow them pretty much nine months out of the year, so there’s always something blooming.”


GREAT DAY LIVE SINCE 2011 NEW BABY: “MY DAUGHTER IS MY UTMOST PRIORITY.” ADVENTUROUS FELL IN LOVE WITH LOUISVILLE HAS 17 ORCHIDS OWNS A HARP

MEDIA

Most Admired Woman

ANGIE FENTON

Editor-in-Chief of Extol Magazine


MEDIA

MAKING IT WORK

Angie Fenton: Entertainment correspondent on WHAS-11 Great Day Live and editor-in-chief of Extol Magazine HOME LIFE Angie was born and raised in Michigan and came to Louisville in 2002 for a relationship. Although the relationship didn’t work out, the city became her home. “I moved here for love, then I fell in love with Louisville,” she says. She now lives in Southern Indiana with her husband of nearly two years, Jason Applegate, their 5-month-old daughter, Olive; their dogs, and a cat. THE WRITE STUFF Growing up, Angie wanted to be a veterinarian, the first woman president, and a writer. “I’ve always loved animals, but I soon figured out that I had no interest in seeing the insides of them,” she says. “Politics was not going to be something that I wanted any part of either, but I stuck with the writing.” Angie earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English and taught as a fulltime adjunct professor at Central Michigan University before joining the Courier-Journal in 2003 as a writer, reporter, and eventually the entertainment columnist. From 2009 to 2013, she was the managing editor of The Voice-Tribune. “I love telling people’s stories,” she says. “It’s so rewarding.” In early 2015, Angie and her husband published the first issue of Extol, a magazine they launched together to showcase the lifestyle and culture of Southern Indiana.

BIRTHDAY SURPRISE Angie and her husband didn’t plan on having biological children. “I’m adopted, and I’ve never had any interest in being pregnant,” she says. The newlyweds were stunned when they found out they were going to be parents just months after launching their magazine and filming an episode of Oxygen TV’s Finding My Father to learn about Angie’s biological father. “If you had said to me this time last year that I was going to be a mom, I would have said, ‘No way, you’re talking to the wrong person,’” Angie says. “But the minute we found out, it was life-changing and amazing.” Olive was born in January 2016 on Angie’s 41st birthday, fittingly marking a new chapter in her mother’s life. “Now it’s all about her. My daughter is my utmost priority.”

I love telling “people’s stories. It’s so rewarding.

CAMERA-READY Angie remembers working at her desk at the Courier-Journal when she got a call from a Fox News producer. “(Louisville native and former partner of Playboy model Anna Nicole Smith) Larry Birkhead had just won custody of his daughter Dannielynn, and all of a sudden they were asking me to go on national television to talk about it. This was ludicrous to me because I’d never been on television before in my life. But looking back at it objectively, I think I did a decent job.” In fact, Angie did so well that she started to freelance as a part-time entertainment reporter for WAVE 3 News while working at the paper. In 2011, she joined the Great Day Live team on WHAS-11 as a full-time entertainment correspondent. “I thank Larry Birkhead,” Angie says of her transition into television. “He’s actually a friend, and he’s a great dad.”

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ANGIE TIME There’s not a lot of quiet time with an infant in the house, but Angie makes sure to grab those moments whenever she can. “It might be only 20 minutes in a day, and sometimes I don’t get them at all, but I have to take care of me in order to be good for anyone else,” she says. Angie is getting back into an exercise routine — “Being an older mom, I owe it to my daughter to keep myself healthy” — and recharges by spending time with her dogs, listening to music, and taking a day off work when she feels like she’s reaching her limit. She also likes to cultivate her green thumb. “I take orchids that are on their way downhill, that are dying, and revive them. I have about 17 of them right now. There’s just something very Zen about being able to do that.” SPILT MILK One thing Angie has learned about herself since becoming a mother is that she’s far more resilient and flexible than she ever imagined. “And I really try not to sweat the small stuff. I was pumping for Olive one morning and literally spilled the milk. I wanted to cry — I’m producing enough to feed her but not an overabundance — but I told myself, ‘You cannot cry over this.’ At the end of the day, what really matters are my daughter and my husband, that my family and friends are safe, and that we’ve done something other than just taking up space in the world.”

Like most new mothers, Angie is doing her best to juggle work and family. “I get up in the morning, spend time with my daughter, drop her off either at her godfathers’ house or at her grammy’s to go do TV, then pick her up on the way home,” she says. “Then there’s the magazine, but I can work on it from anywhere — ‘have iPad, will travel’ — so I can be flexible to fit Olive’s schedule. That will change the more awake and interactive she becomes, but we’ll figure it out.”


