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February 2011

P o w e r

l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Love& Business

When married people work together

Drop Pounds! Find

Four Women Reveal their Weight Goals

LOVE After 30

Heart Check Your


February 2011 articles

Contents

*Online issue pagination differs from printed issue

Power I am Today’s Woman Because… 10 By Lucy Pritchett

About This Issue By Anita Oldham

On Our Cover

Take Five: How Do Relationships Affect Your Life? 12

6

8

By Anita Oldham

By JENNIFER THOMPSON

Love and Business: Romance at

32

Work 14

by Megan Seckman Survival Skills: Thrive in Your

Workplace

26

16

by Jennifer Thompson

Finding Love After 30

18

by Kyle ShephErd

Arts Insider Must-See: Kathleen Madigan: Hey, (Funny) Lady 22 by Gioia Patton

19 Things

23

By Anita Oldham

STYLE Her 13 Inspirations

26

By Holly Gregor

Catch Sight of the Beautiful

28

By Barbara MacDonald

I Love My…32

By Lucy Pritchett

WELLNESS Ready to Change Your Life?

34

by Melissa Donald Healthy Woman: If Winter Gets You Down 36 by Cheryl Stuck

CONNECTIONS

34

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2011

Go Red For Women su p p l em en t

4 Things Not To Miss 38

by Jennifer Thompson and Gioia Patton

Real or Fake 42 by Tiffany White

Heart Supplement Breaking News H-3 by Jennifer Thompson

It’s News to Me H-4 by Jennifer Thompson

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BREAKING NEWS: Your heart could be in danger! Know the signs to watch for…

Go Red Executive Leadership Team H-12 Sorghum Roasted Squash Salad H-18 by Melissa Donald

Know Your Numbers H-20

sponsored by

by Jennifer Thompson

after page 22

Circle of Red Society H-26 Keeping Your Kids’ Hearts Healthy H-28 by Lisa Hurt Kozarovich

CLICK HERE to Read these special online-only articles:

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(At the end of our regular issue) February

2011

• Gioia’s Not to Miss events • Caitlin Gaynor’s Dating Dilemmas

Wearing Your Heart on Your Card H-30 by GIOIA PATTON Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

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About This Issue

Relationships

Relationships are intriguing.

They can start out friendly and end up romantically. Sometimes the new person we meet and make the snap judgment that we could never be friends with ends up becoming a bosom buddy. We work so hard to keep some relationships going and find others practically fall into our laps. Whether they are friendships or romantic, relationships help us to figure out who we are and expand our knowledge of ourselves.   For example, our very own Cathy Zion met her husband Earl when they worked together at a Louisville bank. It was definitely not love at first sight, but they have been married for 22 years. When Cathy bought Today’s Woman, Earl came along as a partner and circulation manager. I don’t think he has gotten a promotion for the last 13 years, but he keeps receiving ”employee of the year,” so he definitely leverages his relationship with the boss.     Sometimes friendships just need a few minutes of connection. Contributing Editor Lucy Pritchett was talking about a new friend she made during the last few minutes of a plane trip from Savannah to Louisville. They recently met for coffee and cake to compare trips to Paris and found they had many things in common including traveling, reading, and shopping.   The moral is, keep your heart open. — Anita Oldham

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Today’s Woman


Volume 21 8 Number 2

Some staff thoughts about the best gifts from loved ones…

COntributing EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion

EDITOR Anita Oldham

publisher@todayspublications.com

editor@todayspublications.com

Cover

Round trip airfare to visit my son, Paul, his wife Lisa and Ella, 3, and Ava, 9 months. Miss them!

On Our

Editorial assistant Jennifer Thompson

account executive Helen Ratterman helen@todayspublications.com

jennifer@todayspublications.com

o

Assistant EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com

SenioR Advertising Designer April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

A framed December 1999 Today’s Woman cover, which I was on, with a poem from a best friend.

SenioR page & Graphic Designer Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Kathy Kulwicki

Makeup artist Holly Oyler

SALES DIRECTOR Cheryl Suhr

account executive Teri Hickerson

cheryl@todayspublications.com

teri@todayspublications.com

I love the rectangular serving platter with a handpainted chickadee perched on a branch selected by my oldest niece, 7, who has an innate sense of gift-giving.

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com

kathyk@todayspublications.com

Circulation Manager W. Earl Zion

OFFICE MANAGER Julie Mayberry julie@todayspublications.com

STYLIST Wendy Anguiano wendy@todayspublications.com

J

enna Evers and Thomas Evers run Thorpe Wood Works, a woodworking company specializing in custom-crafted furniture and cutting boards. This married couple lives directly above the shop, have two small children, and…they still look very happy! Meet three couples who live and work together and learn how they are doing it (page 12).

writer/photographer Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com

IT Support Provided by Skye Technologies 8 www.skyetechnologies.com

For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call (502) 327-8855. Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 www.iamtodayswoman.com

o

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues.

BBB Rating of

Photo by Melissa Donald.

Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2011 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

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Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

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CHRISTIE MUELLER

~

I like things to be done the right way ”

founder of CLM Business Etiquette Consulting, Austin, Texas, and Louisville.

AGE: 26

by Lucy M. Pritchett / Photo: Melissa donald

Where she learned to do things the right way: I had intensive training at the Protocol School of Washington in Washington, D.C. It was my graduate school. I also learned from my father to shake hands and look people in the eye. From my mother I learned to take small bites.

On doing business in Austin: In Austin, it is more about the person than the suit. Business is personal there. Are you a good businessman/woman? Can I rely on you?

On doing business in Louisville: There is more formality here.

What she did in Washington:

Worked for Senator Mitch McConnell and the Republican Governors Association.

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On attending social events:

Never leave your house unless you are in a mood to see people. Asking “how are you” is not rhetorical. Pause for an answer. Ask about others. And don’t limit yourself to talking to one person in the room.

The handshake:

Never be afraid to introduce yourself. As a woman, always extend your hand for a handshake. It shows confidence and leaves a positive first impression. The handshake should be palm to palm. Don’t shake fingers.

On cell phones:

Don’t talk on yours in someone else’s presence at a meal. I tell people, your cell phone is not invited to lunch. This goes for texting as well.

What to wear:

Austin is very laid back. When I worked in D.C., I had black, navy, and gray suits. In Austin, I wear skirts and sweaters. You have to adjust to your audience. There is a sense of pride in looking put together. I am usually overdressed, and I like it. But most of my pearls stay in Louisville.

Best thing in Austin: The breakfast taco. A small flour tortilla filled with scrambled eggs, peppers and onions, cheese and red or green hot salsa. It is God’s gift to Texas.

Can’t have too much of: Stationery. Just put my initials on some sort of paper and I am happy.

photo taken at Dover House

I am Today’s Woman

Pet peeve:

People who shovel their food. The fork becomes the focus of my attention — is that huge bite going to make it to your mouth?

Never goes out of style:

Handwritten thank-you notes. Any kind gesture should be acknowledged by a written note. An email saying ‘thanx’ doesn’t count. I don’t need an abbreviated thanks in response to an unabbreviated kind gesture.

Big Dream:

To be the social secretary for the White House.

If she could change one thing:

There would be more ‘please’ and ‘thank you,’ accompanied by smiles.

Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

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Take Five How do relationships affect your life? By Jennifer Thompson

When we hear the word “relationship,” we often think of significant others or close family members or friends. But beyond those connections, we also build relationships daily with everyone we encounter — with Facebook friends, with animals, and even with our own selves.

I

1 D  o I need all these “friends?” With social media, I do think it is important to have a realistic perspective on what I’m looking to get out of revived connections. Sometimes it’s okay to do a little house cleaning in the relationship department. Either I reengage with someone I haven’t talked with for a while to tap into their doings or sometimes give myself permission to pull out the sifter. Elke Wasdovich, consultant in training

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Relationships with my children teach me how to give selflessly… Relationships are about giving. Emily Austin, pharmacist and mom

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4 Get a furry friend

Dogs treat you the same no matter what. It doesn’t matter if you’ve had a bad day. It doesn’t matter if you’ve had too many cookies and gained 10 pounds. Dogs will give you unconditional, true, devotional love. You can’t always find that kind of bond with another human. 12

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Diane Lindstrom, CEO of the Paw Zone

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2 Relationships as a mirror of yourself You can’t have growth unless you have interaction with others. Your relationships are always a mirror for yourself. Every encounter is a gift to show what’s going on inside you. You don’t notice good or bad qualities in other people unless you have something of it within yourself. In your mind, you might be compassionate, but it means nothing unless you put it into practice. Della Wilbers, life coach

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5 A fairy tale We all walk into relationships with different ideals…I think we get ourselves in trouble when we fail to see what’s important to us, and we get caught up in fantasies about what we want in a relationship and forget what goes into making a relationship work. We have to be comfortable enough in ourselves to disagree. You have to be humble and look at your part because that’s all you have control over. Erin Rommann, marriage and family therapist Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

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LOVE

T

&

o most, the delicate dance of marriage is challenge enough. Mastering the steps, keeping with the tempo, and managing to stay off one another’s toes takes grueling daily practice, but doesn’t guarantee the winning chemistry. There’s the eye contact, the poise, and the unspoken spark that makes it art. Now, take this routine and add in the twisted tango of a family business. Around the clock synergism, fusion of business and pleasure — truly taking the term “partner” to another level. But these Kentuckiana business owners have welcomed the challenge of melding romance with business and attempt to dance daily with grace.

BUSINESS

t

By Megan M. Seckman photos by melissa donald

Romance at Work

Kristen and Dave Davis

Finding a new balance

“It’s funny,” Kristen Davis says, “…when I tell most people that I work from home, they get envious, but (when) I tell them I work from home with my spouse, they tend to give, what I call, ‘The Face.’” Kristen and her husband, Dave Davis, own and run two businesses together from their home: Panorama Creative Group, LLC, a publishing and design firm targeting small businesses, and Kalla Studios, where Kristen creates jewelry, using traditional metalsmithing designs. “It’s almost as if they can’t believe I’d want to spend all that time with my spouse, but we have a great time. We laugh a lot…and building something we love is just icing on the cake.” Business begins for the Davises around 9 a.m. After the morning rituals of Pop-tart and CNN (Dave) and cereal and Facebook (Kristen), each partner proceeds to the offices located in separate rooms of the house. “No matter how in love you are, everyone still needs their own space,” Kristen said. But the “typical” day ends there. Due to the nature of their business — collaborating, meeting with clients, crafting new art pieces, designing logos, etc., Kristen admits she sometimes doesn’t leave her studio until late into the night. “Some evenings we’ll work into the night, but the other day we cut out early and took an impromptu trip to

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Cincinnati.We’ve had to define a new ‘balance’ that works for us, and we’re always working to fine tune it.” The key to their success together? Kristen says it’s all about trust, communication, and teamwork. She says the dream of owning her own business was just a dream until she met Dave; then it suddenly became a reality. “I think we both had the entrepreneurial spirit, but we needed each other for it to work. I’m the ‘go, go, go,’ and he’s the ‘let’s sit back a minute and think about the consequences.’ We both respect those qualities in the other. It’s like a car — you need an engine to make it go, but you should also have steering and, sometimes, brakes.” Today’s Woman


“He has the big dreams… I am detail-oriented”

Medora Safai met her husband, Mike Safai, many moons ago in southern California. “I was selling realestate, and Mike came in to the model homes to buy a house — he got a house and a wife,” Medora explained of their meeting. For the next 10 years, Mike and Medora worked on their separate careers. Medora double-majored in biology and chemistry in hopes of becoming a doctor, and Mike, an engineer, frequently traveled with work. The idea of a family business didn’t manifest until Mike requested a transfer to Louisville that would end his strenuous traveling schedule. “Suddenly,” according to Medora, “he had all this ‘extra’ time off. Next thing I know, he’s driving around, looking for a ‘hypothetical’ good spot for a drive-through coffee kiosk, like we’d seen on our many visits to see family in Seattle.” The couple now own and operate Safai Enterprises and Java Brewing Company. “This was back in 1995-1997, and I was pre-med and working downtown at University of Louisville’s Out-Patient Center. Next thing I know, not even nine months after moving to Louisville, Mike purchased an old photo drop-off booth at the corner of Shelbyville Road and Moser…and fashioned a

counter out of 2x4s and a laminate top. I’ll never forget — he asked me to work, ‘Just four hours a week on Saturday mornings...that’s it!’” Medora attributes their success to balance, “He’s always 10 minutes early and I’m always 10 minutes late, so when we are together, we arrive exactly on time. He has the big dreams, doesn’t say ‘no,’ and figures out a way to make things happen; I’m detail-oriented and know exactly how each detail should look and feel.” But Medora admits it’s hard to separate work from business when you are the business. “I’ve turned to him at 11 at night and asked if he responded to certain emails. But now that our son is six, we’ve had to stop discussing work around him, tone the Medora and Mike Safai hours down, and take real days off. It’s been a difficult transition…we are both completely comfortable working around the clock and falling asleep exasperated, but accomplished.” As far as completely forgetting about work? Medora says that only happens when they leave the country and can’t use cell phones or Internet, and they’ve only been able to do that a couple of times in 13 years. “Above all, though, ours is a family business. I like that our son sees us work hard. I think as he gets older, he’ll have a realistic understanding of the working world.”

