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20tH AnniversAry issue DeceMBeR 2011

P o w e r

S t y l e

c t i o n s

Helping women since the beginning of time (really, since 1991)


December 2011 articles

Contents

About This Issue

By Anita oldham

6

Power Sticky Women: Women We Can’t

Forget 10

By Lucy M. Pritchett Survival Skills: A Business That Lasts

14

Today’s Woman the Magazine By Jennifer Thompson

20 Reasons Why Today’s Woman Survived Her Teens 16 By Cathy Zion

18

We’ve Got Women Covered By Angie Boggs

STYLE 20 Years Behind the Scenes

50

By Holly Ralston-Oyler

20 Inspirations

56

By Holly Gregor

A Journey Down the Aisle By Lauren Williams Dahl

58

WELLNESS The Hunt for the Perfect Salad 60 By Melissa Donald

My 20 Favorite Quotes By Bob Mueller

14

62

20 Wellness Tips and Insights By Cheryl Stuck

58

64

CONNECTIONS 6 Things Not to Miss

By Gioia Patton

68

Top 20 Arts Insider Subjects By Gioia Patton

Photo Concepts We Love By Anita Oldham

70

74

60 4

DECeMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


About This Issue

Happy Birthday to Us!

The year was 1991. Lady Gaga was 5, the USSR was no more, “I’m too sexy…” was number one… and Today’s Woman was born. As with most newborns, the event brought joy and excitement and mistakes and late nights. As the magazine grew, many changes took place…in its looks and character. Today we are what we are due to the women and men who have allowed us to tell their stories, to inspire others, and to help us to see what is possible. Many local businesses have invested in our readers and have become partners in making this publication possible. In this community many writers, photographers, and stylists have been a part of making this magazine come together. To all our readers, where would we be without you? We take you very seriously and listen to your ideas, suggestions, and learn from your critiques. Happy 20th Birthday to all of us. — Anita Oldham

6

DecEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion

EDITOR Anita Oldham

publisher@todayspublications.com

editor@todayspublications.com

Cover On Our

Volume 21 8 Number 12

Assistant EDITOR Tiffany White

COntributing EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett

tiffany@todayspublications.com

o

W

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen

SALES DIRECTOR Cheryl Suhr

susan@todayspublications.com

cheryl@todayspublications.com

account executive Rose Helm

account executive Teri Hickerson

OFFICE MANAGER Jacklyn Walker

rose@todayspublications.com

teri@todayspublications.com

jacklyn@todayspublications.com

SenioR Advertising Designer April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

SenioR page & Graphic Designer Kathy Bolger

photographer/Food Writer Melissa Donald

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Sharon Adams

melissa@todayspublications.com

sharona@todayspublications.com

e found “Eve” in Lianna Simpson Nguyen. The 20-yearold, who is a freelance Vietnamese translator and a contestant for the Miss Kentucky USA 2012 pageant, secured a spot on our 20th anniversary cover as a result of our recent model call. And we’re glad we snagged her. Aside from her talents, Lianna is a pro at making fake leaves wearable. For this shoot, she transformed these leaves into Evelike attire. Charming. — Tiffany White

kathyb@todayspublications.com

INTERNS: KIM KERBY kim@todayspublications.com JESSI WINNER jessi@todayspublications.com

Makeup artist Holly Oyler

STYLIST Wendy Anguiano

Circulation Manager W. Earl Zion

wendy@todayspublications.com

o

Reprints are available!

Photo: James Moses Makeup: Lorie Karnes Hair: Micheal Jecker

Call Jacklyn, (502) 327-8855, ext. 10, or email us at reprints@todayspublications.com with details and specifics. For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call (502) 327-8855. Today’s Woman

BBB Rating of

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 www.iamtodayswoman.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2011 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

8

DecEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


Sticky Women: Women I

We Can’ t Forget

by Lucy M. Pritchett

o

PAGE 12

have written hundreds of stories and profiles featuring many of the lovely ladies of Louisville. We have talked about books and baseball, journaling and journeys, late bloomers and lavish balls. There were conversations about shopping, starting over, and settling in. About getting off the technology highway, going meatless, and turning a front porch or back deck into a garden. Paths to simplicity, serenity, and supporting one another. It has been a great ride.

oto At B ecky’s phlle d out pu shoot, she hered a box of feat stag e fans an d other a d ge ag sn I props. with a bo white feather an d tossed s nd ra silver st neck. She it around m yok ed so lo I told me could I at th g in h fetc still I a. bo keep the ha ve it.

Linda Ciresi. Aka The Spider Lady. July 2006

“Spiders are a good thing. They live everywhere — in water, snow, deserts and mountains. They are colorful and they are shy.” (Oh yeah? Just tell that to Miss Muffet.) 10

DECEMBER

2011

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PAGE 10

The

Donna Ball. Owner of Nature’s Magic. July 2002

Penny Sisto. Quilt artist,

For a story on home remedies, Donna mixed me up a ‘witch’s brew’ for relief from sinus inflammation which I have used often and recommended to many.

September 2007

Mix together three parts eucalyptus, two parts lavender, and one part peppermint. It doesn’ t matter what the ‘part’ is — a pinch, a tablespoon or a handful. Put a healthy helping in a bowl of hot water and breathe the soothing steam. Herbal heaven. y t. Ma alked oris l I wfort F . n e i ng h k 20 08

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Here is a woman who has a full size tepee in her yard. And a cedar sweat lodge. And cages where she tends to wounded or sick animals. “I found great solace in animals and nature. I want to pass through this life doing no harm so that when I look back I see no bleeding bodies. Have no regrets.”

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I asked what bread, fru n a is e L he lessoneek in Pa ris in inm s secret idential T a . t ie r in waved vaguel she lived in and she g e ir t V w en he pres ’s pres pen t a an Highlands.” y and answered, “The when I s as t ck Oba ma ntucky, isto r 20 10. e b Highlands?” I“Ipushed. “Where in th m e te a S ep B a r aign in K nsultant forshe responde would rather not sae y,” ca mpen dent co n al not- d comfortab , d. She didn’t feel as a public an in depl an d n a tioa tions, anal sometimes leco d lo ca it org an iz le ma yor o f letting the an ntroversial figure, in L e ah onymous wor address. B y th pro f a Louisvilha ps on e a ts, ld kn Ho r D o u g h her e r f s e a ticu over, though e time the intervieow g P w w in . o h te ng lturert y. her house an, she had invited me wtowas I w an didaost challea chin g me tin g. ist. c d a se sw e Fe br ore me to se about its loca K in g s sho ua r y her mgh, was toen e for tex crecy tion. I neve d p 2010 to p om fo pin g a r told. thouse m y ph ed ba ck. t k u ba ck lan t in r “on e the P o Mel anie o o l t t en’ pick ya rd. L m y n a r goo d t lan t instruc Rudolph. L I ha v ro ree” ea aughin tor. May o August 20 09 W r. o g ay 2 M 01 e go ut a st h helpew y 1 o ga Af ter t n. former so t m a d l ra t en i Ab f t se e h m ry o ely e interv Jer e ey have foun d ie She lon g in t talkin g river b le can sa y th clothes just abou irch a 20 -mm yself alonw with Mela e t t man y pefop r’s o o r o N ay e M l k e s d I th . in d t ue, t m thoug inute drive e in m y ca r n ie I the in side o rst Man Iss a the erg a rten e, “Whein plan tsher to Lou t I wo fa cin g r. It w as in t. For our fi no se o s lo n , H c a try. h . is t H t is u I u w he t pum vil ld den rvie w e glassed-to had to in te on I- S o there I g ive laughinle. I iew held in th thempkin se ts hom ea cher as in e pho casual in tehrvis home. During thrr e e sen t d a stran64 laughin g owas, speeding yog a w forg in the s. I porch o fw e all ga thered in Je hy’s plan ith ot a e ti alon e wg e experien c ut loud. It g east f is r f t o n, o t o io ts bo nt ed o sess e ith no set for sho Just had k o ver t ut them ya rd an ou , this lau was clothes clo h a d . n. e echo inthe soun d otside stimulughin g io y T ct I a colle still rd fu whole he y t. F if ty or me, “W g in the ca r f m y own la s. ll o f lo p l A y o . i a es c ti v r f r e o t . Melan e laugh fo t ure. . We tha t pDECEMBER ump dWoman outs12 d the sa mesuit all “I have a lo ie t ugh a2011 2011 t id DECEMBER menToday’s kin s12 summer anea a da rk r laugh fe in. With laa joke fromold t sixty for h .” w a u l .” yo u rom th the ts it o ff w in ter. W a en lorful tie se e insidgehter yoga, w co e, m ti e the out.”


Survival Skills: A Business that Lasts

Today’s Woman the Magazine

A

lthough most 20-year-olds are just starting to stretch their career muscles, Today’s Woman magazine has spent the last 20 years growing from a tabloid-sized publication produced by a handful of part-timers and contractors to one of Louisville’s leading glossy magazines covering power, style, wellness, and connections. A walk through Today’s Woman’s two-decade history shows how this magazine’s survival skills have earned it an invaluable place among Louisville’s ladies.

Rule #1: Bulk Up

Today’s Woman began as Woman’s News (soon changed to Louisville Woman) in December 1991 under the headship of Gayle Uhls and Kit Hartmann Abel. When Cathy Zion purchased the publication in May of 1996, Today’s Woman was a tabloid that averaged a slim 36 pages and had a circulation of 38,000. Just six months after Cathy purchased it, Today’s Woman went from a tabloid to a tabloid-sized magazine with a glossy cover, ad sales increased 20 percent, and readership soon doubled to nearly 77,000. In the years that followed, production was brought in-house, and the “house” grew from 1,100 square feet to the 2,700-squarefoot office space in which Today’s Woman now resides. Readership also grew and continues to grow as the magazine is distributed in nine counties in the Kentuckiana area. Now Today’s Woman, along with her sister publications, boasts a staff of 16, not including the dozens of writers and photographers who add voice to the magazine’s mission to inform and inspire women all across our city.

Rule #2: Draw Attention to Others

Although Today’s Woman has received her share of Society of Professional Journalism and other awards, the magazine enjoys recognizing others in the community. The first HER (Honoring Excellent Role Models) awards took place in March of 2000, honoring eight local women whose contributions deserved to be recognized. The event debuted at the Kentucky Center for the Arts with 700 people in attendance. Today’s Woman looks to the younger generation with the Today’s Girl essay contest and the now-retired Today’s Teen awards. Way to Go Woman! recognizes up-and-comers under the age of 40. Today’s Woman also shows that women don’t have to search the nation to find other women who have accomplished a great deal in a variety of disciplines. In 2003, Today’s Woman began the Most Admired Woman awards honoring women in 12 different categories which represent all facets of our community. Not only does Today’s Woman nominate only local women to be honorees, but the magazine opens voting to readers to reflect their voice in who the community admires most.

14

DECEMBER

2011

by Jennifer Thompson

Rule #3: Stay Local

Today’s Woman’s commitment to Louisville manifests itself in every aspect of the publication. The magazine’s cover girls are local women and fashion features display clothes from Louisville stores and boutiques so that readers can re-create the outfits that catch their eye. Today’s Woman loves to draw attention to new local businesses and can be counted on as a guide for great local holiday shopping. Today’s Woman also p h oto : M elis sa Do provides a calendar of nald events every month to highlight events, and rarely is there a major concert or production that the magazine’s Arts Insider doesn’t scout with her camera and interview notebook. Each year Today’s Woman also partners with local hospitals, physicians, and health organizations to raise awareness for pressing health matters like heart disease, breast cancer, and arthritis. In the form of annual supplements, the magazine gathers practical information that women in the area can apply to guard their own and their family’s health. Today’s Woman combs the city every year for women currently grappling with these diseases so that readers can relate to women just like them who are learning to walk through difficult times.

Rule #4: Multiply

Today’s Woman is the older sister of two other print publications, Today’s Transitions and Today’s Family. Today’s Transitions for seniors and caregivers was born out of features originally included in Today’s Woman, and its inaugural issue came in December 2004. Today’s Family (originally Kentuckiana Family) joined Today’s Woman in October of 2007 and complements Today’s Woman by covering local children’s school, health, and social issues. Today’s Woman, of course, does not forget the other half of the local population. Three years ago, the magazine graciously started giving one of her 12 editions each year to feature Today’s Man. Now each August, dozens of local men entrust themselves to the magazine’s all-female editorial staff to show off their talents and success as husbands, artists, and business leaders. Today’s Woman is also expanding to the digital age, providing each edition fully online and including online-exclusive articles. Social media is playing a role, as Today’s Family has started its own blog, and Facebook allows all three magazines to interact with readers. And as technology continues to stretch and affect society’s reading habits, Today’s Woman will continue to mature beyond her 20th birthday to share much more with her readers. Today’s Woman


20 Reasons Why Today’s Woman Survived Her Teens by Cathy Zion / Publisher

W

ith this issue, Today’s Woman magazine officially becomes a “woman.” She sometimes has searched for her identity through her pubescent years, as do all girls. But the past few years as a teenager have been her most challenging as she pushes new boundaries and explores new avenues. Many of her “peers” have gone away; others have become very anorexic. But she’s shown the tenacity and tenderness to persevere. As her parent, I’m proud of the many reasons why:

• She’s always upbeat and positive. • S he looks great. While her weight fluctuates from month-to-month, she’s always stylish. • S he likes to have a good time and shows up at many area events.

photo: Melissa Donald

• S he’s called a gift…a treasure...a resource…to the thousands who know her best. • S he is true to herself and doesn’t try to imitate everyone else. • S he is well versed in what it takes to get ahead in the business world. • She is inquisitive, always looking beyond the obvious. • She is an advocate for healthy living. • S he’s involved with many non-profit organizations. From Women-4-Women and Go Red for Women to Hosparus and The Children’s Foundation, she promotes all those organizations who are making our community a better place for women and their families. • S he is connected to all the great events in our area, from the opera to the marathons. • S he has generous support from so many companies who realize their goals mirror hers, and that symbiotic relationship has helped all involved grow. • S he has a small but supportive family who makes sure she looks her best every month. • She’s earned awards for her efforts over the years. • S he enjoys delving into medical issues that can alleviate women’s pain, whether it’s a new breast cancer treatment or ovarian cancer vaccine. • She is unique. • She is resourceful in her quest to stay progressive and pertinent. • She is omnipresent — you see her all over town. • She has a sense of humor and a silly side to her, which helps her survive. • She is fashionable, especially at Derby time. • S he is loved by her over 150,000 friends who can’t wait to see her every month Since adopting her over 15 years ago, she has brought me much joy. Sharing her with each of you has made even my tough days exciting. Thank you for helping me mold Today’s Woman magazine into the vibrant woman she has become.

