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CONTENTS: WINTER 2016/2017

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22

40

20

PERFECT ENDINGS SUPPLEMENT AFTER PAGE 48

Directories

4

DON'T STOP MOVING

22

SMART WATCHES

46

DEAR ME

Directories & Facilities by Location

6

SETTLE INTO COMFORT By Carrie Vittitoe

24

BOOK BESTIES, FILM FRIENDS

49

QUARTERLY CAREGIVER WINNER

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

28

WISE AND WELL

50

30

CAREGIVER CIRCLE By Carrie Vittitoe and Anna Oldham

SENIORS AND TECHNOLOGY: A PERFECT MATCH FOR RETIREMENT?

52

A GRATEFUL HEART = PURE JOY

82

54 How to Use

56 Adult Day Care Facilities

58 Aging-in-Place

12

Communities

By Yelena Sapin

60 Alzheimer’s Care Facilities

64 Assisted Living

14

Facilities

68 Home Health 75 Independent Living 76 Nursing/Rehab Facilities

87 Helpful Resources

HAVE YOU READ THIS?

By Megan Seckman

By Amanda Beam

By Mark Kaelin

By Patti Hartog

16

PUT PARKINSON’S ON HOLD

36

20

WHAT I KNOW NOW

38

By Lucy Pritchett

By Mary Ellen Bianco

40 For advertising information, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

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10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR HANDYMAN WARM DRINKS

By Melissa Donald and Anita Oldham

By Cindy Venable

By Ronnie Blair

By Bob Mueller

By Amanda Beam

Facilities

83 Personal Care

By Tiffany White

RULE FOLLOWER

By Connie Meyer

UPDATES & HAPPENINGS

By Gioia Patton and Anna Oldham

88

WHAT TO WEAR By Alissa Hicks


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From the Editor Volume 13 / Number 4 PUBLISHER

Cathy S. Zion cathy@todayspublications.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Anita Oldham anita@todayspublications.com EDITOR

Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Lucy M. Pritchett

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

F

Don't Stop Moving

itness hasn’t been something I’ve ever integrated into my life on a regular basis. Often, I would begin an exercise regimen, but not stay consistent. I had a difficult time committing myself to something I knew would benefit me — until three months ago. On a whim, I decided to download Couch to 5K, a training app that prepares you for running a 5K. Since starting the program, I feel a sense of accomplishment and look forward to a 30-minute run through the park. If your mood is low, setting aside time for exercise — regardless of the type of workout — is one of the best ways to keep you energized and happier. Try a few exercises at home or find out what Marilyn Cannon, owner of Bodies by Design, does to maintain good health (p28). If you’re searching for a gentler workout, the Jewish Community Center offers Walk with Ease, a program for seniors that focuses on increasing balance and strength. Yoga at Crescent Hill offers chair yoga classes, or you could find out about the water aerobics and Tai Chi classes at the YMCA of Greater Louisville. Or sign up for a fitness class through Silver Sneakers. There are also fitness programs designed for people with physical limitations. Anytime Fitness, located in Floyds Knobs, offers Rock Steady Boxing, which is a program that helps people with Parkinson’s Disease improve their mobility through a series of intense boxing workouts. In 2017, make a commitment to be healthier for yourself, your family, and your friends. Once you start, you won’t be able to stop.

Got something to say? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events. 4 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR

April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com Jennifer Wilham jennifer@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHY

Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Amanda Peyton officeadmin@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

W. Earl Zion COVER ART

Silvia Cabib TODAY’S TRANSITIONS is published by: Zion Publications LLC

9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 TodaysTransitionsNow.com

The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. The staff has made good-faith efforts to provide comprehensive and accurate listings in all directories. Information included in the directories is based strictly on that supplied by each entity. Zion Publications does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2016 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.


Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Settle into

COMFORT BY CARRIE VITTITOE

ILLUSTRATIONS JENNIFER WILHAM

N

o matter our age, we would all like our daily lives to be comfortable. As time passes,

though, we often find that comfort becomes even more imperative in our day-to-day routines. Arthritis may slow us down or we may deal with other physical ailments that make it necessary for us to find adaptive means of self-care. Whether you or a loved one is looking for effective ways to make daily living more comfortable, we’ve got some simple suggestions to consider. PAGE 8>>

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<< PAGE 6

Clothing Just because an individual is older doesn’t mean he or she no longer cares about personal appearance, but changes in arm strength and flexibility may mean that function has to be as important as style. Jo Ross, a local fashion consultant, says, “Things that are front-closure are much more manageable” for older adults, whether the closure is a zipper, button, or snap. She recommends that people “wear nothing that is tight or binding,” not only because of its impact on circulation and comfort, but also because it just doesn’t look as nice. Jo likes the Alfred Dunner and Pendleton collections, which can be found at local department stores. Many of the pieces in these collections are washable and have elasticized waists. These collections also offer a variety of color-coordinated pieces that allow someone to add a cardigan, jacket, or vest to pants and a top. Adding that third item of clothing to an outfit, according to Jo, provides polish and an extra element of sophistication. When it comes to footwear, she recommends non-slip shoes with arch supports in order to keep the body in proper alignment. Footsmart is a distributor that offers brands such as Clarks, Stretchies, and Bernie Mev, all of which offer supportive and stylish shoes. Having one’s clothing tailored is another consideration when it comes to daily comfort and aging. Individuals or their family members should take the time to ensure that pants and robes aren’t too long to pose a safety hazard. “As we mature, we get shorter, so it’s easy to get a toe or the heel of a shoe caught and fall,” Jo says.

Just because an individual is older doesn’t mean he or she no longer cares about personal appearance, but changes in arm strength and flexibility may mean that function has to be as important as style. 8 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Hair and Skin Care Some people find it increasingly difficult to get out to the salon or barbershop as they age. Lauren Abbey, a stylist at Shear Images Salon in Pleasure Ridge Park, sees this firsthand: “Some of my clients transition from walking to walkers to wheelchairs in a short period of time,” she says. Stylists are able to move styling chairs and other equipment to make room for wheelchairs and are happy to do so because they know how much better a person feels having his or her hair washed, cut, and styled. Lauren has done some creative maneuvering in the past to ensure clients are comfortable and coiffed, including making house calls. One of her clients

had advanced Alzheimer’s disease and no access to a vehicle, so she went to the woman’s home. They rolled her wheelchair backward to the tub and turned a plastic cape around so the water would roll directly into the tub and not into the client’s lap. There are few things that feel as nice as having one’s head massaged during a shampoo, and continuing this self-care routine is an important part of maintaining one’s self esteem. Special tea tree oil or peppermint shampoos offer a little zing and scent that loved ones may find both rejuvenating to the scalp and relaxing. PAGE 10>>


<< PAGE 8

Simple Enjoyment Connie added a fish tank to her home and Connie Ray, a certified nursing assistant in Salem, bird feeders outside the windows when she was Indiana, cared for her elderly friend Lula Mae in preparing to care for Lula Mae. These two simple her home for nearly a year and made hair, skin, and additions gave Lula Mae something to keep her nail care a special treat. Connie had a roll-in shower mind occupied during the last installed in the bathroom for months of her life in 2015. her and added other luxury "Pay attention to the The animals she had loved as touches like special heaters person, what makes a younger person were still and a towel warmer to keep comforting to her at 101 years Lula Mae from getting cold them smile and brings of age. both before and after her peacefulness to them." In caring for loved ones, shower. Every evening before families sometimes lose bed, Connie would put lotion sight of the simple pleasures that have always been or vitamin E oil on Lula Mae’s skin. She would important. “Pay attention to the person, what regularly trim, clean, and polish Lula Mae’s nails. makes them smile and brings peacefulness to them,” Paying attention to those small details can make Connie says. Those little things, like a luxury throw a big difference in an older person’s day. Connie blanket or gently scented lotion, can make a person’s says having a hangnail or a sock with a hole can be day more comfortable in small but psychologically maddening to someone who has all day to sit and sizable ways. focus on that uncomfortable feeling.