“I used to feel guilty about breaks”

(after cleaning, crafting product, transporting kids to and from school, making dinner...) as getting the kids to bed, turning on Business is at home for Jenna Evers and husband, Thomas the baby monitors and returning to the workshop to do it all Evers, who run Thorpe Wood Works, a woodworking company over again. specializing in custom-crafted furniture and cutting boards “It’s a really tough balance, made harder with having very — they live directly above the shop. Their business has always little time together and two children. Sometimes I wake up at been about family; they began making furniture for their 3:30a.m., wide awake and ready to own home (being dissatisfied with do more work,” Jenna says. the quality and price of commercial Jenna and Thomas Evers But they still manage to steal products) using Thomas’s family a little time away from work: they talent for woodworking that dates have Sundays off as a family, go to back to Grandpa Thorpe. bed at the same time, and try to “Both of our children have worn go out once a week as a couple. ear protectors since they were infants “I used to feel guilty about taking and have grown up watching momma ‘breaks’ but have realized they are glue up cutting boards from their crucial to having a good, stable baby seats. Our oldest, four, now relationship.” helps with scrap wood organization What those breaks allow, Evers and often ‘helps daddy’ make says, is the key to their relationship furniture,” Jenna says. — communication. “I think I am With two children, a newly learning that having children and expanded family business downstairs, hectic lives makes communication and Thomas’s full-time job outside darn near impossible some days, so the home, the couple is pretty busy. finding those five minutes alone is Jenna says she’s trying to get better very important. I have learned not about the 24-hour work environment to bottle up...take a deep breath and describes part of her typical day (or two of three) and let it out.”

www.iamtodayswoman.com

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Survival Skills: Thrive in Your Workplace

Andi Pollard

by Jennifer Thompson

P

aved roads and processed foods protect most of us from having to learn wilderness survival skills, but today’s woman has traded her hunting and gathering tools for the sometimes more daunting prospect of an endless assembly line or an iPhone that follows you home like a lost puppy (a loud, yappy one, at that). And unless you’re one of the chosen few who have found a way to work at home, we all have coworkers and a workplace that can make or break our modern-day survival on a given workday.

Zappos human resources manager Andi Pollard guides us on how the workplace can be somewhere you not only survive but actually thrive.

Rule #1: Pretend you’re not at work.

Like most managers, Andi has two chairs at her desk at Zappos Fulfillment Center—one for her and one for a visitor. However, Andi’s visitor chair is actually a rainbow-colored beach chair, but that’s only because it has to fit in with the beach umbrellas, skim boards, leis, and sand buckets that the rest of the HR department have around their desks. “Most people don’t like to come to HR, but everyone likes to come to the beach, so that’s what we are,” Andi says. Outside of the HR office, most of Zappos’ square footage is dedicated to several stories of warehouse goods. Zappos’ response to this was to create the “Zen Den,” a room built along the edge of the warehouse complete with carpet, books, and comfy couches. “It’s a completely enclosed space, away from the concrete and the florescent lights so that you can forget for a while that you’re in a warehouse,” she says. “We had a contest to name the room and thought ‘zen den’ described it perfectly.”

Rule #2: Be yourself — or if not, be a superhero.

Rule #3: Sing and dance at work.

photo: Melissa Donald

One of Zappos’ core values is to “wow” its customers with excellent service, and the Shepherdsville fulfillment center decided early on that the people who delivered the biggest “wow” were superheroes, so naturally they wanted their employees to be superheroes — literally. The doorways to the warehouse are painted to look like phone booths (“because that’s where heroes change from street clothes into superhero mode,” Andi says); the break room has murals of comic book heroes spouting the company’s core values in speech bubbles; and even the HR department is chiefly referred to as part of the “hero support staff.” “It’s a way to stand out and show your personality at work,” Andi says. “You shouldn’t have to be one person at work and another at home. Happy employees deliver better customer service, and how else are we going to make our employees happy than to do everything we can to show them our respect and appreciation?” Most new companies don’t have a Wii or a karaoke stage on their list of essential startup equipment, but these items are both staples to the Zappos break area. “I love to do karaoke at lunch, and a lot of people are into Just Dance 2 on the Wii,” Andi says. “It’s a way to blow off steam and make work fun and exciting for people who are sometimes on their feet for ten hours a day.” Andi says that trust and accountability in employees are essential to keep the balance between de-stressing and getting the work done. “We want the work stories people share at home and with friends to be good stories.”

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Rule #4: Have friends, not coworkers.

“When you work with your friends, it doesn’t feel like work,” Andi says. And friendship starts early on with the Zappos team, as potential job candidates are often invited out to happy hour after their interview “so we can see what they’re like outside of work.” “We’re not a cookie-cutter staff,” Andi continues. “We’re a team, but we’re diverse. Some of our best ideas come from the people who are out on the floor actually doing the work, not sitting in an office. The best way to succeed is to surround yourself with good people, and that’s why even if you’re the best technical fit, you won’t get the job here unless you’re the best cultural fit too.”

Rule #5: Party when no one else does.

“The holiday season is our busiest time of year, so we can’t shut down the building to have a party,” Andi says. “But to celebrate all our hard work, the HR staff plans a party in January every year, and our themes are epically awesome. One year we did Dr. Seuss and had multicolored trees all over the place. We keep the theme a secret so that the employees are completely surprised when they walk in. They beg us to tell them the theme every year, but we never budge.” (It’s true. When I interviewed her before the party, she wouldn’t tell me, either.)

Rule #6: Seek happiness to find success, not the other way around.

“If you’re not happy at your job, you’re not going to be passionate about it and then you’re not going to be successful,” Andi says, paraphrasing the philosophy of Zappos’ CEO, Tony Hsieh. Andi describes herself as a “recovering lawyer” who practiced, among other things, employment law for years. She found her way to HR because she wanted to “make a change from within a company and help those who don’t feel like they have a voice. Find what makes you happy, and the success will come,” she says. “No matter your level, you can show your personality and have fun. Then maybe one day you can have your staff who will turn the whole office into the beach.”

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e v o L

Finding 35

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After 30

By Kyle ShephErd

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H

ave you ever had one of those moments where you are driving I-65 and it hits you…”Gah, I forgot to get married!” Then that other thing falls out of the sky and thumps you in the head, and it hurts. You. Are. Over. 30.

Take heart if you are among those of us who walk the earth solo. Living in 2010, the freak-out age is chronologically further down the line for us than it was for our predecessors. For some expert advice, I turned to author, social psychologist, and director of the Shyness Research Institute at Indiana University Southeast, Dr. Bernardo J. Carducci. He often conducts dating seminars, and I asked him if he ever saw women in their 30s at his seminars who seem a bit more anxious than their 20-something counterparts. “I think that happens at every age group. The reason is that the people who aren’t in a relationship, who aren’t in love, tend to look around and the only thing that they see is people who are in relationships. In social psychology we call that the self-reference effect. The only thing you see around is the people that have what you want.” How do you get it? “Every great romance and every big business deal start with conversation,” Carducci reminds us. “Talk to people.” The key to taking control and putting yourself in the drivers’ seat of finding love after 30…”Doing lots of different kinds of things with lots of different kinds of people,” he said.

Looking… I didn’t have to look too hard to find ladies well into their 30s and beyond, doing just that. All were putting themselves out there in an active way to make things happen. All were weather-worn, yet hopeful. One look at the pretty 37-year-old, never-been-married Jennifer Abner will have you scratching your head as to why she’s not paired. She is one of those mysteries in life: smart, articulate, pretty, kind, confident, yet Alone. Jennifer dates and recently thought she’d met the one, until he called six months into their relationship to tell her that she wasn’t his “soulmate” and that his previous wife had “ripped his heart out” and he just wasn’t ready. Jennifer was ready and is moving forward, practicing what Carducci says is key: getting out and about and meeting people through friends and social events. She has dabbled in online dating, but isn’t a fan. “Technology has taken out the integrity and consideration of dating. Texting and Facebook are second-rate substitutes for conversation,” she said. “My eyes are always open,” says 37-year-old, never-been-married Nancy Stephen. “I think looking for love at any age has its issues. I’ve seen the dating pool evolve since my 20s, which has caused me to cast a wider net.” Nancy accepts and cherishes her single life. “I’ve made the best of my single years — it’s allowed time for me to grow as an individual, focus on my career, travel, spend time with my friends, take part in the activities I enjoy.” Like others I spoke with, her biggest challenge is seeing friends paired off. “It makes me feel like I’m missing out on something.” Is she hopeful? “Depends on the day. Today I am feeling hopeful. What’s the hurry, anyway?” While Jennifer, Nancy, and myself know nothing of married life, 52-year-old Penelope R. Scally knew 25 years of marriage and five children before a separation from her husband. She now finds herself at a loss as to where to meet men. When she was first separated in her mid-40s she said she thought it would be easy to find someone but now laughs at how wrong she was. She volunteers, and had hoped to meet someone through her service or at her church. “It’s been so long since I’ve dated,” she said. “I truly have no idea how to look. I’ve considered online dating services, but quite frankly, they scare me.” Penelope considers herself shy and old-fashioned in that she thinks the man should do the pursuing. While most days she is hopeful, she does find herself discouraged at times. “I do feel the clock ticking, and look in the mirror and am afraid that time is running out. That my beauty is fading, and I will one day only be attractive to old men who want a companion.” Penelope tries daily to put her ultimate trust in God.

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Take heart, there are successes out there. Terri Lenahan-Downs married Kevin when she was 36. She met him when she was 32. “I don’t think I waited by choice. I think it was part of the plan for me and things I had to ‘learn’ before my soulmate was presented to me.” Both she and Kevin agree that they knew after their first date they wanted to spend the rest of their lives with one another. She is very glad she waited it out. Toads disguised as princes were a part of Terri’s road to Kevin. “I don’t look at them as failures. I look at them as relationships that were trying to teach me something, so when my soulmate showed up, I would recognize him.” 2011

Today’s Woman


Bridgette Adams, 45, took a trip to Hawaii alone when she was 41. This selfprofessed shy lady then did what we all want, but few actually do…she asked out Dave, the tour guide/bus driver. He accepted and years later asked her to marry him when they took a joint vacation back to Hawaii. We’ve all heard it: once you stop looking, you find. ”I had kind of given up on finding a person that matched me, and I just went to have a good time, and I think that is part of why it happened. I wasn’t searching, it just kind of fell in my lap.” Bridgette reiterates what we all feel about the family and social pressures of finding someone. “I took that pressure off myself. Once that pressure was removed to try to meet people for the purpose of finding a date or a mate…I relaxed and I presented a more relaxed person.” Love can come around twice. It did for Lesley Deal, 63, who married her next-door neighbor when she was 51. Lesley had been married for 30 years before her husband announced he was leaving. Lesley reminds us that the abrupt ending of a long-term union is core-shaking. “It takes a couple of years at least just to get to the point where you decide if you even want to have another mate.” Her soon-to-be husband, Jack, helped her after her divorce. He’d been there. After several years of dating, they knew they could trust one another with their hearts. Shared pain brought them together. Trust keeps them together. “To find someone that you feel you can really trust is hard when you are looking for a mate, especially if you feel that you’ve been betrayed by the first one.”

The Game looks a little different When you play in this after-30 love game, the game is different. Chances are you are competing with an entire other life a person has shared with someone else. Sometimes that life includes kids. Sometimes it includes scars. In any case, managing expectations is part of the game. Carducci finds in his research that each time someone falls in and out of love, their expectations become more realistic. This doesn’t mean you settle. It just means you play smarter. And really, after 30, we should be smarter. So what do you do if you are still single, in your 30s, or beyond? Get out and make conversation with someone who seems interesting. Make friends. Carducci says a big predictor of having relationships is having friends. Increase your friends; increase your chances. In the end, you can be the person you want to be, and romance will either happen or it won’t. Either way, you are the person you were meant to be. www.iamtodayswoman.com

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W o m e n ’ s P o w e r B u z z

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Professional Connections

CalEndar BPW-Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Monday • 5:30pm Tucker’s American Favorites 2045 State Street New Albany Sarah Ring 502.550.9503 BPW-Business & Professional Women- River City Every 2nd Wednesday • Noon Lunch and Program noon-1pm University Club 502.499.4420, www.bpwrc.org eWoman Network Every 3rd Thursday • Noon Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Angela Reedus 502.592.8244 www.ewomennetwork.com EWI- Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tuesday • 5:30pm Louis T. Roth & Co. 2100 Gardiner Lane Roberta Brock 502.581.2059 roberta.brock@pnc.com

IAAP- International Association of Administrative ProfessionalsLouisville Every 2nd Thursday • 5pm 4007 Kresge Way, 2nd Floor Paula Kessler 502.495.5116 Paula_Kessler@kyfbins.com www.iaap-louisville.org Legal Secretaries of Louisville Every 3rd Tuesday • 11:30am Jefferson Club, 20th flr 2000 PNC Plaza Darlene Kelly 502.568.5761 darlene.kelly@skofirm.com www.legalseclou-ky.org MLWPC- Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 3rd Thursday • 5:30pm City Cafe 505 West Broadway Angie Wallace akwallace0818@ yahoo.com www.mlwpc.org NAWBO- National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tuesday info@nawbolouisville.org www.nawbolouisville.org

Sponsored by

National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Monday • 5:30pm Breckinridge Inn 2800 Breckinridge Lane Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121

WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tuesday • 11:30am Buca di Beppo 2051 South Hurstbourne Pkwy. Laura Morriss 502.599.4917 LMorriss@userinc.com

Network Now Every 2nd Friday • 11:45am UofL campus – University Club Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com

WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tuesday • 11:30am Breckinridge Inn 2800 Breckinridge Lane Lindsey Davis 502.727.9003 info@win4louisville.org

Take It To Fame Network Every 2nd Tuesday • 6pm-7:30pm Location Varies; check website Sharon Wimberly 502.500.9394 takeittofamenetwork.com WIN- Women in Networking Every 2nd Wednesday • 11:15am Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane Monica Jakoby monica@corporatetechsolutions.com WIN- Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wednesday • 11:30am Fern Valley Conference Center 2715 Fern Valley Road Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net

Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thursday • 11:30am Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Kathy McGann 502.552.3090 jshaber@venturetg.com All listings are on a per month basis To list your meeting free of charge in calendar, email us at info@todayspublications.com or fax at 502.327.8861 your meeting date, time, and location, with contact phone number and website. Deadline for inclusion is 5 weeks prior to issue date (e.g. June 25 for August issue).

