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Need More Adventure?

Get Inspired Here…

All About Your Heart

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february 2013

CoNTents

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44

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46 Hot Happenings

27 In Our Issue..................6 By Anita Oldham

On Our Cover................6 By Tiffany White

By Tiffany White and Gioia Patton

10 Old School/New School 30 Ready to Change Your Life? By Lucy Pritchett 14 Survival Skills By Marie Bradby

By Cathy Zion

18 21 Things By Anita Oldham

26 B  e Brave — Do Your Thing By Holly Gregor

27 Super+Duos By Gina Roberts-Grey

By Kimberly Crum

By Melissa Donald

34 Wellness Watch By Jessica Smith

16 The Agenda

48 Falling

36 W  hy Are We So Miserable? By Bob Mueller

38 Cozy Dining By melissa donald

50 Before You Go By Tiffany White

Go Red For Women Heart Supplement

Pump YoUr Heart HealtH

It Up!

42 W  hat’s Happening on TodaysWomanNow.com? 44 Passions By Anita Oldham

2013 Go red For Women S

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sponsored by

We Are

oNLINE: 4

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TodaysWomanNow.com Today’s Woman


todayswomannow.com

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2013

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in our

issue Myself i e M Improve Your Relationship Oh, relationships are complicated, and the relationship a woman has with herself may be the most confusing. 

The Inattention: In any relationship, attention is a key ingredient. It seems that women are not always paying attention to themselves. It is difficult with all the other people needing something. The Misunderstandings: Sometimes your body is trying to tell you something, and you just don’t understand it. Or, you misinterpret it — perhaps the internet doesn’t always know the answer. The Fights: Do you have fights with yourself over going to the doctor or making check-up appointments? I have heard every type of excuse, and used many of them myself. Arguing with yourself about doctors, exercising, or eating right does not make you any healthier. The Answer: We don’t have the answer for how to improve your relationship with yourself, but spending a little more time thinking about yourself and your health is always a step in the right direction. This issue of Today’s Woman is largely dedicated to matters of the heart, with 24 pages exclusively about heart health. Read about local women and the surprise their hearts played on them. This surprise changed their own relationships with themselves: the way they think, the way they live, and the way they approach each day. It could inspire you to a change of heart. — Anita Oldham

on our

Cover

Rebecca Kimura looks forward to seeing the excitement on the face of a future bride who has just found the perfect wedding dress. Read more about what she’s doing on page 10. Photo by Melissa Donald Makeup (as seen on pg. 10) by Denise Zeydel and

Stephani Jones of Z Salon & Spa

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Today’s Woman


Volume 23 8 Number 2

C elebratin g 2 1 Y ear s

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion

EDITOR Anita Oldham

publisher@todayspublications.com

editor@todayspublications.com

COntributing EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett

Assistant EDITOR Tiffany White

Assistant Editor/Designer Jessica Smith

OFFICE administrator Kaitlyn Tew

tiffany@todayspublications.com

jessica@todayspublications.com

officeadmin@todayspublications.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen

SALES DIRECTOR Cheryl Suhr

account executive Rose Helm

susan@todayspublications.com

account executive Teri Hickerson

cheryl@todayspublications.com

rose@todayspublications.com

teri@todayspublications.com

SenioR page & Graphic Designer Kathy Bolger

photographer/Food Writer Melissa Donald

SenioR Advertising Designer April H. Allman

kathyb@todayspublications.com

melissa@todayspublications.com

Circulation Manager W. Earl Zion

april@todayspublications.com

Reprints are available!

Call (502) 327-8855, ext. 10, or email us at reprints@todayspublications.com with details and specifics. For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call (502) 327-8855. BBB Rating of

Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 todayswomannow.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2013 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

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She is hardworking and organized, and she loves sparkle. Old School

REBECCA KIMURA

Founder and owner of Rebecca’s Wedding Boutique

Interview by Lucy M. Pritchett Photography by Melissa donald

Rebecca Kimura, 50, founder and owner of Rebecca’s Wedding Boutique, 159 Chenoweth Lane •N  eighborhood: Prospect • Household: Husband Zorre Kimura; two daughters: Alex, 22, who lives in Austin, Texas, and Sam, 20, who attends Western Kentucky University; dogs Willie and Max; cats Kanu, Aspen, and Jerry. • In the Biz: Since September 1989 •W  ebsite: rebeccasweddings.com

About Bridal Retail:

I have 17 employees — full- and part-time.

Our busy season starts On average the store sells 50 dresses a month. in January. Traditional Bridal gown prices range from $600 up to $3,500. wedding months are May, The average cost is $1,600. June, September, and For the past three years, as part of the October. • Most brides national Brides Across America program spend a year planning their (bridesacrossamerica.com), we have given away 50 wedding. • Dresses take four dresses a year to military brides. It is a small way to six months to come in. • in which we can give back and thank those in the Brides try on samples that military for what they do. we have in the shop and then order their size and This dress has a champagne color. • Most bridal gowns color — a trend in gowns is a ordered are of a soft, light touch of color. ivory that looks good on almost all skin tones. In her cute Kate Spade leather purse:

Phone, peppermint gum, Burt’s Bees lip gloss, wallet, car keys, and a travel-size container of lotion — Estee Lauder’s Pleasures.

In the store you will find bridal gowns, bridesmaid and flower girl dresses, mother-of-the-bride/groom outfits, veils, jewelry, belts, and headpieces. My twin sister, Karen Wellinghurst, manages Rebecca’s Black Tie, the brother to Rebecca’s Wedding Boutique that features tuxedos and formal wear for the groom and groomsmen. Lace is back, which adds even more romance. Sparkly belts, jewelry, and tiaras add the bling. I am seeing a small move away from the strapless gown and toward a soft, off-shoulder drape. Some brides add a lace jacket that can be taken off at the reception or have two belts — one for the ceremony and one for the reception — giving them a different look. About Brides: Each one wants to feel special and pretty. She also wants a good value for her money. Brides are looking for guidance and help, and even if they come in with their own ideas, they can be opened up to what is out there. They love the attention. It really is all about them. Biggest wedding party:

Nineteen bridesmaids, 10 junior bridesmaids, and eight candle girls, plus the same number of corresponding groomsmen, ushers, and escort boys.

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She is known for her bustles and has been sewing since age 9. NEW School

Meghan Hicks

Owner of Beautiful Bustles

Interview by Lucy M. Pritchett Photography by Melissa donald

I took formal sewing lessons from age 9 to 15 with a woman who gave lessons in her home. I was home-schooled until I was 15, and the lessons were part of my curriculum. I had four younger sisters and made clothes for them. They were my real-life Barbies. Meghan Hicks 31, seamstress, founder, and owner of Beautiful Bustles, a bridal gown alteration business • Hometown: East Lansing, Mich. • Neighborhood: Fern Creek • Household: Husband Grant, son Ethan, 5, and daughter Ellyse, 2. • In the Biz: Since 2006

1. what is A dream dress?

Every bride has a different idea of her dream dress, and it is my job to bring that idea to life. I never mark on or cut on the dress in front of the bride. It gives them a heart attack. I treat the dress like a baby. 2. what is A Successful dress?

Her business

Specialty?

Full alterations for the bridal gown and any of the female wedding members’ outfits. I don’t make the gown from scratch but take what the bride has and turn it into what she wants. I can make veils, belts, and headpieces. I have taken a simple dress and turned it into a full ballgown.

I am known for my bustles. The bustle is created to pull the long train up to hem length so that it doesn’t drag and makes walking and dancing easier after the ceremony. The French bustle is tied up with ribbons underneath, and the American bustle is formed from the top with hooks and eyes.

I love it when the bride says to me, “I don’t want to take my dress off!” 3. W  hat does A Dress Cost?

I charge by the job. Every one is different. I would say the average cost for a full alteration is $250. I work on about 50 dresses a month. 4. what are Your Go-To Movies:

27 Dresses, IQ, While You Were Sleeping 5. what are Your Go–To Authors:

Sophie Kinsella, Francine Rivers, Jennifer Weiner.