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POLITICAL Ellen Hesen: Chief of Staff for Louisville Metro Mayor Greg Fischer HOME LIFE Except for her time away at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ellen has always lived in her beloved native Louisville. “We have 400 square miles of city and the largest urban forest in the country,” she says. “Where else can you find everything in one city?” Ellen currently lives in the Highlands and has three grown step-children and five grandchildren.

a lot of practice with the chaos part,” she says. Several years ago, Ellen lost her husband after having lost her parents. “That was hard. But the lesson to learn is how to have the right balance in your life. I think we all, especially women, struggle with that. Every decade in life is a little bit different, with a new set of circumstances, but we learn to adjust.”

LEARNING THE ROPES A history major in college, Ellen went on to law school at the University of Louisville. “I hadn’t really thought about being a lawyer per se, but I had started getting more interested in government and law toward the end of college,” she says. “And there were limited jobs for history majors, although it was a very good background.” Ellen attended law school at night and had a variety of jobs during the day. “I worked at the county attorney’s office and for some private practitioners. I ran errands. I was also the information desk lady at the Hall of Justice. That was fun, and I learned my way around the courthouse pretty fast.”

24/7 In her current position as the mayor’s right-hand person, Ellen is front and center in whatever is happening in Louisville. “City government is very quick-moving and intense, and there’s always something going on,” she says. “People think about public safety, but we also have parks, the zoo, and the library system. Jails are always running, and we have folks repairing potholes and answering 911 calls — it’s a 24/7 operation running on three shifts. But it’s also a really fun time to be working in the mayor’s office. There’s a momentum of younger talented people moving into Louisville who are energetic and enthusiastic about participating in the community. It’s exciting. I really believe in the mayor and in where he wants to take the city.”

City government “is very quick-

moving and intense, and there’s always something going on.

CIVIC-MINDED After establishing herself as an attorney in the private sector, Ellen entered the public arena. “I was interested in current events and civic issues,” she says. “In high school, I volunteered in campaigns and worked at the precincts. So I thought I would just take a sabbatical from private practice and go work for state government for a couple of years, but I found it to be really rewarding and professionally challenging.” Ellen has continued to work in government. Prior to joining the mayor’s team, she held positions in several different agencies, and she served as general counsel for the state auditor and most recently for Gov. Steve Beshear. “I’ve been lucky. I’ve worked with some great elected officials and got to feel like I’m really making a difference. And now I get to ride down the street and see things that I had a hand in making happen — from a new sidewalk to something big like the Bridges Project.” TRIAL BY FIRE Ellen has had experience in staying calm in the midst of chaos and keeping her equilibrium in difficult times. “I still have to work at it, but I’ve had

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TIME OUT Ellen treats herself to a relaxing spa massage when things get hectic. “I like to do that on Sunday nights, then have a glass of wine and sleep really well.” She also loves to get together with family and friends for meals. “I love to cook, but I don’t get to do it much anymore. I have all the accoutrements. I just need to find the time and get organized.” Two things she dreads doing, however, are ironing and washing windows. “Those are the two worst things in the world! That, and cleaning out closets.” FINAL NOTE Ellen played guitar in high school and now plays the dulcimer. “I pick on it a little bit on holidays. It’s an easier instrument to play than guitar when you haven’t been practicing much. But I wish I could sing. I can’t carry a note, not even in the shower. And I wish I could whistle. I can do it a little, but not using my fingers. I need to work on that at some point.”

WORKING THE RULES Although she’s not in a counsel role as the mayor’s chief of staff — “I’m a ‘recovering lawyer,’” she quips — Ellen finds her legal background helpful when trying to accomplish goals. “People often joke that if you take something to the legal department, they’ll just tell you, ‘No.’ I do like to work within the rules, but I try to figure out ways to get to the ‘yes’ so we can get things done. And the folks I’ve worked with in government have been really great at coming together to do that.”


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Most Admired Woman

ATHLETICS/FITNESS

HALL OF FAME

ARTS 2003

Patti “PJ” Cooksey 2003

Helen Starr

2004

Carlton Ridge

2005

2006

Bekki Jo Schneider

Laura Lee Brown

2007

2008

Lynn Ashton

Jennifer Bielstein

2005

Julie Hermann

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Barbara Sexton Smith

Kim Johnson

Summer Eliason

Delanor Manson

Leslie Broecker

2015

2016

Marsha Bornstein

Melody WelshBuchholz

2003

2014

“Art without emotion is like chocolate cake without sugar. It makes you gag.”