Spotlight On Education Considering a Career Change? Accounting careers are in demand and offer favorable pay and growth opportunities. Spalding’s Second Degree Accounting program is designed for individuals with a bachelor’s degree in another discipline. Catering to working adults, the program may be completed in as little as a year, with each class meeting once per week in the evening or on weekends. Dr. Michelle Reiss Chair, School of Business

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FEBRUARY FEBRuary

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Dr. Michelle Reiss, Chair, School of Business – College of Business & Communication Spalding University • Office: 502-585-9911 ext. 2372 • E-mail: mreiss@spalding.edu — This is an Advertisement —

Today’s TodAY’s Woman WomAn


Sponsored by

W o m e n ’ s P o w e r B u z z

www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

February FEBRUARY

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Arts Insider Must-See

By Gioia Patton

Kathleen Madigan

Hey, (Funny) Lady I

My audiences are mostly age 30 and up, pretty well educated, and 50/50 men to women. I’m not big with the young people who like ‘goofy’ guy comics-for lack of a better word.

n 1996 Kathleen Madigan was named ‘Best Female Comedian’ by The American Comedy Awards. — comedienne Kathleen Madigan Although after the December afternoon I spent watching clip after clip of Madigan’s hysterical standup having any sort of marketable package. Apparently, talent routine on YouTube in preparation for this interview, doesn’t matter any more,” she wisecracks. “Comics used to Madigan is, in my opinion, one of the ‘best of the best’ of be a credible guest on The Tonight Show and Late Show With today’s comics, male or female. David Letterman, for instance. But if you look at it now, there Right off the bat I begin my phone interview with Madigan is no outlet for us, as we’ve all been replaced as the third by mentioning her American Comedy Award, followed by guest on the couch by Snooki from Jersey Shore. Although asking if I guessed correctly that the ratio of male to female Craig Ferguson is still in the game with comics on his late night professional comics is roughly 1,000 men to one woman. show,” she says admiringly, “because Craig is a comic. Today “Probably, yeah,” Madigan replies in her husky-sounding SIRIUS satellite radio appearances are the closest in launching voice from her Los Angeles home. “But the thing is, there are what an appearance on Johnny Carson’s The Tonight Show so few of us comics in the country, like, compared to singers, used to be for comics,” explains the woman, whose latest who make a living at it by making at least $40,000 a year, that DVD Gone Madigan (Image Entertainment) was released there are probably no more than 1,000 professional comics. last month. And of that, only about 30 are women, to the point that, Does Madigan utilize reality shows and sensational because there are so few us, eventually we’ll all win that ‘Best headlines about celebrities in her stand-up? “Well, that Female Comic’ award,” she deadpans. celebrity stuff is why I’m glad Kathy Griffin is in the game, When I tell Madigan I can’t get out of my head some of because she covers all that. For example, I don’t know the fans’ comments included within her press kit, i.e. ‘we who the Kardashian sisters are…and I don’t know why I’m came out in a hail storm and your show was sold out!’ and supposed to know who they are…and I’m not interested ‘we drove 11 hours from Saskatchewan to see you!,’ she enough to find out,” she says matter-of-factly, although chuckles to herself, then delivers the following response in a her low-ball delivery is such that I burst out laughing. “And rapid comedic rhythm: “I know…believe me, I always think that kind of stuff is not in my act because, for example, that too…like I’m sitting upstairs in my hotel room watching I don’t care where Lindsay Lohan is today, or if Britney a Lifetime network movie, thinking, ‘oh man, I wish I didn’t Spears is a good mother or not. It’s so meaningless to me,” have to work tonight!’ and it doesn’t even occur to me that Madigan declares, then sighs. somebody is so excited that they drove over an hour to see my Madigan then reveals the three characteristics necessary show. It’s cra-zy! I just did a fundraising gig in Minneapolis, and to have a long career as a professional comic: “Being when I found out afterwards that a woman and her friend comfortable with chaos, comfortable with unpredictability, had driven all the way from Phoenix to see me, I actually said and comfortable with living on the road. And all three of to her, ‘Why didn’t you just stay there? I’ll come to you… those, really, are what knocks out a lot of comics, especially if eventually.’” Ba dump bump. they want to have a ‘normal’ life with kids,” admits the neverMadigan refers to her successful career as “just a series married and childless St. Louis native. of timing, in that I got lucky, having been on both The “Comedy to me is…if you’re in, you have to be allll in Tonight Show (10 times with Jay Leno as host) and David and it’s a lifetime. It’s not a race to get on Comedy Central Letterman back in the days when comics could do both or a sprint to get on Letterman’s show. That there was no shows. Although I wasn’t as lucky as Roseanne (Barr), one thing that happened to me that put me over the top because if I had gotten on The Tonight was because it wasn’t available to Show when Johnny Carson was still me,” she explains. WHEN: February 12 @ 8pm there, this whole (fame) thing would-a “And although I did great WHre: Bomhard Theater tickets: $27.50 moved a lot faster.” when I got on The Tonight Show and $32.50 contact: In person @ Kentucky When I bring up today’s popular Center box office or call 502.584.7777, with Jay Leno, for the first time — toll free, 800.775.7777, or visit culture stars, in particular the ‘realitynothing changed for me careerwww.kentuckycenter.org. For accessibility show’ ones, the 45-year-old Madigan wise…I still played Omaha the services: access@kentuckycenter.org audibly groans, then laments: “They grew next day.” up with the goal of ‘wanting to become famous…a celebrity’…that dream not GIOIA PATTON IS AN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CELEBRITY PROFILER.

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Today’s Woman


2011 Go Red For Women Su p p l em en t

BREAKING NEWS: Your heart could be in danger! Know the signs to watch for‌ sponsored by


supplement credits: writer, Jennifer Thompson • cover photos, James Moses • story photos, Melissa Donald • MAKEUP, HOLLY OYLER

BREAKING NEWS: You may have heart disease and not know it.

I

f disaster strikes or something happens to shake up Louisville, the local news is the first place many people look to find out what happened. However, many disasters never make it to the TV screen, including the ones that go on inside our own bodies. Our hearts don’t always broadcast when there’s a problem, so it’s up to you to learn how to keep your own heart healthy. What can you do? Know Your Numbers:

I eat poorly, and actually, I should have been dead 47 years ago from what the doctors tell me about the way I eat. I can’t even spell will power. I try, but I have none, because I love, love, love food. Please don’t do what I do!”

Dawne Gee anchor, WAVE3

Dawn’s Numbers: Total Cholesterol: 204 • HDL: 71 • LDL: 104 • Triglycerides: 141 • Triglyceride/ HDL Ratio: 2.9 • Glucose: 96 • Blood Pressure: 128/86

I take medicine for rapid heart rate, which I didn’t know I had until my doctor picked it up at a wellness checkup. He asked me if I was afraid of the doctor because my blood pressure was always so high at my appointments. Now I understand the value of going to the doctor even if I’m feeling good.”

CANDYCE CLIFFT anchor, Fox41

Rachel Platt anchor, WHAS11

Candyce’s Numbers: Total Cholesterol: 206 • HDL: 73 • LDL: 121 • Triglycerides: 59 • Triglyceride/HDL Ratio: 2.8 • Glucose: 81 • Blood Pressure: 116/68

My favorite ‘little step’ to take toward a hearthealthy lifestyle is wearing a pedometer. If you take 10,000 steps a day, that’s optimal for your health. Some people fear heart disease because of their heredity, but with the pedometer, you just take one step at a time and it’s encouraging to see how active you can be.”

I always thought heart screenings were more for men than women, but this experience has been so eye-opening. I know I’m not exempt. It takes less than five minutes to know the numbers that can put you on the road to a healthier life. Why would you say no to that?”

Rachel’s Numbers: Total Cholesterol: 184 • HDL: 75 • LDL: too low to measure • Triglycerides: 45 • Triglyceride/HDL Ratio: 2.5 • Glucose: 90 • Blood Pressure: 110/62

Monica Hardin anchor, 32WLKY

Monica’s Numbers: Blood Pressure: 118/62 (other numbers not available)

Ideal Numbers: Total cholesterol: less than 200 • HDL: greater than 50 • LDL: less than

100 • Triglycerides less than 150 • Triglyceride/HDL ratio: less than 3.5 • Glucose: less than 100 when fasting • Blood pressure: 120/80 • Look for more information on how to protect your heart at www.heart.org

www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

Go Red For Women

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I news to me

t was news to me that I had heart disease… …because I have no family history. Sissy Graham, age 43

Sissy is wearing: Alex Marie jacket, $159; Alex Marie skirt, $89. Available at Dillard’s, Mall St. Matthews 5000 Shelbyville Road 502.893.4400; bracelet, $40 available at Bliss Handbags & Accessories.

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issy Graham had pain that she says “felt like it went straight through my chest to the bone.” Having no history of heart disease, Sissy thought the pain was severe indigestion, and when the emergency room doctors saw her (age 40 at the time) and her lack of family history, they affirmed her self-diagnosis and sent her home. But after Sissy’s mother, who is a nurse, listened to her describe her jaw pain and the sensation of her hands needing to pop, she took Sissy back to the same emergency room and demanded further tests. It turned out that her blood work levels had been elevated during her first visit, but because the doctors assumed it couldn’t be a heart attack, they did not tell Sissy about the elevation when they sent her home. “I had no idea I was sick,” Sissy says. That was her first heart attack, and Sissy was able to look back at her life with a new perspective. She remembered how her heart would race with physical activity and how her cholesterol level was always high, but she didn’t realize the implications these things held for her heart health. Now, after 10 acute myocardial infarctions, 15 stents, and 13 pills a day, she is an unyielding advocate for hearthealth awareness and education. “Even if you don’t have heart disease, your friends or your kids might, and you can help them by being educated,” Sissy says. Sissy has taken control of her diet and her children’s diet by minimizing their sodium intake and consulting the American Heart Association’s menu for meal choices and preparation. She also started walking more and joined the committee for the Anthem 5k Fitness Classic to promote the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Sissy’s new proactive outlook doesn’t always hold her fear at bay. Her kids are sometimes hesitant to leave her alone, and after her first few heart incidents, they would wake her up at night just to make sure she was okay. But above all other remedies, Sissy values prayer the most. “It doesn’t seem like a lot, but it’s gotten me through everything. Whether God heals me on this side or the other side, I’ll be okay.” The support Sissy has found since her heart troubles started has enabled her to have a positive and pragmatic outlook on the future. “A family history has to start somewhere,” she says. “I wish it hadn’t with me, but my family and my church family have let me know that I’m not in it alone.”

Today’s Woman


news to me I

t was news to me that I had heart disease… …because I eat right and exercise.

Marty Cherol, age 48

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2011

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arty Cherol’s parents both encountered heart problems during their lifetimes, her father undergoing bypass surgery and her mother having stents. Marty knew the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, so she always ate healthfully and exercised regularly. Her parents’ heart troubles happened when they were in their 70s, so at 48, Marty never imagined her heart was in danger. But on March 25, 2010, Marty learned, as she puts it, “heart disease knows no age — there are no boundaries.” Marty woke up with tightness in her throat, a headache, and a feeling that her heart was doing somersaults in her chest. Thinking it wasn’t anything severe, she went back to sleep, but she woke up a few more times with the same feeling. When the symptoms persisted as she drove to work the next morning, she knew something was wrong. “Instead of turning right to go to work, I turned left to go to the hospital.” The emergency room doctor agreed that something wasn’t right and wanted to do stress tests the following morning. Luckily Marty stayed overnight in the hospital, because at 10:30 that evening, she had a mild heart attack, and shortly after, she was scheduled for quadruple bypass surgery. “I wrote my will with my son the night before the surgery,” she says. As a single mom who had never had a major surgery before then, Marty was shocked and fearful of not only the surgery but also what this meant for the rest of her life. She was already eating well and exercising. What was there to change? “That’s the scariest thing — being told not to do anything differently,” Marty says. But rather than being frustrated, Marty redoubled her efforts at listening to her body, particularly in relation to stress. After twelve weeks of cardiac rehab and going to stress management seminars, she is ready to take responsibility for her heart health as much as she can control it. “I don’t stress over work, and I say no to overbooking,” she says. “I want to do yoga, take more time for myself, and let go of control. I look at things so differently now, and I feel like I’ve been given another chance.”

Today’s Woman


LeBliss

www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

Go Red For Women

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news to me I

t was news to me that I had heart disease… …because I didn’t have a heart attack.

Natalie Canfield, age 23

Natalie is wearing: Another One Bites the Dust dress, $219; earrings, $30 available at Rodeo Drive, 2212 Holiday Manor C, 502.425.8999.

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atalie Canfield’s family has a tradition of fundraising and volunteering with the American Heart Association. After having this legacy passed down from her grandmother to her mother to her, Natalie knew the facts about heart disease and even had personal experience with it, as her family has some history of heart troubles. What Natalie didn’t know was how heart disease would shape her young adult life. Over the last couple years, Natalie has experienced chronic, severe migraines that have prevented her from being as active as other people her age and even caused her to have to take a medical leave from school. And if the migraines weren’t enough cause for concern, Natalie has experienced three transient ischemic attacks (mini-strokes) that brought on numbness, tingling, loss of vision and hearing, and even fainting. This fainting led to some dangerous falls into walls and furniture, which earned her several bruises on her arm and even a loose tooth. After tireless personal research and visits to several neurologists, cardiologists, and other specialists, Natalie and her family finally got their self-diagnosis confirmed in November 2009: Natalie had been born with a patent foramen ovale (PFO)—a hole in her heart. “When I actually saw the picture of the hole in my heart, I felt such a sense of relief—that I had been validated,” Natalie says. “We were so frustrated because the doctors kept saying I was too young [to have heart disease], but all the symptoms fit.” In June 2010, Natalie underwent surgery to close the hole, and in October 2010, she received news that tissue had grown around the hole, making the surgery a success. Natalie recalls being awake the entire time during the surgery and being able to feel the doctors moving in her heart and to see the ultrasound screen showing what they were doing. “I just had to tell myself it wasn’t me on there,” she says. Although her battle with heart disease is won for the foreseeable future, Natalie continues to share her story to help others who are walking through the fear and confusion that her family did. “Don’t get intimidated by the overeducation of the doctors and the technical terms,” she says. “Make a list of questions beforehand every time you go to the doctor, and don’t always listen to a doctor’s first diagnosis. “If you feel like something is wrong with your body, get it checked out. Seek a second, third, and even fourth opinion.”

Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

Go Red For Women

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news to me I

t was news to me that I had heart disease… …because I was too young.

Ruth Totty-Mitchell, age 60

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2011

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uth Totty-Mitchell is no stranger to heart disease. She knows that she is the fourth generation in a family line afflicted with heart disease, and she walked through the loss of her father and grandmother, who both died of coronaries. Even as a child and young adult, Ruth had what she calls “a laundry list of symptoms,” like a rapid heartbeat and thyroid disease that caused fatigue. Physicians continually labeled her as a “sickly child” and never considered heart disease because of her age, but her true sickness defined itself when Ruth was 29 and experienced her first coronary. “I remember it just like it was yesterday even though it was 30 years ago,” she says. “It’s like beings superimposed in a picture — like you’re looking at yourself from the outside.” Ruth soon became a case study because of her young age. She was sent home with monitors to keep track of her heart rate and other levels, and over the years, she went to occupational therapy and counseling to cope with the high stress levels of being a single mom who desperately didn’t want heart disease to cause her to leave her kids alone as it had done to her father. “I learned that the little words ‘no’ and ‘can’t’ aren’t profanities,” Ruth says. “My body is like a bag. I can expand some, but I can’t go past a certain point.” A large part of Ruth’s fight for her heart health included getting her children involved and educated about heart disease. She had her kids learn CPR and taught them early about the value of a dollar so they would understand why it was necessary to cut back on expenses when Ruth’s health didn’t allow her to work more than 40 hours a week. Ruth also came up with activities she could do with her kids that wouldn’t over-stimulate her heart, such as making healthy meals together from scratch. Unfortunately Ruth’s fight with heart disease is continuing on with the next generation in a very real way. Ruth’s daughter, who was also “too young” to have a heart attack, died of a coronary because the people around her didn’t realize what was happening to her. From this terrible loss, Ruth’s convictions about the value of life and the importance of guarding it tenaciously have increased all the more. “She didn’t stop and take time for herself,” Ruth says. “You’re the most important person in your life, and that’s not a selfish thing to say when it comes to heart disease. Your presence is the most important present you can give, and a temporary inconvenience for someone else is worth it for your permanent well-being.”

Today’s Woman


Go Red Executive Leadership Team Back, left to right:

Nina Seigle

Chief People Officer, ResCare

Connie Steller

Linda McGinity Jackson

Table Sponsorship Vice Chair Client Development Manager, Stites & Harbison, PLLC

Luncheon Program Chair Executive Territory Manager, Abbott Vascular

Kelley Bright

Assistant Director Business Development, Ernst & Young

Harriet Lair

Peggy J. Heuser

Leigh Pittman

Kimberly Black Maffet

Vice President, Director Program Management Center of Excellence, Brown-Forman

Chief Operating Officer, Heuser Clinic Priscilla Hancock

Vice President of Information Technology, University of Louisville Betsy Phillips

U.S. Bank Commercial Banking

Jane Merman

Metro Vice President, American Heart Association

Deb Moessner

Cathy Zion

Dana Moody

not pictured: Jill J. Bell

Gwendolyn H. Walters

Director of Employee Training and Development, Premier Home Care, Inc. Wendy Chapman

Regional Manager, BB&T Private Financial Services Dana Allen

Ellen Cavanaugh, RN

Vice President Corporate Responsibility and Community Affairs, LG&E and KU Services

SVP, Market President, American Founders Bank President, Baptist Hospital East Kim Tharp-Barrie

System Vice President Norton Healthcare, Institute For Nursing and Workforce Development Maggie Tully-O’Neal

Kentuckiana Goes Red Co-Chair Exercise Specialist, Clark Memorial Hospital

Janet Lively Heberle

Vice President Business Development, TEG Architects Margaret Horlander

Go Red Executive Chair Owner, Home Instead Senior Care

Go Red For Women

Vice President, Ambulatory Care Jewish Hospital and St. Mary’s HealthCare

Susan Stout Tamme

Owner, EmbroidMe

Laura Douglas

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Shelley Neal

Wendy Case-Schifano

Front, left to right:

Becky Beanblossom

Manager, Member Outreach, Passport Advantage

M. Trish Osborn

Open Your Heart Chair Curriculum Development Manager, Medtronic

Kentuckiana Goes Red Co-Chair System Analyst, Clark Memorial Hospital

President, Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield of KY

Table Sponsorship Chair Vice President, Public Affairs, Passport Health Plan

Vice President, Marketing, Norton Healthcare

Jennifer Hunt

Circle of Red Society Chair Special Assistant to President and Provost, University of Louisville

Go Red For Women Director American Heart Association Publisher, Zion Publications

Kathy Renbarger

Vice President, Fifth Third Bank

Vice President, Creative Alliance 2011

Today’s Woman


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Today’s Woman


Sorghum Roasted Squash Salad

Y

Story and Photos By Melissa Donald

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ou will Hillbilly Tea. This new hillbilly has been refined and redefined. With a name like Hillbilly Tea, one might not know what to expect, but this cozy little nook has an intimate and creative menu full of sophisticated dishes. Such arrangements as their Sorghum Roasted Squash Salad. Made from fresh, local, and virtually all organic ingredients, this savory salad is bursting with a mixture of contrasting flavors. And, it’s the perfect salad choice for your heart. A beautiful blend of sweet, peppery, and sharp flavors, this salad is loaded with all sorts of heart-smart goodness. The squash is butternut, which is high in antioxidants, folate, fiber, and carotenoids — all nutrients known to help protect against heart disease. As the squash roasts in a sweet sorghum dressing, it creates a complementary sweet and savory fusion that is the base for this salad. Gently placed atop the squash you will find a pile of arugula greens, grown hydroponically by Grateful Greens, a local green house that supplies its clients with fresh local produce all year round. Lastly, the dish is sprinkled with candied walnuts (also a heart-healthy favorite) and local goat cheese, which enhances this lovely vegetable combination. I paired the salad with the Pearl’s Green Jasmine tea to balance the rich, earthy flavors with a light flowery finish. Delicious! Aside from their fun hillbilly twist of southern gourmet dishes, check out Hillbilly Tea’s array of specialty loose leaf teas, freshly brewed to order. A cup of tea on a cold midwinter’s day is a wonderful way to relax and enjoy the present. Another mindful health aspect to take to heart.



Hillbilly Tea: 120 South 1st Street in Louisville. www.hillbillytea.com. Salad’s approximate nutritional information including dressing: calories: 475, fiber: 6g, protein: 16g H-18

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2011

Go Red For Women

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K

know your numbers now your numbers…

I don’t care if you do hate math. You need to know the numbers that affect your risk factors for the number one killer among women: heart disease. We sent four of our readers to Norton Healthcare and Jewish Hospital to have their risk factors for heart disease assessed. They found that after giving up just an hour or so of their time, they now know some of the most important numbers in their life and have the tools to alter the course of their health for the better.

Cholesterol: 228

CONNIE MEYER’S NUMBERS IDEAL

CURRENT

(A little high)

Total Cholesterol HDL LDL Triglycerides Blood Glucose

0

50

100

150

200

250

*Connie’s blood pressure is 110/74; ideal blood pressure is 120/80.

Connie Meyer has seen heart disease manifest itself in many different ways. She describes her father-in-law being “full of life one minute and dead the next minute” after a sudden heart attack, while her own father suffered slowly Triglyceride/HDL ratio from congestive heart failure and “died so many times, you Waist Circumference would think he was Lazarus.” Another impactful experience for Connie was reconnecting with her long-lost half-sister when her sister called her to tell her Blood Pressure that she was sick. Four months later, she died of heart failure. “I started to wonder how much heredity matters, and it became my impetus for awareness,” Connie says. Connie decided to act on her impetus by meeting with cardiologist Jesse Adams, MD, president of the Kentuckiana chapter of the American Heart Association and member of the Physicians Group at Jewish Hospital, for a personal consultation about her risk for heart disease. The number that Connie focused on most was a number she already knew would be high: her cholesterol. “There were no surprises. It was exactly what I thought it would be. I was just so grateful that my cholesterol wasn’t higher.” Connie’s cholesterol is slightly higher than the recommended total cholesterol of 200. She and Dr. Adams discussed how changes in diet can have a big impact on lowering her cholesterol. “I could very well become dependent on medicine if I don’t make these lifestyle changes,” Connie says. “I still have the opportunity to turn this around.” Connie says that her attitude makes the biggest difference in her dieting choices. Rather than using the excuse that she doesn’t want to die with Weight Watchers being her last meal, she is looking at some small, realistic changes she can make to her eating habits. “There are things I can do that really aren’t a sacrifice. When you start throwing the word ‘sacrifice’ in with diet, you start to feel deprived. If you really want that long-term change, you have to find a way to make a positive change for you.” Some of Connie’s “non-sacrifices” include replacing white bread with whole grains and replacing french fries with fruits. By lowering her cholesterol, Connie hopes not only to extend her life, but also maintain the quality of her life. “Living a long time isn’t the goal; it’s living to do the things you like to do.”

Connie Meyer, age 60

“I could very well become dependent on medicine if I don’t make these lifestyle changes.”

To schedule a heart health assessment, call 866.521.DOCS for a Jewish Physician Group doctor near you.

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Today’s Woman


know your numbers Tenesha “Nikki” McCubbins, age 34

“Even if you get results that aren’t good, there’s always something you can do.”

Tenesha “Nikki” McCubbins knows that life — and heart health — can sometimes give you what you expect and sometimes what you don’t expect. Several members of her mother’s family have had heart attacks without warning, and because of these unexpected events, Nikki now expects a higher risk level for heart disease. But instead of fearing the unknown, she has decided to be proactive about her health. “If I had terminal cancer, I’d still want to know because it’s all about what you can do to change your life.” Nikki discovered how she could make positive changes for her heart health when she went to Norton Women’s Heart Center to find out her risk for heart disease. Nikki knew going in that she was struggling with high blood pressure leading to swelling and fluid retention. Despite this and her family history, Nikki was not nervous to know her numbers. “It’s important to do all you can for your body and do everything you can,” she says. “Even if you get results that aren’t good, there’s always something you can do.” One number that was particularly important for Nikki was her glucose level because of her family history of diabetes. Theresa Byrd, RN, the clinical coordinator at Norton Women’s Heart Center, says that the risk of heart disease for those with diabetes is four times that for those without diabetes. “I was surprised about my glucose level,” Nikki says. “I know I eat well, but I just have to be very careful because of my family history.” To lower glucose levels, Byrd recommends limiting sweets and highstarch foods (such as white bread and potatoes). Nikki says she wants to redouble her efforts at eating more fiber, fruits, and vegetables and also reducing her stress level. “I want to live as long as I possibly can. I know some things are out of my control, but I want to help the things I can control. Some people ignore the signs, but I want to be around for my girls and my parents.”

Glucose: 119

(A litht)le hig

To schedule a heart disease risk screening with Norton Women’s Heart Center, call 502.629.1234. The cost is $40.

TENESHA “NIKKI” McCUBBINS’ NUMBERS CURRENT

IDEAL

Total Cholesterol HDL LDL Triglycerides Blood Glucose

0

50

100

150

200

*Nikki’s blood pressure is 104/70; ideal blood pressure is 120/80.

Triglyceride/HDL ratio Waist Circumference Blood Pressure

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know your numbers now your numbers… Leigh Ann Yost, age 40

“Honestly, I was just at a point I wanted to know either way if my heart was healthy.” Leigh Ann Yost’s life changed dramatically in 2001 when her father died suddenly of a massive heart attack at the age of 54. “I still don’t think I am over it,” she says, almost 10 years later. Leigh Ann’s grandfather died at 46 due to a heart attack as well, and as Leigh Ann looks at her family history, she knows it’s time to get serious about her heart health. “I recently turned 40, and it’s a big joke with my husband and me that I will drop dead of a heart attack from stress, and my father’s death gets brought up a lot.” Leigh Ann also went to Theresa Byrd at Norton Women’s Heart Center to find out her numbers, though with some slight trepidation. “I knew I had gained weight, so I was really nervous about that number (as most women are). Honestly I was just at a point I wanted to know either way if my heart was healthy or if I needed to get really serious about heart health.” Leigh Ann’s results, however, were very positive. Her cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose levels were all within the recommended range. “I am extremely surprised at how heart healthy I am, given my family history and stress levels,” she says. “Being an athlete for so long has really helped me out, even though I am not nearly as active as I used to be. I definitely need to get into the workout game.” Stress, although a difficult thing to measure in numbers, can increase one important number in relation to heart health: blood pressure. Byrd calls blood pressure “the silent killer” and says that it can lead to an enlarged heart and damage the lining of the arteries. Although stress is often an intangible mental difficulty, it can be combated, as Leigh Ann wants to, with exercise. Byrd also recommends hobbies and meditation as good de-stressors. The generations before her got Leigh Ann thinking about her heart health, but she says it’s the generation after that will motivate her to change. “It is important for me as a mother to model good behavior for my boys, and that includes what I put into my body. Even though I make good meal choices for my boys, I don’t always make the same ones for myself, so now it’s time to practice what I preach!”

HDL: 8) 1 (good

To schedule a heart disease risk screening with Norton Women’s Heart Center, call 502.629.1234. The cost is $40.

LEIGH ANN YOST’S NUMBERS CURRENT

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* Leigh Ann’s blood pressure is 124/84 (left arm); 116/76 (right arm); ideal blood pressure is 120/80.