Occupational Activity and Eating Simple adaptations to daily chores are a way to help older people stay comfortable and functionally independent in their homes. Kelly Riska, occupational therapist and owner of Heart of Wellness, helps clients make these modifications. She suggests clients “condense a larger kitchen so you aren’t having to walk as far,” which may mean keeping frequently used kitchen items on the counter. Putting items on a lazy Susan or hanging pans on a pegboard might be better than keeping them in lower or higher cabinets that are difficult to reach. She also recommends that clients sit on a stool in the kitchen as they are preparing or cleaning up their meals, which allows them to minimize their energy usage. Kelly suggests paying close attention to food packaging, which can be especially challenging for older people with arthritis or carpal tunnel problems. A flip-top cap is going to be easier to open than a screw-top lid. It is also a good idea to keep a pair of scissors and rubber grippers nearby. Eating meals can be difficult, especially if an individual has Parkinson’s disease. Kelly says there are weighted utensils that help minimize tremors, but people could also just use a cuff weight of 1-2 pounds on the wrist to help keep food on utensils. She suggests stabilizing plates on a rubber mat (like the kind used to keep rugs from slipping) and considering the use of a plate guard, which allows a person to push food against it to get food onto a utensil. Using grabbers with trigger or squeeze handles to pick up dropped items or to retrieve something from a shelf can be a helpful tool for comfortable daily living. Kelly says some adults with back problems use these to put on their pants or socks each day. 10 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017


! d l O g n i t t e G It’s Heck BY YELENA SAPIN

rk the way they used to wo n’t do es di bo r ou en wh Solutions for

PROBLEM:

Fatigue

F

eeling tired is a common complaint at any age, but it’s not necessarily a normal part of getting older, says Dr. Ann Roberts, physician with Norton Community Medical Associates – La Grange. You may be tempted to turn to caffeine or to sugar- and carb-laden treats to give yourself a boost, but these short-term fixes can end up leaving you feeling even more tired when the inevitable crash comes.

PROBLEM:

Snoring/Sleep Apnea

T

he incidence of snoring and sleep apnea increases as we age, says Dr. David Winslow, Norton Healthcare pulmonologist and sleep specialist. Snoring, or audible vibrations of the soft palate, is not a health hazard in itself. It could however be a sign of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the back of the airway collapses and blocks the airflow, causing the sufferer to repeatedly stop breathing and wake up throughout the night. Untreated, sleep apnea not only interferes with restful sleep but also increases the risk of developing serious health problems.

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SOLUTION:

Re-evaluate Your LIfestyle

SOLUTION: See Your Doctor

Good basic lifestyles habits — a healthy diet, plenty of sleep, and regular exercise — are the key to optimizing your energy levels. “People who remain active typically have fewer problems with being tired,” Roberts says. Managing stress is another key factor. “Stress keeps your adrenaline up, and that can get exhausting after a while. Do a self-assessment and give yourself permission to relax, take a nap, or turn down an invitation. Take care of yourself because no one else is going to do that for you,” she urges.

Fatigue that isn’t alleviated by rest and lifestyle changes can be a symptom of underlying health problems. Common culprits of low energy levels include nutritional deficiencies, an underactive thyroid, sleep apnea, depression, and medication side-effects. “Exhaustion brought on by normal everyday activities such as doing yard work or household chores can also be a sign of heart disease,” says Roberts, so don’t delay seeing your doctor. A thorough medical evaluation will rule out any serious conditions and can start you on the road to feeling better.

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Putting on pounds as we age increases the likelihood of developing sleep apnea. “Losing weight, or not gaining it in the first place, almost always helps breathing at night,” Winslow says. Sleeping on your side rather than on your back is also helpful for some people, and there are devices available to keep you from rolling over on your back while you sleep. “Treating nasal congestion or repairing a deviated septum in the nose to clear the nasal passageway can also alleviate the symptoms,” Winslow adds.

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the standard treatment for sleep apnea sufferers. “The new CPAP machines and masks are smaller, quieter, and much easier to use than in the past,” Winslow says. A special dental device worn at night to help the airway stay open is another treatment option. “Combined with a little weight loss — even 5 percent — it can be effective for some patients,” Winslow says. And if neither of these treatments do the trick, an implanted electronic device that stimulates the airway to remain open while you sleep is now available.

Minimize Risk Factors

Get Treatment


Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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BOOK CLUB: CARMICHAEL'S COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB

Catching Up Here’s what other area clubs are reading next:

From the book:

“The truth is that the police reflect America in all of its will and fear, and whatever we might make of this country’s criminal justice policy, it cannot be said that it was imposed by a repressed minority.”

CARMICHAEL'S COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB WHEN: Last Tuesday of the month WHERE: Carmichael's on Frankfort Avenue CONTACT: Corin Hindenach, info@ carmichaels.com

NEW DIRECTIONS The Wright Brothers by David McCullough Contact: Larry Hartog, larryhartog@twc.com

Have you read this? STORY & PHOTOS BY PATTI HARTOG

Carmichael's Community Book Club was established in October 2013 at the suggestion of the bookstore’s customers. Book selections are chosen quarterly. The club is open to the public. Ten to 20 people attend each meeting and are welcome to attend only one meeting or all. Bookseller Corin Hindenach provides snacks based on the theme for each discussion. This quarter, the group is reading accounts of Americans from diverse backgrounds. Recently, the book club read Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates, his personal experiences as a black man growing up in the U.S. We caught up with Corin to get her thoughts. What did you learn from this book? From Ta-Nehisi Coates, I have learned that while I may feel worldly, progressive, and empowered, I have no experience living in his circumstances. I have not feared for my life while visiting my significant other, nor have I been directly threatened with a gun. I have learned that as an ally of those who are underrepresented, I need to do more to stand up and take part, to help in any way I can. How did the book change your thinking? There was a particularly moving moment in the beginning of the book where the author experiences the threat of gun violence for the first time. It hooked me to the real fear of the narrative and helped me to see that people experience this kind of fear on a daily basis from a young age. His experience of living is 14 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

completely different from mine, and reading this book will hopefully help me act with greater empathy toward those of diverse backgrounds. What did the book bring to mind? Today's current political climate. We read this book in September to be able to create important discussions around what it means to have minority experiences in the U.S. at this time in our history. Reading such a wellcrafted and emotional account of what it is like to be an African-American male today was profound for me and deeply affecting for those who participated in the discussion. What is a favorite book you've read? Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. It is my favorite book of all time. It has science, adventure, unknown places, innovation, and stunning lyricism.

PAGE TURNERS What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty Contact: Teresa McLeland, tmcleland@twc.com

WINE, WOMEN AND WORDS Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri Contact: Marilyn Faulkenburg, mjfaulkenburg@aol.com


Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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t u P

d l o H n o DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION

BY AMANDA BEAM

T

he days leading up to Steve Davis' deep brain stimulation operation were nerve-racking. Neurosurgeons at Norton Hospital would be performing surgery on his brain while he remained conscious, a scary concept for many. “That’s quite frightening to think that somebody is going to be working in your skull and on your brain when you’re awake,” Steve said. “But it’s not as bad as what you’d think.” Fifteen years before, the Huntingburg, Indiana, resident had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative neurological disorder. Each year, roughly 60,000 Americans are given a Parkinson’s diagnosis, with more than 10 million people worldwide living with the disease. Abnormal motor abilities, such as tremors, stiffness, slow movement,

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and reduced balance, are the most noticeable symptoms of Parkinson’s. For Steve, his right leg, hand, neck, and, at times, head would shake uncontrollably. Everyday living became difficult. Things worsened when the medications combatting the signs of the disease lost its effectiveness. A local doctor in Jasper suggested Steve get a consultation from a Norton’s physician. After reviewing his medical records and ordering myriad tests, the team of specialists recommended him as a good candidate for deep brain stimulation.