2005

2006

Margaret Schneider Browning

Cenia Wedekind

2009

Angel McCoughtry

2007

Zenda Stackelbach

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Kelli Flint Campbell

Mary Beth O’Bryan

Terri Waller

Heather French Henry

June Bale

2016

Julene B. Samuels

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“The most beautiful makeup of a woman is passion. But cosmetics are easier to buy.” ― Yves Saint-Laurent

2011

Liz Lewis

2009

2015

2008

Janice Geralds

2010

Dr. Kara Mohr, PhD.

2008

Janet Rowland

Raquel Koff

Jessica Moreland

2007

Kirby Adams

― Laurie Halse Anderson, Speak

2004

Phyllis Reed-Johnson

2006

Geron Cadden

C.J. Fletcher

BEAUTY/FASHION

Brenda Light

2004

Tori Murden McClure

2013

2012

Kim Carpenter

2014

Chancellor Dugan Oksana Masters

2015

Donna Barton Brothers

2016

Crystal Kelly


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BUSINESS OWNER

2003

Martha Neal Cooke

2005

Christina Lee “Christy” Brown

2007

Teresa Bachman

COMMUNITY/NONPROFITS

2004

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Alice Houston

Diane W. Kirkpatrick

Sharon Darling

Helen Donaldson

Elaine “Cissy” Musselman

Judy A. Lambeth

2012

2013

2008

Denise Vazquez Troutman

2006

Teresa Bridgewaters

2009

2010

2011

Jeri Swinton

Lynnie Meyer

Sheila Day

2014

Marta Miranda

“The desire to reach for the stars is ambitious. The desire to reach hearts is wise.”

2008

Tricia Burke

Lori Redmon Cathe Dykstra

2015

2016

Karen Morrison

Vicky Weber

— Maya Angelou

CORPORATE 2009

Debbie Scoppechio

2010

Jeannie Unruh

2003

Susan Ivey

2011

Debra Walton

2015

Tonya York Dees

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2006

2007

Phoebe Wood

Lynn Pendergrass

2008

Deb Moessner

2012

2009

Patti Swope

2005

Carolle Jones Clay

Pat Koch

Virginia K. Judd 2013

2004

Kathy C. Thompson

2010

Diane Murphy

2014

Deborah Charlton

2016

Diane Medley

JUNE 2016 / TODAY’S WOMAN

2015

2016

Patricia Henry

Laura Melillo Barnum

2011

2012

2013

Jill Jones

Karen Lee

Jane C. Morreau

2014

Jill Joseph Bell

“Some women choose to follow men, and some women choose to follow their dreams. If you’re wondering which way to go, remember that your career will never wake up and tell you that it doesn’t love you anymore.” ― Lady Gaga


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Most Admired Woman HALL OF FAME

HEALTH/ HEALTHCARE

EDUCATION We added this category two years into our Most Admired Woman contest.

2003

Sue Stout Tamme

2005

Diane Downs

2011

Dr. Cynthia Crabtree

2006

2007

2008

2009

Dr. Jo Ann Rooney

Beverly Cox Keepers, Ph.D.

Barbara Flanders Wine

Dr. Shirley Willihnganz

2004

Mary Norton Shands*

2010

Dr. Rita Hudson Shourds

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Sara York

Doris Tegart

Cheryl Lowe

Donna Hargens

Angela Parsons

2005

Jerri Quillman

2007

Dr. Kim Alumbaugh

2006

Joanne Berryman

2008

Dr. Anees Chagpar

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT 2009

2010

Rebecca Booth, Dr. Kerri Remmel, M.D. M.D., PhD. 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Elizabeth Kizito

Helen Friedman

Susan Seiller

Kathy Cary

SueAnna Masterson

Grace DeluiseKoenig

2011

Dr. Mollie Cartwright 2009

2010

2011

Judy Schad

Terri Lynn Doyle

Summer Auerbach

2012

Nancy Grantz

2013

2014

Claudia DeLatorre

Sarah Fritschner

“Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the ‘Titanic’ who waved off the dessert cart.” 2015

Ericka ChavezGraziano

2016

2013

Charlotte Ipsan

2014

Dr. LaQuandra Nesbitt

— Erma Bombeck

Adrienne Holland

2015

58

2012

Becky Beanblossom

Cis Gruebbel JUNE 2016 / TODAY’S WOMAN

* Deceased

2016

Kim TharpBarrie


TODAY’S WOMAN / JUNE 2016

59


HOME/HOMESTYLE

Most Admired Woman HALL OF FAME

MEDIA 2003

Betsy Wall

2005

Donna Dusel

2007

Lawren Just

2009

Tracie Utter

2004

Carla Sue Broecker 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Dawne Gee

Liz Everman

Jackie Hays

Jean West

Melissa Swan

Vicki Dortch

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Rachel Platt

Janelle MacDonald

Renee Murphy

2006

Lenora Paradis*

2011

2013

Leslie McCarthy

60

Elizabeth Woolsey

“I was brought up to believe that the only thing worth doing was to add to the sum of accurate information in the world.”