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know your numbers now your numbers…

Tonya Smith, age 27

As a registered nurse applicant about to take her boards, Tonya Smith knows firsthand why it’s important to pay attention to her heart health. She says that working in healthcare, “you see heart disease, diabetes, obesity — so many things that we can control and we have a part in. A lot of diseases we have later in life are contributed to by what we do now. It’s easy to say, ‘Oh, I’ll do this, I’ll change that,’ but when you see it every day, it gives you a different perspective.” Tonya also has a personal interest in keeping up with heart health awareness. Her father developed heart disease in his late 40s, leading to a bypass surgery and heart medication that he still takes to this day. “Because of my family history, I wanted to know where I stand now and what I could do to prevent any kind of heart disease from occurring or progressing any further,” Tonya says. Tonya also met with Dr. Jesse Adams at Jewish Hospital to have her numbers checked. Dr. Adams says that with younger patients like Tonya, it’s important to focus on risk factor modification with lifestyle recommendations to prevent bigger problems later in life. As a fellow healthcare professional, Tonya agrees. “Prevention is a lot more cost-effective than treatment. I can’t control my race, ethnicity, or family history. But I can exercise.” Exercise and eating well are top on Tonya’s priority lists for improving her heart health. Some of the challenges she faces are her on-the-go lifestyle and childhood habits of fatty foods and little exercise. “I grew up in a household where we ate a lot of the wrong things and weren’t physically active, and I’m more apt to return to those types of behaviors,” Tonya says. “I just have to break the cycle.” Although still in her 20s, Tonya has a long range vision when it comes to treating her body well for long-term benefits. “I can live to 80 and spend the last 20 years of my life in and out of hospitals, or I can live to 80 and be productive all those years. It’s our responsibility to keep up with our health, and I prefer to do something about it now.”

“Because of my family history, I wanted to know where I stand now.”

Cholesterol: 180

To schedule a heart health assessment, call 866.521.DOCS for a Jewish Physician Group doctor near you.

TONYA SMITH’S NUMBERS

Tonya is wearing:

IDEAL

CURRENT

Merona shirt, $10 from Target; J Brand Jeans, $207, available at Rodeo Drive, 2212 Holiday Manor Center, 502.425.8999; ring, $14.99, available at Bliss Handbags & Accessories, 502.423.9882.

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*Tonya’s blood pressure is 118/79; ideal blood pressure is 120/80.

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American Heart Association’s

Circle of Red Society Mary A. Littrell Vice President Central Bank

Connie Steller Executive Territory Manager, Abbott Vascular

Carole Christian Partner, Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs

Kimberly Black-Maffet Chair, Circle of Red, Special Assistant to President & Provost, University of Louisville

Priscilla Hancock Vice President of Information Technology, University of Louisville

Cathy Zion Publisher, Zion Publications

Kim Evans Nurse Practitioner, Institute for Integrative Medicine

Susan Allen Advertising Director, Zion Publications Sally Snavely

Dana Allen Vice President, Marketing, Norton Healthcare

not pictured:

Sandi Archibald, MD Physician in Emergency Medicine Leslie Hornback Senior Wealth Manager, Meritrust Wealth Management Chris Johnson President, Leadership Louisville Center

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Shelley Neal Vice President, Ambulatory Care, Jewish Hospital and St. Mary’s HealthCare M. Trish Osborn SVP, Market President, American Founders Bank Marilyn D. Schorin, PhD, RD Principal, Schorin Strategies, LLC

Leigh Pittman Vice President, Director Program Management Center of Excellence, Brown-Forman

Mary Ellen Stottmann Retired Becky Beanblossom Owner, Home Instead Senior Care Karen E. Bolin System Vice President, Women’s Services, Norton Healthcare Lawren A. Just President, Persimmon Ridge Golf Course, Inc. Deb Moessner President, Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield of KY

Circle of Red Society is an elite group of women who have the desire to significantly impact the health and economy of the community by making a personal commitment to help find a cure for the #1 killer of women.  These individuals make a personal gift of $1,500 to support the Go Red For Women movement and serve as ambassadors for the cause.

Mary Jane Peebles District Sales Manager, sanofi-aventis pharmaceuticals Rebecca Phillips Partner, Not-for-Profit Services Director, Mountjoy Chilton Medley Kim Tharp-Barrie System Vice President Norton Healthcare, Institute For Nursing and Workforce Development Today’s Woman


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kids’ hearts healthy eeping Kids’ Hearts Healthy

Cindy Wright has the support of her family, which includes 9-year-old Michael and 6-year-old Sarah.

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s one of only a handful of pediatric cardiologists in Louisville, Dr. Lucinda Wright spends very long days caring for some of the sickest children in the city. When she’s not doing rounds at the hospital, seeing patients at her Pediatric Cardiology Associates offices, or teaching medical students at the University of Louisville, she’s Cindy, mother of two, shuffling kids from basketball practice to piano lessons, checking homework, and trying to ensure everyone sits down together nightly for dinner and some family conversation. “I’m fortunate enough to be able to take the kids to school most of the time. We have a 20-minute car ride that we spend talking about school, their friends, listening to music...we go over spelling and vocabulary words, go over after-school plans,” says Cindy. “And even with our scattered lives, we always eat dinner together, although we eat out more than we should, and I’m a little embarrassed to say the kids’ favorite places often involve pizza.” In other words, she’s just like most working moms, except she spends her days saving lives and working to prevent other children from developing serious illnesses. But the Bowling Green native is the first to say she’s no super mom. “My husband is a big part of what allows me to do what I do. He runs his own business from home, so he’s flexible in his schedule. I depend on him a lot,” she says of David, who runs an independent financial portfolio management company from their Lake Forest home. And like most working parents, she often carries guilt with her.

There is a lot of evidence that heart disease starts at a really, really young age,” she says.

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By Lisa Hurt Kozarovich

“There are a lot of times I feel I’m missing out on things. That’s why, when I’m with them, I’m 100 percent there,” says Cindy, who, until a few months ago, was the only female pediatric cardiologist in the city. Being on-call some weekends and holidays and traveling around the state to treat patients can certainly cut into family time, though. When you’re one of only a handful of pediatric cardiologists in the state, the calls can be demanding. “These are usually cases that have to be handled now, not something that can wait until Monday. Sure, it can be hard, but when you have a child whose life is depending on you, there are no doubts about whether you’re doing the right thing. You go and do what you do,” she said. Cindy attended undergraduate and medical school at the University of Louisville before completing her pediatric and pediatric cardiology residency at Snyder Children’s Hospital in New York City. She says she doesn’t remember ever wanting to be anything other than a doctor. She feels fortunate that she’s been able to fulfill her lifelong dream, despite the difficult nature of her job. “We deal with death and children disabled by heart disease. We have to tell parents that their child is dying. My reward is when we have a baby so sick, and you see them grow up to be a healthy child. I also go home a lot and hug my kids,” Cindy says. While she always dreamed of being a doctor, she has no desire to be her children’s doctor. “I don’t want to be their pediatrician, I want to be their mom. I don’t diagnose or treat them, or call in antibiotics. I really use our pediatrician like every other parent,” says Cindy. One area she’s very proactive about regarding her children’s health, though, is getting their vaccinations. Cindy says, “I’m a huge believer in vaccinations. I’ve read strong literature (in favor of vaccinating) and I’ve seen, firsthand, children die of easily preventable disease. When parents (decide not to vaccinate), they don’t always think about the devastating diseases they’re welcoming.” Cindy also advocates for parents to create healthy eating and exercise habits in their children early on. “One of the biggest problems we see in children now is obesity, and with it we see high blood pressure, diabetes, and developing heart disease. It’s a huge problem. There is a lot of evidence that heart disease starts at a really, really young age,” she says. “Diet and exercise are so important to children — the habits they develop now are going to follow them throughout their lives. It’s much more difficult for adults to change habits.” She also understands how difficult convincing children to eat healthy and exercise can be. “I’ve been cursed with trying to find a balance with my own family. It’s an ongoing challenge to get my son, in particular, to eat vegetables. We find ones he will eat and try to find different ways to include them, and we constantly reintroduce other vegetables. We also try to set an example by what we eat,” Cindy adds. Cindy also encourages parents to keep up with well-child visits. “Your pediatrician can pick up on things you might not notice and then you can get preventative care that can make a world of difference,” she says. “Your pediatrician is your best resource and your child’s best advocate.”

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Card Wearing Your Heart on YourX Sleeve By Gioia Patton

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Photo Credit Ted Schafer

t all began one evening at a Manhattan restaurant a little over three years ago. Lori Cheek’s male friend/dinner companion scribbled the words ‘wanna have dinner with me?’ on the back of his business card while Cheek was in the ladies’ room, and as they were leaving, slid his card onto the dinner table of the woman sitting next to him. “I realized what a stealth move that was on my friend’s part, and came up with the idea of Cheek’d by taking it to the next level of mystery behind that card,” begins a very friendly Lori Cheek, who squeezed in a phone interview from her Greenwich Village studio apartment/office. Cheek’d subscribers receive 50 eye-catching calling cards that can be handed out to captivating strangers encountered in every day (or night) life. Recipients of the card can use the identification code printed on them to log onto www.Cheekd.com and send a message to his or her admirer. Each card has a different ‘cheeky’ phrase, i.e., ‘I’m totally cooler than your date,’ ‘I’m hitting on you,’ and Cheek’s personal favorite: ‘I just put all my drinks on your tab.’ “Even I had a hard time meeting people before I started Cheek’d in May of 2010,” sighs the 37-yearold unmarried Taylorsville, Ky. native, who moved to Manhattan 15 years ago after graduating from the University of Kentucky’s architecture school. “And I had a lot of beautiful and successful friends asking ‘where is he?” she continues. “I lived and breathed the idea of creating Cheek’d for three years from the moment that event happened in the restaurant, talking about it nonstop. And the feedback I received from people whenever I mentioned the idea was always ‘that’s a genius idea!’” she recalls excitedly. Cheek laughs, then remarks, “I’ve had so many people say to me, ‘I wish I had those cards last week when I noticed this guy on the subway.’ I also hear a lot of, ‘I can’t believe someone didn’t think of this idea sooner,’” she continues, admitting that her reaction is similar. Cheek, who until Thanksgiving still had a day job working as a furniture representative in a high-end Tribeca neighborhood furniture store (selling furniture to

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designers and architects), mentions that her architecture degree actually comes in handy since she created her business. “One reason my dating website is kind of hip is because I do have this design background so it has a really clean feeling to it,” she explains, “along with the design and branding of Cheek’d.” Eighty percent of the Cheek’d lines are created by Cheek herself, she says, and the remainder courtesy of “some of my very funny friends. I’m also coming out with a dog deck theme, with lines like ‘My dog thinks you’re cute’ and ‘My dog made me do this.’” As to the ages of Cheek’d clients and whether they’re interested in finding ‘Mr./Miss Right’ or ‘Mr./Miss Right Now’, Cheek says: “Subscribers’ ages range from 20 to 50, and I’d say it’s a little bit of both interests. Although a lot of people in my age group are looking to settle down,” she adds. For a business open only seven months at the time of this interview, I was impressed when Cheek answered my ‘Are there plans to take Cheek’d international?’ question with “We’re already international for free, and gotten the word out to over 10 countries — where you can customize your own deck of cards to say whatever you want (within reason) in your own language.” “It’s just really exciting!” she enthuses, “because I feel like everywhere I go, someone is either saying ‘I was just reading about Cheek’d’ or ‘my friend was just telling me about it.’ I’ve even given cards to people who’ve responded ‘I just got one of these cards on the subway the other day.’ So there’s a real buzz about Cheek’d right now…especially in New York City as it’s so big here.” Cheek concludes, “I just think this little idea of mine is kind of an answer to the online dating fatigue, because there are so many dating websites out there and none of them really have a sense of humor. And Cheek’d is kind of light and playful, and kind of bringing the online off-line and back to the streets.” GIOIA PATTON IS AN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CELEBRITY PROFILER. *Locally, Cheek’d cards can be found in the gift shop of the 21C Hotel in downtown Louisville.

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We love our readers! To prove it…14

Days of Love from Today’s Woman!

During the first 14 days of February, we will give away 14 great prizes, including great gifts from Aesthetic Alternatives • Azure Skin & Wellness • Beauty Glow • Davis Jewelers • Expressions Gifts & Décor • John Seelye Furs • The Melting Pot • Moore Jewelry • Ooh-La-La Bakery • Sweet Surrender • The Sweet Tooth • Taste of Kentucky • Ultimate Vein Care • Whitehall • Wild Strawberry Hair & Nail Salon. Learn more about the specific prizes at www.facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine.

WORTH $1,000

Write us a note about your closet and why it needs a makeover (less than 150 words). Also attach a photo of your closet showing why it needs help. Send entry by February 15 to:

closetmakeover@todayspublications.com Closet Makeover Today’s Woman magazine 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville KY 40223

Our own Stylist Wendy Anguiano will give Spring fashion tips.

Lose Weight Along With Them

We started our 2011 Weight Loss Challenge (page 32). Even if you weren’t chosen, you can still join the movement toward better health on our Facebook page www.facebook. com/todayswomanmagazine. Our four women will journal about their experiences, and the experts will offer ways you can lose weight.

Win a Closet Makeover

You can also enter by sending to:

Since it is heart month — head to a free Norton event on February 17 for a heart screening. You’ll get free blood pressure and body fat screenings. Call 502.629.1234 to register.

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Wear this for

National Wear Red Day, February 4.

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Happenings, news, celebrations, and tidbits that caught Today’s Woman’s eye this month.

Bailey 44. Available at Rodeo Drive, $219

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new local show features these women’s View From on WKYI channel 138 and analog channel 24.

(pictured: Adrianna Hopkins, Julie Smith, Jessica Taylor and the show’s producer, Sherlene Shanklin).

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Loved this Book

I read the book Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand in about two days. It is a compelling story about the amazing stamina we have as human beings — at least that Louie Zamperini had during his life as a World War II prisoner of war.