During the procedure, he noticed improvements. Around a week later, when the battery pack was implanted and the electrodes aligned, the shaking stopped. That was almost five years ago. Now 67-years-old, Steve lives his life to the fullest. The tremors have subsided, so much so he can mow his own grass and golf again. “I can do anything I want to do,” he said. “It’s been a great and wonderful thing.” Steve said his hands are as steady as can be, something unimaginable only years before. “I got a new life out of it,” he said. Dr. David Sun is used to these happy endings. As part of the multidisciplinary team at the Cressman Parkinson’s Center and the Norton Neuroscience Institute Resource Center, PAGE 18>>


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<< PAGE 16

1

Small, metal screws are placed into the outer part of the skull.

2

D ST EEP I PR MU BR OC LA AIN ED TIO UR N E

the neurosurgeon works to improve the lives of patients who can’t get around as well as they used to. Deep brain stimulation is one option to provide relief. Neurosurgeons use electrical impulses to disrupt the brain’s defective circuitry. Electrodes implanted in the brain deliver the modification. “For a lot of these movement disorders, what we’re finding is the complex circuitry in the deep parts of the brain are overactive,” Sun said. “If we can add a set of switches to the circuit board that allow the neurologist to essentially turn down or modify that uber-activity, then we can hopefully affect some of the symptoms.” But the decision to operate doesn’t come easily. Each patient must go through a rigorous evaluation by the team to ensure that the procedure would be successful. Those with neuropsychological problems like dementia, or heart and lung diseases that would make surgery unsafe, generally are excluded from consideration. So are those whose medications are performing satisfactorily.

“IT'S A QUALITY OF LIFE OPERATION. IT'S NOT AN OPERATION TO MAKE SOMEONE LIVE LONGER... IT'S AN OPERATION TO TRY AND MAKE PEOPLE LIVE BETTER.” — Dr. David Sun

“The hard part is knowing who is the right person for the right surgery,” Sun said. “With the right patient selection, our success rate is very high.” In the future, targeted radiation or ultrasound waves could provide the same liberation without surgery. But those advances remain in the experimental stage. For now, deep brain stimulation continues to be at the forefront of treatment options for those with movement disorders that medication can’t help. “It’s a quality of life operation,” Sun said. “It’s not an operation to make someone live longer, or anything like that. It’s an operation to try and make people live better.” 18 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Surgeons insert electrodes into the brain.

3

Doctors implant a battery under the skin.

Deep Brain Stimulation The full procedure, which is generally covered by insurance, takes place in three separate steps. First, small metal screws are placed into the outer part of the skull. Sun likens it to drilling for oil. These anchor screws would be the foundation that’s holding the oilrig to the ground. After insertion, which takes roughly 30 minutes, the brain is then scanned. While the doctors study the images to decide where to best place the electrodes, the patient goes home that very day. A week after the first visit, patients return for the next stage. During the time in between, the team maps out its plan of action for inserting tiny electrical wires through the brain tissue. These leads target very specific areas. Step two, then, involves surgery to insert the electrodes into these crevices. Unlike with most operations, the patient remains awake and responsive throughout the procedure. In fact, they perform tasks, such as picking up a glass of water, so the surgeons can gauge the electrodes' effectiveness. “The neurologist will start playing with modifying the circuit with that electrode,” Sun said. “And the neurologist is looking to watch the water stop spilling, and we’ll see it right there before our eyes. It’s very gratifying to see because you know you’re helping a person right then and there.” After staying the night in the hospital, patients are released the following day. Fast-forward one more week, and the person begins the final stage of deep brain stimulation, the step in which doctors implant a battery under the skin and connect all the leads to the power source. Patients receive general anesthesia for the 30-minute operation, but still are released the same day. Those undergoing the procedure usually see drastic results during both stage two and at the completion of the process.


WHAT I KNOW NOW

Don Preston

Preston Arts Center celebrated its 75th anniversary this year. Don Preston, second generation owner, has been involved with his family’s business for more than half of those years. He helps guide artists — both professional and those just beginning — to the perfect art supplies or class to make their work soar. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

What makes you happy now?

The sheer joy of working with family and running a small business not dominated by a remote organization. I can see the results of our work every day. And our family is expanding. Our first two grandchildren, both girls, arrived in September within 17 days of each other. What is the key to a successful marriage?

Kathy (Brennan) and I have been married for 40 years. We were only married for about 18 months when we came to the business and so our whole married life has been centered around it. I had a good example in that my parents worked together as partners at home and in business. The adventure of marriage is always a journey. I wouldn't be where I am today without Kathy. How do you motivate others?

Solicit their ideas. If your staff doesn't have any ideas you've done a poor job of hiring and training. If you only impose instructions on people you can't expect much enthusiasm from them.

Do you see yourself retiring soon?

As long as I am useful I'd like to be involved in the business. It has been a lifelong passion and it would be hard to replace or find something as equally satisfying. What did you learn from your father?

Attention to the social aspect of business beyond commercial success. It was important to him to contribute to the community and become part of it and to develop friends as well as customers. What skill should every man have?

Being a tool user. Not losing touch with using your hands. Before he started the retail business, my father was an auto mechanic, and I marveled at his ability to fix things. How do you know whom to hire?

It's not so much someone’s knowledge as the eagerness to be creative and receptive to new ideas. Someone with the ability to greet the public, understand a person's creative instincts, and who can bond with the customers over a common purpose.

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As second generation owner of Preston Arts Center, Don Preston follows his parents' ideals of independence, service, and community involvement. I can't quite get the knack of...

...thrusting myself into social situations. I don't have a glib opening line for when I'm meeting people. What book has influenced you?

The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin. I have a late 19th century volume that I treasure and am rereading right now. To see his curiosity and how he worked through the steps of his theory of evolution and his descriptions of the places he visits is fascinating. What have you learned by being in retail?

To listen to what's on other people's minds and remember that you're dealing with creative people. Sometimes leadership is follow-ship. For example, who would have thought that spray paint would have become an art form?

What have you learned from hanging out with creative people?

To stop judging and start appreciating. If you make judgments about ideas or possibilities you close doors and you need to keep doors open. What is your greatest accomplishment?

To have continued my parents’ idea of independence, service, and community involvement. What does the average American not understand about art?

That it is not foreign territory. We see art in clothing, music, design, and architecture. We are surrounded by art forms and should embrace them.


Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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TECH TALK

BY MEGAN M. SECKMAN

Save Time with a Smartwatch

S

martwatches have made the leap from science fiction to reality, and they’re not reserved for techies anymore. In the grocery, on a jog through the park, or at the conference table, you are likely to see people speaking into their phones, checking their calendars, collecting data, and organizing their lives — all from a tiny screen strapped to their wrists. Is it worth the bother to manipulate that tiny screen with your seemingly giant fingers? Well, not only are smartwatches capable of doing just about everything your smartphone can do, but smartwatches have now cornered the market in the ability to track health and fitness. No longer do you have to carry two devices (your Fitbit and your smartphone) in order to track your steps and receive important phone calls or messages. No longer do you have to dig through your purse to find those pesky devices — strapped to your wrist, the watch goes where you go. If the smartwatch has been on your radar lately, check out this comparison guide.