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SURVIVAL SKILLS

Written by Marie Bradby

Hope for the Slopes Elaine Tillman

Photography by Melissa donald

Professional Ski Instructor

She carried an avalanche rescue transceiver, a radio, and an emergency backpack with a shovel and a probe she could stick in the snow to find fellow skiers in the event of a snow-slide. Elaine “E.T.” Tillman stepped out of a Bell helicopter last March in the Monashee Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, and took the ride of her life in fresh champagne powder up to her knees. “The adrenaline, the excitement — I felt like I was 18,” says Elaine, 60, a professional ski instructor whose friends call her “E.T.” — “extraterrestrial” or “eternal terror” — for her unrelenting energy and daring ways. “When you are going through the snow, it blows up and looks deeper than it is.” So began a heli-skiing trip with Canadian Mountain Holidays, where Elaine climbed in and out of a helicopter all day, ate lunch on the mountain, skied down 70,000 vertical feet, and stayed at a lodge so isolated that chains had to be put on buses to get them up the primitive road. “What we were doing was very risky,” says Elaine, who is also an independent travel agent. “It’s an extreme sport. The helicopter could crash. We could get hung in an avalanche. Each group in the helicopter had a guide, and you did what he told you. They drop you off; you ski down. Then they drop another group off, and they ski down. Then he picks you up and drops you in another spot, and you do this all day. “While we’d wait for the helicopter, I’d plop back in the snow and make snow angels, and I kept telling everybody that I’m not afraid to die anymore because I know where the angels are.” “Get a good nigh A tomboy who grew up in a sheltered religious t’s sleep and avoid the tou family, Elaine honed her skiing at Paoli Peaks in gh runs at the end of the Indiana as an adult. She was a natural. day. Accidents happen “I liked going fast,” Elaine says. “I always wanted when people are to ski with the guys. That’s the first time in my life that tired. Do that black ru I had done something that challenged me because my n the next morn ing wh parents had held me back.” en you are fresh.” Elaine was certified as a member of the National Ski Patrol at age 33. For nine years, she aided people who got hurt on the slopes at Paoli. After being shaken by a serious accident involving a young skier, she switched to “Many eir teaching. She now spends her time instructing children h s pu t h parents g, in at Paoli from December to February before teaching y a s n, ch ildre ing to more students at a ski resort in Beaver Creek, Colo., from “People eat u’re go o y , h ‘O fic ult) if February through March. (d k chili for lunch. c and ers burg la ham sk i a b no “I started teaching these children, and I was like, do all that y have they e how h see t don’ T I .’ run g on n ii ‘Wow! This is exciting,’” Elaine says. “I’m giving some k exercise.” s ical ss and then do phys busine It will . confidence to these children, and it can help them for the n u r a black ou’ve rest of their lives. h e m. Y sc a re t y “If you a “I had children who said, ‘I can’t ride that lift.’ I was ke bab ren’t hav ing fun, got to ta can you d up il how like, ‘I’m going to be right here with you.’ You do it with u b learn an to s p te yth ing? s .” e c y o n u Wh e n e see that d them, and they’re like, ‘Oh, my gosh. I can do it!’” fi n o c they are t heir gett ing bored, a Elaine shares these rules for the slopes: s ch ildre n do, you your sk is take off and c limb up the woo in to d s where th “At Paoli, I get children for “Adults forget ere is fre snow, sp “Because of what it’s like to be sh ri n k two hours. Out West, people le Jello in a ch ild and let go the high altitude in the and sit th . Find the snow someth ing that ma ere and , give me their children for kes you laugh.” eat Jello. mountains, you need talk abo You ut what six days. I have them all y ou’ve be to and the stayToday’s hydrateWoman en doing d. Also, sk ills yo 14 2013 14 FEBRuary January 2013 day. If we get hurt, we’re u are usi moisturize your skin.” ng.” not going to have any fun.”

Rule #4: Rest.

3: Rule #. Learn

Rule #5: Don’t overeat.

Rule #6 : Have f un.

Rule #1: Giggle .

Rule #2: Safety.

Rule #7: Drink lots of water.


The Agenda by CATHY ZION, Publisher

Feb

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Cathy Zion at the National Association of Women Business Owners EPIC Awards Reception. See her and say hi at one of these events this month.

1&2

Go Red!

As you can tell from our featured Heart Health Supplement (after page 24), we are passionate about raising awareness of heart disease. It is THE number one killer of women. So on February 1, we’ll all be decked in red as the American Heart Association recognizes Wear Red Day. Think about your heart as you see red everywhere from building lights to bridge spotlights. Want to participate more? Come to the Heart Ball on February 2 at the Downtown Marriott. Contact: 502.371.6023.

Women of Distinction

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Feb Fourteenth m

Small Business Day

If you own one of the more than 300,000 small businesses in Kentucky, make plans to attend Small Business Day in Frankfort on February 14. As Chair of the Kentucky Commission on Small Business Advocacy, I see just how critical it is for us to have a voice in Frankfort with our state legislators. Do you know your state senator and representative? When was the last time you contacted him/her? This is a great way to get acclimated in a non-threatening way. After a yummy breakfast in the Governor’s Mansion, you break off with others of common interests to visit with your legislators. Let them know what you think — they’re working for you! Contact: nfib.com/kentucky/contact-nfib.

Caregiver of the Year Today’s Transitions magazine recognizes caregivers throughout the year, but at GuardiaCare’s Chocolate Dreams event on February 11, we announce the 2012 Grand Prize winner while indulging in decadent desserts. Contact: guardiacare.org. And, make sure you tell the caregivers in your life howmuch they’re appreciated. Even better: Offer to help out for a couple of hours.

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We love all the amazing women who elevate the status of women. At this year’s Celebration of Service and Survival, five accomplished women will be honored as the 2013 Women of Distinction: Madeline Abramson, Dr. Renee Campbell, Susan Ely, Tori Murden McClure, and Mary Gwen Wheeler. The Center for Women and Families annually hosts this event to not only recognize an outstanding group of women but also raise funds and awareness for their organization. It’s a powerful evening you won’t want to miss. Contact: thecenteronline.com. You’ll also learn about the amazing work of The Center in working with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault and ways that you too can help.

photo by melissa donald

February…A month for hearts and those full of heart

Today’s Woman


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HINGS T Why 21?

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Because we are 21 years old!

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Happenings, news, celebrations, and tidbits that caught Today’s Woman’s eye this month. by ANITA Oldham

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Take a

Cruise

Try a dinner cruise for Valentine’s Day right down the Ohio on the Spirit of Jefferson. Enjoy a dinner buffet, entertainment, and views of downtown Louisville. You can order extras, like roses, balloons, and champagne, to make your night even more special. 502.574.2992.

Pass the Maple Syrup, Please!

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We keep bees... (Mostly my husband does, but I eat lots of fresh honey). Learn how to keep bees at one of these workshops at Bernheim. ($30/$20 for members. 502.955.8512) • Natural Beekeeping with John Seaborn,
 February 9, 1-4pm • Bee Curious: An Afternoon with Phil Craft, February 16, 1-4pm

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f you haven’t had fresh maple syrup, stop by the Maple Syrup Festival in Salem, Ind. Besides the waffles/pancakes, you can enjoy music and pioneer demonstrations. Check it all out on lmsugarbush.com

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Vote!

Vote for a Beautiful Baby to be on the June cover of Today’s Family magazine! TodaysFamilyNow.com

Corrine said she became intrigued with Ali because of the determination it takes to be a fighter.

FEBRuary

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Home & Garden Remodeling Show March 1-3, Kentucky Expo Center (louisvillehomeshow.com) We are giving away tickets at todayswomannow.com

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Stop by the Muhammad Ali Center before March 16 to see the exhibit, “Ali: The Greatest” which includes contemporary art of local artist Corinne Pondell Holt and 20 artists from across the country.

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7

HINGS T Why 21?

21

Because we are 21 years old!