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even local chefs will join forces for a culinary event in memory of one of their own. On February 25 and 26, Napa River Grill will have a five-course chef collaboration dinner with wine pairings in memory of their sous chef Kenneth Black. Where: Westport Village location of Wild Eggs and all proceeds will be donated to a scholarship fund at Sullivan University named in Black’s honor.Tickets: are $125 per person. Reservations: 502.423.5784, www.aculinarytribute.com.

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haring Our Stories (SOS), a support group for women diagnosed with breast cancer within the last 18 months, will launch February 7. Call Baptist East Information Center at 502.897.8131 or email BHEInfoCenter@bhsi.com

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Coming March 2011

The Wild Women Wearable Art Show will be February 4, 4-7pm February 5, 10am-3pm at Marriott Courtyard, 100 South 2nd Street.

100 Wise Women

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top by and see the very popular Form, Not Function: Quilt Art at the Carnegie, an annual, juried exhibition exploring the world of contemporary art quilts. A new take on an old technique, art quilts are created strictly for their aesthetic appeal rather than functional use. Find them at the Carnegie Center for Art and History in New Albany through March 5.

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Hear from Sue Stout Tamme, President of Louisville market for Baptist Healthcare System and her daughter Brittney Stout, Clinic Manager for Baptistworx Physical Therapy

This event sells out, so grab your 100 Wise Women ticket now for March 9 by going to www.leadershiplouisville.org

Not Your Grandmother’s Quilt This quilt was made by Louisville’s own Vallorie G. Henderson. It is called Wooded Stream

The Wild Women Wearable Art Show

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t Gilda’s Club Louisville, you can find free events to help you deal with a cancer diagnosis. On February 7, there is a couple’s problem solving workshop and on February 17, there is a young adult family and friends event. 502.583.0075, www.gildasclublouisville.org.

For our anniversary, my husband and I celebrated at the downtown Z’s Fusion restaurant, where they are sporting new-to-Louisville chef David Scales and delicious food. I had the Hawaiian Walu and he had the Rack of Elk. Quite exotic. I learned that there are some special seasonal menu changes coming, and on Sundays they offer half-price bottles of wine. Z’s Fushion specializes in prime aged beef & fresh seafood flown in daily.

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Writer Spotlight

Cheryl Stuck

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alk about a writer who is up for anything…an editor can’t help but love her. In her 10 years with the magazine, Cheryl Stuck has tried so many different approaches to communicate a story and to inspire our readers. Here’s some examples of the extremes she has gone to on behalf of our readers: Exercise with Today’s Woman (She tried a different exercise each month.), Check Up (She had a different medical check-up each month.), Try This (She invited readers along for a special activity including dancing, journaling, hair styling.), Health Care Alternatives, Health Hazards, Job Perks. Besides writing features for all three of our magazines, this year Cheryl is working with our Woman of Wellness health advisory board to cover different areas of health and wellness. Her article is on page 32.   In her non-writing hours, Cheryl owns and manages NiteLife Boutique, a lingerie store in Columbus, Ind. She commutes at least three hours per day and spends many hours at the store, but her family is her first priority. “I love spending time on the river with my husband, Carl, and spend as much time as possible with my children and grandchildren,” she says.   As for writing outside of our publication, Cheryl is working on a suspense novel that is in the revision stage as well as a screenplay based on that novel. She has also started writing memoirs for individuals who want to preserve their memories for their children.   We appreciate all Cheryl has done for this magazine, but she wanted to give back some love. “Today’s Woman gave me my first chance to be paid for my writing and gave me the self-confidence to finally call myself a writer,” Cheryl says. She says she has loved meeting and writing the stories of many interesting and courageous women — some inspiring, some sad, and some insightful. “I have learned so much from them.”

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Shop for Good

Bring in new or gently used professional attire to LeBliss Salon and receive 10 percent off purchase at LeBliss, Clodhoppers, Dandelion, and Blush. This will go to help The Center for Women and Families.

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Love the Puppets

Fools for Love — 8th Fundraiser for Squallis Puppeteers on February 12 at 770 Eastern Parkway. The family-friendly show includes: Live Puppet Dating Game with local band, Junk Yard Dogs. Donations: $10-$25. Contact: 502.636.1974 www.squallispuppeteers.com www.iamtodayswoman.com

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Her

Inspirations By Holly Gregor / photos by Melissa donald

CHILDREN’S DESIGNER EMILY SAYLOR

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rowing up in Middletown, Emily Saylor said she was a very shy little girl. She felt sad and lonely. Now she has found a way to make all those feelings of being “different” work for her. Emily uses her creativity… She says she has found busy but fulfilling bliss in her work. “One day I was looking at (fashion designer) Trina Turks’ website for pillow fabric in her new home line. I saw this fabric and thought, ‘that would make a great little girl’s dress.’ That’s what sparked it. I guess it was no coincidence that I was pregnant with Carolena at the time.” Now Emily stays up nights designing and sewing. “I have two cabinets of fabrics that I mix and match. There is a lot of spontaneity, but also a lot of planning goes into it. I go with the flow. I don’t like to follow patterns.” A big inspiration for Emily is her children’s individual personalities. Since she has been unable to find the right clothes in the stores to match their personalities, she makes them. She has three children: sons, Byrd, 5, and Finley, 3, and daughter, Carolena, 14 months. Saylor has just started venturing out to sell her children’s clothes to the public. Currently, she has participated in one show, The Anchorage Arts & Crafts Show, held last December. She does, however, take special orders from her friends. 1

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Saylor’s final thought: “You know how, for a long time, you go through life and it’s fine, but you feel like something is missing. When I figured out how to use my creativity, life became more fulfilling. It’s even better that I can do something for my kids and with my kids!” 6


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13 Things That Inspire Emily: 1. My Kids With three totally different personalities, I have so much fun trying to come up with outfits that they love and that I love as well. They come up with the best ideas. My youngest son wanted dinosaur pants the other day. We couldn’t find fabric that we liked, so we made our own. They are always requesting different themes or color combinations. They remind me that creativity is unique to the creator and is not always what someone else would imagine. 2. Trina Turk Her designs are always bright, eye-catching, interesting, and happy. When she came out with a home décor fabric line a couple of years ago, I wanted to redecorate my entire house. She has a pair of navy striped pants in her spring line that might have to find a way to my closet. 3. Sara Floyd from Sara Floyd Photography I first started using Sara for our family pictures a little over a year ago, when my daughter Carolena was born. I was looking for someone to do newborn pictures and she came highly recommended. After meeting Sara, I could tell right away that her mind works in the same way that mine does, always busy, always thinking. She has an amazing talent behind the lens and has a unique and beautiful photographic perspective. When the two of us get together on a photo shoot idea, it is like a creative tornado — ideas flying everywhere! 4. elementsofstyleblog.com This Boston-based blog features interior design ideas mixed in with a little fashion design as well. Blogger Erin Gates has a great eye for style both in fashion and interiors. 5. hostessblog.com Throwing a party? Looking for entertaining ideas? Hostess With The Mostess is my go-to blog for researching party and entertainment ideas. The author blows me away every time with her party themes and beautiful photographs. I have planned many parties from inspiration from this site. 6. 6pm.com (Formerly known as Zappos Outlet) I. LOVE. THIS. PLACE. Not only can you score some amazing deals on shoes here, but now they carry clothing as well. This place has inspired many of my personal fashion looks. I never knew that I wanted a pair of red cowboy boots, but when I saw a beautiful pair of Lucchese boots there (for a steal!), I knew they had to be mine. I now wear them at least once a week. I could go on and on about the amazing deals I have gotten there. 7. New Smyrna Beach, Florida We have been vacationing there since I was about 10 years old. With a mix of young surfers, vacationing families, and older retirees, it is somehow the perfect balance of being casual but not sloppy casual. This place makes me think of white linen drawstring pants for the boys and long flowing dresses for the girls. 8. gilt.com I think this might have been the original of the online outlet explosion. Great deals, great brands, but for me it is also the whole “get it before it’s gone” aspect. Every day at noon, they start a new sale, and things sell out fast. 9. Fabric designer Amy Butler Her designs are a mix of graphic and delicate, but all very bold and beautiful. The great thing about her collections is that you can mix any of her fabrics together and come up with so many interesting looks. Her fabrics work for children’s clothing, women’s clothing, home decor, so many things. 10. Lucky Magazine I love different and interesting design, but I also like it to be something that you could actually wear. Much of what you see coming down the runway is beautiful, but certainly not wearable in a day-to-day situation. Especially for someone with three small children. Lucky seems to hit the mark when it comes to unusual but accessible items. 11. Made Blog — www.dana-made-it.com This is mainly a sewing blog, but Dana puts together great tutorials on food, printables, children’s clothing, and many other things. Her ideas are easy to follow, unique, and relevant. This is one of the blogs I visit daily for creative inspiration. 12. Cindy Borders from Cindy Borders Jewelry I have about six pairs of her earrings. Cindy is not only a talented jewelry designer, but a beautiful person as well with a great sense of style. 13. Clodhoppers Boutique I have been shopping with them since they were at their original location on Bardstown Road. I bought my first pair of 7 for All Mankind Jeans from them years ago. I know I can always count on them for something fun and stylish in a pinch.

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Catch Sight of the Beautiful Story and photos by Barbara MacDonald

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I’m not much of a shoe girl. Never have been. Perhaps it’s from growing up in Hawaii and not even owning closed shoes until the third grade, or perhaps it’s because I have painful feet. Most fashionable shoes feel like torture devices to me. So, when I find a pair that is both fashionable and comfortable, I sing it from the rooftops. After spotting these in an advertisement for Apricot Lane in Westport Village, I decided it was worth the drive to check them out. The Nomad brand Yippy Rain Boot comes in a variety of colors and patterns; the store even had UofL and UK colors. I chose the black and white combo of leopard and zebra print. Having never really owned rubber boots, I was concerned about how hot or smelly my feet might get. I was also concerned they wouldn’t be comfortable enough. My worrying was wasted. Not only are these comfortable enough to wear all day, even when standing or walking a lot, they keep my feet feeling comfy and dry. You can find this brand at Amazon.com too. The boots retail for less than $50.

When Dogs Need Clothes

This winter Winnie came to visit. She’s a two-year-old Maltese who was living in Florida and belongs to a friend there. The friend was planning some extensive travel abroad and asked us if we could take her in for awhile so he could rest easy knowing she was in good hands.

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The night Winnie arrived, it was about 20 degrees. The next morning I set out to find her sweaters or jackets to help her stay warm until our weather warms up. Let me say this: I never in a million years thought that I would have a dog with a wardrobe, or one that could fit in my purse, and it’s nowhere near the same as having a German Shepherd mix like our old Daphne. Now I know why there are dog boutiques. Finding dog clothes at pet stores is not that easy. They carry a limited supply of sweaters and coats that can run from about $8 to $30 for size small. Three Dog Bakery in

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o Chenoweth Square also carries dog clothes, including some fancy, pricier, sequined sweaters and leather bomber jackets, but the owner there told me to be careful with sizing. Not all small-size dog clothes are the same; the measurements vary wildly from brand to brand. After a full day of shopping, Winnie has three sweaters, a down coat, and pajamas. Hey, it gets cold in the house at night. And she seems happy and warm. By the way, online you can find custom-made dresses, skirts, shirts, and pants for dogs with prices (again, for a small size) running easily up to $100 or more.

Afghan bracelet

Ryan, my soldier son, is currently serving in Afghanistan with the U.S. Army and is one of many Americans over there helping the Afghan people protect themselves. A special thank you to all our brave men and women who are helping with that effort. He brought with him rubber bracelets he bought from a street vendor in Kandahar. The LIVESTRONG-style bracelet is red, black, and green (the colors of Afghanistan) and has white Pashto writing that was difficult to translate. I asked on Facebook. I emailed friends. I asked friends to ask their friends. And finally an answer came from a rather unusual source. While watching the news one night and playing on Facebook, I saw a report from an ABC News reporter who is based in Kabul. I quickly looked him up, and since his name is somewhat unusual — there was only one Nicholas Schifrin — I sent him pictures of the bracelet, and he quickly got back to me with the translation, “The Afghan Security Forces are the defenders of the Afghan people.” — Thanks, Nick.

Fun for Your Bath

Romance is in the air this month as everything turns red or pink. For some notso-typical Valentine treats, check out the LUSH counter inside Macy’s at Oxmoor Mall. The Frog Prince Bath Bomb has a Prince Charming hidden inside. Dissolve in your bath to reveal your prince. The Frog Prince has a new scent that sounds divine: jasmine, sandalwood, rose, and neroli. With a great name, It’s Raining Men, this shower gel promises to leave your skin soft and smelling like crème brûlée. I’m not sure my diet could stand it. The LUSH crew must be working overtime on these names. The Ex Factor Bath Bomb is scented with ylang ylang and vanilla. The yummy fragrance will leave you feeling happy, relaxed, and ready to meet someone new.

Get Your Skin Ready

As winter’s end appears within reach, remember that February is a great time to schedule facials, peels, and other exfoliating treatments. The tender skin left behind after such a procedure isn’t ready for sun. And before you know it, we’ll be getting ready for the Derby.

ow She’sr tnist! an a

Boost Creativity ~ Take a Class

Since writing about boosting creativity in my December column, I’ve had the pleasure of talking with many readers who were touched, moved, or inspired by what I wrote. One such reader, Ann Marchal, currently works as an artist, but that wasn’t always the case. Ann says her creativity was sparked by an art exhibit in Chicago about six years ago, and she soon started taking painting classes at Mudpies with two of her sisters. Finding painting to be very therapeutic, she kept at it. A year later she moved over to Schrodt Studio for more classes. Today she paints at home a few days a week and has art for sale at Cartwheels Paper & Gifts in St. Matthews. She also does commission work. Ann recommends classes for anyone wanting to start painting. She says you’ll learn the basics and also make new friends. “My style is usually expressionistic. I love using bold colors and texture in my paintings.  My favorite painting is the Degas I painted for my dad. He loved horse racing and was fond of the works of Degas.”

Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions to Barbara@todayspublications.com or find me on Facebook. Have a great month.

— Barbara

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www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

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I love my

breakfast room table What an unusual table. No wonder you love it. What is its history?

It is a Lazy Susan made of pine that was the dinner table at my house in Hopkinsville when I was growing up. My mother bought it in the 1950s at a store in Nashville called Bradford’s. Our house was fashioned like a cottage...before the cottage look became popular...and there was an exaggerated bay window in the living room. The table sat there and it is where we ate all our meals.

How do you use the table today?

It is our casual dining table. We use it for breakfast and Sunday night suppers, and it serves as the children’s table at holiday dinners.

Those are some wonderful dishes. I love the colors. So festive. I bought them in Italy in 1999. We were visiting our daughter who was in school in Florence, and I bought 12 place settings. There are four different patterns. That is my mother’s silver, Chantilly by Gorham.

Not every home has a dedicated breakfast room. I like it.

AMANDA TYLER Proprietress of The Curtain Exchange, The Vogue Center, 3733 Lexington Road Husband, Terry Tyler, and 10-month old Havanese, Pete.

Household:

Neighborhood: Indian

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2011

Hills

I thought about opening up the room into the kitchen, but I am not known for my cooking. I don’t like people watching me measuring and stirring.

What was your mother’s Sunday meal?

We usually had roast beef with carrots and onions that cooked on top of the stove while we were at church. This was before crock pots. There were mashed potatoes on the side with good gravy and fresh vegetables. My dad raised tomatoes,

By Lucy M. Pritchett Photos by Barbara MacDonald

so those were always on the table. And Mother’s special dessert was custard. I have tried to duplicate it but no one can make it like she does.

What were some of the rules at your family table? Use your napkin. Stay at the table until everyone is finished eating. Ask to be excused.

That revolving top looks like it might have tempted you as a child.

Oh yes. My brother and I would sometimes get on and ride it. Of course, we got into a lot of trouble when Mother caught us.

I am fascinated by the wallpaper. All those animals.

The wallpaper is Le Cirque by Brunswick and Fils in indigo blue. The animal motif — elephants, camels, elk — is very whimsical. And I love the color.

Your choice of drapery panels is perfect in this room. They are simple panels of warm, winter white linen with a striped French blue banding. The hardware is wrought iron in a brushed pewter finish with leaf finials.

Tell me about the photos in here.

They are black and white family photos framed in black. I hung them here because it is the cozy room in the house. It is more private.

This is a round table and your formal dining room table is oblong. Which do you prefer?

There is so much beauty in a round table. It offers open, friendly sitting. There is no head. Everyone is participating.

Today’s Woman


Weight Loss Challenge 2011

By Melissa Donald

adies, are you ready to change your life? If so, then stay tuned for this year’s weight loss challenge. We have L carefully selected four new participants to take part in four different exercise programs, and we will be tracking their progress for four months. Many of us can relate to their dieting and exercise dilemmas, and I admire their bravery and their willingness to make dramatic changes in their lives. Join us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine)and read about their experiences. Follow us through the next four months as we share each participant’s journey.

N

ikki Fouch is a beautiful young woman on the inside and out. She is strong and independent and wants to feel that same kind of energy on the outside that she does on the inside. She worries about the health risks of being overweight: diabetes and heart disease. “I am only 24. I shouldn’t feel this way. My joints hate me, and I am out of breath easily. I want to learn now how to be healthy and feel good about my body so when I am ready to start a family, I can teach them how to do the same.”

Nikki Fouch Age: 24 Height: 5’3” Starting Weight: 225 Goal Weight: 160 Occupation: Apple (computer) Specialist

Exercise Program: Mohr Results Boot Camp ~ Kara Mohr

www.mohrresults.com; www.mohrresultsbootcamp.com

D

esireé Bush is a busy woman. She works full-time as an educator for the public school system and owns Grub-n-Scrub BBQ restaurant and car wash. In addition to her work, she is a wife, and mother of two young girls. Desireé is ready to be healthy and to set a good example for her children. “Heart disease has been a silent killer in my family, and I refuse to be the next victim.” Desireé states that it’s hard for her to loose weight due to lack of time to exercise and focus on a healthy diet. Historically, once she looses the weight, she seems to gain it back. She is ready to get rid of the “mommy pooch and saddlebags for good!”

Desireé Bush Age: 32 Height: 5’11” Starting Weight: 218 Goal Weight: 178 Occupation: Teacher and Owner of Grub-n-Scrub in Middletown

Exercise Program: Coach’s Fitness Club ~ Personal Trainer Merica Koch

W

edding bells are in Schannon’s near future, which is one of the reasons she has taken up our challenge. Schannon also wants to live a healthier life by maintaining a healthy weight for total well-being and longevity, and to set a good example for her children. “If we do not focus on the total person, mind, body, and soul, what good would we be to ourselves and our children?” She has always been an active person involved in team sports, track and field, and dance, and is looking forward to increasing her energy level to match her already energetic personality.

Schannon Clayton Age: 42 Height: 5’9” Starting Weight: 256 Goal Weight: to loose at least 30 lbs. Occupation: Case Manager for Healthy Start Program

Exercise Program: Downtown YMCA ~ Trainer Abbie Richards www.ymcalouisville.org/downtown

C

indy Wohl has had a roller coaster of stressful events over the past few years, where she has turned to food for comfort. Stress eaters can relate. There was a period of time when, “I stopped thinking about my weight, and I didn’t realize how my weight was affecting my confidence. The older and wiser I am, the more I know that not thinking about it doesn’t work.” Cindy is ready to get back to her original steady weight and say “I will wear a bikini again!”

Cindy Wohl Age: 50 Height: 5’5” Starting Weight 195 Goal Weight: 145 Occupation: Regional Manager for KEEPS (Kentucky Energy Efficiency Program for Schools)

Exercise Program: Pilates Village ~ Stacy Hunter Celi www.pilatesvillage.com

www.coachsfitness.com

Mae Pike

All of the food will be provided. Food Provider: Home Cuisine ~ owned by Sandy Pike and Mae Pike. Home Cuisine is providing three meals a day for each participant. Home Cuisine, which specializes in preparing fresh nutritious meals, drops off the meals twice a week at Rainbow Blossom where the participants pick them up. www.homecuisineonline.com

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SMART

Styles

Davis Jewelers

A Taste of Kentucky

This Valentine’s Day, let Davis Jewelers help you select that perfect gift for your loved one.

Show your sweetie some love this Valentine’s Day with our new hand painted wineglasses that are filled with these indulgent Cellar Door gourmet chocolates.

Sterling Silver and diamond pendants with adjustable chains.

Your Choice $69

Davis Jewelers just made shopping a little easier!

A Mother’s Touch Personalized Jewelry Find the perfect gift for your Valentine. Large selection of engraveable items — Unique, personalized, and custom made. (Free engraving on some items.) Specializing in Mother’s, Grandmother’s, Children’s, Spirit and Themed jewelry, including a large selection of charms. Offering corporate shopping and fundraisers; party room available for parties for all ages or group. 502.253.9477 12312 B Shelbyville Road www.amotherstouchjewelry.com

Downtown in the Aegon Center 400 West Market Facing 4th St. 502.566.4554 Mall St. Matthews by the Women’s Dillard’s 502.895.2733

Visit www.davisjewelers.com and shop at your convenience 24 hours a day! 9901 Forest Green Blvd. • Louisville, KY 502.212.0420 • www.davisjewelers.com

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center Follow your heart! Classes available.

Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe

We have an eclectic yet classic mix of fine jewelry with competitive prices since 1949. Visit www.claterjewelers.com for our exclusive collections and a full list of services.

Necklace $138

Davis Jewelers

FREE Snap Clasp Bracelet when you

purchase 3 Chamilia Beads (a $58 value).

502.212.0420 February 1-28

Register to win a sterling silver Personality starter bracelet, $120 value! (Includes a 7” bracelet with one glass bead and two sterling silver stoppers.)

502.426.0077 Earrings $30

Bracelet $143

Open 7 days with a wide selection of yarn and accessories. 10482 Shelbyville Rd. Louisville, KY 502.244.4927 www.sophiesfineyarn.com

February 1-14

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center

Visit, browse, and let us assist you with all your knitting and crocheting needs. Our shop is conveniently located in the Stonefield Square Shopping Center next to the Fresh Market.

Style Calendar

Necklace

Now located in Westport Village 1201 Herr Lane 502.426.0077 www.claterjewelers.com

$182

—ADVERTISEMENT—

Wednesday, February 9 • 5pm-9pm

Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe Join us for a Valentine Pot Luck and Knit Along! Call … 502.244.4927 February 25

Smart Styles Advertising Deadline to advertise business in April issue. Call today … 502.327.8855


Does Winter Affect Your Mood? During the dark days of winter, you may find yourself feeling down in the dumps. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, women are 70 percent more likely than men to experience depression during their lifetime. Depression can not only interfere with your own life, but also those who care about you. by Cheryl Stuck Dr. Joyce Spurgeon said that many people suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and get depressed each year in the fall and winter when there is little to no sunlight. Spurgeon is residency training director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, said that a lot of people suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and get depressed each year in the fall and winter when there is little to no sunlight. Depression can not only interfere with your own life, but also those who care about you. But help is available. So, how can you tell if your depression is serious? First of all, if you have suicidal thoughts you should seek immediate help, according to Spurgeon and clinical psychologist, Dan Guy at Baptist Hospital East. Dr. Guy said, “Everyone deals with a certain amount of depression at different times in their life.” After a traumatic event, such as loss of a loved one, an accident or loss of a job, it’s not unusual to experience some of the symptoms of depression. Guy said the thing to consider is whether or not you had those symptoms before the event or if all of a sudden the symptoms are present. “If that depression remains significant and is detrimental to your general lifestyle after a couple of months, like after eight to 12 weeks and it’s not going away, not lifting at all, then that might be something to check out with a doctor or a counselor.” Both Guy and Spurgeon said that a good place to start is with your family physician to rule out physical causes.

SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION • A sad, hopeless, or “empty” feeling that won’t go away. • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you once enjoyed. • Feeling restless or irritable. • Eating more or less than usual. • Sleeping too much or too little. • Trouble concentrating or making decisions. • Fatigue or low energy. • Feeling guilty, hopeless, worthless, or like a failure. • Thoughts of suicide or death. Call 911 or a suicide hotline for immediate help. For a free, confidential online screening test, visit the University of Louisville Depression Center website. www.depression-screening.org. You can also contact Baptist Hospital East at 502.896.7132.

Guy added that a hormone imbalance as well as other physical causes can lead to depressive symptoms.

HOW to fight depression? Get regular exercise

Guy said, “It will increase your metabolism and your energy level over time. And usually you will sleep better if you’re on an exercise regimen. ”

Eat healthy Spurgeon said, “Healthy eating and looking at how to make healthy choices…this can really help people fight off some of the symptoms of depression.” Guy said, “Cut down on caffeine, sugar, and food late in the day because that gets your body ramped up instead of slowing it down so you can sleep at night.”

Expose yourself to sunlight For SAD sufferers, Spurgeon said, “Sunlight absolutely plays a role in that. There are light boxes which help and some patients swear that tanning beds provide the same help. Just sitting under artificial lights doesn’t help with this.”

Consider medication “Medication is helpful to people who are struggling with depression in most cases. It is not a lifelong commitment for a lot of people… but is based on a case by case basis,” Spurgeon said. “I do not recommend the OTC (over the counter) remedies. None of them are studied by the FDA and none of them are regulated.” So if you are looking for OTC remedies, Spurgeon said, you should probably be consulting your doctor.

Spend time around people Guy said this is extremely important. “When people are alone and isolated, they have a tendency to focus on negative things and the more time you spend thinking about negative things, the more likely you are to develop depression symptoms.”

Do enjoyable activitives “Doing something that makes you feel good can release endorphins and help you relax more,” Guy said. “So something [like a massage] can be beneficial but is not an actual treatment for depression.”

Avoid alcohol Alcohol is a depressant drug and over time it can increase your problems with depression.

Advisory group members are: Margie Beeler • Susan Boddy • Christie Bollinger • Sherrice Bond • Kim Broecker • Jennifer Brown • Linda Burry • Kimberly Carpenter • Tamella Buss Cassis • Holly Clark • Stacy Cohen • Diane Collins • Pat Cooke • Funmilayo Dixon • Laurie Duesing • Kelly Davis Fleenor • Tanya Franklin • Julie Garrison • Carol Graham • Dawn Hayden • Pam Hayden • Mary Haynes • Gretchen Houchin • Mary Jennings • Alexis Karageorge • Dee Jay Kelly • Tomiko Coates Kiefer • Diane Kissel • Kristi Jedlicki Levenhagen • Melissa Little • Sean Maguire • Geri Manning • Lisa Mattingly • David McArthur • Anne McReynolds • Tara Morris • Maria Munoz • Tina Nuttall • Denise Orwick • Betsy Paulley

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Today’s Woman of Wellness Advisory Board Says:

32

out of 33 respondents report that their mood is affected by the shorter days of winter.