2008

Liz Wilson

2015

2016

Kelsey Starks

Angie Fenton

― Margaret Mead

POLITICAL

2010

Andie Frisbee

2003

Cindi Sullivan

Candyce Clifft Claudia Coffey

2012

Joan Waddell

2014

Diane Stege

Anne Meagher Northup

2009

Eleanor Jordan

2004

2005

2006

2007

Janice R. Martin

Crit Luallen

Joan Riehm*

Bobbie Holsclaw

2010

Virginia L. Woodward

2015

2016

2015

2016

Kathy Olliges

Mary Ann Dallenbach

Barbara Weakley-Jones

Ellen Hesen

JUNE 2016 / TODAY’S WOMAN

2008

Martha Layne Collins

2011

2012

2013

2014

Tina WardPugh

Shellie May

Angela Bisig

Julie Denton

“One of the penalties of refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.” 2015 ― Plato

Barbara Weakley-Jones * Deceased


SmartStyles Products and services to fit your style

Tony Renfro’s Hair Studio Summer Special: • $50 color, cut and style • $80 Smooth Keratin Treatment – Be Frizz Free this Summer!

Old Louisville Hidden Treasures Garden Tour

20+ years Master Stylist Tony Renfro can give you that glamorous look this season. Schedule now and get going with your summer pizzazz!

Located In Sola Salons (corner of Hurstbourne & Westport)

2809 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy, 40223 502.426.3363 Ofer expires 7/1/16

Dedi’s Beauty Secrets

Gather a bouquet of garden ideas Saturday and Sunday, June 11 & 12 10am to 5pm

We ofer permanent makeup for eyebrows, eyeliner and lips. These can beneft people who:

Visit 11 private gardens Enjoy complimentary refreshments, a silent auction and advice from master gardeners

• have allergies or medical conditions • desire freedom from daily makeup application Also ofering eyelash and eyebrow tinting, microdermabrasion, chemical peels, collagen masks, Smoothsculpt™, tanning beds and custom spray tans.

Summer Special: $189 Permanent Eyeliner or Eyebrows (value $395) Expires 6/30/16

8211 Shelbyville Road Louisville, KY 40222 502.550.8393 DedisBeautySecrets.com

Diana Smith’s Hair Studio Sassy Fox Consignments Sassy Fox upscale consignment, carrying a well-edited selection of women’s name brand and boutique/designer clothing and accessories from casual to formal.

150 Chenoweth Ln, St. Matthews 895.3711 Sola Salon & Hair Studio welcomes Diana.

Spring Color Special: Color, Cut & Style $50. Limited time available.

10-5 Mon.–Sat., 10-8 Thurs. Find us on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

Color Specialist Diana Smith Sola Salon & Hair Studio 12689 Shelbyville Road • 270.202.5147 - ADVERTISEMENT -

$15 tickets in advance $20 on tour days

oldlouisvillegardentour.com 502.919.2539


Professional Connections

CALENDAR

Networking and careerbuilding opportunities for women around town

presents

Athena’s Sisters – For Military Women Every 2nd & 4th Mon. • 6-8pm 201 South Peterson Avenue Lindsay Gargotto 502.489.0956 info@athenassisters.us BPW- Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Mon. • 5:30pm Contact for info & reservation. Tuckers, 2441 State St. Nadine Wilkinson 502.523.1698 BPW - Business & Professional Women of River City Quarterly • 11:30am Networking Noon Meeting & Program The Bristol - Downtown 614 West Main Street bpwrc.org or bpwreserve@gmail.com to register Bridge the Gap Professional Women Every 5th Sun. Heyburn Building 430 W. Muhammad Ali, Suite 24A Hazel Parrish, Chapter President 502.417.2566, hazelp17@gmail.com Call to reserve.