16

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

DECEMBER

17


20

Celebrating

Years

1991 — 2011

Intro

We’ve Got Women Covered 20 Years of Today’s Woman Covers by Angie Boggs/Photos by Melissa Donald

These next few pages move through a year’s worth of covers in a month-by-month format. The magazine was first released in December 1991 under a different name — Women’s News. That name changed after 18 months to Louisville Woman. Then, in January 1995, it became Today’s Woman and has remained that way since.

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2011

january covers

Debbie Scoppechio 1994

Unidentified 1992

THEN

Karen Bearden 1993

Debbie Scoppechio

We interviewed Debbie Scoppechio seven years into starting her business and have seen how her talents have contributed to the growth and sustainability of Creative Alliance.

NOW (17 years later): ”Creative Alliance has grown a lot since 1994,” says CEO Debbie Scoppechio. “Our billing was over $65,000,000 in 1994. Now it’s over $185,000,000! We had 100 employees then. Now we have 174. We try to get and keep great talent. “Three years ago we added an ESOP employee stock ownership, which has worked out great for our employees and for Creative Alliance. The retirement plan is a great motivator. Everyone has their name and ‘owner’ on their door instead of a title. Employees start thinking like owners, so sales increase and costs are controlled more.” In her personal life, Debbie recently got married. She’s also done some traveling, including a recent trip to Italy with a group of friends. When she wants to unwind, Debbie says, “I love to sit overlooking the ocean with a great book!”

Today’s Woman


20

Celebrating

Years

1991 — 2011

Why would we take 16 pages to take you on a tour of Today’s Woman’s cover pages through the years? A trip through our cover archives reminds us of all the women we have met over the 20 years of the magazine. We hope that you have also had a chance to meet some of these women who are changing our community and neighborhoods. Enjoy reading updates on 20 of the women who have previously graced the cover of Today’s Woman: Some of their lives have changed dramatically. Jill Bell

Ann Coffey

1996

1995

Jill Bell, former vice president of corporate affairs for Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, proved that women don’t have to choose between having a career and starting a family. In her essay, which ran in our January 1996 issue, Jill wrote about the challenges and perks of her life as a new mother.

“When I was on the cover of Today’s Woman, I was rappelling down the Doe-Anderson building!” said Ann Coffey a former employee of the company. Ann’s penchant for mountain climbing is a sign of her willingness to take calculated risks in her personal and professional life. Ann Coffey

THEN

NOW (16 years later):

“I’m still passionate about climbing. I’m going to the highest point in each state, and I have 40 so far, 10 to go! Some are harder than others; some you can drive up, some require climbing 1,300-1,400 feet. I go with friends and family. I kicked it off with Kentucky’s Black Mountain. It’s beautiful there.” Ann was president and CEO for Women 4 Women for eight years. She recently joined University of Louisville  as chief of staff for the vice president of advancement, Keith Inman. “We provide access to education for as many as possible, that’s our goal.”

Jill Bell

THEN

(15 years later): Jill Bell, vice president of Public Affairs at Passport Health Plan, remembers her Today’s Woman cover story. “I had my one-year-old little boy on my lap. Now he’s 16, he’s 6’3” and weighs 220 pounds,” she says with a laugh. “That was such an honor,” she said of being in the magazine. “To talk about how a baby changes things, juggling things with a full-time job, especially for women in an executive position. I was fortunate to have help. My parents were here then, and my husband’s parents.” Though transitioning into the new role of motherhood can be challenging, Jill said she found a way to make it work. “I had a nanny who came to my house every day. She’s been with us since Tommy was 6 weeks old. I couldn’t be where I am in my career without Mrs. Kistner. NOW She was retiring as a nanny for another family, and we talked her out of retirement. She still works for us, but has cut back some. I have a daughter Rachel who is 14; she picks her up from school.” Jill is involved with several local organizations, such as Kentucky Derby Festival, and the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women committee. Jill Bell and son, Tommy

more january covers www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

DECEMBER

19


20

Celebrating

Years

1991 — 2011

january covers

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Page 3

JANUARY 2007

Erika Malone-Roberts 2001

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Freshen Up Your Home

Judge Angela Bisig

WHAT MAKES YOUR DAY?

HOW ONE WOMAN LOST 145 POUNDS

Cindy Watts 1997

Angela Bisig

Elizabeth Kizito 2002

Alison Tyler 1998

Phyllis George 2003

Paula Ciniero 1999

Candice Malone 2004

Juliet Ehrlich 2000

g dinher n a st of t it of s t e’ on buick p! Sh fr t —a tr sho in ar s to a o w Ph

Liz Curtis Higgs 2005

Angela McCormick Bisig 2007

Angela McCormick Bisig had started the Enhanced Family Supervision project aimed at monitoring the behavior of domestic violence offenders more closely in the court system.

THEN NOW (4+ years later):

Angela is stepping outside of the courtroom and venturing into new territory outside of her country. Bisig recently went to Taiwan as part of a group of 10 with the World Affairs Council of Kentucky and Southern Indiana to learn about the economic, political, and educational systems in Taiwan and China.  She also got married a couple of years ago. Re-elected last November to her third fouryear term as Jefferson County District Court Judge, she was also elected Chief Judge by her peers. She has also been involved in Dare to Care Food Bank and is immediate past-chair of their board of directors.  Angela presides over the Juvenile Court Docket. “We generally handle approximately 25-55 cases a day. These cases concern any type of crime a juvenile could commit from drugs and theft to assaults, robbery, burglary up to murder. “ In her down time Angela runs 3-4 miles most days of the week. “I run much more slowly than I used to,“ she joked. “I also enjoy cooking, yoga, reading and being with my kids,” she added. “My all time favorite pastime is traveling, whenever I have the time and money to do so.”

Christy Spence 2006

20

DECEMBER

2011

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2011

DECEMBER

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20

Years

Celebrating

1991 — 2011

january covers TWOM0108Coverd

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JANUARY 2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Angela Nunn

C o n n e c t i o n s

IT’S TIME Get Yourself Together

(11 months later) “What’s new with you” was an easy question to answer for Angela, owner of Salon Muse. “I had a baby! John Michael is 3 months old now.” Angela had just learned she and her husband were expecting after she was interviewed for Today’s Woman last year. When asked about the stress of running the salon and having a new baby, she says “Some of the challenges I have had to face with having the baby are mainly just time management. I have great employees at the salon that have made my transition back to work from maternity leave very smooth. While I was out, I was able to enjoy my new little addition with no worries. I have an excellent group of stylists, and I am very proud to say we all work together as a team.” While she adds that “it takes me twice as long to do anything,” she says “John Michael has not made my life more difficult, he has just given me more to be thankful for.”

2011

January 2011

FOR THE NEW YEAR

to Improve: 25 Ways • Your Look • Your Attitude

l e

• Your Food & • Your Home

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

“Now is not the time to be greedy”

Lisa Garcia Reger

– says this

2008

new business owner

Million $ Wedding Looks like a

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JANUARY 2009

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Thrift Stores

C o n n e c t i o n s

ready to change your life?

You Will love

Angela Nunn

Angela Nunn opened Salon Muse two years prior to our interview with her and talked to us about plans to grow the business and start a family.

NOT TO MISS 13THINGS

Dotty Battoe 2009

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NOW

JANUARY 2010

P o w e r

THEN

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Kira Simpson

a y ewon eto r is th m e of air th W t he re t. lo in tptu ho ca s

Makeup: Kerry O’Bryan

2010

Come and celebrate 20 Years of Today’s Woman at Eve*olution. January 19, 2012. See page 7 for more details. more covers 22

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


20

Celebrating

february covers

Years

1991 — 2011 TWOM0208Cover

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FEBRUARY 2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Geraldine Ann Snyder

C o n n e c t i o n s

Women We ove

2008

In our last conversation with Geraldine Ann Snyder, co-founder and artistic director of the Blue Apple Players, she was preparing for their debut of The Princess and the Pea. Geraldine had already written over 40 Blue Apple Players’ musicals and looked forward to producing more great work for kids to enjoy. Blue Apple Players has been in existence for 35 years.

L

1992

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1998

FEBRUARY 1999

Wisdom on Wheels

Pam Magers, Cora Potter 1993

Jean West

Amber McCutcheon

Martha Layne Collins

2004

I foun d this dress for Jean on the way to the photoshoot. Lo ved it!

Unidentified 1999

Lori Kane

2005

Elizabeth Grabowski 1994

Jo Dufton Palmer, Lawrence Palmer 2000

Malinda Fangman 1995

It co l w a s ve d ba r in PJ ry n th ’s even a t ing.

Lalie Dick

Patricia Cooksey 2006

2001 TWOM0207Cover5

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Special Heart Supplement Inside

THEN

Geraldine Ann Snyder

(3 years later): “I’m out doing shows,” she says. “I’m in two schools a day, out

on the road. But this past year we’re back locally more, in Louisville and the surrounding counties and Indiana,” said Geraldine, who founded Blue Apple Players with her husband, Paul Lenzi. “But we’ve been everywhere — all over Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Indiana. “We’re doing a show now called The Melting Pot, about immigrants coming to Ellis Island at the end of the last century. Forty thousand kids have seen the show!” Geraldine gets ideas for her shows from current events: “I’m a news junkie! There’s plenty of inspiration for anyone who wants to make a difference. Although NOW my schedule is hectic, two shows most days, an audience of young people nourishes me. Spending time with them is good for my soul.” For relaxation, Geraldine says she and Paul cook together and she finds comfort in her two dogs, Charlie and Nigel. “They always keep me grounded.” Snyder also enjoyed being a Today’s Woman cover story. “I giggled every time I saw it. In short, I loved it. Who wouldn’t?”

Page 3

FEBRUARY 2007

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Putting Her Bekki Jo Schneider

Romantic Fashion Heart Health

The 6 Mistakes We Make

Hayley Uhls, Kayla Oldham

Cissy Musselman 2002

Bekki Jo Schneider 2007

This wa co ver contrs quite o versia l.

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FEBRUARY 2009

P o w e r

TODAY’S WOMAN

1996

Into It

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

February 2011 FEBRUARY 2010

C o n n e c t i o n s

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l

l n

2011

C o n n e c t i o n s

When married people Work together

Drop Pounds! Four Women Reveal their Weight Goals

LOVE AFtEr 30

vol. 20 no. 2

DECEMBER

Business

FinD

FEBRUARY 2010 ISSUE

24

2009

l n e s s

Love&

Special Heart Supplement

Women we

JacQue White 2003

TUESDAYS WITH TODAY’S WOMAN

Heart Check Your

Special Go Red For Women Heart Supplement Inside

1997

s

Don’t miss

Love

Liz Curtis Higgs, Lillian (daughter) Jennifer And Dean Hohl

n

P o w e r

Leah Dougherty 2010

Jenna Evers, Thomas Evers 2011

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2011

DECEMBER

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20

Celebrating march covers

Years

1991 — 2011

Rabbi Gaylia Rooks 1998

Emily Lawrance, Lynn Howard 1992

Mary Norton Shands 1993

THEN Rabbi Gaylia Rooks

Rabbi Gaylia Rooks began her work for The Temple with the intent to provide services and resources to people in need. She worked alongside her husband, Joe. In her March 1998 interview, Gaylia talked about her commitment to serving others: “I feel that I am a partner with God in a very holy task, in a very sacred obligation of healing the brokenness of the world in which we live.”

NOW (13 years later): “The biggest thing I’m working on (right now) is finishing a CD,” she said when asked about her recent accomplishments. “It’s all original Jewish music, with Steve Stuhlbert, my best friend since I was 12.” The proceeds will go to go to the Crusade for Children. Rooks also is proud that her daughter is following in her parents’ footsteps as well. “My daughter, Yael RooksRapport, just graduated from Brandeis University, and is the first child of two rabbis to be accepted to seminary. She was in Jerusalem last year, and now she is in New York.”

Mary Bush, Maria Gerwing, Barbara Pence, Kathy Potts, Nina Seigle, Sheila stoke, Kathy Thompson, Cathy Zion

Carlton Ridge 2000

1994

Carlton Ridge has seen a wealth of changes since she graced our cover in March 2000, when we introduced the all-glossy magazine format. She sold her wildly popular jewelry business two years later. “The world marketplace did me in. I was used to paying decent wages to craftspeople, and I was out priced. There’s no way to compete.”

THEN

Janice Martin 1999

Carlton Ridge

Beverly Truitt, Bonita Coots, Maxine Brown, Gary Rodemeier

NOW

1995

Cindi Sullivan 1996

(11 years later):

But that didn’t stop this creative designer from moving on...to oil painting, working on a novel, traveling to India, which fulfilled a lifelong goal, and riding horses on her farm. She admits she misses jewelry design, but after 30 years, she says “I had a great run. I’ve remarried. And I’m having a blast. Life is more heartfelt. Spiritual, instead of go-gogo.” Ridge’s next focus is on finding galleries in Cincinnati, Lexington, and Louisville to show her paintings. 

Van Ly Tran

1997

26

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2011

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20

Celebrating march covers

Years

1991 — 2011

(10 years later): Amy has remained in the Information Technology field but is also focusing on other projects.

2001

THEN Amy Bordogna Price

Amy was co-owner of her own company, Pilgrim IT, a computer consulting firm.

“We loved the business, we kept it for 10 years. But, you get older and priorities change. The business was a high stress, 24/7 kind of thing.” She was diagnosed with a degenerative genetic condition which required Amy to make some adjustments in her life. It was time to de-stress, she says. “I had to learn to work remotely.” She uses a motorized wheelchair and has a service dog, Bell, a Golden Retriever. “She can do everything from bringing me my keyboard to picking up things I drop, or throwing things in the trash can.” Amy described the impact her condition has had on her life: “I had to learn to balance my life and energy, and not let work take over.” NOW She married her long-time friend and business partner, Kelby Price. “We found we loved working together, and it was like we looked up one day and realized we really cared about each other.” While she still does consulting in IT, she is focusing now on training and mentoring engineers and enjoys working with interns from University of Louisville and Bellarmine University. “It’s neat for them and for us, to see students get into an actual work environment. It’s a neat transition and focus.” Amy said she might only have a couple of good hours a day. “Things that used to take five minutes now take an hour. I have to think about and be conscious of the choices I make and be prepared. It makes you appreciate every day, and the opportunity to spend time with family and friends and the projects you work on.”