Here’s what our Today’s Woman of Wellness Health Advisory Panel had to say: What is the best way you have found to pull yourself out of a depressed mood? “Exercise outside if possible, inside otherwise, and spend time on my glassed-in porch where the light is very good.” Deborah Tuggle, founder, consultant, educator, Critical Care Curriculum

“Surrounding myself with friends. The less time I spend alone, the better, when I am feeling down. It helps to laugh and have a good time. To do something active (walking or hiking) or watch an uplifting or funny movie.” Rhonda Sigler, marketing manager for State Farm Insurance

“I have found that the best way to combat a depressed mood is to become busy at something I typically enjoy. It might be practicing my flute or translating some Latin or taking a long walk with my dog. I have also found that heavy moods are inclined to dissipate when I attempt to put my so-called troubles into perspective, specifically counting my many, many blessings.” Laurie Duesing, Latin teacher

“Putting on high energy music and dance like no one is watching.” Susan Boddy, independent insurance agent

“I focus on things outside of myself. I volunteer, connect with friends, and read positive devotional books.” Mary Jennings, director, marketing/PR, Clark Memorial Hospital

Next month, our panel will discuss sleep. • Mae Pike • Leesa Richardson • Ticonna Roberts • Cheryl Scanlon • Rhonda Sigler • Burke Stephens • Myrdin Thompson • Deborah Tuggle • Lannette VanderToll • Jessica Walker • Marine Walls • Janie Biagi Watts • Cenia L. Wedekind • Anthony Westmoreland • Cathi Wiley • Kathy Wilkinson • Debbie Williams • Allison Young www.iamtodayswoman.com

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4

THINGS

Not To Miss

Brad Paisley

1

THIS Month

#

This traditional country and southern rock music superstar has been one of my favorite music artists for years. I couldn’t have been happier this past November, when after having been repeatedly nominated as Country Music Association’s (CMA) Entertainer of the Year, Paisley won. Guitarist extraordinaire, songwriter/ singer: his hits include the heartbreaking ballads Whiskey Lullaby (duet with Alison Krauss), and When I Get Where I’m Going (duet with Dolly Parton), and the humorous I’m Gonna Miss Her, Alcohol, and Celebrity (the latter in which Paisley pokes fun at today’s reality-show ‘stars’). To date the three-time GRAMMY and multiple Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association Award winner has sold more than 11 million albums, and Paisley’s most recent studio album, American Saturday Night, was ranked TIME magazine’s No. 1 album of 2009.

When  February 19 @ 7:30pm Where  KFC Yum! Center tickets  $29.75 & $59.75 Contact  The box office, or Ticketmaster outlets, or 1.800.745.3000, or www.ticketmaster.com — Gioia Patton

American Red Cross 13th Annual Valentine Gala

This Mardi Gras masquerade night will include dinner, dancing, music by Wulfe Pack, and fantastic lucky heart drawings. The proceeds from this event will benefit the Bullitt / Spencer County Service Center. When  February 12 @ 7pm Where  Paroquet Springs Conference Center, Shepherdsville, KY tickets  $50 Contact  502.955.6259

4 #

Romantic Fools

“Romantic Fools is a quirky and offbeat look at

dating, relationships, and the inner workings of Men & Women,” begins John Campbell Finnegan, director of the Bunbury Theatre production. “It’s

Men Are From Mars/Women Are From Venus

meets ‘Barnum and Bailey (Circus)!’” Finnegan adds cryptically. “Written in a Vaudeville style, the 12 two-character sketches peel back the layers of how human relationships form, grow, and go haywire!” ‘A side-splitting new comedy. You’ll ache from non-stop laughing.’ — Show Business Weekly

February 10-27, various performances Where  The Bunbury Theatre. The Henry Clay Building, 604 South 3rd St. tickets  $10-$21 Contact  502.585.5306 or www.bunburytheatre.org Group rates and discounts available. Theater is handicapped accessible. — Gioia Patton When 

3

Louisville Salutes Blue Apple On Broadway

This one-of-a-kind fundraiser showcases the talents of Louisville’s leading citizens and original songs from 37 musicals commissioned by the Blue Apple Players. While it is an opportunity for Blue Apple to share with adults its nationally acclaimed educational theatre programs for youth, it is also an evening filled with show-stopping fun. When  February 12 @ 7-10pm Where  Brown Theatre tickets  $100/single; $150/two; $750/group of ten Contact  502.587.7990 or www.blueappleplayers.org

14 Days of Love from Today’s Woman

Starting February 1, we’ll be giving you 14 reasons to love us more! For the first 14 days of February, we’ll be giving away a prize a day to a lucky winner. Each day, we’ll post a question on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine) related to love, and the person who receives the most “likes” on their comment wins a prize! The contest will start at 9 a.m. and end at 9 p.m. each day. You could win one of these great gifts: • A Taste of Kentucky ~ hand painted wineglasses filled with Cellar Door gourmet chocolates, $60 value • Aesthetic Alternatives~ $100 gift certificate • Azure Skin & Wellness ~ $125 gift certificate •B  eauty Glow ~ facial, $55 value The Sweet Tooth ~ dessert and coffee for two, $13 value • Davis Jewelers ~ jewelry, $100 value • Expressions Gifts & Décor ~ $100 gift certificate • J ohn Seelye Furs ~ pearl leather and blush sheared beaver purse, $584 value

2 #

• Moore Jewelry ~ silver earrings with cubic zirconia and hearts, $125 value • Ooh La La! Bakery ~ Valentine’s Day Cookies & Chocolates Basket, $50 value • The Melting Pot ~ dinner for two, $100 value • Sweet Surrender ~ 6-inch cake, $35 value • Ultimate Vein Care~ $150 gift certificate • Whitehall House & Gardens ~ candlelight dinner, $200 value • Wild Strawberry Hair & Nail Salon ~ $50 gift certificate

Go online to www.iamtodayswoman.com to see the rest of Gioia’s Not to Miss events and Caitlin Gaynor’s Dating Dilemmas.

#

The Corpse on Farewell Street

Presented by WhoDunnit Murder Mystery Theater, The Corpse on Farewell Street is the seventh and latest of the ‘Dr. MacCrimmon’ murder mysteries, and because it’s set in 1900, actually takes place before all of the other MacCrimmon mysteries — which cover a 10-year span beginning in 1902. “Ann Waterman, the author, has done a splendid job in getting audiences to want to know more about Dr. Angus MacCrimmon and his unique detective abilities, as well as his own personal mystery — that of the disappearance of his wife in a shipwreck, in which the doctor survived,” remarks WhoDunnit Inc. of Kentucky’s Artistic/Producing Director, Niles Welch. “In this story, Dr. MacCrimmon is challenged to solve the mystery of a mysterious corpse and a secret society.” Frank Whitaker reprises his role as Dr. MacCrimmon. Saturday evenings, February 12-April 2. Seating @ 6:30pm, performance begins @7pm Where  The Hyatt Regency, 320 West Jefferson St. tickets  $43.95 includes dinner, show, tax and gratuity. Discounts apply for groups of 6 or more. Advance reservations are required.Contact  the box office, 502.426.7100 or www.whodunnitky.com — Gioia Patton When 

If you would like to include your event in our upcoming issue, send it to Calendar@iamtodayswoman.com. Please include a hi-res jpeg image (photo should be 300 dpi at 4x6 size). We must receive your information at least 6 weeks in advance. No phone calls, please.

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Today’s TodAY’s Woman WomAn


I M A G E E N H A N C E M E N T

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41 39


Beautiful Hair Real

or

Fake?

By Tiffany White / Photos by melissa donald

Turn your hair into one of your most beautiful features. Here’s how to do it.

IF YOU WEAR A TOPPER

IF YOU GROW YOUR HAIR

When Dr. Michelle Aboud began to experience hair loss, she decided to wear extensions, but the process of putting them in was timeconsuming and expensive. Her stylist, Jackie Sturgeon, owner of Blades Salon & Spa (132 Chenoweth Lane, 502.893.0431), suggested she try a topper, which is a hair piece that is placed on top of the head and blended into the rest of the hair for a fuller look.

Lee Ann Chitwood keeps her hair looking its best by following the advice of her stylist — Oleg Sennik, owner of Volos Salon (3900 Shelbyville Road, Suite 7, 502.693.8845).

Toppers, says Jackie, vary in size and are available in different shapes to fit the area that needs to be covered. They can either be clipped into the hair like Michelle’s or double-sided tape can be applied to the bottom of the topper to keep it in place for as long as desired. Both methods of attachment enable you to put it on and take it off at any time. To wear it permanently, an adhesive must be applied to the bottom of the hair piece. The topper would need to be removed every 23-25 days. You can sleep in it, shampoo, and style it. Prices range from $600-$1,200. Makeup by Blades Salon & Spa

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To keep hair healthy and shiny, Sennik suggests trimming the hair every seven to eight weeks which prevents split ends and helps the hair grow. Applying a treatment to the hair is also beneficial, but it must have the right balance of protein and moisturizers for your specific hair type. “Too much protein can make the hair break and too much moisturizer can make it flat,” says Sennik. You should also avoid using multiple chemicals such as perms, relaxers, and colors at the same time. “Over-processing the hair removes the top layer of the cuticle, and the only thing you have left is the cortex, which is very fragile, and causes the hair to break,” he says. To avoid dryness, says Sennik, use hairsprays that don’t contain lacquer or too much alcohol.

IF YOU WEAR EXTENSIONS

Bianca Hadley has been wearing extensions for a year to add length to her damaged hair and help it grow. “It is a long process, but I like the end result,” she says. Prior to putting in Bianca’s extensions, her stylist, Heidi Bibb Pugh, of Tasha’s Head to Toe Salon (9304 New LaGrange Road, Suite 200, 502.426.0213) adds a texturizer to her natural hair to loosen its curl pattern. “For some types of African American hair, you want to texturize it enough to keep it straight so that it can grow without breaking,” she says. The decision to texturize or straighten the natural hair using a relaxer is determined based on whether the client chooses a hair extension that is wavy, curly, or straight, says Bibb. To put in Bianca’s extensions, Heidi created a braid using her natural hair and sewed the extension onto the braid. Other methods for attaching extensions include: •C  lipping them (hair clip extensions) into the hair. • Sewing them into loose hair. •C  lamping them (hair clamp extensions) onto a small piece of hair using a hair clamp tool.  luing them in; the hair extension is glued to the •G scalp or infused to hair strands. Prices vary depending on client’s needs. Makeup by Heidi Bibb Pugh


TW

SPECIAL ONLINE-ONLY ARTICLES

>>


e r o m

>

2

THINGS

1

Not To Miss THIS Month

An Acoustic Evening with Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt

#

Two of America’s most esteemed and beloved songwriters team up for a side-by-side evening swapping tales and singing songs from throughout their careers. Four-time GRAMMY winner Lovett’s career, which fuses elements of the blues, country, folk, gospel and jazz music, spans fourteen albums and more than four million albums sold since his 1986 self-titled debut.

Thirty years after the release of his debut album, John Hiatt remains a respected and influential singer-songwriter, whose songs have been covered by artists as diverse as Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan and Bonnie Raitt. Among Hiatt’s most popular songs are Thing Called Love and Have A Little

Faith In Me.

The concert was filled with camaraderie, with heart-warming displays of mutual respect, formidable musicianship and the highest level of song craft. — Toronto Star

  When 

— Gioia Patton Sunday, February 13 @ 7pm Where  Kentucky Center’s Whitney Halltickets  $38, $45, $60 The box office in person (walkup or drivethru), or 502.584.7777 or www.kentuckycenter.org

Contact 

2 #

Impressionist Landscapes: Monet to Sargent

This exhibition of more than 60 Impressionist paintings by groundbreaking French, other European, and American artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries comprises some of the finest impressionist paintings from the extensive collection of the Brooklyn Museum in New York, as well as noted works from Kentucky collections.

Ruth Cloudman, chief curator of the Speed Art Museum mentions: “Since these works will never again be shown together, this is literally a once in a lifetime opportunity to see an extraordinary range of Impressionist paintings.” Also on view will be the exhibition The Gardens of Giverny: A View of Monet’s World, featuring photographs of the artist’s famous garden taken in 1974 by artist Stephen Shore.

 

When  February 4-May 22, 2011 *Galleries closed Mondays and Tuesdays Where  Speed Art Museum, 2035 South Third St. tickets  $5 for Museum members, $10 for non-members. Group rates available Contact  502.634-2960 or tours@speedmuseum.org — Gioia Patton


Dating Dilemmas By Caitlin Gaynor

F

Coming to Terms With V-Day

reezing cold temperatures, possibly some snow, but definitely a lot of gloom. Welcome to February in Kentucky! So uplifting, right? It doesn’t help that one of the most-loved and simultaneously most-hated holidays exists during this month: Valentine’s Day. Thank you, St. Valentine. You were a great guy, I’m sure. I’m so glad we get to celebrate you, but this holiday holds a love-hate relationship with me, and I’m sure millions of other Americans feel the same way. It’s the notorious “pressure-filled” holiday that makes the single people feel like crap and the people in relationships stress out. It’s the time of year when you will never find roses at a more expensive price, and the chocolate industry makes a mint! I’m not even going to pretend I don’t love it, though. A holiday for celebrating love? Any girl would be crazy to turn that down. I’ve definitely gone through my ups and downs with the infamous “V-Day.” I’ve had my fair share of bitterness toward it, but I’ve decided to just look at it this way: a reason to celebrate the people you love in your life. Valentine’s Day is the perfect reason to break out of the February funk and fill your life with some warmth and excitement. If you’re still not convinced you should celebrate, maybe these ideas will give you a jump-start to planning the perfect Valentine’s Day, no matter who you spend it with. Pamper yourself. How often is it that you actually have time to relax? Never. So lie in bed until 2 p.m., watch trashy TV, shop online, or get a pedicure or a massage. It’s your holiday, so spend it how you want. It’s the perfect excuse to be lazy and enjoy some down time. This is something you could do alone or with a partner. Do something you haven’t done forever. Go bowling, go ice-skating, or go to a concert. It’s a holiday: time to break out of your normal routine. Take a break from Louisville and go for a little weekend getaway. Cincinnati and Nashville are both big cities with lots to offer that aren’t too far away. Explore something out of Kentucky and make it a memorable Valentine’s Day. Revel in the cliché. Why not? Buy a bottle of champagne, munch on chocolate-covered strawberries, and watch a romantic movie. When in Rome, right? Whatever you do, just don’t be bitter. You don’t need a romantic someone in your life to celebrate with. You just need someone to be thankful for. Even your cat or dog will do.


Today's Woman February 2011