Legal Secretaries of Louisville Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30am Bristol Bar & Grille 614 West Main Street Angela Gibson 502.589.5980 AGibson@bsg-law.com legalseclou-ky.org MLWPC - Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 4th Mon. • 5:30pm University Club -U of L Belknap Campus Virginia Woodward 502.361.4866 mlwpc2011@gmail.com NAWBO - National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tues. admin@nawbolouisville.org 502.625.0248 nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Mon. • 5:30pm Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121

CBPW - Christian Business & Professional Women 2nd Thurs: May, July, Sept, Nov • 11:30am Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Sharilyn Unthank 502.417.5481 cbpweast@gmail.com

National Association of Women MBAs - Louisville Chapter Location & event vary. Details on website: mbawomen.org/chapter/ louisville-kentucky *MBA not required for membership

Distinctive Women, Entrepreneurial Women Making a Difference Every 1st Thurs • 6:30-8pm Email for meeting location Deleskia Butler 502.509.5521 distinctivewomen2013@gmail.com

National Council of Negro Women, Inc. - Louisville Section Every 4th Thurs. • 6pm Main Library, 301 York Street Cassandra Lasley 502.650.6602 lasley5514@twc.com

EWI - Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tues. • 5:30pm Contact for information & reservation Christy Smallwood 502.595.7157 ewikentuckiana.com christy@arkhamexec.com

NEW - Network of Entrepreneurial Women Every 2nd Wed. • 6-8pm Location varies. See nentw.com for details.

League of Women Voters Every 3rd Mon. • 6pm Lang House, 115 S. Ewing Ave. Pat Murrell 502.895.5218 info@lwvlouisville.org

Network Now Every 2nd Fri. • 11:30am Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com

The Ninety-Nines, Inc International Assoc. of Women Pilots Kentucky Bluegrass Chapter Saturday, March 5, 9am 14th Annual Girl Scout Aviation Day Air & Space Academy, Bowman Field 2720 Cannons Lane, Hangar 7 Terri Donner 502.419.7938 Terri.donner@yahoo.com Savvy Women in Business Every 1st Wed. • 6:30pm Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Brenda Daisey 502.742.4505 bdaisey@cruiseplanners.com Savvywomeninbusiness.com Southern Indiana Women’s Networking Group Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30am Holiday Inn-Lakeview 505 Marriott Drive, Clarksville info@soindwng.org

WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30am Big Springs Country Club 5901 Dutchman’s Lane Gretchen Mahaffey 502.451.0600 gmahaffey@kfg.com WIN - Women in Networking V Every 2nd Thurs. • 11:30am Roosters / $15 10430 Shelbyville Rd #7 win5networking.com Kim Hogle kim.hogle@proforma.com Women on the Front Line Every 5th Sat., 4-5:30pm Sponsored by Bridge the Gap Addiction and Mental Health Services 2629 Slevin Street, Louisville Hazel D. Parrish, Clinical Director 502.417.2566 Women’s Business Center of KY funded in part by a cooperative agreement with the SBA

Top Ladies of Distinction Inc. Every 2nd Tues. • 6:30pm Hotel Louisville, 120 W. Broadway, Suite 930 Mamie L Maxwell 502.767.4180 ms.maxwell@twc.com

Every 1st Fri. Roundtable • 8:30am Location – TBA Sharron Johnson, 502.566.6076#104 sjohnson@cvcky.org cvcky.org/womensbusiness center.html

WIN - Women in Networking Every 2nd Wed. • 11:15am Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane Laura Ridge 502.491.7877 lridge@oxmoorcountryclub.com

Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:30am Big Spring Country Club 5901 Dutchmans lane Elizabeth Monarch 502.551.1286

WIN - Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30am Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net, gowin2.com

WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tues. • 11:30am Laura McClellan, president 502.709.3004 Louisvillewin3@gmail.com win3louisville.com

Elizabeth@elizabethmonarchgroup.com

The Women’s Republican Club of Louisville Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:15am University Club, University of Louisville 502.314.2534 or 502.899.1999 ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thurs. • 6pm Logan’s Steakhouse 5005 Shelbyville Road Joyce Seymour 502.553.9241 jespud@bellsouth.net

Listings are on per month basis. To list your meeting for free, email your meeting date, time, location, contact info and website to advertising@todayspublications.com or call 502.327.8855 ext. 14. Deadline for inclusion in next issue is 6/8.

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JUNE 2016 / TODAY’S WOMAN


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Today's Woman June 2016  

Announcing the 2016 Most Admired Woman winners! Their interests and talents are as varied as their professions. We were really impressed wit...

Today's Woman June 2016  

Announcing the 2016 Most Admired Woman winners! Their interests and talents are as varied as their professions. We were really impressed wit...