Tori Murden McClure 2002

Photo: Courtesy Amy Price

Amy Bordogna Price

Lynn Winter 2003

Susan Miller 2004

NOW

Phoebe Wood

(6 years later): In 2008, Phoebe left the company in search of new pursuits.

“I shifted to a different segment of my career.” She joined the Board of three different corporations: Coca-Cola Enterprises, Inc.; Invesco Ltd.; and Leggett and Platt. “I invest in startups with high-growth potential such as Rooibee Red Tea.” Phoebe has her own business called CompaniesWood. She is also working with local organizations as board member or advisor. “It’s like I have one foot in the corporate world with the boards, and one foot in entrepreneurial, and I have an interest in education and philanthropy. I think we’ll all do multiple careers, in different segments of life. Who knows what will come from that, we’ll just see where it goes. One never knows. But I’m thrilled with what I’m doing. “ Wood, who has a ninth-grade daughter at home and a daughter at the University of Chicago, organizes a family international trip each year both for enjoyment and education. “In 2009, it was China; in 2010, it was Norway and Sweden; then Sweden again this year; and The Olympics (which are in London) next year.”

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S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Great Vacation Ideas

C o n n e c t i o n s

2006

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

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P P o o w w e e rr

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S S tt y y ll e e

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••

C C oo nn nn ee cc tt i i oo nn ss

They lost over

Ride OF Her Life

pounds!

HEALTHY

2008

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Fling into

10Now

Projects

They’ve Lost 31 lbs.! page 48

VotE

QUIT

that Habit

to Do

100

Kristin Ward

MARCH 2011

P o w

SPRING

Get

Hire This Woman?

Spruce Up Your Home

2007

2/17/10

MARCH2010 2010 MARCH

Would you

Denise Vazquez Troutman

Phoebe Wood held a powerhouse position as the executive vice president and chief financial officer for Brown-Forman. Of her time there, Wood says she “is proud of the success of the acquisitions, divestitures, and financial structuring we completed, but mostly of the talented individuals I was able to attract and develop while at the company.”

TWOM0210Coverfinalnospine

Denise Vasquez Troutman

THE

Valla Ann Bolovschak

P o w e r

THEN Phoebe Wood

Page 3

MARCH 2009 MARCH 2008

P o w e r P o w e r

1:09 PM

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Vote for the Most Admired Women MARCH 2007

2005

Most Admired Woman

VOTE MOST ADMIRED WOMAN

Tanya Moore 2009

Anna Bradshaw 2010

Mariya Tarakanova 2011

more covers 28

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


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2011

DECEMBER

29


20

Celebrating april covers

1991 — 2011

Our April issue has been the issue where we feature the Kentucky Derby and all that comes with it. In this issue we amp up our fashion focus and creativity to bring you different ways of thinking about this fun, social time of year.

Fillies Ball chairwoman Ellen Greenwell and member Ball hostesses

11:55 AM

1995

3/20/07

3:03 PM

1999

Judi Patton

Risa Yussman

2002

2003

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3/20/07

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We started featuring a woman wearing a Derby hat in 2000 and never considered anything else since.

Karen Boone

1998

Louisville women in beautiful Derby hats (from 1995 Derby day)

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3/20/08

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Julie Ianke

Madison Lewis

2000

2001

Lee Ann Shellman

Patrizia Ferreira

2004

2005

Page 3

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2006

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Rebecca Bright DerHohannesian

3/19/08

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APRIL 2007

APRIL 2007

Libby Jones

1994

Jenny Coleman

1997

APRIL 2007

P o w e r

Churchill Downs

1993

1996

Kim Ray Smith

TWOM0407Cover4 3/21/07

Nicola Deegan, Allison DeLuca

1992

We have an 11-year tradition that started in 2000 of featuring a woman wearing a Derby hat. And, in the last five years, we started featuring multiple covers for each of our April issues. TWOM0407Cover1

Years

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

P o w e r

C o n n e c t i o n s

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

P o w e r

C o n n e c t i o n s

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

APRIL 2008

APRIL 2008

APRIL 2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l

n n e c t i o n s

P o w

n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

DERBY 2008

Arrive in Style

Derby Time : &

Kick Up Your Heels

BE BOLD BRIGHT

Trina Keown

HOW TO WEAR A

Hat

Majesty PURPLE

& OTHER THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE KENTUCKY DERBY

Toya Andrews

create some

DERBY DRAMA

Tara McBride

Dr. Jenna Wheelock

BE A DERBY DIVA

Chantel R. Depp

2007

We started doing multiple Derby covers in 2007. TWOM_Apr09covspineOBC

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Stand Out!

Trina Keown

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3/20/09

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TODAY’S WOMAN

P o w e r

C o n n e c t i o n s

oman

TODAY’SW APRIL 2009

APRIL 2009

Darlene Allgeier

2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

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APRIL 2009

P o w e r

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S t y l e

• W e

o n s

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APRIL 2009

APRIL 2009

P o w

t i o n s

P o w e r

n e s s

t i o n s

How to Wear

APRIL 2009 ISSUE vol. 19 no. 4

y DerbyDream Derb the

Issue

Katie Lee

a Hat A

Hot LOOK Derby

FOR

get the look you want

Amber Marquez

Jon’a Fogle

Meg Klempner

Shavon Hannah

2009

30

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


TODAY’S WOMAN

APRIL 2010

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

APRIL 2010 ISSUE vol. 20 no. 4

THE

Derby Issue

What to do ~ Where to shop ~ What to take

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TODAY’SW APRIL 2010

DERBY: Look Great All Day TWOM0410Front

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TODAY’SW APRIL 2010

Pretty in

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P o w e r

APRIL 2010

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

The

Derby Issue

Hats that Dance TWOM0410Front

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oman

TODAY’SW APRIL 2010

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Derby & Dining page 84

YOUR GUIDE TO DERBY:

Shawn Burke

WHAT TO WEAR * WHERE TO GO * WHAT TO TAKE

Julie Gingles

APRIL 2011

2010

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Art the

of the

Hat

page 46

Natalie Salen 2011

more covers www.iamtodayswoman.com


20

Celebrating may covers

Years

1991 — 2011

Louisville Women’s Conference

Lucy Friebert

Renee Campbell Mapp

1993

1992

Mrs. S.V. Jackson, Kit Hartman Abell, Marty Hartman, Teel Hartman

Betsy Wright and son, Noah

1994

1995

Thelma Hausman

1996

1997

Neeka Parks

Cindy Bartlett and her daughters 1998

e er w y, Af tt Cin dm e mee becala r sh regu n ist a oo y’s ca rrtTo dan. foWoma

(12 years later): She is continuing to build her career, now that her sons are in high school. “I’m establishing my legal career,” said Neeka, who worked for the state of Kentucky from 20061999 2008, as deputy director of the Office of Diversity and Equality, representing state employees on discrimination claims. She recently left the firm Stoddard Parks and Associates. “I’m now on the Kentucky Parole Board. We conduct hearings for offenders to determine if they can be released, or deferred, or will serve out their sentences.” Neeka, who has been divorced for NOW eight years, says her sons are thriving. “They are more independent now.” They THEN Neeka Thompson are in high school and involved in orchestra, band, golf, and the newspaper.” In her spare time, she likes to meditate, go out Neeka Parks was with friends, and enjoys “watching movies with my focused on issues of kids, and doing activities with them, like going to juggling work and museums and plays and art. We recently went to the family. She put her DaVinci exhibit at the Frazier History Museum. It was career on hold to exhilarating. One of my sons is studying French and become a stay-atis interested in aviation, so DaVinci’s discoveries gave home mom to her us so many things to discuss.” twin sons, Nigel and Nuri.

Cindi Sullivan

Tricia Barnstable Brown

Jessica Ferguson

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S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

she’s got style FLOWERING FASHION & GARDEN TOURS

Living a

BEAUTIFUL LIFE Stacye Bouchillon and mother, Penny Love 2006

4/21/08

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Lena Pysareva 2007

Rachel Ross

2003

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P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

BRIGHT Spring FASHIONS Take a Garden Tour

Up Brighten YOUR HOME

Brenda Woodling 2008

P o w e r

Kathy Sullivan

2004

4/21/09

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2005

Page 3

MAY 2009

MAY 2008

MAY 2007

P o w e r

Laura Polar

2002

2001

2000

May 2011

MAY 2010

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

P o w e r

• S t y l e   •                   s   •   C o n n e c t i o n s

Women What to Wear GO

GARDEN TOURS

Simpleeauty B

Gabriela Lyvers 2009

Rock!

c Musi

s

MoYvoeu

that

Meet today’s teen Letter from Daughter

“I Lyve my Mom”

Andrea Davidson 2010

P o w e r

S t y

s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Happiness

…discovered Hair Removal That Works SpRing

Salad

LAUGH! Finding the funny in your life

Lindsay Boling 2011

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Today’s Woman


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2011

DECEMBER

33


20

Years

Celebrating june covers

1991 — 2011

As you can see from these covers, our June issue has featured many prominent women in the Louisville community. In 2003, we started featuring a dozen women voted as our Most Admired Woman. The winners are chosen by you, our readers, and the women we meet during this time have become part of an elite group of women who have made our community better. Deborah Pennington

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Christine Deeble, Cathy Jacobs, Laura Benson

Elizabeth Jeffries

1992

1993

Women Olympic torch bearers

1995

Sue Stout Tamme

Donna Dusel

1997

1998

Page 3

today’s

Svea Allgeier, Donna Dusel, Pat Seitz, Jane Wilson

1994

1996

Elizabeth Woolsey 1999

Terri Cardwell

Julie Schmidt

Patti Swope

2000

2001

2002

JUNE 2004

Real Women – Real Conne ctions • Ser ving Kentucky & Indiana

A R T S  AT H L E T E S / S P O R T S  B E AU T Y / FA S H I O N  B U S I N E S S O W N E R  COMMUNITY/NON-PROFIT 

MOST

Admired

WOMAN 2004

C O R P O R A T E  F O O D & E N T E R TA I N M E N T  H E A LT H & F I T N E S S  HOME & HOMESTYLE  MEDIA  P O L I T I C S  H A L L O F FA M E

Most Admired Woman

Most Admired Woman

2003 TWOM0607Cover2Q5

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JUNE 2009

M ost A d m i r e d W oma n

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Most Admired Woman 2010

C o n n e c t i o n s

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S t y l e

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C o n n e c t i o n s

A Politics • rts •

2008

MOST ADMIRED WOMEN WINNERS JUNE 2009 ISSUE

June 2010 ISSue

& ood •F

2007

on

t • Health & Hea lth Care • Hom tainmen e&H Enter ome sty le

• dia Me

2009

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vol. 19 no.6

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JUNE 2011

• fits Pro n-

Ath le

Fashion • Business Owner • auty & Com • Be mun ess ity Fitn &

June 2010

P o w e r •   S t y l e   •   W e l l n e s s   •   C o n n e c t i o n s P o w e r

WINNERS:

& tes

2006

TODAY’S WOMAN

TODAY’S WOMAN

JUNE 2008

Most Admired Woman

2005

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JUNE 2007

P o w e r

Most Admired Woman

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Most Admired Woman

Most Admired Woman

2007

2008

DECEMBER

2011

woman Most Admired201 1

Most Admired Woman 2009

Most Admired Woman 2010

Most Admired Woman 2011

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2011

DECEMBER

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20

Celebrating

Years

1991 — 2011

july covers Gail Iwaniak, Joan Koester, Monica Toner, Carol Baker

Barbara Franklin

1992

Louise Edelen, Evelyn J. Pusateri, Carol Pope, Lyn Larsen, Pat A. Parks

Marsha Weinstein

1993

Catherine Lynn

1995

1994

1996

Jennifer Ayers 1997

THEN

Jennifer Stone

Jennifer had been a volunteer firefighter for the Fern Creek Fire Department for a year when we interviewed her in 1997. The experience, she said, gave her more confidence and self worth. Dr. Kelli Applegate

Melinda Miller

1998

NOW

Dr. Suzanne Ildstad 2004

has been “focusing on taking care of myself,” as she was diagnosed with kidney cancer a year and a half ago. “I’ve been cancer free for one year now.” After her grandmother died in 2005 of kidney cancer, Jennifer says “I just didn’t have a Jennifer with daughter, Jessica passion for being a firefighter any more. It was time to move on.” Jennifer left the fire department in 2006 and is working in a pediatrician’s office, but she hasn’t abandoned her fellow firefighters. “We just started an auxiliary at Highview,” where her husband JR Ayers is a firefighter. “They haven’t had an active group in several years. I’m vice president. We help with fund raising and the Crusade for Children. We’re involved in support, if firefighters have a lengthy run we take food, drinks, whatever they need. It’s nice to still be involved,” Jennifer says. “I know what it like is to be out there for a few hours.” For Jennifer, firefighting has become a family affair. Her 18-year-old daughter, Jessica, is in the current recruiting class. “She is following in her mother’s footsteps. I’m very proud of her.”  6/19/07

6:12 PM

Susan Hibbs, M.D.

2003

NOW

(7 years later): “We’ve made a lot of progress in our clinical studies,”

says Suzanne Ildstad. She is still the director of the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics, and professor of transplantation and surgery at University of Louisville. “We have kidney transplant patients who also get bone marrow and are off suppressants. We’re in clinical studies where sickle cell patients are making normal blood cells.” She was just awarded a $3.6 million grant for a kidney study from the National Institute for Health. “This is direct cost, there will be about 40-50 percent more indirect, so that is about 5 million dollars going to University of Louisville. It’s wonderful. “When the 2012 budget is finally passed, there will also be $1.6 million more for clinical trials.” Suzanne is also developing protocol for children with inherited metabolic disorders with a colleague from Duke University. “Three transplants have been done where parents donated to a child. In this clinical study anyone who has a parent who can donate can get bone morrow, it doesn’t have to be a perfect match. It can be mismatched. We also have in our kidney studies where husbands can donate to wives, and wives to husbands.”