Apple Watch series 2

Arguably the best smartwatch on the market, although more pricey at $369 and up. Benefits include: • Waterproof up to 50 meters to allow you to track your swim • Added GPS feature allows for a “running assistant” which tracks the distance you run. • Notifications sent with a ping and 22 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

piece of jewelry • 10,000:1 contrast ratio makes for bright, vivid colors • Features fitness apps that track steps, heart rate, and calorie burn • Water resistant up to 1 meter for 30 minutes • Compatible with your iPhone Drawbacks: inaccurate calorie burn only works on motionless wrists; reviewed as a “waste of time” by Wareable • no GPS • 1.5 day battery life, although it fully charges in one hour • overpriced for a first generation device

gentle buzz, so you are always aware of important messages • Screen can be enhanced from the 66 percent default brightness for clarity and sharpness • Apps such as Breathe help you relax or monitor fitness Drawbacks: two-day battery life • square, boxy screen • no sleep monitoring or elevation tracking • app drawer is small and awkward to use

Android Huawei Watch

The most stylish device on the market; priced at $349. Benefits include: • Stainless steel body in gold, black, or silver; round, scratch-resistant sapphire crystal face; and a fine-grain leather band makes it appear more like a

Sony SmartWatch 3

The best bang for your buck ($249) in a sporty, light-weight, stainless steel design. Benefits include: • Accurate and impressive GPS feature for tracking a run • Mix and match straps allow you to change looks; straps are adjustable allowing for a perfect fit • Battery life of two days with easy charging is competitive with more expensive options • Waterproofing up to 2 meters for one hour is impressive for price Drawbacks: screen is dull and lags behind others on the market • strap collects dust and grime • no heart rate monitor Source: Wareable


Do you remember a childhood favorite that influenced your life?

BOOK Besties & FILM Friends BY AMANDA BEAM

T

ucked in the back of a closet reserved for towels, my grandmother kept a tattered book. A raggedy cover revealed it to be an early print of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. Grandma loved this classic, more so for the iconic Scarlett O’Hara than for the storyline. Both Southern women survived much sadness in their lives, and both persevered. In Scarlett, Grandma saw a hazy reflection, one that told her that indeed tomorrow was another day. Works of art can change us. Characters in movies and books become like good friends. At times, we feel we understand them more than we understand ourselves. Transporting us to other places and times, these books and movies teach us lessons that stick with us through decades.

Harold Trainer, 74

Book: The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck Lesson Taught: Social justice

Carol Trainer, 69

Book: Nancy Drew Books Lesson Taught: A world beyond our own “They were exciting. Nancy Drew was curious. She was always doing something active and exciting and trying to solve mysteries. I grew up here in Louisville and in a small community, and she excited me about the world and travel and other people and other cultures. [The books] definitely let you know there was a world outside your own little world.”

Owen Kane, 74

Book: Comic books Lesson Taught: Love of reading “My second grade teacher spoke to my mother when I was coming out of first grade. My mother had said, ‘Oh, he loves comic books so much and he wants to read them.’ The

“It’s a book about the movement during the Great Depression of Oklahoma homesteaders to the Central Valley of California, and the hardships they experienced. That always struck home, especially when I was younger, the social justice, labor union, Great Depression messages. "My grandfather and my father grew up in the Great Depression. They often talked about it when I was growing up. You think a lot about it and the hardships they went through in terms of making a living and finding a job and saving money. That had a lot of meaning for me… and, of course, it still relates.”

teacher said, ‘Give him all the comic books he wants, but don’t read them to him.’ She forced me to learn how to read and I haven’t stopped since. It changed my life forever. I was attracted to the colored pictures in comic books. My favorite was Scrooge McDuck. I got the beginnings of my sense of humor out of comic books.” PAGE 26>>

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BOOK Besties & FILM Friends << PAGE 24

Donna Leonard, 64 Movie: The Wizard of Oz Lesson Taught: Togetherness

“It only came on TV once a year, unlike today where you can just get it on DVD. I think it was in the fall. After we watched it, we always went to school the next day and played on the yellow brick road and sang ‘We’re off to see the Wizard.’ I still watch it with my grandchildren today. They love it just as much as I did.”

Grace Click, 87

Book: Big Little Book edition of Tarzan Lesson Taught: Adventure “This would go back to when I was 7 or 8, I loved the Big Little Books. They would have an illustration, black and white, of course, and a page of writing. And they were five inches or six inches square, and they fit in a little child’s hand just right. You’d lie on your belly and have this chunky little book. "The one I loved was the book about Tarzan. I loved that he did whatever he wanted and went up high in the trees and he was always a champion. I was a tomboy anyway. I think that’s why he appealed to me.”

"We read to know that we are not alone." C.S. LEWIS 26 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Erv Klein, 67

Character: Atticus Finch in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird Lesson taught: Calmness “I loved his character. I identified with that whole situation because here he was, a single father. My father had lost his wife, my mother, at a relatively young age. I kind of saw my father as an Atticus Finch type, although nobody could live up to that personality. The thing I really like about him was how calm he was in so many different situations. Whatever the crisis, he was always the cool head. I’ve tried to emulate that in my life, very unsuccessfully I might add. But I’ve always tried to live my life in such a way that when things are bad I can be calm and be the voice of reason.”


Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet

Heart Rate Training “Our sessions are an hour long and they are led by a personal trainer who ensures you’re working at the level you need to, to really see changes,” says Victoria Coleman, studio manager at Orangetheory Fitness in St. Matthews. Tracking your heart rate during sessions ensures you're stimulating your metabolism and meeting your exercise goals as you cycle through the treadmill, rowing machine, and weights. Schedule your free workout by calling 502.259.9199.

Put the Brakes on Alzheimer's According to the Alzheimer’s Association, over 5 million Americans are living with the disease. Current treatment is built around slowing its progression. To do this, “stay mentally, physically, and socially active,” says Dr. Robert Friedland, a physician and researcher at the University of Louisville. Engage in activities that enrich the brain such as learning a new language, regularly exercising, and maintaining strong social ties.

BY MARK KAELIN

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

Wise&Well

Marilyn Cannon, owner of Bodies by Design fitness studio, says getting healthy involves working on all areas of your life, not just your muscles.

5 Things Marilyn Cannon Won't Eat Seeing her parents and relatives struggle with illnesses fueled by unhealthy choices motivated Marilyn Cannon early on to learn how to stay healthy and fit. Open her pantry and you won’t find any processed foods or items high in sugar, gluten, dairy, or soy, because “80 percent of health comes from what we put in our bodies,” Cannon says. In addition to fueling her body with high quality foods, Cannon maintains her strength and endurance by utilizing a wide variety of exercises from Barre work to whole body vibration. However, she’s quick to point out that true health requires work in all areas of your life. “Many people minimize the impact of psychological stress and the importance of sleep,” Cannon says. Not satisfied with just looking after her own health, Cannon shares her knowledge and experience on healthy living with her clients on a daily basis at her fitness studio, Bodies by Design in Prospect, Kentucky.

A Dose of Dancing Whether it’s the jitterbug, the Shag, Lindy hop, or East Coast Swing, dancing provides an excellent workout that improves muscle strength, cardiovascular endurance, and balance, according to the American College of Sports Medicine. Get your groove and health back by attending weekly meetings of the Derby City Bop Association. For information, contact Mike Hall at 502.438.8408 or visit derbycitybop.com. 28 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017


Caregiver

CIRCLE ITOE BY CARRIE VITT AND ANNA OLDHAM

Fresh and Clean There are an increasing number of products that make it easier to keep one’s home, linens, and clothing smelling good, especially if incontinence is a problem. Caregiver Lucy Martin, an IT manager at UPS, is a huge fan of Downy Unstopables, a scent booster that can be added to the wash. She also uses fragrance beads, fabric softeners, and dryer sheets, which she says take odors out of all fabrics. She has found Sassy Baby disposable diaper sacks to be a great way to dispose of adult diapers and reduce odors (available at local stores and Amazon).