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Most Admired

WFPK Free

Wednesday

Woman

February 27, 7:30pm: WFPK Winter Wednesday’s final concert: Featuring Bobby Long. Free at the Clifton Center

List Revealed in March issue

Helen is 55! That doesn’t sound old, but when you say she is the 3rd oldest in North America… She celebrated at the Louisville Zoo with banana cake designed by Heitzman’s Traditional Bakery and Catering.

Thanks, Sandy!

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TEN

Viewing the Bodies BODY WORLDS Vital exhibition includes wholebody plastinates, a large arrangement of individual organs, organ and arterial configurations, and translucent slices that give a complete picture of how the human body works.Vital tells the fascinating story of how to best fight, manage and prevent lifethreatening diseases — such as cancer, diabetes, and heart ailments — through healthy choices and lifestyle changes. Dr. Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS exhibitions are the original anatomical exhibitions of real human bodies. Contact: 502.561.6100, To purchase tickets online, kysciencecenter.org

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Another birthday party: But he is old, or would be… Thomas Edison turns 166. Louisville is throwing a birthday party at the Thomas Edison House, 729 E. Washington St. on February 9, 10am-3pm. edisonhouse.org

Read a single girl’s dating woes and share our own on TodaysWomanNow.com. Also, win tickets to the Single Mingle Louisville’s February event.

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Stop and Eat a Light Bulb Cake

The Center for Lay Ministries/ Bliss House Committee named the Sue LaRue Service Award winner as Sandy McCauley, who has dedicated many hours of volunteer time during the past seven years to help the Bliss House accomplish their mission of recovery of women dependent on drugs/alcohol. Celebrate at the Bliss House Fund Raiser, Valentine Bliss, February 16 at 5:30pm (300 Spring Street, Jeffersonville). Cost is $50. 502.445.1420.

All the Single Ladies…

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HINGS T Why 21?

21

Because we are 21 years old!

On Erin’s Wish List: TodaysWomanNow.com

This fringe scarf from Dress and Dwell in New Albany is on Erin Fust’s wish list. Read Erin’s style advice on TodaysWomanNow.com. Her whole Valentine’s gift wish list will be revealed on February 5.

Maybe I need to invite her to dinner…

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essica Grace, chef and owner of Grace Personal Chef Services’ main focus is weekly meal preparations for families too busy to cook dinner every night, tired of takeout, and who want to give their family restaurant-style and quality food on a daily basis. She is also available for intimate dinner parties, small events, and cocktail parties. Chefjessgrace.com

“I love this fringe scarf because of the variety in colors that it comes in, the texture it can provide to a basic white teeshirt and jean outfit, and how you don’t have to compromise style for warmth!”

17 Winter is the time of

promise because there is so little to do — or because you can now and then permit yourself the luxury of thinking so.

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— Stanley Crawford

aryhurst made-from-scratch original recipe cookies — which include chocolate-dipped chocolate chip, raisin-crammed oatmeal, and buttery raspberry thumbprints — are from Sister Grace’s recipes. Cost is $25 with proceeds from the cookie sales helping Maryhurst care for more of Kentucky’s abused and neglected children. Maryhurst.org or 502.271.4523

Good Date Ideas?

our 25 anniversary, my husband and I decided we 18 For had to celebrate. Because we didn’t see getting away for th

a big vacation that conducive to our lives at the moment, we decided we would go on 25 intentional dates this year and document them in an online scrapbook. So, if you have some good date ideas, send them to me at anita@todayspublications.com with “great date” in the subject line and maybe we can capture you and your loved one on a great date.

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Win A Workout for a Month

As part of our Ready to Change your Life, we are giving our readers an opportunity to jump in and try some of what our Ready to Change Your Life participants are doing as part of their exercise and food plan program. This month, you can win a month of Jazzercise from February 18-March 15 at the Jazzercise Middletown Fitness Center location only. To win, enter online at TodaysWomanNow.com 22

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Start your Raised Bed Garden Planting Shawn Neal will lead you through a raised garden planting planning on TodaysWomanNow.com

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Learn How to Do Something

Beer brewing, organic gardening, consignment shopping, and whiskey tasting are among 13 new enrichment classes introduced by the University of Louisville’s Lifelong Learning. Most start this month or next: Louisville.edu/lifelonglearning, 502.852.8564 Today’s Woman


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Professional Connections

CALENDAR Spotlight on

Education Spalding’s School of Natural Science now offers a postbaccalaureate Dr. Kathleen certificate Klueber designed for qualified college graduates who wish to pursue additional coursework in preparation for a career in healthcare including: medicine, physical and occupational therapy, nursing, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other allied health fields. It’s also for students who wish to enhance their credentials in preparation for graduate education or P-12 teaching. Students from Spalding’s College of Health and Natural Sciences will be a major part of the educational component of Body Worlds, an extraordinary human anatomical exhibition at the Kentucky Science Center available through May 19th. Come see us!

Dr. Kathleen Klueber Chair, School of Natural Science kklueber@spalding.edu

502-873-4445 Spalding University Spalding.edu Admissions: 502-585-7111

presented by

Networking and careerbuilding opportunities for women around town

BPW- Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Culbertson West 904 E. Main Street New Albany Ann Windell 812.282.9310 BPW- Business & Professional Women- River City Every 2nd Wed. • Noon Lunch and Program noon-1pm The Bristol-Downtown 614 West Main Street 502.499.4420, bpwrc.org bpwreserve@gmail.com CBPW - Christian Business & Professional Women Every Second Thursday (Odd months only) • Noon Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Christine Ward 502.931.2918 cbpweast@gmail.com EWI- Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tues. • 5:30 p.m. Contact for information & reservation Dotty Wettig dw1122@att.com The Heart Link Network Every 1st Wed. • 6:30 p.m. Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Barbara Madore 502.377.8625 40222.theheartlinknetwork.com IAAP- International Association of Administrative ProfessionalsLouisville Every 2nd Thurs. • 6 p.m. Location Varies – See Website for Details. iaap-louisville.org Legal Secretaries of Louisville Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Bristol Bar & Grille 614 West Main Street Alice Harris 502.595.2310 #339 aharris@louisvilleprosecutor.com legalseclou-ky.org MLWPC- Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 4th Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Olmsted Bistro at Masonic Homes 3701 Frankfort Avenue Sherry Conner 502.776.2051 mayorconner@insightbb.com

NAWBO- National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tues. info@nawbolouisville.org nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121 Network Now Every 2nd Fri. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com NIA Women’s Roundtable Every 4th Fri. • 8:30 a.m. NIA Center 2900 West Broadway – 3rd floor Suzanne Carter 502-775-2548 suzannec@morethanconsultants.org Southern Indiana Women’s Networking Group Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30 a.m. Holiday Inn-Lakeview 505 Marriott Drive * Clarksville Email Lisa Stinnett for RSVP: lisa.stinnett@elwoodstaffing.com

[ mé

Great Résu Tip #2

Include important keywords your next employer values. Look for buzzwords in the job description, company website, LinkedIn profiles that match your desired job title, and conference program descriptions.

WIN - Women in Networking V Every 2nd Thurs. • 11:30 a.m. Buca di Beppo 2051 S. Hurstbourne Parkway Lee Ann Lyle 502-836-1422 info@win5networking.com win5networking.com WOAMTEC-Women On A Mission To Earn Commission Every 2nd & 4th Wed. • 11:30a.m. Limestone Restaurant 10001 Forest Green Blvd. Charlene Burke 812.951.3177 woamtec.com Women’s Business Center of KY funded in part by a cooperative agreement with the SBA

WIN- Women in Networking Every 2nd Wed. • 11:15 a.m. Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane WIN- Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30 a.m. Fern Valley Conference Center 2715 Fern Valley Road Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net win3louisville.com

Every 1st Fri. Roundtable • 8:30a.m. Location – TBA Sharron Johnson 502.566.6076 #104 sjohnson@cvcky.org cvcky.org/womensbusiness center.html Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:30 a.m. Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Lynda Minzenberger 502.552.8768 lynda@catalystrealty.net

WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Angela Boggs 502.262.3575 angelaboggs@riterug.com win3louisville.com

ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thurs. • 6 p.m. Logan’s Steakhouse 5005 Shelbyville Road Joyce Seymour 502.553.9241 jespud@bellsouth.net

WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Corner Café 9307 New LaGrange Road Amanda Smith 502.807.1781 info@win4louisville.org

Listings are on per month basis. To list your meeting for free, email your meeting date, time, location, contact phone number and website to advertising@todayspublications.com or call 502.327.8855 ext. 14. Deadline for inclusion in next issue is 2/8.