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S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

INTERVIEW WITH

Martina McBride

Eye hing c

Catc

Chiaki Gauntt, M.D.

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

e c t i o n s

Fabulous Living

Gotta Wear Shades TAKE CARE OF YOUR EYES AND YOUR HEALTH

Dr. Raymonda L. Stevens

Marlee Mitchell

2005

36

DECEMBER

2006

2011

Chiaki Gauntt , M.D. 2007

6/19/09

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JULY 2009

JULY 2008

In 2004, Dr. Suzanne Ildstad, the director of the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics, had been researching methods that could eliminate the THEN negative effects of transplant surgery Dr. Suzanne Ildstad for patients.

Lori Fields

2002

JULY 2007

P o w e r

2001

2000

(14 years later) She

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Kathy Mayberry Brent

Diane Bagby

1999

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n

c t i o n s

2008

P o w e r •   S t y l e   •   W e l l n e s s   •   C o n n e c t i o n s

JULY 2011

P o w e r

S t

e s s

PAGE 44

Bear’s Best Friend

C o n n e c t i o n s

SurvivinG the Job hunt

Charla

Is She Part Bird?

EXPOSED

We Found a Great Salad

PAGE 20

ST MY JOB! I LO T MY BUT WORLD DIDN’T FA LL APART page 14

Darlene Allgeier

oman

ToDAy’sW

JuLY 2010

Sara Peak

2009

A WomAn ReveAlS:

Wild At Wick’s Pizza

PAGE 30

(what did she eat?)

“My drinking became a problem.”

the

The Spy ISSue

spots

COOL

Confessions, Mysteries, and Un-CoverUps

Charla Young 2010

A DIY Wedding

Rachel Klein 2011

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20

Celebrating august covers

Years

1991 — 2011

g to elpinmen h n i ntal 4 Wdoraiser. rume men I nstn ch Woment fun lau tourn a golf

Sheleen Fryer

Women 4 Women

1992

1993

Christy Callahan, Judith McIntyre, Jill Joseph Bell 1994

Can you believe Kirby Adams agreed to this? Love her for that!

y an m r on fo r. e wa rdsco ve W aw s i th

Kristie Dawn Hicks

Melinda Cardwell Bosco

1995

Kathleen Hoye

Valerie Ellsworth Gattis

1998

1999

Kirby Adams 1997

1996

o d int olve a rds v e l ir r Aw y’s G een. t in ousue u s To dada y’s T i o To re g ivenptember. w e st/S e yea rs u or 7 f Aug

Love Yascone, Joy Yascone, Faith Yascone 2000

Terri Lott, Rachel Lott

Christy Cox and daughter

2001

2002

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Jennifer Green, Scarlett Harrod, Casey Culbreth 2003

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AUGUST 2007

P o w e r

S t y l e

go

e c t i o n s

iL D

W

CREATE A

SANCTUARY T O D A Y ’ S

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2004

Page 3

Rachel Komisarz 2005 TWOM0809Covernospine

7/21/09

Carissa Lawson

12:21 PM

2006

Page 3

X

AUGUST 2008 AUGUST 2009

P o w e

e s s

TOP

C o n n e c t i o n s

TEENS

Today’s Woman’s Man Issue was introduced in 2009.

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

WHAT IS HE THINKING?

Secrets of Louisville Men

BOLD

G I R L

A W A R D S

Jessie Ballowe 2007

AUGUST 2010

AUGUST 2011

P o w e r •   S t y l e   •                                 n n e c t i o n s A

The

Man Issue

Men

ve Lo WoMen

S p e c i a l

Yo u

B y

Tod ay

’s

Wom a n

MEN!

16 great husbands, 11 bachelors, 8 men who are changing Louisville, 5 men who are perfectly fit, 3 men who can cook, 2 men you should know, & 1 man sitting here

MeeT your

Mayor-To-be

38

Janice Carter Levitch

Josh Loren Kroll

Eric Jefferson

Brentley Combrinck

2008

2009

2010

2011

DECEMBER

2011

more covers Today’s Woman


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39


20

Celebrating september covers

Betty Griffin

1991 — 2011

Marcia Roth 1993

1992

When Today’s Woman readers met Betty Griffin in 1992, she was the founder of a new group called National Association of Women Business Owners THEN (NAWBO). “The organization Betty Griffin was very successful, with a huge growth in membership. I was running a successful public relations business, and our new NAWBO organization was growing in leaps and bounds, both locally and on the national level. Nationwide leaders looked upon our Louisville NAWBO organization as one of the best in the nation,” said Betty.

NOW (19 years later) On a personal level, Betty and her family

have been tested by illness and loss. While Betty was working with NAWBO, her daughter Stacy was diagnosed with breast cancer. She was 36. “After struggles of helping her get well and caring for her toddler and preschool son, she became strong and well again.” Then Betty lost her mother unexpectedly. “It took a long time for me to get over her death,” she said. She has struggled with her own health as well over the last 10 years, first with colon cancer, then knee replacement surgery, then her own battle with breast cancer. After her medical problems, Betty realized how much time had passed. “I was trying to get my health back to what I remembered as my ‘wonderful, active, joyous’ life. But the world had changed. Computers were a must, cell phones were a necessity. It was not 2000 anymore, it was 2010.” Betty says she is healthy and enjoying retirement. “My next upcoming health challenge is having cornea implants for both eyes. I look forward to that ‘next experience’ soon.”

Years

Helping women protect themselves has always been one of Marcia’s biggest preoccupations. When she THEN was on the cover, she was Marcia Roth the founding director of the Office for Women determined to save the lives of women in abusive relationships. “The goal of the office was to improve the status of women in Jefferson County, and domestic violence became our focus because there was a well publicized murder-suicide.” The case involved two well-known teachers. “People were shocked. They didn’t know domestic violence could happen to someone they knew.”

September has been a month where we focused on girls as tomorro’w’s women. Now we feature Way to Go Woman! in September, celebrating women under age 40. For many years, September was also an issue about the Arts, but we now include arts in every issue. Often concerts are covered online at www.facebook.com/ todayswomanmagazine.

NOW (18 years later): Her previous position

led to Marcia’s current work at The Mary Byron Project, where she’s also founding director. She got to know Pat and John Byron after their daughter was murdered by a former boyfriend. The Mary Byron Project was started in 2000 as a national public organization to support domestic violence solutions. The organization also funds four scholarships at Assumption High, Mary Byron’s alma mater. “The girls are educated on teen dating violence and domestic violence and become peer role models. “Our big push right now is for Kentucky to join the vast majority of other states in offering protective orders for dating relationships as well. Right now only those who are married, or formerly married, or living with, or formerly lived with, or have a child together can seek protection. Thirty-three other states have passed this. It’s a huge issue. That’s our number one goal in Kentucky right now.” When asked how dealing with such issues for so many years affects her, she thoughtfully replied: “It can be stressful, but I have good friends and a wonderful husband. I like to read and knit and play golf. What I get to do is focus on positive changes. When I’m discouraged, or feel like we’re behind, I remind myself of the good things we’ve accomplished. I don’t get depressed. It’s not in my DNA.”

Naomi Judd 1994

Madeline Abramson, Carol Armstrong, Kirby Adams, Tandy Patrick 1995

Susan DeSensi 1997

Kay Meurer 1996

Treana Redd, Kayla Oldham, Jefra Bland 1998

Tara Henry, Ashley Rowatt, Jennifer Denny, Krystal Lewallen, Lisa Leach 1999

40

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


Erin Stoltz, Caden Wheat, Maryelle Roosa, Lynnesy Rowland, Katie Hu, Brittany Robinson

Theresa Bautista

2000

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2006

SEPTEMBER 2007

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C

s

She's Planning a

Barrel

Fun of

Debbie Huddleston

Can Your Heart

EXPAND?

Way to Go Woman!

WINNERS

Amanda Jack

Debbie Huddleston 2007

2001

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SEPTEMBER 2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s

n e c t i o n s

Gorgeous Gardens A CHAT WITH

Sheena Easton and Lisa Minnelli

Dancing for fun & fitness

WINNERS

Way to Go Woman!

Cheryl Skinner

Christina Smith

2002 TWSept09covspineOBC5

8/21/09

10:37 AM

2008

Page 1

oman

TODAY’SW

TODAY’S WOMAN

SEPTEMBER 2009

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Y… READT… SE

C o n n e c t i o n s

GO! SEPTEMBER 2009 ISSUE

WINNERS

vol. 19 no.9

Way to Go Woman!

Laura Scheidt

Get the

INSIDE SCOOP

Kimmet Cantwell Swabek 2009

2003 TODAY’S WOMAN

SEPTEMBER 2010

P o w e r •   S t y l e   •   W e l l n e s s   •   C o n n e c t i o n s

Meet a september 2010 IssUe

Curly Chemist

and other great women

vol. 20 no. 9

What Not to…

Wear, Do, Eat, Say, Think… Way to Go Woman! WinnerS

Cari Tindall

Katie Prince 2010

2004 SEPTEMBER 2011

e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Take the Wheel! Find Your Courage, Find Your Happiness, Find Your Life!

Way To Go Woman! Honorees

Claudia Coffey

Sarah Lyon

2005

2011

more covers

www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

DECEMBER

41


20

Celebrating october covers

Jackie Hayes and family 1992

Years

1991 — 2011

Brigid Adams, Allison DeZarn, Monique Bell, Laura Wigginton, Stacey Brenzel, Julie Craven, Wendy Bancroft

Unidentified

1993

JoEtta Warren

1994

June Mumme

1999

1998

Katherine Doll

Katherine Doll had already established 2002 herself as one of the more wellTHEN known home improvement contractors in the city when we interviewed her in 2002. Trusting her instincts and natural talent made her a success. Katherine Doll

Susan Moremen 2003

Tara Diamond

2000

Rebecca Jackson

Susan Johns, Linda Atkins

1995

1996

Sharon Mayes 1997

Kim Higdon 2001

(9 years later): She admitted that 2009-10 was

NOW

“slower” for the contracting business. “We do a lot of smaller jobs. But I love what I do.“ As owner of Katherine Doll Inc., a general contractor, she does mostly residential remodeling and some commercial work as well.   Katherine mentions one particular special project: the remodel of the Mary Craik Gallery on Market Street, in Louisville’s “NuLu” district. “We did that in 2005. Mary is a fiber artist. We renovated the first floor for a studio and gallery, and the back as living space. The second floor, Phase 2, used to be rented to other artists. It was a big ‘before and after.’” She adds, “I’ve been in business for 16 years, and I still love what I do. It can be challenging, like with any business. With construction there are always variables, it’s how you deal with them. It’s what you do at the end that people remember.” 

Susan Moremen didn’t let a cancer diagnosis become an obstacle in her life, and since our 2003 interview with her, she continues to persevere. She was one of three women to start Gilda’s Club — along with Sharon Receveur and Lindy B. Street.

THEN Susan Moremen

(8 years later): “I’m still on Gilda’s Club board,” she explained. “That was kind of the culmination of having

cancer, founding Gilda’s, and it’s been such a thrill to see what’s happened with it.” She adds, “We have over 500 volunteers and 4,000 people went through our doors last year. Twenty-five percent are children. We’re running out of room. We have more people than can fit. It’s gratifying,” she adds. Susan also has been working in strategic planning at the Frazier History Museum but took time off to care for her 93-year-old father, who is ill. “He just moved in with me, we’re getting him settled in, and we’re finding our space and routine. I’m thrilled to have him here.” She adds, “We added a stair lift, and increased the bathroom size, and made his room look less like a guest room and more like a room someone lives in, to be more comfortable for him. And I had to stock the refrigerator to prepare breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But it’s good. I’m crazy about my Dad!” To maintain her health, Susan says she occasionally uses a personal trainer and walks when the weather is nice. “When I had cancer, NOW someone told me ‘trust the journey,’ and I had no idea what that meant before, but now I do.”

more october covers 42

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


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2011

DECEMBER

43


20

Celebrating october covers

Years

1991 — 2011

Mary and Darby Witherspoon 2006

Mary Witherspoon wrote about moving with her husband Bill and 10-year-old daughter, Darby, to Bahrain for her husband’s new job in 2005. She lived there for 4 years.

THEN Melode Crabtree, Shannon Lee, Shelby Dreher, Christal Wordlow

Stacey Lee

2005

(5 years later): They are back home, living in the house they left. “During part of our stay, my nephew, who was attending UofL, moved in and took great care of it. After he graduated, it sat empty, and our wonderful neighbors kept watch over it. Darby and I left NOW Bahrain every summer, as temperatures could top 120 degrees.” Bill is still working for the Bahrainis U.S. division, commuting from Indianapolis. “We came home in summer 2009,“ said Mary. “I enrolled my daughter back in the school she left as a 5th grader.  She’s now a freshman at Kentucky Country Day School.” Mary said it was an adjustment coming back to the United States with its faster pace. She is a stay-at-home mom. Life overseas, she says, is less stressful. “It’s a much slower pace there, less to do, less distractions. It’s more stressful here, but in a good way. We’re grateful to be home, and have a job, and grateful for that experience. We’re so blessed all around, no other way to put it, especially in this recession.” “Darby has a memory box of trinkets from her time overseas,” said Mary, with American things like a baseball signed by her whole team, and things like “a t-shirt with Gaddafi’s photo on it, sent to her by a friend who was evacuated from Libya during the recent revolution. Moving from a relatively sheltered life in Louisville and into a different culture was difficult at first, but she came away with more confidence in her ability to adapt to change, make new friends and go forward.” “As for me, “Witherspoon continued, “I missed out on many celebrations, weddings, and birthdays, and my father became ill and passed away as well. My siblings had time with him, memories I don’t have. But I would do it all over again in a heartbeat because it pushed me out of my comfort zone; for that I feel changed, and very blessed.”