Clothing Conundrum If upper body weakness has made getting dressed a challenge for an older loved one, Ken Gould at Gould’s Discount Medical suggests these products to make it easier: • sock aids (flexible plastic tools with handles on which a sock is placed and pulled up onto the foot) • dressing sticks (dowels with hook-like attachments on the end, which can grab clothing and make dressing easier) • long-handle shoe horns (a shoe horn with a long handle to prevent bending over) • Spyrolaces (shoe laces that don’t require tying and can be tightened to preferred tension) • button hook aids (hooks that pull buttons through buttonholes) • leg lifters (straps or rods with loops attached at the end to help lift one’s legs onto beds, footrests, or wheelchairs) 30 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Tidying Tips Keeping a loved one’s home fresh and clean doesn’t have to be an overwhelming task for caregivers. Becky Beanblossom, president of Home Instead Senior Care, suggests cleaning out the refrigerator on a regular basis, wiping down the bathroom frequently, and laundering soiled clothing and sheets immediately. It is also important to ensure any dogs in the home are being taken out regularly and cats’ litter boxes are being cleaned daily. Whom and How to Hire If you’ve gotten to the point, however, that you’re looking to hire a caregiver or a cleaning service, Becky says to consider these questions: • What type of work needs to be done and how often? • Is the person or company you’re looking to hire able to do the necessary tasks? • Does the hiring process include background checks and drug screens? • Have you been given referrals by friends or colleagues? • Does the individual or company offer references? • Do you need to upgrade your homeowners or renters insurance to handle any liabilities if the caregiver is injured at your home? • What types of protections are available if a disreputable person steals or breaks something?

GETTING UP ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BED Kayla Cook, RN, owner of Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care, says caregivers can use a cloth gait belt to help an older loved one out of bed. She says, “The caregiver stands in front of their loved one with legs in a wide stance, knees bent and back straight to prevent caregiver injury. The gait belt is very helpful and prevents painful pulling on loved ones’ arms and skin tears.” She recommends, though, that a loved one sit for 3-5 minutes at the side of the bed before standing up to normalize blood pressure and prevent dizziness. Non-skid slippers or shoes are a must.


Caregiver

CIRCLE ITOE BY CARRIE VITT AND ANNA OLDHAM

Digital Encouragement We all have those days where we feel lost, exhausted, and just want to throw in the towel. For Alzheimer’s caregivers, these days can quickly turn into weeks, months, even years. Home Instead Senior Care has introduced a free app that provides daily encouragement and advice to those who have a loved one suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia. The app, Alzheimer’s & Other Dementias Daily Companion, can be downloaded to your iPhone or Android device and features emotional support, advice for dealing with new behaviors and situations, and a variety of resources you can turn to in times of need.

Go Ahead and Vent The letter below is from a caregiver ready to give up: I am 67 years old, sleeping once again in the house I was raised in. I have given six years so far, caring for my 92-year old mother who has Alzheimer's. My husband, children, and grandchild live in another state without me. People say this is the responsible thing to do. I attended support groups for years and have read every printed book on Alzheimer's and caregiving. It seems nothing helps anymore. I am just "stuck." So I carry on each day, cooking, cleaning, and handling the perpetual emergencies. One step at a time; one more day, and the days turn into years. This is my life's sentence and one I had not planned. I just want this to end and it seems hopeless. I no longer respect life in the end. The cost is too much for everyone. Do I give another six years? I have missed all these years without my grandchild. I'll never have those years back again. I'm giving up. Nobody said it was fair. Nobody said it would be easy. And it's not fair, and it's not easy. Frustration builds, anger builds, resentment builds, aloneness, emptiness, hopelessness … it builds and builds until you want to scream. So go ahead. Scream. The woman who wrote the letter emailed me afterward that she felt better. She is not alone. You are not alone. So go ahead. Walk away for a day, vent, let all the frustrations out. You’ve earned the right to do that, and in the end, you’ll feel better. — William McDonald, writer and author of oldfriendsendslove.com

“Whatever happens, you have to have patience. When you’re caring for someone who’s sick, you have to realize that sometimes what they’re doing and saying is not them; it’s not their fault. It’s just something that happens. You can’t take it personally.” — Carol Cockerel, primary caregiver for her husband

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Caregiver

CIRCLE ITOE BY CARRIE VITT AND ANNA OLDHAM

Seek Support As a caregiver, it is important to know you are not alone in this battle. There are others in the community who echo your thoughts, feelings, and hardships. Seek out a support group — Alzheimer’s Association, DementiaWise, and the Kentuckiana Stroke Association — are just a few local organizations that offer support for caregivers. If you are unable to attend a support group in person, or one does not exist in your area, many organizations offer online support groups you can join. Just knowing someone out there understands what you are going through can be a huge help. Also participating in events such as Moving Day (Parkinson’s Foundation) or Walk to End Alzheimer’s gives you the chance to connect with others who have become caregivers.

Don't Let Words Get in the Way An innocent conversation can quickly escalate into an argument between you and your loved one if you don’t choose your words carefully. Dementia care expert Teepa Snow suggests a couple of techniques caregivers can use to avoid uncomfortable situations. Problem 1: Your mother doesn’t remember that you are taking her to her doctor appointment at 2:30. Mother: “Why are you here?” Your Response:

X WRONG: “Don’t you remember? You told me last week to be here at 2:30?” 3 RIGHT: “How about we go for ice cream before the appointment?” Problem 2: Your mother makes embarrassing comments in public that draw attention. Mother: “Oh, my. Look at that woman. Isn’t she fat?” Your Response:

X WRONG: “Mom, don’t say that! She can hear you.” 3 RIGHT: “Well, you know, she is a bit heavy. Now let’s go and get something to eat.” Trying to change the person who has dementia, says Teepa, is one of the biggest mistakes caregivers make. Instead, she encourages caregivers to use statements like ‘I’m sorry...this is hard’ to show that they are validating and empathizing with the person.

“I believe it’s our job in life to make sure our loved ones are cared for, but I don’t believe it’s our job to do all of the caring. Sometimes we feel this great sense of guilt for not being able to be the primary caregiver for our parent or loved ones or not really being involved in their care, and I think that’s unfortunate because not every person is called to be a caregiver. I think you have to be true to who you are, and in doing that you can certainly make sure that your loved one is cared for, but you don’t have to be the one to do it if you’re not best suited to do it.” — Becky Beanblossom, owner of Home Instead Senior Care

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A Grateful Heart = Pure Joy BY BOB MUELLER

I

have often heard people make the following remarks:

• “Why do I so seldom feel joyful?” • “Something always nags at feeling joyful. I wonder ‘what next?’ or ‘maybe it won’t last.’” • “I know about pleasure, but I don’t think I’ve felt pure joy.” • “It’s like I always expect something more.” • “I’m always disappointed in the end.” These laments give me an opening:

• “Why do you think that joy is such a rare experience?” • “What gets in the way of a full heart?” That’s the problem! We are never satisfied. We are never thankful for what we have. We lack gratitude. Joy is a heart full and a mind purified by gratitude. It is steady elation with a current of “at last” coursing through it. Joy’s fingers lift my heart out of my chest and hold it high so that nothing can touch it. It has more staying power than happiness with no chance of being diminished by circumstance. I can be happy and still want more. Joy is it. This full-blown exhilaration stands in stark contrast to the tired heart and weary

soul that often precede it. I know joy as misery’s opposite. Joy’s tall branches are secured by deep roots. It grows in the wake of trouble and sadness in a life fully lived. Its consuming presence can surface even in the midst of disaster. Joys pass; memory keeps joy alive. Joy is life’s reward. Gratitude is in-your-bones appreciation for what comes your way; it answers “yes,” come what may. It purifies the mind of the confusion wrought by “me first” and creates plenty of room for joy. Gratitude reverses the attitude that the world owes you something, lots of things, and that you deserve them and much more: the biggest screen television, gourmet dining, travel and leisure on demand, a partner who is all yours, a baby who never cries. Drowned out by the noise of entitlement, joy hasn’t a chance. A grateful person approaches each day

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with a sincere “thank you” poised on the lips. Just the thought that the world owes us nothing frees and fires dialogue. I agree to go first in a quick round of “grateful because.” I’m grateful to the coach who taught me to play sports for no payment or reason other than love of the game and belief in a kid’s promise. I’m thankful for infusions of grace that lighten my way however long the time lapse between injections. Every time love nips me by surprise, my being registers an automatic thanks. And how fortunate I am that I make a living working for a cause like hospice. When I plugged my annual salary into a global study, my income ranked in the top 20 percentile in the world. What to do? Can I lean into each day with thanksgiving? Thankful

because relationships, levees and faith hold fast? Will I learn that joy can spring only from a grateful heart? Morrie Schwartz is dying, and his former student Mitch Albom welcomes laughter-laced Tuesdays with Morrie just as he did twenty years ago. What lessons remain? “The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in,” and for the professor “love is when you are as concerned about someone else’s situation as you are about your own.” Albom brushes his hand across Morrie’s head and sees “the slightest human contact was immediate joy.” Morrie counsels the student he loves that by making peace with death we can do what’s more difficult, to “make peace with living.” He is a grateful heart and finds pure joy.

Bob Mueller is vice president of development at Hosparus. Visit his website at bobmueller.org.


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10 Questions to Ask a

Handyman BY MARY ELLEN BIANCO

Home repairs or maintenance issues may require professional help. Terry Rogers has been self-employed locally for almost 30 years as a carpenter and handyman. He explains what you need to know before hiring someone. 1. How do I find a good handyman?

“Ask neighbors or people at work or church for references. Many handymen advertise in local papers, online, or with signs in the area.” 2. How do I check references?

“Check with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and ask the handyman up front for references that you can call. Ask to see their prior work. You can also check reviews online.”

3. When can I hire a freelance handyman versus a contractor?

“You might use a freelance handyman for work that doesn’t require a license and if it’s a small job. Make sure you know the rules in your area. A contractor should already have a license and would be a better choice for a large project.”

4. What are some common things that a handyman would repair?

“Faucet leaks, floor repairs, small paint jobs, and simple electrical repair such as replacing a light switch.” 5. Would I be charged by the hour or by the project?

“Jobs that could have a lot of hidden problems such as water or termite damage would be charged hourly. Straightforward jobs like installing a door would be priced by the job. Always get a written quote before the work is done that includes labor and materials.” 6. If the job is too difficult, how would a handyman feel about referring me to someone else?

“A good handyman should be honest about what they can or cannot do, so referring you shouldn’t be a problem.”

7. Should I ask for a schedule of when the work will be finished?

“Yes. Some work can be lengthy due to the type of project, and it may involve other trades. A schedule would be helpful to keep things going forward in a timely manner.”

8. How do I verify if a handyman is bonded, and what does it mean?

“Ask to see the bond paperwork. It means that a bonding company has secured money that can be given to consumers if they file a claim against the person or company that did the work. The state controls the payment process.” (Terry used this source: bargaineering.com) 9. Does a handyman need insurance?

“Yes, and you can ask to see his policy. Handymen need to carry liability insurance in case they are injured on the job, to cover them if they should cause damage to your property, or if you’re injured by bad workmanship.” 10. What options do I have if I’m unhappy with the work?

“Get a list in writing of work performed as a guarantee or warranty if something goes wrong. Speak to the handyman directly. If it isn’t resolved contact the BBB. Legal recourse would be the final step.” 38 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017


A Cup of Warmth

Ginger syrup, pictured below, adds more flavor and immune-boosting properties to your favorite winter drinks. Pictured here: Green Goddess from the Louisville Tea Company, Hot chocolate with ginger, and Chai Rooibos by the Yogi tea company.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

W

ith the cold weather, many of us tend to avoid the winter elements altogether. Why not stay inside with a delicious, hot drink for comfort and for preventative measures? Here is a recipe that includes an immune boosting syrup that can be added to several different healthful and decadent drinks. PAGE 42>>

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Ginger Syrup 2/3 cup of chopped fresh ginger, unpeeled 2 cups water ½-¾ cup sugar Pinch of salt • Chop the fresh ginger into rounds and then roughly chop into smaller pieces • Place all the ingredients into a saucepan and heat to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 45 minutes. • Strain the ingredients through a sieve and place in a jar. • Keep stored in the refrigerator for about 2 weeks. Start with adding about ¼ c of ginger syrup to your tea or hot chocolate and add more if you prefer a stronger ginger flavor.


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A Cup of Warmth << PAGE 40 One of my favorite teas is Chai Rooibos by the Yogi tea company. Chai Rooibos already includes several warming spices such as cinnamon and ginger. For an even more enhanced ginger flavor, add about ¼ cup of ginger syrup to this tea. Another incredible immune boosting drink is adding this ginger syrup with green tea. I really enjoy this flavor combination and there are several green teas that are available. One of my favorite green teas is called Green Goddess from the Louisville Tea Company. This includes green tea with pomegranate pieces — adding about 2 Tbsps of ginger syrup to this tea adds a subtle hint of ginger. Add more ginger syrup based on your taste.

One of my favorite ginger combinations is with chocolate. What better than to enjoy these two flavors — in one hot drink! Choose your favorite hot chocolate mix and blend with milk and about ⅓ cup of ginger syrup. Heat until warm and add your favorite toppings.

“Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.” Edith Sitwell

British poet and critic

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A Better Way to Grocery Shop?

W

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

ould you like to drive up to the grocery and have someone bring your food and load it up in your car? It is possible, and the cost is minimal.

If you have not yet taken advantage of Kroger’s new ClickList system, then go to kroger.com and click on Kroger’s ClickList. This allows you to choose the items you want to purchase online and pick up at participating local Kroger stores. Go to the selected Kroger store at the chosen time, park in the designated spot, call the number, and wait in your car while someone brings your groceries and loads them in your car. It’s a great way to save time and limit your exposure to the cold, damp weather. There is a $4.95 fee for using Click List, however this fee is waived for the first three times you try it. If you place your grocery click list before midnight, you can pick up your groceries the next day between 8am and 9pm. Currently, there is no same-day click list grocery pick up, but Kroger is testing a pilot system that it hopes to implement in a variety of Kroger stores starting in January 2017.

Kroger is working to implement same-day pickup, anticipated January 2017.

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Winter 2016/2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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DEAR ME:

Advice you’d give your younger self

PHOTOS COURTESY CINDY VENABLE

Dear Cindy, As you graduate with your Master of Social Work and examine your options with what feels like a wide clear slate, know that you are going to be excited, energized, scared, depressed…and that you will make a difference in your world. The offer of the job as director of an adult day care center, which would involve the administration of a program working with older adults in a psychosocial day setting, was a surprise and a challenge. Plans had been to work with children in play therapy.