Q & BeBrave A Do

Interview by Holly Gregor

Your Thing

Photography by Melissa donald

Mary Rounsavall’s Thing: It happened again — that feeling of falling Restoring a Community’s Treasure in love with a place. building the Horticultural Center. The old head house and potting shed are going through restoration now, and a new greenhouse is being built. The renovated buildings are “the guts” of Yew Dell where seedlings will be planted and cuttings taken. They will then be moved into the new greenhouse for propagation and display. Also new and close to Paul Cappiello’s heart — he is an adjunct professor of horticulture at UK — is the apprenticeship program that just got started this year. Yew Dell took a graduating student from the horticultural school and gave him a place to live, a job with pay learning real-life lessons, and valuable contacts.

When I returned after nine years to Yew Dell Botanical Gardens in Crestwood, Ky., I was invited to tour the gardens and have lunch outside on the deck of the Pavilion — and have my questions answered by Mary Rounsavall, president of the Yew Dell Gardens board of directors.

How did you get involved in Yew Dell Gardens?

My garden club had a meeting in 1999 at Klein’s Yew Dell Farm (and nursery, residence, and garden) very shortly after Theodore Klein died and when there were grave questions about its future. I was stunned by what I saw, even in its ruined state (Klein was 93 when he died in 1998). I could see the “bones” of the gardens, the beautiful stone walls, and the Cotswold-style buildings, including a half-scale castle. I knew restoring it was a project I’d like to be involved in if we could ever get it off the ground.

How were you brave?

What made you think you could do this?

I say I have a “used car salesman gene.” I can be persuasive when I’m excited about something, and people seem to respond to it. I’m an eternal optimist with worrywart tendencies — just ask my children. I’m a gardener and previously an artist, so Yew Dell was right up my alley.

Was the restoration a difficult task?

We underestimated the enormity of the project and the amount of money it would take to put Yew Dell back in shape. The property was completely overgrown,

all 33 acres of it, and the buildings were in dire condition. I tell the story of setting out 12 buckets to catch leaks just in the little kitchen of the castle! And since the old farm was in rough shape, it was hard for donors to think our small community group could have the success we knew we could. My husband was supportive, saying, “You are great at taking baby steps.” The funny thing was that the people I thought would be donors were not. It was people who just came out of the woodwork.

What helped you continue despite the challenges?

In the fall of 2002, two things happened that brought us recognition and tremendous momentum. The most important was that Paul Cappiello, who had been working as director of horticulture at Bernheim, came on board part-time as executive director. His is the hand that guides Yew Dell, and we are very grateful for it. Also notable was that the Garden Conservancy, a national preservation organization recognizing

Yew Dell’s potential and the horticultural legacy of Theodore Klein, named Yew Dell as one of its preservation projects. They were a stamp of approval.

What’s next?

Since the last 10 years have focused on rebuilding Yew Dell, the next step is

It wasn’t just me. There was a tiny group of us, including Theodore’s daughter, photographer Marian Klein Koehler. We were passionate but foolhardy; we just knew there was a little jewel in Crestwood that we couldn’t let slip away from us. We owe thanks to a lot of people.

What advice do you have for others?

If you have a chance to make a difference in your community, to provide a resource that wasn’t there, or to save a precious place that would be lost forever, why wouldn’t you do it?

What is Yew Dell Gardens? Theodore Klein took 33 acres of Oldham County farmland in 1941 and transformed it into a successful commercial nursery, collecting more than 1000 specimen trees and shrubs. Klein designed all the gardens as well as his family home and support buildings. His approach was as an artist, down to the very last detail. Yew Dell Gardens recently celebrated 10 years.

Don’t miss Yew Dell’s fabulous plant sale on April 27 and 28. 26

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SUPER+DUOS Healthy Food Pairings You Should Make Story by Gina Roberts-Grey / Photos by Melissa Donald

O

n their own, fruits, veggies, and other foods are healthy. But combining certain foods can enhance

their innate healthfulness so you can take advantage of “food synergy” and boost you and your family’s nutrient

absorption, says Jackie Newgent, dietician, author of Big Green Cookbook, and recreational chef instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education.   These super couples are some of the easiest and tastiest ways to enhance nutrient absorption and effectiveness.  

Tea + lemon Go ahead and guzzle freshly brewed tea to quench a midday thirst, as long as you squeeze a splash of citrus in your glass. Not only does tea deliver a hefty dose of healthful antioxidants to your cells, but a new study says adding a twist of fresh lemon, lime, or orange is a simple and tasty way to turbo-charge the health benefits of tea. “Adding vitamin C to your tea enhances the absorption of catechins, the antioxidants in tea, up to threefold,” says Ann Kulze, M.D., nutritionist and author of Eat Right for Life Cookbook Companion.

Veggies + olive oil Whether you’re grilling, sautéing, or roasting, spritz spinach, tomatoes, green peppers, squash, and dark greens with a dash of a healthy fat to fully leverage all the glorious goodness in your vegetables. “Fat improves flavor and texture, but most importantly, it serves as a vehicle for transporting fat-soluble phytochemicals like lycopene — which helps fight cancer, heart disease, and even wrinkles — from the digestive track into the bloodstream,” Kulze says. “Absorption of the nutrients is enhanced further when heated rather than fresh or uncooked, like tomatoes roasted with olive oil,” Newgent adds. The healthiest fats to pair with your veggies are extra virgin olive oil, canola oil, nuts, seeds, and avocados. PAGe 28

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Strawberries + whole wheat toast The vitamin C in strawberries (and citrus fruits) helps your body better take in the iron in whole wheat toast and other grains. “Vitamin C helps convert iron from a form you can’t use to a form you can,” says Geri Brewster, a registered dietitian and certified nutritionist in Mt. Kisco, NY. “And it needs to be in the latter form to be taken up into the cells of the body.” Another great iron/vitamin C pair, says Brewster, is lean meat served with vitamin C-rich foods such as red peppers or mandarin oranges.

Broccoli + mustard, horseradish, or wasabi A new study shows that a powerful cancer-fighting compound in broccoli is more readily absorbed in the upper part of your digestive system — where it will do the most good — when paired with the enzyme myrosinase, which is found in mustard, horseradish, and wasabi. “Add a splash or dash to your broccoli to kick up its flavor and its cancer-fighting power,” Kulze says.

Spinach + mushrooms Spinach provides calcium, and mushrooms provide vitamin D, says Newgent. “Together, they create a win-win combination for bone health because vitamin D helps with the absorption of calcium.” So it’s a good idea to think of spinach and mushrooms (and other calcium- and vitamin D-containing foods) as a nutritious bone-friendly couple. “They’re a delicious duet for the palate, too,” Newgent says.