Mary Witherspoon

2004

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TODAY’S WOMAN

OCTOBER 2007

OCTOBER 2009

(2 years later): “I’m now working in the Fischer administration, the mayor’s office. My title is Chief Community Builder.” In this department, she oversees community services and revitalization (formerly housing), libraries, parks, the zoo, the department for public health and wellness, and the human relations committee. She is also a liaison for the Is Your Life like a science center and other cultural attractions and arts.  She was appointed by Governor Beshear in 2009 to serve as district court judge, but then 2009 High Flying Fashion A Death-Defying had to run for re-election in 2010 to keep the seat. “The beauty of it,” she noted, “is that one Journey Sadiqa Reynolds door does open after another one closes. I had been appointed judge, but then lost re-election, Sadiqa Reynolds told us she was so I did what I recommend everyone in that situation do — I went on a Disney cruise! When I “interested in making the world a better got back, I had a message from the mayor-elect.” place,” when we talked to her two years Sadiqa makes community service a big part of her life. In May, she will be the ago. At the time, she had been sworn in as keynote speaker at the Journey of Hope luncheon, which is Maryhurst’s annual Jefferson County District Judge and talked fundraiser. “I’m also involved in mental health awareness. It’s something that needs to about her interest in keeping the city safe. be talked about, there is too much shame associated with that, especially in the AfricanAmerican community. I’m involved with Wellspring, Bridge Haven, and I’m on the board at the Depression Center at the University. NOW “Work that really matters, and that is important to me, advocating for those who don’t have a voice, that’s what I want to do. And have a good life. Laugh.” Sadiqa says her two girls, age 4 and 6, “make me laugh all the time. They are hilarious!” P o w e r

P o w e r

avealing •

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

Re bon Rib

Lynda Lambert

OCTOBER 2009 ISSUE

Fall Fun

vol. 19 no.10

Laugh at Life’s Problems

Lynda Lambert 2007

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OCTOBER 2008

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

MEOW!

women & their pets

5

Things

not to miss

CLAW

your way to your dreams

Pink Power fight against breast cancer

S t y l e

W e

C o n n e c t i o n s

THEN

C o n n e c t i o n s

circus?

Sadiqa Reynolds

Amie Henderson 2008 OCTOBER 2011

OctOBER 2010

P o w e r •   S t y l e   •   W e l l n e s s   •   C o n n e c t i o n s

I am a super woman

STOP Worrying! Goodbye, Breast Cancer! Alli Truttmann 2010

44

DECEMBER

2011

Fighting

Breast Cancer

Ami McMullen 2011

more covers Today’s Woman


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20

Celebrating november covers

Years

1991 — 2011

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NOVEMBER 2007

P o w e r

Tracie English Gomez

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

YOUR HOLIDAY

1996

Tracie’s 20-year prison sentence was commuted and she was set free by then-Governor Brereton Jones. She had been convicted for the self-defense killing of her abusive father when she was 16.

Reba Cobb

1992

C o n n e c t i o n s

Electrify Glowing

Pam Kleier

Gifts

1997

Thankful For…

Jennifer Spiegelhalter 2007

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NOVEMBER 2008

P o w

s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Carole Lindsey-Smith

THEN

2002

Tracie English

for your list

35

Gloria Pollard

(15 years later): She moved to New Hampshire in 2010

1993

Photo: Courtesy Tracie Gomez

1995

Erika Chavez-Graziano 2008

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Kathy Olliges

NOVEMBER 2009

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

2003 Jewelry for any budget

Debbie McGrath 1999

vol. 19 no.11

Wendy Evans

We’re Thankful for...

WITH HEALTH

NOVEMBER 2009 ISSUE

1994

1998

TODAY’S WOMAN

Sharon Potter, Trish Pugh Jones, Christy Brown, Marea Gardner, Lois Mateus

with partner Sharon Slaughter, and is attending college. “So much has happened. My kids keep me busy,” said Tracie of her twin girls Macy and Marissa, age 13, and son Cody, age 12. After moving to New Hampshire about a year-and-a-half ago, her mother passed away. “It was hard,” she says. She also lost her brother in June. “We had a rough year, but we’ve pulled through.”  She is attending Springfield College in Manchester.  “I go to a wonderful school. I want to go into human services and criminal justice, to work in crimes against children or juvenile probation.” Because she received a full pardon, “I can work with the police.” The conviction was further taken off her record by former Kentucky Governor Ernie Fletcher in 2007. She volunteers at Work Place Success, a New Hampshire program to help individuals on public assistance. “They earn money by volunteering or going back to school. We help them find volunteer positions, to get training and job skills to put on a resume. Some of the women have not worked before, or have only worked at part-time jobs like McDonalds.” Tracie is also proud of her kids. “They’re doing well in school; the schools here are amazing. They were bullied in school before (in Kentucky), and they don’t allow that here. There’s an open door policy where the kids can talk to a NOW counselor anytime they need, even if they’re just having a bad day. “My kids are my life. I try to do the best I can, to take my life and make something positive out of it. No looking back.”

Women You Should Meet

Pam Rankin

Make Your Home Arts Insider Must-See

FLORENCE HENDERSON

THE WEIGHTING GAME

Biz Ruby

2009

NovemBeR 2010

P o

y l e

Pamela Schneider

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Dreaming Up

2004 find the

Perfect Gift What to Wear

Lisa Twyman

to the

2000

Party

EntEr OUr

Weight Loss challenge

Melissa Liptrap 2010

NOVEMBER 2011

Monica Hardin 2005

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C

t i o n s

Insider

tips Are you

too stressed?

Kick up your

Heels for the Holidays!

Martha Brown 2001

~ Best Books for Gift-Giving~

Tatiana Collins 2011

Miriam Roccanova 2006

46

DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


20

Celebrating december covers

Ellen Sheikun

1991 — 2011

Kit Hartmann, Gayle Uhls

1991

Years

Joyce Hughes-Inman, Susan Allen

1998

Claire Alagia

12th birthday edition

Page 3

1991

Celebrating 15 Years

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Staff of Today’s Woman 2001

Betty Ayres TWOM1208Cover8

Page 3

1996

2000

Peggy Stevens

2004

2003

2002

1:04 PM

Betty Siefert

1999

We thank you, our readers and advertisers, for being loyal Timeless through our changes and experiments as we continue to stretch and grow to serve our mission of inspiring, informing, and encouraging women in this community.

Reverend Mary Ann Koffenberger

1995

Kristi Nawman

1997

11/17/06

Mary Ann Moore

1993

Joyce Seymour, Reba Cobb

TWOM1206Cover5

1994

Louisville Ballet members

1992

2006

11/17/08

1:15 PM

2005

Page 3

DECEMBER 2008

DECEMBER 2007

DECEMBER 2006

C o n n e c t i o n s

S t y l e

P o w e r

S t y l e

W e l l n e

S t y l e

W e l l n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

ON THE SCALES



Let it

Sweet 16

ve, Heather, Ste s and the girl

It’s Our Birthday!

Heather French Henry, Steve Henry, and daughters

Reeya Mathew 2007

2006

11/20/09

12:08 PM

2008

Page 3

DECEmBER 2010

DECEMBER 2009

P o w e r

P o w e r

i o n s

magic GET THIN 4 WOMEN STEP

Latasha Booker

TWOM1209Covernospine

CHRiSTMAS

P o w e r



W e l l n e s s

n e s s

P o w e r

C o n n e c t i o n s

S t y l

n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Look at

Louisville!

new things to do, people to meet

Cheery Christmas …awesome trees, glowing lights, thoughtful gifts

have a

Laura Wallace

Brittany McWhorter

2010

2009 20tH AnniversAry issue DeceMBeR 2011

P o w e r

S t y l e

c t i o n s

Helping women since the beginning of time (really, since 1991)

www.iamtodayswoman.com

Lianna Simpson Nguyen 2011

2011

DECEMBER

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your

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Professional Connections Calendar Your go-to spot for professional networking and career-building opportunities around Louisville BPW- Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Monday • 5:30 p.m. Tucker’s American Favorites 2045 State Street New Albany Sarah Ring 502.550.9503 BPW- Business & Professional Women- River City Every 2nd Wednesday • Noon Lunch and Program noon-1pm University Club 502.499.4420, www.bpwrc.org

The Heart Link Network Every 1st Wednesday • 6:30 p.m. Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Barbara Madore 502.377.8625 www.40222.theheartlinknetwork.com IAAP- International Association of Administrative ProfessionalsLouisville Every 2nd Thursday • 5 p.m. 4007 Kresge Way, 2nd Floor Paula Kessler 502.495.5116 Paula_Kessler@kyfbins.com www.iaap-louisville.org

eWoman Network Every 3rd Thursday • Noon Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Angela Reedus 502.592.8244 www.ewomennetwork.com

Legal Secretaries of Louisville Every 3rd Tuesday • 11:30am Bristol Bar & Grille 614 West Main Street Alice Harris 502.595.2310 #339 aharris@louisvilleprosecutor.com www.legalseclou-ky.org

EWI- Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tuesday • 5:30 p.m. Louis T. Roth & Co. 2100 Gardiner Lane Roberta Brock 502.581.2059 roberta.brock@pnc.com

MLWPC- Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 3rd Thursday • 5:30 p.m. City Cafe 505 West Broadway Angie Wallace akwallace0818@yahoo.com www.mlwpc.org

All listings are on a per month basis. To list your meeting free of charge in the calendar, email us your meeting date, time, location, a contact phone number, and website to info@todayspublications.com or fax to 502.327.8861. Deadline for inclusion is five weeks prior to issue date (e.g. June 25 for August issue).

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december DECEMBER 2011 2011

NAWBO- National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tuesday info@nawbolouisville.org www.nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Monday • 5:30 p.m. Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121 Network Now Every 2nd Friday • 11:45 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com Take It To Fame Network Every 2nd Tuesday • 6-7:30 p.m. Location Varies; check website Sharon Wimberly 502.292.7179 takeittofamenetwork.com WIN- Women in Networking Every 2nd Wednesday • 11:15 a.m. Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane Monica Jakoby monica@corporatetechsolutions.com WIN- Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wednesday • 11:30 a.m. Fern Valley Conference Center 2715 Fern Valley Road Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net

WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tuesday • 11:30 a.m. Buca di Beppo 2051 South Hurstbourne Pkwy. Laura Morriss 502.599.4917 LMorriss@userinc.com WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tuesday • 11:30 a.m. Breckinridge Inn 2800 Breckinridge Lane Lindsey Davis 502.727.9003 info@win4louisville.org WOAMTEC-Women On A Mission To Earn Commission Every 2nd and 4th Wednesday • 11:30 a.m. Limestone Restaurant 10001 Forest Green Blvd. Charlene Burke 812.951.3177 www.woamtec.com Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thursday • 11:30 a.m. Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Kathy McGann 502.552.3090 jshaber@venturetg.com ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thursday • 6:00 p.m. Logan’s Steakhouse 5005 Shelbyville Road Joyce Cain 502.339.8682 joyce.cain@insightbb.com

Today’s Today’s Woman Woman


Sponsored by:

www.iamtodayswoman.com www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011 2011 DECEMBER December

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Holly Ralston-Oyler / Behind the Scenes:

Photo Shoots and Articles in the Last 20 Years My Favorite Shoot of All Time Give (Editor) Anita bolts of brightly colored silk, linen, and tulle along with a few dozen Derby Hats, and it is a match made in heaven. (Editor Anita’s note: Before this shoot, we were shopping in Baer Fabric’s bargain room — loved that place — and we stumbled upon so many bolts of this fabric, and this is how the idea was formed.) This is one photo shoot that put my styling kit to the test. We taped, sewed, pinned, and clipped the models into the fabric, becoming fashion designers for a few hours (We did have some people ask where we got some of the dresses!). After the shoot, on my way back home, the spoiler under my car fell off. A kind gentleman stopped and offered his help. After crawling under the car, he said, “If we had something to secure this…” Returning from the trunk with my oversize clear plastic bag of every kind of duct tape known to man, I asked, “Would this help?” holding the bag where he could see it. He had only one comment; “Do I even want to know what type of work you do”?

Hats.qxd

3/21/07

11:38 AM

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Hats.qxd

Hat, Polly Singer, $250; necklace, Discoveries, $38. Modeled by Julia Sisk.

3/21/07

11:39 AM

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Hat, Glitz by Gin, $599; necklace, Lona Northener, $495. Modeled by Jessica Walters.

Hat, Glitz by Gin, $499; Necklace, Discoveries, $36.

Hat, Christine A. Moore, $489. Modeled by Kelly Hickerson.

Hat, Christine A. Moore, $439; earrings, Discoveries, $24. Modeled by Felicia Nabwza.

Hat, de Vuono $650; necklace, Sharon Major, $180; earrings, Sharon Major, $55, all available at Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft. Modeled by Kayla Oldham.

Hat, Christine A. Moore, $415; earrings, Discoveries, $56; necklace, Lona Northener, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, $395. Modeled by Hanna Aven.

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Hat, Attitudes by Angie, $1500. Modeled by Tiffany White.

Hat, Gabriel Amar for Frank Olive $500; necklace, Lona Northener green stone drop, $395. Modeled by Julie Timberlake.

SOURCES: Attitudes by Angie, (502) 419-3600 • Christine A. Moore Hats, sold exclusively in Louisville by Luna Boutique, (502) 454-7620 • Gabriel Amar for Frank Olive, available at Extraordinary Hats at the Summit (502) 327-9940 and Von Maur • Glitz by Gin, 12426 Shelbyville Road, (502) 254-5492 • Honey Vine Hats, 215 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., (502) 327-0093 • de Vuono hats and Jill Henning hats available at Kentucky Museum of Art & Craft, 715 W. Main Street, (502) 589-0102 • Polly Singer, www.hatsandveils.net, (859) 533-1426 • Jewelry from Discoveries, 1315 Bardstown Road, (502) 451-5034.

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A P R I L

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April 2007 - Look again (Derby)

My Red Shoes Are Famous I have a fabulous pair of red shoes, so when we scheduled the first Go Red Heart shoot, I just had to wear them. They ended up being worn by someone in the front row of the photo. The next year the same thing happened and just about every year since they have been worn by someone. These shoots are always t was news such a joy, but two stand out in my mind. e that I ha newsto mto mdeheart disease… 2007 — The Music of Your Heart was such a strong concept, R the TW office had people calling and wanting to order the faux CD shown in the shoot. We searched everywhere for red choir robes and could not find enough of them for the shoot. While attending a holiday church concert, the choir came walking down the aisles in beautiful red robes. I immediately texted Anita, “found robes” while receiving a dirty look from the woman sitting next to me. 2011 — There was time to get to know the women and their stories. Once again, my shoes showed up on page H-10.