THE BASIC COMMITMENT TO RESPECTING EACH INDIVIDUAL, AND SEEING THE VALUE/IMPORTANCE/DEPTH OF EACH, IS ESSENTIAL, ESPECIALLY IN WORKING WITH PEOPLE AS THEY AGE. REMEMBER THAT EVERY PERSON . . . HAS VALUE AND A HISTORY OF EXPERIENCES. As you follow this opportunity, you will continually have new opportunities to learn and grow. These experiences will shape your future. Discovering that you enjoy being an administrator, can manage budgets, learn daily from staff, and are delighted in working with seniors is amazing and satisfying. From your parents, you were grounded in respect for all people and aware of the power of community. Bringing people together and working with their shared efforts always shapes how you approach problems and issues. 46 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2016/2017

Cindy Venable, who had planned to work with children, found herself working with older adults.

The basic commitment to respecting each individual, and seeing the value/ importance/depth of each, is essential, especially in working with people as they age. Remember that every person with whom you are interacting has value and a history of experiences. Give each person recognition of his personhood and the dignity of her actual name. There are core beliefs that you’ll find underpin everything. Do what you say you will do when you say you will do it. Don’t make promises you can’t keep. Respect the dignity of individuals. Respect confidences. These principles are a foundation for moving through the world. The magic of a smile

and of actually listening to what people say makes all the difference in how they respond to you. All people appreciate being recognized as individuals. Seek out training opportunities to refine what you know. Look for new experiences. Listen to yourself to discover what resonates deep within you. Louisville offers many opportunities to bring people together to share knowledge and information. There are so many ways in which you can be involved with the life of the city. Take advantage of the options and enjoy!

Sincerely, Cindy Venable Retired Director Office for Aging/Disabled Citizens at Louisville Metro Government


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Caregiver winner T O D AY ’ S T R A N S I T I O N S

Meet our “Care Package for the Caregiver” contest winner! Rossan Smith is our quarterly Care Package for the Caregiver winner. She will receive four hours of sitter service from Home Instead Senior Care and tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse performance. Why She Won: Last year, Rossan took on the responsibility of caring for her brother Peary who has Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, which is a rare form of Parkinson’s. Peary had been living in an independent living community in Florida, but after realizing he would need constant care, Rossan moved Peary to Taylorsville to live with her. Rossan, who works as a full-time CNA at Brightstar Care, says being Peary’s caregiver comes naturally. “I have been caregiving all of my life. My brother is a stellar human being, honest, and true blue. I feel very lucky to have the privilege of caring for him.” Dan Heins, one of Rossan's friends, says her dedication to Peary is admirable. “Due to Peary’s dysphasia, Rossau would have to patiently take up to three hours to feed her brother at each meal time. After losing a considerable amount of weight, they finally concurred that a PEG feeding tube was the appropriate action to take. Being a CNA has provided her the experience needed to take the best care of her brother.” < ROSSAN SMITH

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

Do you know a caregiver who deserves some pampering and recognition? Nominate him or her for our Care Package for the Caregiver contest and tell us what makes this person stand out. The winner will receive gifts from our sponsors and be featured in our next issue. Deadline: January 15, 2017.

Mail form to: Today’s Transitions 9750 Ormsby Station Rd. Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223

Nominator’s name: ________________________ Phone number: _____________ Email: ____________________________________________________________ Caregiver’s name: ___________________________________________________

Fax to 502.327.8861 or go online to TodaysTransitionsNow.com

Address: __________________________________________________________

The care package will include:

Phone number: __________________ Email: ______________________________

• Two tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse production

He/She is an exceptional caregiver because: ______________________________

• Four hours of sitter service donated by Home Instead

_________________________________________________________________

City: _____________________ State: _______ Zip: ________________________

_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Fall 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Seniors & Technology A PERFECT MATCH FOR RETIREMENT?

I

BY RONNIE BLAIR

t’s time to drop the cliché that older generations don’t know what they’re doing with today’s technology.

In fact, it’s changing the way most retirees are living, says Edward Sota, partner at Safeguard Investment Advisory Group, LLC. Today, nearly 60 percent of those 65 and older are active online, according to Pew Research Center. That’s a drastic increase from 14 percent in the year 2000. And, the online participation of older adults is sure to increase even more as smartphones, tablets, and social media continue to influence our culture. “Online technology is so prevalent today, and gadgets are increasingly userfriendly, that it’s no surprise more retirees are using the vast amount of opportunities online,” Sota says. “There are multiple dynamics to technology that positively affect finances during retirement.”

1

Sota says there are several ways seniors benefit from today’s technology.

Working from home has never been easier. More than 13 million Americans telecommute at least part of the work week, according to the latest census data. For seniors who want a taste of the retirement lifestyle — avoiding rush hour, etc. — while putting their skills to use for a paycheck, this is an excellent option. Depending on circumstances, extending one’s career may be a necessity. Edward Sota is the president and co-founder of Safeguard Financial Services, Inc., and a partner at Safeguard Investment Advisory Group, LLC (www.safeguardinvestment.com).

2

3 4

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Stay young with your gadget. Tablets, iPads, and smartphones are keeping seniors four to eight years younger, suggests a new study from the journal Intelligence. The cognitive ability of people 50 and older today is found to be significantly better than people of the same age group and education levels a decade ago. The common differentiating factor is the increased use of technology.

Twitter and Skype — a senior’s best friend? Twitter is just one example that offers a community for just about anything you can think of — including advice on retirement or contact with thought leaders in multiple fields. Twitter offers interaction on various ideas for those without many friends. With Skype, you can stay in touch with distant family members and old friends.

Apps and online content can track and inform your retirement money. Some good apps to track your retirement money include CNNMoney Portfolio, SigFig Investment Optimizer, and USA Today Money Portfolio Tracker — all free. And there are an endless amount of resources to help educate you on general principles for retirement savings.


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Connie’s World

Rule Follower

Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

F

or as long as I can remember, I have followed the rules. In first grade the teacher told me I had to eat my entire ham sandwich. I had left the part of the ham with fat on it because I hated fat. I was so terrified when she told me this that I managed to finish the sandwich and held the piece of fat in the side of my mouth until my mother came to pick me up. My mother took one look at me and knew something was wrong. When she asked me, I burst into tears and pulled out the piece of fat that had been stashed away in my mouth for at least three hours. In between tears and apologies, I told my mother what happened. I never remembered seeing her so angry. She took me home and returned to school to let the teacher know she had better never make me eat anything I didn’t want again. She didn’t. You might think this would have alleviated some of my rule-following tendencies, but I believe it only exacerbated my need to please and follow rules exactly. At the earliest of ages I realized I would be liked and loved if I did what I was told. It never occurred to me to do otherwise. When someone asked me why I had never tried smoking or drinking in my teens, all I could think of was that I did not want to disappoint my mother. Such naivety can lead to problems in the real world. When my oldest son was a rebellious teen, I was ill-prepared for the normal

Would you have followed the rules like Connie and eaten the sandwich? experimentation with smoking and drinking. How could I deal with “normal” rebellion when I never rebelled myself? I was devastated. I could not believe he had been smoking and drinking behind my back. I assumed he would follow every rule just as I had with my parents. This thinking did not make parenting easy. Following the rules causes ridicule from those who seem to delight in breaking them. Nowhere is this more evident than when it comes to driving. My righteous indignation at people’s disregard for stop signs and turn signals seems to go unnoticed as they whiz by me and around me. It is even worse on the open highway where I must remain in the “slow” lane in order to follow the speed limit rule. Of course I am being passed by everyone except the little old lady behind me who can barely see over the steering wheel. With each passing year, I realize that I am becoming that little old lady, if I’m not she already. Rules may be made to be broken, but that applies to any and everyone except me. Rules of etiquette were