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to CHANGE Ready2013

Your Life? story and photos by melissa donald

It’s the 2013 weight loss challenge! Meet the readers chosen for this big challenge as well as the fitness experts leading the charge. Our food provider again this year is Home Cuisine, who is creating three portion-controlled meals Maggie Helton each day. So follow along, get Age: 53 inspired, and take action! height: 5’5” There are many who work at a desk in an office setting, but there are also many who work from a desk at home, which sometimes offers a more flexible schedule in the work day. A flexible schedule is very appealing, but this type of schedule keeps Maggie Helton from establishing routine. “I’ve never been an overweight person, well, not until now,” says Maggie, who is a virtual employee working from her home in New Albany. This sedentary lifestyle combined with menopause is what Maggie feels is the culprit to her weight gain. As we get older and the body changes, many find it harder to lose the weight. A workout routine and guidance from a trainer can make all the difference. Maggie and her husband take walks together, and this March they will be hiking the Grand Canyon. A huge short-term goal for her right now is to build stamina and strength for her Grand Canyon hike. Her other goals are to create an exercise routine she can stick with and run the Anthem 5K.

weight: 160 lbs BMI: 26.6 Waist: 35½” hips: 42½”

trainer:

Allison Hilles, Fitness Instructor at Floyd County YMCA, New Albany ymcasi.org

Food by Home Cuisine — Mae Pike Wallace Avenue in Louisville, KY 502.288.6363 homecuisineonline.com

Meal Provider: Home Cuisine ~ Louisville. Portion controlled, low calorie meal provider: Homecuisineonline.com 30

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Win a

Workout for a Month  

As part of our Ready to Change Your Life, we are giving our readers an opportunity to jump in and try some of what our participants are doing for their exercise and food plan program. This month, you can win a month of Jazzercise from February 18-March 15 at the Jazzercise Middletown Fitness Center location only. To win, enter online at TodaysWomanNow.com

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to CHANGE Ready2013

Your Life? Lizzet Verdi Age: 38 height: 5’4” weight: 182 lbs BMI: 31.5 Waist: 377/8” hips: 44½”

trainer: Dave

Randolph, Owner and Instructor at Iron Body Fitness, Louisville iron-body.com

Susan Barry

For many of us, a huge motivator for losing weight and adapting to a healthier lifestyle is a loved one, and Lizzet Verdi has found her motivation: her 4 year-old daughter for whom wants to set a good example. While she was pregnant, Lizzet had gestational diabetes, and the risks of developing type II diabetes are very high, which scares her. She also suffers from high blood pressure. Lizzet has come close to acheiving her weight loss goals, but for some reason she always “falls off the weight-loss wagon.” Lizzet’s goals are to make permanent, healthy lifestyle changes for herself and for her family.

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Age: 46 height: 5’3½” weight: 170 lbs BMI: 28.6 Waist: 42” hips: 44¾”

trainer: Maria Bernard, Fitness Director at Baptist East/Milestone Wellness Center, Louisville, KY Baptistmilestone.com

Over the last seven years, Susan Barry has gained more than 30 pounds. Ten were gained just in the past year. “At 5-foot-three-and-a-half there are not many places to hide this much weight. It has also taken a toll on my energy level and self-esteem,” Susan says. Susan, a single mother of two, finds that it’s time to make healthy changes in her life. The next step for Susan is to become stronger and healthier so she can be fully prepared for the next adventure life has for her. Susan’s short-term goal is to drop three sizes in three months. It’s an ambitous goal and one she is up for. She too wants to make permanent, healthy lifestyle choices.

Today’s Woman


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WellnessWatch

by Jessica smiTh

PhoTo: melissa donald

Kentucky

1 2

Kasey (l) trains with Alison once a week and works out at least four other days a week.

Brain injury survivor tackles her health limitations

I

able to sit up or walk or talk again. n 2002, Kasey Whisman was told I always look to that as something she would probably never walk that pushes me forward.” or talk again. The 17-year-old had After her accident, Kasey went received a traumatic brain injury through 11 surgeries and eight in an accident, and her hopes of months of therapy. Once she was college, or even of being able to sit back on her feet — a miraculous acup on her own, were dashed. She complishment in itself — she knew was also overweight, something she had to tackle she’d battled as her weight. She’s long as she could since lost more remember. than 115 pounds. A decade later, “One of the Kasey is happy, things that helped healthy, and me initially was excited about keeping a food her upcoming journal,” Kasey wedding on St. says. “Everything Patrick’s Day. She that went into my works with trainer nt in 2002 mouth, I wrote Alison Cardoza Kasey after her accide down the calories once a week at for. Also, having a partner Milestone Wellness Center, tracks her eating habits, and or somebody like Alison who can shares her story with her patients as keep you motivated to work out — that’s half of it right there. an occupational therapist at Norton “Limitations that you’re told you Hospital. Last year, she even ran a may have — there are other ways 5K race with the Brain Injury Allito go about doing something. Don’t ance of Kentucky. She’s planning to ever be told you can’t do something, do it again this year. because even if you can’t do it one “I’ve learned to never give up and way, there are 10,000 other ways say you can’t do anything,”Kasey you can do it.” n says.“I was told I would never be

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The Epilepsy Foundation of Kentucky is trying

to secure 900 applications needed by the DMV to make a specialty license plate for epilepsy research. Order a plate and help a local cause by going to goo.gl/G6jn9.

Pe arl s + p ump s

5

6 a disturbing report last month by the center for disease control and Prevention found that about one in eight women — and one in five high school girls — report binge drinking, consuming an average of six drinks per binge about three times a month.

What: a spring fashion show featuring local models and vendors and benefitting the women’s cancer program at Baptist Health When: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 9

Where: The Olmsted Cost: $60, baptisthospitalfoundation.org or 502.896.7704

extras: hors d’oeuvres, signature cocktails, and prize packages up for grabs

Today’s Today’sWoman Woman


Q& A

Have you ever ignored health problems?

Tamella Cassis, M.D., Dermatologist

We physicians are notorious for ignoring our own health. I have ignored a few symptoms because I felt I was too busy to take time to go see my doctor. Once I started verbally complaining about my symptoms, my husband quickly reminded me that I couldn’t help my patients if I were dead!

I will ignore colds at first and hope they don’t progress. If it gets too bad and my symptoms progress to symptoms of infection, then I will usually Allison Collins drag myself, reluctantly, Young, licensed to the doctor. It works massage about half the time. I do therapist know a lot of people who rush to the doctor for anxieties when I personally feel that they might fare better at seeking help with emotional therapies and learning coping mechanisms instead of relying on medications. Read more of our advisory group’s answers at TodaysWomanNow.com.

L isten Up! Tune into 93.9 FM on Saturdays at 11 a.m. for the Painless Living Show with Louisville’s own Dr. Michael Cassaro. You can call in with health questions and learn practical treatment advice for chronic pain. > 888.440.4442 painlesslivingradio.com todayswomannow.com todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

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Why Are We So Miserable? by Bob Mueller

Everyone wants to be happy and fulfilled. So why are so many folks miserable most of the time? The reason is we get caught up in our more money) can bring us temporary highs outside world and lose track of who we are on that usually flatten out after a short time. the inside. Tragedy or loss can put us at an all-time low Geographic escape doesn’t help us find for a while, but eventually our mood rises ourselves. Our inner selves are not waiting on back to normal. Regardless of highs and some faraway street corner for our bodies to lows, most of us keep going back to a catch up. We simply pack up old habits and baseline of happiness. carry them like luggage wherever we go. The So, if we keep returning to a certain surroundings are different, but our responses baseline regardless of our life conditions, what are the same. If we wake up feeling positive determines our level of happiness? The and optimistic in Louisville, we wake up answer is internal conditions, which keep us feeling positive and optimistic in New York. steady in a sea of ups and downs and carry us If we wake up to anxiety and for the long haul. pessimism in Louisville, we I’ll never forget a man I met wake up to anxiety and who, at a young age, had Happiness and pessimism in Hawaii. The grass contracted HIV. Devastated at self-confidence is not greener in another place. the news, the young man spent a are not byThose of us who feel year getting over the shock and incomplete and empty often look disbelief. However, by taking the products of life outside ourselves to correct bad opportunity to explore circumstances. habits or fill an inner void. Many spirituality for the first time, he They are of us seek confidence through found his life transformed in by-products of accolades, overloading ourselves positive ways. He seemed to with projects, deadlines, and our state of mind. appreciate everyday things more busy activities. Or we use and to get more out of each day alcohol, unhealthy relationships, than ever before, and he felt food, and possessions to build confidence. We happier than he had before the diagnosis. become enslaved by greed, competition, When misfortune hit, this man afflicted with power, wealth, and material gain, thinking HIV refused to become a victim, turning his they are answers to our problems. We search obstacle into an opportunity to become an frantically for purpose through jobs, active participant in life rather than a passive relationships, drugs, cars, or big homes. We recipient of what life doled out. expect our careers, children, love interests, or I also remember a woman who lived four Oprah to give us the answers. We rearrange years with lung cancer who decided that, our furniture, change jobs, divorce and regardless of how many days she had left, remarry, establish new friendships, buy a new she’d live as large as possible. She didn’t hold wardrobe, change our hair color, build a new anything back. She fully embraced her house, have children — all in an effort to lead feelings, hugging whomever she felt like a totally self-actualized life. hugging, forging bonds with people unlike Scientists and spiritual leaders agree on any she had ever forged before. She adopted few things, but they do agree that material her own dress code, expressed her opinions things don’t buy confidence. The studies on freely, spoke out on important issues, and happiness show that wealth, marital status, stood her ground even when it went against age, beauty, and other external variables do the grain. The people around her admired this not make people any happier or more uncharacteristic side of her. confident — even though most people think We must find our inner life, make free they will. Physically attractive people aren’t choices, and learn to take responsibility for happier, and people with disabilities aren’t our life conditions. With the mindset of a more miserable. Happiness and selfsurvivor, instead of a victim, we can surrender confidence are not by-products of life to situations over which we had no control. circumstances. They are by-products of our We can move out of our life what we do not state of mind — the way in which we want and make room for what we really do experience our lot in life. want. Our whole life can change by living it Material gain (a new house, a new car, or inside out. Bob Mueller is Senior Director of Mission & Stewardship at Hosparus, the community hospices of Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Central Kentucky. He has three books available: Look Forward Hopefully, The Gentle Art of Caring, and his latest, Create a Better World. Find Bob online at bobmueller.org and email him at bobmueller@insightbb.com.