I

H-10

Go Red For

Women

…because I was

2011

too young.

uth TottyMitchell is to heart disease. She no stranger knows family line she is the fourth generation that she walke afflicted with heart in a d grandmothethrough the loss disease, and Ruth Totty-M of Even as a r, who both died her father and itchell, age child and of coronaries. 60 what she young calls “a laundr adult, Ruth had like a rapid heartbeat y list of symptoms,” caused fatigue and thyroi her as a “sickly. Physicians contin d disease that ually child” and heart diseas never considlabeled e becau sickness se of her ered define age, but her experienced d itself when true Ruth her first coronary. was 29 and “I remem even thoug ber it just like it like beings h it was 30 years was yesterday ago,” she superimpos says. “It’s you’re lookin ed in a pictur g e — like Ruth soon at yourself from of her young became a case the outside.” study becau age. She monitors was sent se to other levels keep track of her home with occupationa, and over the years,heart rate and l therapy with the and couns she went to high eling to cope who despe stress levels of being a single cause her rately didn’t want mom heart to to her father leave her kids alone disease to . as it had “I learne done ‘can’t’ aren’t d that the little words ‘no’ like a bag. profanities,” Ruth and I a certain can expand some, says. “My body is point.” but I can’t go past A large health includpart of Ruth’s fight for her heart and educa ed getting her childr ted about kids learn heart diseas en involved CPR and the value taught them e. She had her of early about why it was a dollar so they would under when Ruth’snecessary to cut stand back more than health didn’t allow on expenses 40 hours her to work up with activit a week. Ruth ies she also came that would n’t over-s could do with her making health timulate her heart kids y meals togeth , such as Unfor tunate er from ly Ruth’s disease is fight with scratch. continuing heart generation on with the next who was in a very real way. also attack , died “too young” to Ruth’s daughter, have a heart around her of a coronary becau her. From didn’t realize what se the people was happe about the this terrible loss, Ruth’s convic ning to value of life of guarding tions and the the more. it tenaciously have impor tance increased all “She didn’t stop and Ruth says. take time for herself,” in your life,“You’re the most impor and that’s when it come not a selfish tant person thing to say is the most s to heart diseas a temporaryimpor tant prese e. Your presence nt you can inconv worth it for your enience for someo give, and permanent ne well-being.” else is

Today’

February 2007 - Go Red Heart Health Supplement

s Woman

February 2011 - Go Red Heart Health Supplement

Editor’s Note: Holly Ralston-Oyler has been working with Today’s Woman almost since the conception of the magazine. She started as a writer and progressed into makeup styling for

photo shoots. Holly, who owns Holly Cosmetics, takes us back to a few of the shoots and articles to tell you what you didn’t know.

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2011

Today’s Woman


TWOM1208Style 1/19/09

7:02 PM

But My Dog is a Diva!

Walking away wiser W

ith only mild symptoms, Mary Weber suffered a heart attack in December 2003, which damaged her heart muscle. Two years later Mary had a pacemaker implanted for Bradycardia, which is a slow heart rate. In April 2007, she was implanted with a cardiovascular defibrillator to treat her irregular heart rhythm. Mary says her physician was not surprised about the heart attack she suffered because of the infection in her body due to rheumatoid arthritis. Mary advises women to be their own health advocate. Learn and practice healthy living through diet, exercise, and awareness. Learn how chronic diseases can affect heart health.

12

Do You Look Like Your Pet? Have you ever worked with a chicken or Iguana? I have during our People and their Pets photo shoot. Even now I marvel at the fact that you can sit a chicken on a stone pedestal, and it will start posing. It was clear that this chicken was going to be the star of this photo shoot. The Iguana was fairly laid back and didn’t care what was going on around it, providing it was on his owner’s arm or shoulder. My highlight of this photo shoot was getting do the makeup on the owners to match their pet. Figuring out how to apply scales and makeup to match on the Iguana’s owner was a challenge. It has to be one of my favorite photos. WC Fields was correct when he suggested not working with children or pets. They will truly upstage you every time. We had a runaway cat that sent us all into a panic mode for a few hours and an adorable dog that tolerated being dressed in human clothes and endeared all of us with his cuteness.

October 2008 Pet Panache

www.iamtodayswoman.com

Go Red For Women 2009

11/14/08

5:01 PM

Page 25

Page 12

MARY WEBER

Author, Infidelity: Discovery to Recovery, a First Aid Manual for the Betrayed Partner Retired Registered Nurse, Marriage and Family Counselor Age: 77 Lafayette 148 red cape, $498; Zenebia black sheer turtleneck, $250; Elliott Lauren black side zip pant, $165; David Goodmon mink snap-on cuffs, $680; Fahrenheit double crystal clip earrings, $110; Rachel Reinhardt silver crystal broach, $125; Rachel Reinhardt black crystal earrings, $65; Prada black sunglasses, $245; Tory Burch black to gray fade bag “Anna”, $495, Rodes, 4938 Brownsboro Road, 502.753.7633; Bruno Magli red crocodile loafers, $455, Dillards (at Mall St. Matthews, 5000 Shelbyville Road, 502.893.0311). Happy (our white furry friend) was wearing a Companion Road Collection black and white Scottie sweater $24.99 and footwear $15.99 PetSmart.

Today’s Woman

February 2009 Go Red Heart Health Supplement

This was one Go Red Heart Supplement that missed using my red shoes, but they did use my dog-child, Happy, decked out in boots and sweater (she refused to wear the hat). She refused to walk (see if I ever tape the bottom of four doggie boots again) to the photo location, and had to be carried by our stylist’s son. Our Victorian Christmas Card inspired photo shoot was too much fun. My dog-child, Happy, was never far from the treats in this photo. Even though the treats were doggiewonderful, it was the pieces of Vienna sausage hidden on the set that kept her attention and `ears perky.

Mele kalikimaka! Merry christmas! Happy Hanukkah! Ha

ChooseYourTreats Wisely... Here’s hoping you don’t get stuck with the bones.

Merry Christmas! Lenore Hemming and Eleanor Allen & Happy More information on page 28-29. w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

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December 2008 Christmas Cards

Lose Weight in Public Excuse me…?

THE BEST TRIPS START AT HOME To see how traveling had changed post 9/11, I contacted Trish Burke with the Louisville Regional Airport Authority. She suggested meeting her in the airport and going through the screening process. First change: my old carry-on luggage no longer meets the new size regulations. Standing in line for the personal security check, I noticed everyone removing their shoes, jackets, and jewelry. Good thing I had only worn a jacket and slacks. Mr. TSA stopped me and demanded I remove my jacket. “Excuse me, you mean this jacket?” “Yes, it’s a requirement, not a request.” I grabbed my shoes from the bin, turned around and stepped out of the line, all the while assuring Trish that I would not be flying any time soon. I needed to learn how to dress so that I would not be going through security with just my bra and slacks on.

Read the rest of Holly’s 20 behind-the-scenes online at www.iamtodayswoman.com.

D E C E M B E

christmas! Happy Hanukkah! Happy kwanzaa! Season’s

Heart Supplement 2009

I was excited about being one of three women trying three different ways to lose weight. My adventure would start with an overview meeting of the HMR program. While flipping through the massive handbook, I was looking for something I could sink my teeth into daily, and it was not there. Not a morsel of sugar or a slice of bread. The first week, I lost nine pounds. By week six, I was down 24 pounds and had literally walked out of my half-slip at work, which officially demoted me from the plus-size range. By the end of week 12, I had a grand total weight loss of 35 pounds. The Crowning Comedy moment: While standing in line at Cinnabon in the Mall to buy a bottle of water, two women walked by and smiled. One jabbed the other with her elbow and said, “That is the lady from TW and she is going to gain all that weight back.”

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Holiday Styles

SMART

S M A R T

S T Y L E S

My Bel Amour Dress your little one in the latest, chic fashions this holiday season – or buy that special gift! Visit our NEW store opening in early December at 11701 Main Street, 40243 in Middletown. Or Shop Online and receive 15% off first purchase. Enter code CHIC101

www.mybelamour.com 502.653.6119

Runway Fashions We carry a diverse line of Elegant Evening Wear for the Holidays and New Years. Gentlemen, you can be stylish and distinguished in our Vittorio St. Angelo Line. Some proceeds from our store goes towards Autism Society of America. DCFW is our 2011 collaborating fundraising partner. *Currently purchasing fall clothing. 2425 Bardstown Road Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 451-5651 www.runwayfashionsinc.com

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center

Korrect Optical

“Decorations of red…” Make the Holiday scene with high fashion designer frames from Versace, Bvlgari, Dolce & Gabbana and more! Choose from distinctive styles, shapes, and colors sure to turn heads, while creating your own personal look. 4036 Dutchmans Lane • 4747 Dixie Highway 502.895.2020 www.korrect.com

Make her sparkle!

Since 1949

Celebrating 62 Years

Westport Village • 502.426.0077 • www.claterjewelers.com —ADVERTISEMENT—


Holiday Styles

SMART

STYLE CALENDAR December 1-31

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center

eyedia, design it again 1631 North Mellwood Ave. 502.540.4940 • www.eyediashop.com

In this re-energized world of green, eyedia serves to reconnect items from one owner to another.

, The Lily Pad Lidn greatest inventio ! ap since plastic wr

• INSIDE — 7500 sq.ft. of quality consignment furniture. • OUTSIDE — 1000 sq.ft. of quality consignment yard, porch and garden furnishings, in our newly painted and furnished space!

December 2nd - Ladies Night Friends, Fun, & Fabulous Jewelry 6pm-9pm 502.426.0077 - Westport Village December 1-31

Boutique Serendipity Stop in Dec. 8th for our Open House! Westport Village 502.423.0058 Complimentary Gift Wrapping December 11 & 12 - Friday & Saturday

John Seelye Furs

9800 Shelbyville Road #111 2-Day Sale. 50% off all regular-priced Call 502.423.8555 merchandise.

Early December - NEW Store Opening My Bel Amour Exceptional & unique children’s clothing.

A Mother’s Touch Come see our special Holiday selections and gifts! Specializing in Mother’s, Grandmother’s, Children’s, Spirit and Themed jewelry. Established in 1999, A Mother’s Touch has the largest selection of charms, engravables, jewelry repair and personalized gifts for any occasion, including Posh Mommy, and featuring Trollbeads & Chamilia. 12312 B Shelbyville Road 502.253.9477 www.amotherstouchjewelry.com

11701 Main Street 502.653.6119 • www.mybelamour.com

December 30

eye dia , design it again 1631 North Mellwood Ave.

Visit us on Fat Friday!

502.895.6600 December 1-31

A Mother’s Touch

12312 B Shelbyville Road

Unique Holiday shopping all month long.

502.253.9477 December 1-31

A Taste of Kentucky Stylish gifts for any occasion!

John Seelye Furs Offers a wide variety of the latest fashions and styles of fine furs and accessories. Purchase from our showroom, or have your fur custom designed. John Seelye Furs provides cold storage, cleaning, restyling and repair on premises. A family business locally owned and operated for 49 years. 9800 Shelbyville Road #111 Louisville, KY 40223 502-423-8555 —ADVERTISEMENT—

502.895.2733 December 1-31 • 502.451.5651

Runway Fashions

2425 Bardstown Road

Fall special. 20% off storewide sale. (Mention ad at checkout for a free gift) December 1-31

Korrect Optical

4036 Dutchmans Lane

See and be seen in spectacular new styles!

502.895.2020

STYLE CALENDAR continued on page 52


—ADVERTISEMENT—

A Taste of Kentucky

S M A R T

S T Y L E S

We have been Louisville’s local holiday headquarters for nearly three decades. Let us put together a unique gift assortment for everyone on your list! Downtown in the Aegon Center 400 West Market Facing 4th St. 502.566.4554 Mall St. Matthews by the Women’s Dillard’s 502.895.2733

Boutique Serendipity Fun. Fabulous. Fashion. Step inside Boutique Serendipity and let the unbelievable staff be your personal stylists for the Holidays. Open Christmas Eve & New Year’s Eve

Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe Visit, browse, and let us assist you with all your knitting and crocheting needs. Our shop is conveniently located in the Stonefield Square Shopping Centernext to the Fresh Market.

Open 7 days with a wide selection of yarn and accessories. 10482 Shelbyville Road 502.244.4927 www.sophiesfineyarn.com

Classes available.

Westport Village 502.423.0058 www.ShopBoutiqueSerendipity.com Facebook.com/BoutiqueSerendipity

Dr. H. Fred Preuss, Jr. Board Certified New FDA Approved Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus Quickly and Comfortably Clears Nails without Drug Therapy

4 Office Locations in So. Indiana and Louisville 812.923.9837 • 502.231.1206 www.louisvillelasertoenailfungus.com

STYLE CALENDAR December 1-31

Dr. H. Fred Preuss, Jr.

4 Office Locations FDA Approved Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus. Call 812.923.9837 December 1-23 Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe Buy your favorite knitter a Christmas Gift certificate.

502.244.4927


www.iamtodayswoman.com www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011 2011 DECEMBER December

55 53


20 Inspirations

by Holly R. Gregor

Interior Design Journalist Holly R. Gregor looks back at Louisville designers who she has been inspired by during her writings for Today’s Woman.

R

ick Jenkins is my favorite designer that I have written about. We became friends the day I met him at the St. James house he lived in at the time with his partner, Virgil Vaughn. My favorite piece of design advice, and one I repeat often, came from Rick: “I think you throw things together you like, and it works. That sets you off in a direction of creating a room that doesn’t look decorated or contrived.” How smart and easy is that? And personally, I prefer that look.

O

ne of the first interior design articles I wrote for Today’s Woman was on Joan Waddell. She took me to an 11,000-square-foot house she was decorating with the idea of making that the focus of the story. However, after seeing Joan’s own house I was “in love.” It was so warm and inviting. I loved the colors, the antiques, the paintings....everything down to her flowers. From that point on, I started writing on designers’ houses instead of their clients.’ I found it much more telling about them. PHOTO: Home of Joan Waddell of J. Waddell Interiors

PHOTO: Home of Rick Jenkins of Rick Jenkins + Co.

W

hen I think of Lee Stough, I think of having fun! I know she works hard, but she likes to have fun doing it. Me too. PHOTO: Home of Lee Stough of Lee R. Stough Interiors

Rosemary Kirkwood Rosemary Kirkwood isn’t a designer, however, she did design her own house and it’s beautiful. She also made the boldest move that I might want to copy one day. When she and her husband, Lee, bought their current house, they announced to their only son, Chase, “We are moving, but you’re staying.” Then they left the house with all the furnishings...down to the pots and pans. Now that’s creative!