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Cozy Dining

Story and Photos by Melissa Donald

La Coop Bistro

The interior is cozy and the décor is oh so French. Located on the ground level of the Green Building, La Coop offers modernized, French classics with an added southern touch. Despite the small interior, you find several different seating options, which offer very different dining experiences. From a high-top table in the bar area, to bar seating, a counter with an appropriately fleur de lis decorated divider, allows one to be close to the kitchen. There’s window seating and half-booth options, as well. Light fixtures replicating French bird cages cover the overhead lights, and the simple yet elegant window treatments add a French feel.

The Food

Left: Vegetable-stuffed eggplant with gruyére cheese.

La Coop Bistro 732 E Market St Louisville 502.410.2888. Coopbistro.com 38

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You’ll find Chef Bobby Benjamin’s version of coq au vin (chicken in wine), a classic French favorite, beautifully executed with a hint of southern flare. If you like pork, choose the lard de maison: A pork belly served over sweet potato mash and gravy. The pork belly is a labor of love, and is processed in-house for approximately 15 days before serving. The pork is first cured for 7-10 days and then braised for 72 hours. The outcome is delicious. The edges are slightly crisp, and each bite melts in your mouth. When combined with the sweet potato mash and gravy, you have one fantastic starter. For the vegetarians, the vegetable-stuffed eggplant with gruyére cheese is a Chef Benjamin creation inspired by the French technique called en papillote. This technique involves cooking, typically fish, in parchment paper. This eggplant dish is not cooked in paper, but instead is cooked in a cast iron dish with a thin filo dough crust on top. For dessert, one of their more popular items is the bananas foster topped with bourbon barrel ice cream. Most dishes are cooked and served in small, cast iron ware. A nice touch that adds a French, country feel. On February 11, La Coop is going Italian for one night. Find details online.

HOURS OF OPERATION: Tuesday-Thursday: (bar opens at 5pm); Dinner: 5:3010:30pm | Friday and Saturday: (bar opens at 5pm); Dinner: 5:30-11:30
pm | Closed Sunday and Monday Today’s Woman


The New Albany Exchange

Now in their new location in downtown New Albany, this gastro pub has a rotating menu of American and seasonal fare. Once inside The New Albany Exchange, enjoy a high-end culinary experience in a casual, laid back setting. This newly-renovated interior has exposed brick walls and steel ceiling supports, creating an industrial and rustic blend of old and new. The main dining area offers a view of the open kitchen and bar. The wood top tables offer a warm, rustic welcome, and each table is adorned with a vase of small tree branches.

The Food

Items such as the Seared Salmon (shown below) with a Parmesan risotto, tangerine/vanilla beurre blanc, mushroom ragout, and green beans can be found on the menu. Chef Rick Adams puts together a cheese board that presents three local cheeses from farms including Capriole Farms and Kenny’s Cheese. Owner Ian Hall includes as many local and regional ingredients as he can get in season. Falling in line with their pub atmosphere, The Exchange also pulls from Indiana and Kentuckiana craft beer breweries, such as BBC, New Albanian, Flat 12, and 3 Floyds. They offer 12 rotating taps and 12-15 bottle rotations as well. The dessert should not be ignored. Check out their éclair. This classic and alltime favorite cream puff pastry is topped with chocolate and served with a dollop of whipped cream and fresh strawberries.

Left: The Seared Salmon with a Parmesan risotto, tangerine/ vanilla beurre blanc, mushroom ragout, and green beans. PAGe 38

The New Albany Exchange 118 W. Main New Albany, Ind. 812.948.6501 newalbanyexchange.com todayswomannow.com

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>

HOURS OF OPERATION: Lunch:
Monday-Friday, 11am-2pm | Dinner:
Monday-Thursday, 5-10pm | Friday and Saturday, 5-11pm. 2013

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CozyDining

Annie May’s Sweet Café

Just like its name, this place is so sweet and so cozy, and…it’s a gluten-free zone! When she was young, Annie May McGill envisioned opening a café very much like the way this space is laid out. The checkerboard floor was part of her vision. In the front corner of the café is a game center, where the young at heart can pull out a board game or two. From Bananagrams to Candy Land, Annie has some fun options that will keep you entertained and wanting more of her delicious baked goods.

The Food

After learning about her own food allergies, co-owner Annie McGill created gluten-free baked goods to taste as close to items that include gluten. With co-owner Kenna Nelson, a Sullivan Culinary school graduate, the two of

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them have created fantastic allergen-free baked goods and dishes. Everything is always gluten, peanut, and tree-nut free. Seventy percent of their business is based on special orders. Cakes, sourdough bread, baguettes, dinner rolls, sandwich buns are items many people order and pick up. They create the gluten-free baked goods from their own special flour blend that they mill on site. Consisting of five ingredients, three grains are milled in house, and then combined with two other flours to create the perfect Annie May flour blend. Check out their lunch options. Build your own sandwich or order a pizza. They also offer breakfast.

The red velvet cheese cake is to die for! Yes, the crust is gluten-free. The super cookie is available dairy free with a chocolate center rather than a cream cheese filling. The dairy-free, gluten-free brownie is well done. Have it warmed slightly to melt the chocolate ganche interior.

Annie May’s Sweet Café 3110 Frankfort Ave. Louisville 502.384.2667 anniemayssweetcafe.com

Tuesday-Thursday, 10am-6pm | Friday, 10am-8pm | Saturday, 9am-5pm | Sunday/Monday, Closed

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IAmTodaysWoman.com becomes

inspire

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TodaysWomanNow.com Here’s an idea of what you’ll find online this month: We Love Giving You Stuff! Every Thursday, we’re giving away something we know you’ll want. Here are this month’s prizes on TodaysWomanNow.com: ~ A $100 gift card from Olivia & Co. ~ A $100 gift card from Radiant Skin ~ A $100 gift card from Sassy Fox ~ Performance pillows, gelinfused memory foam, latex or down from Bowles Mattress

What They Said Read comments from our wellness advisory group about decisions they’re making to live a healthier life.

Be Fashionable Every Day You can do it. Style expert Erin Fust will update you on the essentials you should have in your closet.

Back to Basics Did you know you could grow a garden in the winter? Shawn Neal will show you how to cut out the excessiveness to make your life comfortable and simple.

Set the Mood for Dining Choose the restaurant you want to eat in based on the type of atmosphere you like. Look for Melissa Donald’s top picks of local places that fit you.

Getting Real about Relationships Make Your Days Better Sometimes a little change is all you need to be your best. Check out our Inspiration Monday post for ideas on getting started.

sa

Do

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Veronica Douglas gives you a peek into her life as a single girl and the dating mishaps she can’t seem to escape.

M by to Pho

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Passions

:: mm mm

In relationships play community Single? Have fun with this group!

photo: Patti Hartog

Kimberly Greenwell and Cindi Gilpin, both local single sisters, started Single Mingle and are hosting the first event the weekend before Valentine’s Day. “If you have taken one of my networking seminars, you will hear me say a thousand times you need to surround yourself with your target market,” Kimberly says. “Well, if you are single and you want to meet someone, then you need to surround yourself with other singles. So, I am creating an opportunity for people to do just that.”

Kim Boyle and her fuzzy friend.

All Bark ~ No Bite By Ilyse McCormick

Just Ask Joyce

local is a way of life, and the dog culture Kim Boyle opened up Barkstown Road in is abundant. March of 2012, and she hasn’t questioned her Barkstown Road carries as many decision to become a small business owner American-made and locally made products since. Boyle’s intense love for dogs and a as possible. All the store’s dog and cat food passion for bettering their lives and the lives is either American-made or made of their owners, caused her Barkstown Road by an ethical source in Canada. Pet to leave graduate school in is located at 1045 Bardstown food products in the shop are FDAChicago and move back to Road in the Highlands. approved as human grade, as well her hometown of Louisville Barkstownroad.com as a variety of foods for pets with a to open Barkstown Road. sensitive stomach or any dietary restrictions. Our community’s furry residents couldn’t be happier with Barkstown Road, which is located Not only can you buy high-quality food for in the heart of the Highland neighborhood and your beloved pet at Barkstown Road, but you can pick up something to spoil them as well. thriving in a community where shopping

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Q:

Single Mingle Louisville’s first event is February 9 from 7-9 p.m. at The Melting Pot, 2405 S. Hurstbourne Parkway. Cost: $50. Reservations at singleminglelou.com (but walk-ins welcome).

14%

– The percent of women who send themselves flowers on Valentine’s Day

“How do I know if someone really loves me, and if I love him?

I’ve been in a relationship for two years. He seems sincere, but I’m just not sure if it’s really love that we feel for one another. My parents divorced when I was 12; his parents divorced when he was 7. We both feel a little uncertain about any kind of big commitment. He wants to move in, but that feels “big” to me. We’re very comfortable around each other, but how do I know if it’s really love?”

Find the A: at TodaysWomanNow.com. Today’s Woman


s g n i n e p p a H

HOT

what’s going on in the month of February.

by tiffany white

Be a sweetheart to your heart

close

Where ~ Frazier

International History Museum tickets ~ Adults $10.50, Children (5-14) $6, Seniors $8.50 contact ~ 502.753.5663, fraziermuseum.org

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Looking for Lilith Theatre Company

Alice Austen (18661952) was born into a world that was just discovering photography, and from the age of 10, Austen took thousands of photographs during her lifetime. The play juxtaposes Alice’s love of photography and relationship with dance teacher Gertrude Tate with the 20thcentury rediscovery of her work by publisher Oliver Jensen as he prepares his book, American Women in Revolt, which intermingles characters from different time periods. Paralleling the powerful true story, the play captures the highs and lows of Alice’s life and love as her well-to-do Staten Island family is ruined by the Depression. When ~ Feb. 28, March 1, 2, 7,

8, and 9 @ 7:30 p.m. March 9 @ 2 p.m.  ex Theater @ Where ~ M Kentucky Center tickets ~ $18 adults, $15 students and seniors contact ~ t he box office, 502.584.7777,

kentuckycenter.org

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— Gioia Patton

Live it up

Whether it’s you and your guy or girlfriends, you’re guaranteed to have a fun time at A Slice of Life. Samples will be available from local restaurants, wineries, and distilleries. You can also purchase a gift certificate from their silent auction. Proceeds benefit local ovarian cancer programs.

When ~ Feb. 7, 5-7 p.m.

Where ~ The Kentucky

Center for African American Heritage tickets ~ Free contact ~ 502.583.4100, kccaah.org

The Who: Quadrophenia and More tour

When ~ Feb. 8 @ 6:30 p.m. Where ~ Clifton Center

tickets ~ $50 in advance;

$60 at the door

contact ~ 502.500.3368

A special treat for caregivers

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When ~ Feb. 2-June 16

Alice in Black and White

Treat the most vital organ in your body with care at The Heart Healthy Happy Hour. Snack on nutritious foods including dark chocolates from Cellar Door, sip some wine, and watch a cooking demonstration.

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It’s the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and in recognition of the milestone, the Frazier International History Museum will be showcasing “Spirits of Passage,” an exhibition chronicling the events of the slave trade. The exhibit includes authentic artifacts from a sunken slave ship.

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m History up

Our sister publication, Today’s Transitions, will be announcing their Caregiver of the Year Award winner at Chocolate Dreams, an annual event hosted by GuardiaCare. Find out who won and sample tons of delicious chocolate desserts from some of the best chefs in town. When ~ Feb. 11 @ 6 p.m. Where ~ Louisville

Marriott East tickets ~ $62.50 contact ~ Guardiacare.org

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2013 marks this legendary rock band’s first North American tour in four years, which consists of their 1973 iconic double-album Quadrophenia (performed in its entirety) and a selection of Who classics. Quadrophenia was the British band’s second rock opera and raised the bar for rock albums as an art form. IGN placed Quadrophenia at #1 on its list of the greatest classic rock albums of all time. When ~ Feb. 16 @ 7:30 p.m.

Where ~ K FC Yum! Center tickets ~ $36.50-$124.50 contact ~ t he box office,

aeglive.com, Ticketmaster outlets, 1.800.745.3000

— Gioia Patton

Today’s Woman


m Joseph and

m

CenterStage

Have a good time

the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

After nine years of patrons requesting CenterStage to“bring back Joseph!”since its sold-out run in 2004, the biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors returns to vibrant life in this delightful musical. Set to a cornucopia of musical styles, from countrywestern and calypso to bubble-gum pop and rock ‘n’ roll, this Old Testament tale emerges both timely and timeless.

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When ~ Feb. 21-March 3,

Chris Botti

One of the world’s topselling instrumental artists, trumpeter Chris Botti, is also a talented composer and charismatic performer. I first became aware of Botti more than 10 years ago when he was in concert at the Louisville Palace as part of Sting’s band. Since the release of his 2004 album When I Fall in Love, he has become the topselling American jazz instrumentalist. Over the past three decades, Botti has recorded with Frank Sinatra, Sting, Michael Bublé, and Joni Mitchell, to name a few. I’ve been to every Louisville tour he’s had to date (four) because Botti manages to stretch himself artistically every time.

various performances Where ~ Jewish Community Center tickets ~ $18 in advance, $20 at the door  02.459.0660, contact ~ 5 centerstagejcc.org — Gioia Patton

Sing and snap your fingers at the Soulful Sounds of Derbytown concert series presented by The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage. Proceeds from the event will go toward completing the center’s interior and establishing educational programs. When ~ Feb. 24 @ 7 p.m.

Where ~ Kentucky Center

for African American Heritage tickets ~ $25 in advance or $35 at the door contact ~ kcaah.org

Little Shop of Horrors

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Derby Dinner Playhouse

Imagine a horror rock musical about a hapless floral shop worker named Seymour who raises a plant that grows so enormous it feeds on human flesh. With music in the style of early 1960s rock ‘n’ roll, doo-wop, and Motown, the popular 1986 movie musical (starring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin) is based on the show. Watch as the R&Bsinging carnivore plant offers Seymour fame in exchange for feeding its growing appetite. When ~ Feb. 19-March 30,

various performances

Where ~ Derby Dinner

Playhouse

tickets ~ $35-$44

contact ~ 812.288.8281,

derbydinner.com — Gioia Patton

When ~ Feb. 24 @ 7 p.m.