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Today’s Woman


S

cott Tichenor was the best at combining fine antiques with barnyard antiques, as he called them. I always felt comfortable in his houses because of the rustic touches of Kentucky that he added. They downplayed the formality of the fine furniture, fabrics, and accessories. This was a great inspiration for me and one I like to use in my house, but instead of using rustic Kentucky objects, I use rustic Texas objects, reflecting my upbringing.

B

PHOTO: Home of the late Scott Tichenor of ES Tichenor Co.

etsy Wall provided me with another life-changing quote: “My favorite detail is quality. Quality brings comfort to a room in a very subtle way.” I try to feel the quality in a room and when I’m out shopping I try to zero in on quality. I even play this trick with myself by shopping at Goodwill and hunting for only items of quality. You would be surprised at the things I have unearthed. PHOTO: Home of Betsy Wall of Bittners, LLC Lee Best of Bittners, LLC In comparison to some of the houses I have visited, Lee Best lives in a small house. It still remains one of my favorites. She showed me how fabulous a house can be, no matter the size. Lee’s house is so beautifully put together, I have been drawn to smaller houses for that well-done, detailed, finished look. I would rather have small and finished than large and unfinished.

Dru Adams of DM Adams Designs I love when I visit someone’s house and feel I know them when I step through the door. Dru Adams designed the house for herself, her husband, Wesley, and their three children. It has a definite point of view. It is so Dru! And she looks good in her house! She knows who she is and what she likes. That’s a good look for any home.

N

o one does decadence like Lee Robinson. When it comes to refined details and living a comfortable lifestyle....ask Lee. PHOTO: Home of Lee Robinson of Lee W. Robinson Company

M

ichael Hoskins is the only designer I interviewed twice, back to back.....so as to show the diversity of designers. First, I wrote on the more traditional house he shares with his wife Deb, and second was a contemporary house he designed for his client/friend, Sue Rosen. It was a creative thought and it goes to show...ask, and you shall receive. At least in this case. PHOTO: Home of Michael Hoskins of Hubbuch & Co.

Read about the other 11 designers from whom Holly Gregor learned the most at www.iamtodayswoman.com. Here are the others she chose to write about: Fran Jaspar, David Arnold, Howard Wagner and his daughter Lucie Stansbury, Katherine Doll, Tess Krebs, Blair Williams, Sue Baughman, Steve Tipton, Lori Finke, and Trace Mayer. www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

DECEMBER

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A Journey Down the Aisle

The Day, and Happily Ever After By Lauren Williams Dahl • Photos by Melissa Donald

Lauren has shared her wedding planning; now she shares her finale: She and Mike got married on November 5. tables/entire space: With the help of the entire family, we managed to decorate the entire space before noon(ish). The dance floor was separated by four poles wrapped in white lights and then softened with tulle. Above the dance floor hung a variety of paper lanterns. Tables were decorated with floral centerpieces, napkins, and painted flower pots as party favors. Cake table: I’m in love with these beautiful cakes made by my sister-in-law. The two outer cakes were pumpkin and iced with a soft green cream cheese icing. I placed white pumpkins glazed in glitter at the ends of the table. The center threetiered cake had the traditional cake flavors of red velvet, white, and chocolate.  Center cake with bird nest cake topper: The traditional three-tier wedding cake sat atop one of the larger wood slices. As the wedding cake topper, I made a bird’s nest with a bride and groom bird nesting on top of leaves. Sugar flowers dissipated down the edge of the cake and pearl branches added to the nature feel of the cake table. kimjustdesserts@gmail.com

appetizer tower: It’s too bad that I didn’t get to enjoy this appetizer tower, but it definitely looked great.

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2011

Mike and Lauren during speeches: It appears that my sister, Mike’s brother, and even Mike and I are all focused on different things. But, for some reason, I love this photo. This is one of the clearest memories I have of the wedding day. All the rushing and attention and talking to all the guests blend together, but the moment when Allison and Brian gave their speeches and Mike and I cut the cake — that will be one of my best memories.

Lauren and Mike are in the midst of their Do-It-Yourself wedding planning.

centerpiece trio: The table centerpieces were made up of an assortment of mason jars and vases. My mom and I used hot glue and rope to decorate the jars, creating random heights of rope on each jar, and layered with a tulle bow. Blue food coloring dyed the flower water which was then filled with wildflowers. The jars sat atop thick wood slices cut by Mike’s dad and uncle. Small candles purchased in bulk on Ebay surrounded the centerpiece. Flower pot guest favor: The biggest project of the entire wedding was painting 260 of these tiny flower pots for guest favors. All the pots were different, but kept a cool, green color scheme and playful design. First the flower pots were painted with acrylic paint, then I used a sharpee marker to outline and finally finished with a coat of varnish. These favors sat atop a gray napkin at each guest’s seat and inside I placed an organza bag filled with chocolate covered sunflower seeds. (Although real seeds would have been a cool idea too). 

Honeymoon: Mike and I had such a relaxing and adventurous honeymoon. We toured the Mayan Ruins in Cancun, swam with dolphins, went parasailing, and explored the local food. Maybe the most adventurous part of the trip was figuring out how to navigate through the city. City buses are just not the same there! Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

2011

DECEMBER

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2011: The Hunt for the Perfect Salad

20 Reasons to Love

Winston’s Special Winter Beet Salad

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Story and Photo By Melissa Donald

hat is there NOT to love about Winston’s? It’s conveniently located right off I-264 on Bardstown Road, has ample parking, great atmosphere, fabulous food, friendly, knowledgeable, and courteous staff, and of course, an amazingly creative team of chefs. Six reasons to love this next salad, and I haven’t even mentioned the salad yet. Winston’s Winter Beet Salad is made with a bed of Arugula and Red Sorrel, topped with thinly shaved rounds of raw beets (whichever beets are in season), dots of beautiful green pistachio nuts, and slices of fresh, juicy oranges. It adds a light refreshing element to a season of typical warm, heavy meals. Arranged around this salad bed are three rounds of toasted goat cheese. A light, decorative drizzle of Winston’s homemade orange pistachio dressing, made exclusively for this dish, completes the salad. The combination of all these ingredients makes for a sophisticated blend. The dressing pulls everything together — the tangy, sweet, bitter, astringent, and nutty flavors work deliciously together. Place a combination on a piece of Lavish bread. It’s a delight. This salad is delightfully good for you, too. Many of the ingredients are high in Vitamins A and C. The beets not only share these vitamins, but also have high levels of potassium, which helps lower heart rates and regulate metabolism. A thoughtfully created dish for the winter season. OK…so that’s actually more than 20 reasons, which means if you haven’t been to Winston’s in awhile or at all, I highly encourage you to go. Reservations are not required but are recommended.

Winston’s — www.sullivan.edu/winstons/ • 502.456.0980 Estimated nutritional information: Calories - 300; Total Fat - 20g (with 5 g of saturated fat); Fiber - 7.5g; Protein - 14g

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Today’s Woman


My 20 Favorite Quotes I

by Bob Mueller

am a collector of quotes that can be used as daily affirmations and guides. There are so many great things said that are noteworthy. Here are 20 of my favorites that center on specific themes.

My favorite friendship quote:

“A friend is someone who can see through you and still enjoys the show.” In the area of letting go and not trying to control everything:

“Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and it annoys the pig.” “When it starts to rain, let it.” For wisdom I always love:

“The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook”

Other quotes that make my “Top Twenty” are:

“Everyone’s life is a fairy tale written by God’s finger.” — Hans Christian Anderson

“An optimist goes to the window every morning and says, ‘Good morning, God.’ The pessimist goes to the window and says, ‘Good God, morning.’” “It’s easy to get good players. Getting them to play together, that’s the hard part.” — Casey Stengel

— William James

At Hosparus we believe strongly in Jonathan Swift’s quote:

“May you live all the days of your life.” The best quote on change and growth that I’ve found is:

“If you’re green, you grow, if you’re ripe, you rot.” A quote that motivates me to action is:

“Those who believe that they can do something and those who believe they can’t are both right.”

“Nobody can make you feel inferior without your consent.” — Eleanor Roosevelt

“Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” —John Wooden

“If you think you’re too small to make a difference, you haven’t been in bed with a mosquito.” — Anita Roddick

— Henry Ford

Two other quotes I love are these:

“When it is dark enough, you can see the stars.”

“Have you ever noticed that anybody going slower than you is an idiot and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?”

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

— George Carlin

“The really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”

Each day is a gift. Receive it with thankfulness, unwrap it with anticipation, and relish it with joy!”

— Mark Twain

My most prayerful quote is this one on gratitude:

“If the only prayer you ever say in your life is ‘thank you,’ it will be enough.” — Meister Eckart

“Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.” — Michael McGriff, M.D.

“Life is too short to wear tight shoes.” — Chad Young Kopple (Died at 16 years)

Today’s Woman has been an important part of my life for 20 years. My goal has been to provide hope, insight, and spirituality in each article I write not only for those who read my columns but also for myself, the writer. I send in my columns as the Spirit moves me, so Today’s Woman has a huge file of articles I’ve submitted. I’m always excited to see which ones are chosen.

Bob Mueller is associate vice president of Mission & Stewardship at Hosparus, the community hospices of Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Central Kentucky. He has three books available: Look Forward Hopefully, The Gentle Art of Caring, and his latest, Create a Better World. Find Bob online at www.bobmueller.org and email him at bobmueller@insightbb.com.

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2011

Today’s Woman


20 and Insights

W  ellness Tips By Cheryl Stuck

Over the past 12 months, participants of Today’s Woman’s Wellness Health Advisory Group weighed in on various health topics. They shared their personal experiences and professional knowledge, offering new ideas and insight to help other women. This month, 20 members of our Health Advisory Group share their tips and insights.

1

“I laid out in the sun every chance I had growing up in Wisconsin. I also went to the tanning bed when I was in college. What silly choices I made to increase my risk factors in life.

3

6 “I feel much better when I am eating no concentrated sweets or too many grams of carbs. I also notice I feel much better when I am well hydrated and have enough protein. And a walk in the morning makes me feel better all day.”

“I have learned to choose and know what I am eating. To eat small meals throughout the day and don’t give up. Keep finding different recipes you like that replace what you ate before.”

8

“I have learned that I must, to some extent, be my own doctor — in that I have to be responsible for choosing excellent and responsive physicians; that I must take the responsibility for eating well and exercising regularly; that I am initially responsible for noticing if something is amiss with my body or my health; and that it is my job to pursue diagnosis and remedies. I can’t expect anyone else to be my perpetual nurse or doctor.”

Kentucky

Rebecca Terry, MD, Co-managing partner, Women First

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“Stay out of the sun, wear Cenia Wedekind, Owner of sunscreen, and do not go to A Mother’s Touch Mary Haynes, President, a tanning bed. We are still Nazareth Home in a real battle to get skin cancer under control. It is 4 “I’m in charge. It’s my such a preventable illness.” responsibility to take Tamella Cassis, MD, Cassis care of my body. While Dermatology and Aesthetics Center 7 assistance and advice from 2 “I work out first thing in others is welcome, the final Laurie Duesing, part-time “Once you get started decision about what I eat, Latin instructor the morning before (with exercise), it will how I exercise, when I see I take the kids to become ingrained and 9 “In the last two years, a doctor is all up to me.” school and go to you will feel guilty when Debbie Williams, Project I have taken control of work. This is my coordinator, AquaPro Painting you skip it. I am a speed my diet and exercise after time, and it starts walker. It is my time to several years of not doing 5 my day off on a “I prefer group exercises, think and plan and reflect. so. I now feel better about great note. Also, stay and having someone to Plus, it makes my little dog myself and have more hydrated. Thirst often is work out with keeps you a very happy guy.” energy and strength than I mistaken for hunger.” accountable.” Deborah Tuggle, Clinical Nurse have had for several years. Kristi Jedlicki Levenhagen, Specialist, Critical Care Curriculum Pam Hayden, Director of Clinical Case Manager Supervisor/St. John It is a good thing.” Resources, Presbyterian Homes of

Advisory group members are: Margie Beeler • Susan Boddy • Christie Bollinger, RN • Sherrice Bond • Kim Broecker • Jennifer Brown • Linda Burry • Kimberly Carpenter, DC • Tamella Buss Cassis, MD • Holly Clark • Stacy Cohen, RN • Diane Collins, RN • Pat Cooke • Funmilayo Dixon • Laurie Duesing • Kelly Davis Fleenor • Tanya Franklin, MD • Julie Garrison, MBA • Carol Graham, MD • Dawn Hayden • Pam Hayden, RN • Mary Haynes • Gretchen Houchin • Mary Jennings • Alexis Karageorge, MD • Dee Jay Kelly • Tomiko Coates Kiefer • Diane Kissel • Kristi Jedlicki Levenhagen • Melissa Little • Sean Maguire, MD • Geri Manning • Lisa Mattingly • David McArthur • Anne McReynolds • Tara Morris • Maria Munoz • Tina Nuttall, MBA, FACHE • Denise Orwick, RPh • Betsy Paulley • Mae Pike • Leesa Richardson, MD • Ticonna Roberts • Cheryl Scanlon • Rhonda Sigler • Burke Stephens • Rebecca Terry, MD • Myrdin Thompson • Deborah Tuggle • Lannette VanderToll • Jessica Walker • Marine Walls • Janie Biagi Watts • Cenia L. Wedekind • Anthony Westmoreland, RPh • Cathi Wiley • Kathy Wilkinson • Debbie Williams • Allison Young, LMT

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o 19 “Many women enjoy 10 “Make the time (for 14 “When I stopped dieting 17 “Eating properly and exercise), no matter what. and started choosing to exercising go hand in watching television Be committed. Zumba, eat well and stay fit so hand. If you workout, that and consider television Love to Dance, doesn’t feel I could hopefully live a doesn’t give you liberty their down-time away like you are exercising. long, full life, it became a to eat whatever you want from family and work You have fun, meet no-brainer for me. I now and if you eat healthy that responsibilities. Exercising great people, and what spend more money at the doesn’t mean that you on a treadmill while support!” grocery to buy good food don’t have to workout. watching a favorite Dee Jay Kelly, Harrods Creek than I do on shoes. When It is the balance of the two television program allows public educator I stopped using artificial that will leave you feeling women time to exercise 11 sweeteners, I stopped fit and healthy. I have to as they emotionally “I have learned that having chronic migraines. hold myself accountable disconnect from their I have to listen to my Healthier choices for staying healthy or everyday havoc.” body. A past mistake was Rhonda Hettinger, DNP, NP-C, combined with exercise, I won’t be able to take letting other people talk APRN-C; Heart Disease Prevention is like premium fuel for care of my family down Specialist in Women me into eating more your car. It just runs the line.” than I should.” Tomiko Coates Kiefer, Owner/ better.” Pat Cooke, Bookkeeper and Artist

Cathi Wiley, Business Development, OfficeWare

12 “Five minutes of exercise 15 “There are so many ways throughout the day adds someone can exercise. up and makes a difference. Don’t make excuses You don’t have to block because there are none. 30 or more minutes each You can exercise at work, day for exercise. Just take the stairs instead of stretching is a form of the elevator, take your movement. I like doing dog for a walk, or play a crunches on an exercise sport with your children. ball and doing floor Find ways to exercise that exercises that stretch you can enjoy with your my muscles. I have found family.” I don’t have to get hot and Holly Clark, Director Employee sweaty exercising to rack Assistance & Worklife Program, Humana up the benefits.” Diane Kissel, IS Director, Kindred Healthcare

16 “We find time for the things that are most 13 “Don’t make exercise too important to us. I love to structured. It makes it less be outside so I find that fun and you will likely not walking and hiking are be as motivated to keep most rewarding for me. doing it.” If you place yourself in Tina Nuttall, FACHE, MBA, an environment that you mommy of two and CEO of enjoy, it doesn’t feel like household exercise.”