Where ~ Brown Theatre tickets ~ Starting at $35  entucky Center contact ~ K

box office, 502.584.7777, kentuckycenter.org — Gioia Patton

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a F ll in By Kimberly Crum / Illustration by Silvia Cabib

M

g

y broken ankle was a small thing relative to current events. Even as I crashed to the ground, burning lava was consuming a city in the Congo. My fracture did not approach the status of that event, yet it was similar in one way. The injury reminded me of my vulnerability in a world where random events happen. I was walking down the street while on a winter vacation in Deer Valley, Utah, when I slipped on a patch of ice, flew into the air, and landed on the unforgiving concrete. Cursing in an uncharacteristic manner, I tried to stand. My ankle crumbled beneath me, and I fell to the concrete once more. Stunned, scared, and alone, I crawled into our rental condo, then cradled my swelling extremity, mumbling to myself all the while. “Oh, my God. Help me. Help me.” ***** I had not wanted to go on this vacation. “I’m too busy,” I’d told my husband. “I can’t be away right now.” He insisted, saying, “This will be good for our family.” “I don’t want to ski.” “You do not have to ski.” “Remember our last trip out West?” 48

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Today’s Woman


I am not superstitious. But my daughter’s Colorado horseback riding accident, four years previous, had changed me (and her). Accidents in my family seemed to happen in the West. “You can’t let that incident rule your life.” Instead of skiing, I planned to attend the Sundance Film Festival. I would wait shoulder-to-shoulder with the intelligentsia to see artsy film noir and catch a glimpse of Robert Redford, the founder of the fest. “This will give me something to write about,” I thought. “A travelogue.” To boost my enthusiasm for the vacation, I shopped. I bought a satin skirt, a black coat with a natural fur collar, an Audrey Hepburn hat, new blue jeans, and a fisherman’s sweater. I sent my children and husband out for ski wear and sturdy shoes with steel-radial tread. No new shoes for me. Robert Redford would not be looking at my shoes.

***** Salt Lake City was clothed in darkness when we arrived. We drove below a star-spangled sky flanked by puffy white clouds. “Where are the mountains?” the girls asked from the back seat. At first glance, what looked like clouds turned out to be snow on the rocky peaks. Our ears popped as our rental car climbed toward our Deer Valley destination, 8,100 feet above sea level , a winter wonderland famous for its abundant snow, well-groomed ski slopes, fine dining, and the 2002 Olympic Park. The Valley glittered with white lights on evergreens and chalets that outshined the stars in the sky. We checked into the condominium and started a fire in the hearth that quickly crackled a warm welcome. Early the next afternoon, the girls clicked their boots into the bindings of their rented skis and posed in positions resembling travel posters: bent at the knees, poles up and behind their hips, polarized sunglasses pointed ahead. My camera snapped their enthusiasm against the backdrop of bright snow-lit ski runs bordered by neat rows of evergreens. Smiling, ruddy-cheeked skiers looking like catalogue models for LL Bean whooshed to a stop only 10 feet away. I left my family with a ski instructor and two final words: “Be careful.” Forty-five minutes later, I was a medical emergency.

***** The ambulance followed the ascending and descending curves of the mountains. I watched the mountains move through the back window. The chair lifts crawled slowly above steep slopes loaded with people whose skis dangled in front of them. I wondered how the world continued unchanged as I lay terrified in a moving ambulance. My pain did not halt the skiers’ pleasure; the mountain beauty ignored my suffering. My tree had fallen in the woods, and no one had heard it. My husband did not have his cellphone. No one except the EMT and God knew where I was.

***** “So, how did we hurt our ankle?” the nurse at the emergency center asked. “We fell on the street, and then we crawled into the condo,” I replied. Lucky for me, the nurse laughed. Stacy was to be in charge of my comfort for the next three hours. As I lay under the florescent lights of my curtained cell in Snow Creek Emergency Center, I felt the sting of fear, said a quiet prayer, had a good cry, then began joking with the staff. Levity for me is like whistling in the dark. “Hey, I had wanted to go to the spa. Maybe this is my spa todayswomannow.com

experience,” I said as Stacy prepared a morphine injection. “Ever have any trouble finding a vein before?” Stacy asked, readjusting the tourniquet in hopes that an IV site would pop up to greet her.

***** That night, immobilized by a splint and numbed by narcotics, I lay on the couch with my ankle immobilized and elevated and watched my husband and daughters prepare the family meal. They were three doing the job of one – slowly, awkwardly, but doing it nonetheless. “How long does a baked potato take, anyhow?” “This thing is hard as a rock.” “How much salt in the mushrooms?” “Just dump some in.” “Napkins?” “I have no idea.” My younger daughter, Liz, stood back to survey the table setting — forks on the right, knives on the left. Something was missing. She grabbed a large candle and proudly struck a match to light it. From start to finish, and with minimal input from the drugged homemaker, my family had prepared a meal. I was proud and disappointed — proud because of the family unity their effort represented; disappointed because I no longer felt indispensable.

***** My bilateral fracture required surgery — an Open Reduction and Internal Fixation. In other words, they opened my ankle on both sides, reassembled the bones like a Chinese puzzle, and screwed them in place. When an orthopedic surgeon says he will use “hardware,” he means hardware. The post-surgical X-rays looked like a Home Depot project: a tidy line of five screws on one side and a plate with two screws on the other. From then on, I would always be a person of flesh, bone, blood, and steel.

***** Among the reasons for my fall were jet lag, bad shoes, walking too fast for conditions, and fate. Mr. Destiny had fated my injury, in spite of my decision not to ski. Why, I thought, must I repeat the vulnerability lesson again? Like a naughty child who must write on the chalkboard 100 times, “I am not in control.” Who is in charge here? I had asked this question several times before — when my 10-year-old daughter lay in an intensive care unit in Denver and again when my parents died of cancer within six months of each other. I lost my illusion of control in the Colorado Rockies when I watched Susanna fall from her horse as it reared and then tumbled onto her soft abdomen.

**** Who is in charge here? Is misfortune a deliberate message from God or simply a random event? Is there such a thing as destiny? How does one cope with the fact of vulnerability? Mine is not a cause-and-effect God, sitting on a gilded throne and pointing a manicured finger toward me as I walk innocently enough along the slippery streets of life. Random events happen. Hardship can be a gift. Vulnerability makes prayer necessary. God greets my prayerful response with comfort, and if I am lucky, I fall into a state of grace and contentment until I deceive myself into believing I am in control again. I am Alice falling down the rabbit hole. Part of the way down, I forget to be afraid and become merely curious, while strange images whirl around me as I plummet to Wonderland.

/ facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

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BeFOre YOUGo

By Tiffany WhitE / Photos by Melissa Donald

Safiyyah Rasool Age: 32 Job: Owner/Choreographer, Safiyyah Dance lives in: Hikes Point Dancing to a hip-hop song turns an ordinary day into something far more special for Safiyyah Rasool, who has been dancing since age 5. “Dancing makes me feel extremely happy,” she says. “It is almost like a disease or sickness if you have a passion for it, because you relate to it so much whether you are happy, sad, or mad.” Safiyyah is satisfying her healthy addiction through Safiyyah Dance, a dance studio she and her partner Venus Ludlow opened four months ago in Lyndon (8007 Vine Crest Ave., Ste. 2). They specialize in hip-hop but also teach ballet fusion (a combination of hip-hop and ballet), breakdancing, jazz, modern, and contemporary dance. Safiyyah says she likes to keep her students on their toes by giving them a challenge after they’ve built up their confidence. Fashion I’m Wearing: “I wear a lot of designer dance clothes from Threader, Wild Child Nation, and Urban Empire. I also wear clothes from Forever 21.” Moisturizer I’m Loving: “I love Oil of Olay Body Lotion and their body wash. I dab a little of the Nivea lotion on my face.” Latest Purchase I’m Praising:

“My studio purchase. I used my own money to get the studio. I am really fortunate.”

Before I Go...“I take my daily vitamin, and I always make sure I have on some Egyptian Musk perfume. I put my two dogs, Sophie and LeRoy, in their crates, otherwise they would tear up everything. And I thank God for what I have.”

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Today’s Woman


Today's Woman February 2013  

Improve Your Relationship! Oh, relationships are complicated, and the relationship a woman has with herself may be the most confusing. This...

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