Instructor of Stroller Strides

18

“Start doing a little 20 change in your life style. A change that you feel happy about, then you can add another and another. Just one little step at a time. “Keep it simple. Pick a goal on whether to eat better or exercise and start. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Use less salt. A lot of food is cooked with salt or seasonings that have salt, so adding salt after the preparation can take its toll on the body.” Ticonna Roberts, Information Always eat the proteins Researcher on your plate first. When the body receives the first bite of proteins, it reacts in a different way than if the first bite is carbohydrates.” Maria Angelica Munoz, Physical Educator

Rhonda Sigler, Marketing Manager, State Farm Insurance

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2011

Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com


My Top 20 Most Memorable Arts Insider

Dr. Maya Angelou: April 2010 (When you get, give... When you learn, teach) To this day my interview with the renown poet and author is the only one I’ve ever conducted this way — in that I was moved to ask Angelou just five questions, by way of speaking only the following five words ‘Acceptance/Pride/Forgiveness/Teacher/Preacher.’ Fortunately, Dr. Angelou enjoyed the unique interview approach, enthusiastically commenting ‘this is a first for me, too! And you should submit the (format) idea to a national publication.” Michael Bolton: March 2011 (His Time, Love & Tenderness) Singer/songwriter stellar career not withstanding, Bolton is also a humanitarian extraordinaire, having created the Michael Bolton Charities in 1993, which assists women and children at risk from the effects of poverty, as well as emotional, physical, and sexual abuse. Michael Bolton Charities has also since partnered with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. He was the executive producer for the 2005 documentary Terror at Home: Violence in America. Nuf said. Sylvia Browne: June 2011 (You Say Goodbye…And I Say Hello) I’d actually opened the article about the worldrenown psychic with my story behind how her story’s title came to be. In a nutshell…I’d been going over my interview notes and both of Browne’s current books but still was having difficulty coming up with a title (something that never happens), when I suddenly realized I’d been singing the chorus to the Beatles’ you say goodbye…and I say hello over and over under my breath!

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Page 72

BY GIOIA PATTON

CAROL CHANNING

The Lady’s A Star “Ahhh did you say…CA-ROL CHAN-NING! How do I get tickets?”

T

Carol Channing: September 2009 (The Lady’s A Star) I couldn’t be more impressed by the devotion to the arts of this 88-year-old Broadway legend, who said that “since my early 80s my passion and major commitment for the remainder of my life was to bringing a refocus of the Arts in the public educational system of my native California, by way of The Channing/Kullijian Endowment for the Arts.” Channing was still performing…having come through town with her one-woman show, The First 88 Years Are the Hardest.

hat was the reaction this writer heard from virtually every single person as I spread the word that on September 19, at Clarksville’s Derby Dinner Playhouse, Broadway legend Carol Channing will be giving a matinee performance of her acclaimed one-woman show, The First 88 Years Are the Hardest. “Broadway’s first lady of musical comedy” has made a jaw-dropping list of accomplishments since making her Broadway debut in Blitzstein’s No For An Answer in 1948 (i.e. three Tony Awards, the Oscar Hammerstein award for lifetime achievement and the Julie Harris Lifetime Achievement Award from the Actors’ Fund of America). Such an impressive list that the only difficult moments I experienced while preparing for Channing’s 30minute phone interview occurred while deciding what topics to talk about and what to omit. Speaking from her Modesto, Calif. home, when Channing is asked at the top of her interview if there’s a ‘secret ingredient’ behind her having achieved iconic status in the world of musical theater, her instantaneous shootfrom-the-hip, tell-it-like-it-is, albeit modest reply sets the tone for the entire interview. “Since the first time I was on stage when I was 7 years old, I have not had the slightest idea of what I looked like or sounded like from the audience,” the 88-year-old Channing answers in her perfectly enunciated and strong alto-register speaking voice. “Not the slightest,” she repeats. “And I think the moment you do, you lose the whole thing. I think if performers are successful they just want to make their audiences happy and live their lives as performers,” she continues. “That’s what happened to me the first time I was on stage in front of my fellow students at my elementary school in San Francisco. All of a sudden I realized ‘they’re laughing…my fellow students are laughing 72 S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 9

hen I was asked to choose my 20 most memorable Arts Insider subjects to coincide with this 20th anniversary issue, I literally groaned, because not only had I written something for practically every issue since the summer of 1996, but for a few years, I’d even written two Arts Insiders per issue. But, ultimately I spent a few hours sitting on the floor of my office reliving the evolution (I hope!) of my interview and writing style by going over 118 back issues that covered (only) the span of January of 2002 to October of this year — having already created a Top 10 Arts Insider list for the 10th anniversary issue of the magazine. All the Arts Insider interviews (sans one) were conducted by phone, and in alphabetical order they are: Dame Julie Andrews: July 2008 (The Gift of Julie Andrews) I chose Andrews because of how she had come to embrace a ‘when one door closes, another opens’ philosophy after suffering the devastating loss of three of the four octaves of her iconic singing voice due to a botched surgical procedure in 1997. She ultimately has become a very successful children’s book author.

7:47 PM

“You can’t stand up there on stage with a big ego. As a performer you think of the audience all the time, and that’s the whole trick in life. The moment you think of yourself, you’re a bloody bore!” — Broadway musical legend Carol Channing

T O D A Y ’ S

W O M A N

Lori Cheek of the dating website Cheek’d: February 2011 (Wearing Your Heart on Your Card) The unmarried Taylorsville, Ky. native had “lived and breathed the idea of creating Cheek’d virtually every day” since the website idea had come to her one night three years before. A mere seven months from the time the Manhattan-based business finally opened, it had already garnered a terrific national and international reputation…consider me impressed! Jackie Collins: September 2008 (Jackie Collins’ Access To Hollywood) I could barely believe my ears after the very friendly novelist dramatically reenacted a harrowing situation that had occurred late one night after Collins and her friends, actor Sidney Poitier and his wife, were pulling up to Collins’ Beverly Hills mansion driveway entrance. So fascinating and fiction-like were the play-by-play events of that episode that I was compelled to open the article with it after laying it out as scenes from a movie. Roger Daltrey of The Who: October 2009 (Talkin’ ‘bout his generation, my generation, your generation) I was fascinated by the ‘everyman’ philosophy of the then-65-year-old singer/actor (who’d been famous since the age of 25), after I’d asked how he walks through life with the title ‘Rock God’ attached to his name. “It’s not like that…as I’ve never tried to create that type of relationship with our audience” explained the very friendly artist. “The Who are much more respectful of our fans. It’s ‘I’m me, you’re you and we’re one,’ which is how I like it!” Paula Deen: October 2010 (Success From Scratch) What stood out from my interview with the New York Times Best-selling author, restaurateur, and Southern cuisine wiz was the fact that even though the household name had made enough money to probably buy, say, for instance, the late actress Elizabeth Taylor’s entire jewelry collection if she’d wanted to, the Georgia native had retained her working class hard-work ethic and downhome Southern friendliness. PAGE 70

By Gioia Patton

8/20/09

An Arts Insider Must-See

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Terry Fator: December 2008 (Rocket Man) Winner of the $1,000,000 prize for America’s Got Talent (in August 2007), the title of the ventriloquist’s profile was a no brainer after I read what changes his career underwent within a 12-month span. It began in May of 2007 (after 25 years in the business) when Fator performed for an audience of one at a Texas state fair, and culminated in May of 2008, after having signed a five-year, $100 million dollar contract with the Mirage Casino and Resort in Las Vegas.

Maureen McGovern: May 2006 (The Healing Power of Music) I love the way in which the singer/actress has chosen to use her fame by having created (in 2001) Maureen McGovern’s Works of Heart Foundation for Music and Healing in partnership with the American Music Therapy Association. “Because of the musical gift I was given, I knew I should use that music for a purpose…a greater purpose,” she explained. “The foundation’s focus is to educate people about the power of music and to aid in the healing of not only patients, but also caregivers.”

Sarah Ferguson, The Duchess of York: November 2003 (American Splendor) Unfortunately, the Duchess stands apart from all the celebrity interviews I’ve ever done for the wrong reason. Although she was very nice to me during our in-person interview, and answered each question in detail, it was obvious that her answers were very carefully rehearsed and thereby boringly robotic. But I understood, because if I’d been slammed as ferociously and repeatedly by the British press as she had been during her marriage and then divorce from the second son of Queen Elizabeth II of England…I’d also be wary of the media for the rest of my life!

Don McLean: July 2008 (American Troubadour) The American Pie singer/songwriter stood out for a particular remark — the philosophy of which is shared by many of the acclaimed music artists I’ve interviewed over the years. McLean said: “A lot of the (music) entertainment today is very substandard, because the artistic creativity has been taken away from the artists and is in the hands of the music industry executives. Even Bob Dylan said: ‘Most of the professionals are amateurs.’”

Elizabeth Gilbert: February 2009 (I Am My Own Best Friend) The New York Times Best-Selling author of Eat, Pray, Love :One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia (Viking Press) was the kind of warm, upbeat, and funny person one would want for a friend. She also stands out because of delivering her answers to my questions in the same way as her writing style. In other words, even if I hadn’t already read the world-wide best-selling Eat, Pray, Love, I would have felt prompted to do so ASAP after spending 40 minutes on the phone with her. Goldie Hawn: March 2011 (Don’t Worry, Be Happy!) My selecting Hawn wasn’t because she’d come to Louisville with her ‘Happiness’ lecture; rather it happened after finding out during her interview that the Academy-Award winning actress really walked her talk by having created in 2003 The Hawn Foundation whose mission seeks to help transform children’s lives by providing them with opportunities to acquire vital social and emotional skills and to improve their academic performance. Hawn’s foundation supports research studies conducted by university-associated social scientists and neuroscientists. Shirley MacLaine: (March 2009) Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that the very first words out of my mouth to the New York Times best-selling author and iconic star of stage and screen would be to blurt out “I’m Sorry!” I then explained that because MacLaine’s latest book, Sageing While Aging (Atria Books), consisted of intensely researched and in-depth detail on such a multitude of subjects ‘I’d have to read the book at least two more times to process that much information!’ MacLaine’s reaction was to laugh, before deadpanning ‘I know’ under her breath.

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Paula Poundstone: January 2010 (The World According to Paula) The comedienne’s memoir There’s Nothing in This Book I Meant to Say (Three Rivers Press) included in-depth references to such historical figures as Charles Dickens, Ludwig Von Beethoven, Joan of Arc, and Helen Keller. Soooo it was all I could do to keep up with the exceedingly nice, exceptionally intelligent, self-deprecating, and satirical artist! Doris Roberts: October 2008 (The Unsinkable Doris Roberts) I loved the self-empowerment mantra declared by the award-winning actress to those people age 65 and over who fear the aging process. “Change your attitude! Stay involved! And do not settle. If you settle (laughs) you’re waiting for the grim reaper honey…and I’m not about to wait for him. He’s going to have to chase me!” Mary Wilson of The Supremes: March 2010 (In the Name of Love) Wilson’s admirable projects at the time included her role as a spokesperson for the Humpty Dumpty Institute which works to raise awareness about the wide scourge of land mines, as well as lobbying to pass a bill prohibiting bogus musical groups from cashing in on the names and likenesses of such famous acts as The Supremes. Additionally, a few years ago Wilson commissioned official stamps heralding the careers of such all-girl singing groups as The Ronettes, The Dixie Cups, The Angels, and The Supremes. Wilson’s collection of The Supremes gowns has been on a world-wide tour for years. Wynonna: December 2009 (‘Til I Get it Right) The singer/songwriter (whom I’ve interviewed four different times) stands out because of her knack for words. I never get anything less than great quotes to wrap my profiles around. Case in point: during my ’09 interview I mentioned that when I think of her I think ‘open book,’ to which Wy deadpanned: “I’ve always been an open book, to the point where the other day someone said to me ‘If I bought a car from you, you’re the kind of person who would tell me everything that’s wrong with it.’”

GIOIA PATTON IS AN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CELEBRITY PROFILER and concert reviewer. DECEMBER

2011

Today’s Woman


www.iamtodayswoman.com

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DECEMBER

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Concepts we love…

photo

April 2009 - Evolve (Derby ISSUE)

AUGUST 2009 - Brotherhood of the Traveling Pants (Man Issue)

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ext month, we are celebrating our 20th anniversary with a huge fashion show event! Our Eve*olution 20 Years of Today’s Woman Fashion Show will feature 20 of our past cover models gracing the runway in clothes from local boutiques. Get up close and personal with our staff and find out what makes Today’s Woman the magazine for every woman. See page 7. APRIL 2008 - Arrive in Style (DERBY ISSUE) 74

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2011

Today’s Woman


Today's Woman December 2011  

The year was 1991. Lady Gaga was 5, the USSR was no more, “I’m too sexy…” was number one…and Today’s Woman was born. As with most newborns,...

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