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applied as “common courtesy” when I grew up, and I still find it appalling when I let a driver pull in front of me, and he never acknowledges my kindness by a simple wave of the hand. Was he brought up in a barn? Stepping in front of anyone and not saying “excuse me” was the equivalent to a military court-martial when I was growing up. Saying “please” and “thank you” were rules regulated by constant reinforcement at home until they became a part of my everyday routine. I realize I am truly old when I start criticizing younger people for the way I think they should act. Just because I was always too afraid or inhibited to break rules does not mean everyone should be like me. (What a disaster that would be!) I find myself admiring those who break rules not just for the sake of breaking them, but because they do not agree with something and aren’t afraid to say so. I have always been amazed at people who get tickets for parking in “no parking” zones. Do they think the word “tow” is referring to an undercurrent

from the Ohio River, or are they simply willing to take the risk? I will not even risk parking in a restaurant space that specifies “take-out only.” Any warning sign anywhere close to where I park might as well be a billboard with my name on it. “Connie, do not even think about parking here!” At age 65 I highly doubt my rule following is going to change any time soon. Following the rules is simply part of who I am. Of course there is another part of me that longs to throw caution to the wind and roll right through the next stop sign I see. That part of me is soon put in its place by the possible consequences of receiving a ticket, not to mention my dead father’s voice in my head repeating constant warnings about such a possibility. I think I might as well face it. I have always been and will always be a rule follower. I am just hoping that such allegiance might in some small way make me a leader.


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How to Use These Directories CONTENTS

These directories are organized first by this location chart. On the following pages, you’ll find descriptive listings of local facilities in each of the eight categories listed under Contents at right. Larger enhanced listings are listed first and are paid for by the facility. Regular listings follow.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory:

Adult Day Care............................56 Home Health.....................68 Aging-in-Place Communities.....58 Independent Living............. 75 Alzheimer’s Care....................60 Nursing/Rehab..................... 76 Assisted Living.........................64 Personal Care..................... 83

Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost

of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Facilities by Location Use this chart and the map at left to quickly view facilities by location. Facilities are organized by zone letters and colors that coordinate with the map.

Zone

ngi

Christian Care Communities (Chapel House, Christian Health Center, Friendship House)

40203

A

Treyton Oak Towers

40203

A

The Altenheim Eastern Star Home

40204 40204

A A

HCM Adult Day Center

40205

A

Nazareth Home

40205

A

Twinbrook Hotel Apartments

40205

Clifton Oaks Care Center

40206

Sacred Heart Home ElderClub Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

40206 40202 40217

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X

Pl ac Al e zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv In in de g Liv p e in nd g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca re

Zip Code

Ag in

Facility Name

Ad u

lt D

ay

Ca

re

If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

A

X

A

X

A X X A X A

X

X

X

X


in gin

Ag

Belmont Village

40207

B

Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Louisville (Sally’s Garden, Sam Swope Care Center, Masonic Home Village, Miralea, The Meadow Active Lifestyle Community The Pillars Assisted Care Center)

40207

B

St. Matthews Care Center

X X

X

X

X

X

X

40207

B

X

Westport Place Health Campus

40207

B

X

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

40222

B

Episcopal Church Home Magnolia Springs Senior Living

40222 40222

B X B

X X

X

X

Westport Care Center

40222

B

X

X

X

X

X

X

Park Louisville

-P la Al ce zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d L iv in In g d L iv e p e in n d g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re Pe ha rs b on al Ca re

re Ca ay tD

Zone

ul

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name

40223

X

B

X X

40243

Brookdale Blankenbaker

40243

B

Clarity Pointe Louisville Forest Springs Health Campus

40245 40245

B X B

Magnolia Springs East Senior Living

40245

B

Oaklawn Rehab & Wellness Center

40245

B

Franciscan Health Care Center

40219

Wesley Manor Retirement Community

40219

Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway Barton House

40228 40241

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community Springhurst Pines - (Cornell Trace, Parr’s at Springhurst, Springhurst Health and Rehab Sunrise of Louisville

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

C

X

C C

40241 40241

C C X

40241

C

Morning Pointe

40291

C

Traditions at Beaumont

40291

C

Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Good Samaritan Society

40299 40299 40299

C X C C

Heartsong Memory Care

40272

Park Terrace Health Campus

40272

D

Autumn Woods Health Campus

47150

E

Green Valley Care Center

47150

E

The Villages at Historic Silvercrest Bee Hive Homes of Goshen Friendship Health & Rehab Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Shelbyville

47150 40026 40056 40065

E G G H X

Bee Hive Homes of Grayson County Green Meadows Health Care Center

42754 40047

K I

X

Multi-purpose Community Action Living

40065

H

X

The Aldersgste at Wesley Manor

40219

H

X

Hampton Oaks Thornton Terrace Health Campus

47170 47243

K K

X X

D

X

X

C

X

X

The Forum at Brookside

B

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X X

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Adult Day Care Directory Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Aging in Place Communities Directory

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

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Click on the Directory names below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

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Click on the Directory names below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

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Click on the Directory names below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Independent Living Directory Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

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Click on the Directory names below to access the online directory listings.

Independent Living Directory Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY GIOIA PATTON AND ANNA PATTERSON

Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill > ACTORS THEATRE OF LOUISVILLE

It’s March 1959, and at a small Philadelphia club a star vocalist takes the stage for one of the last shows of her life. This powerhouse performance conjures jazz icon Billie Holiday for an intimate cabaret evening featuring live renditions of her most beloved classics, and a revealing glimpse into the troubled history of the woman behind the legend. Funny and heartbreaking, this play with music is a testament to one woman’s ability to mine humor from hardship and to the transformative power of song. WHEN: January 3-29, various performances WHERE: Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Bingham Theatre TICKETS: Starting at $25 CONTACT: 502.584.1205 or actorstheatre.org or the box office

Beat the Winter Blues

Avoid the winter blues this season at the Schaffer Senior Enrichment Center affiliated with Highlands Community Ministries. The center offers a wide variety of activities to keep you busy all winter, such as art appreciation, lowimpact exercise courses, ice cream socials, and bingo. You can find your inner peace with beginner tai chi lessons or learn some new steps with line dancing. HCM also offers transportation to many of its off-campus events and programs. To find out more about wht is happening this season, visit hcmlouisville.org/seniors.

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continued on page 86


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

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Updates Continued continued from page 82

Funny Girl

> CENTERSTAGE Set in the opulent world of Broadway’s early years, Funny Girl is the story of comedienne Fanny Brice as she clowns her way up from the burlesque clubs to vaudeville stages on her way to become Ziegfeld’s “Greatest Star.” With a loving husband by her side and a thriving career in theatre, Fanny’s dreams seem to have finally come true. No honeymoon lasts forever, though, and soon Fanny finds herself having to choose between a career she loves and the husband who resents her success. WHEN: January 26-February 12 at 7:30pm (with 2pm performances on January 29, February 5 and 12) WHERE: CenterStage at the Jewish Community Center of Louisville at 3600 Dutchmans Lane TICKETS: Saturday nights and Sunday matinees are $22 in advance, $24 at the door. All others are $20 in advance, $22 at the door. CONTACT: jewishlouisville.org/jcc/centerstage

Brighten Someone’s Holiday

Many of us have fond memories of holidays with our grandparents – celebrating quirky family traditions, exchanging gifts, and spending quality time with those we love. Unfortunately, many seniors this season will not be making special memories and will be spending the holidays alone. Home Instead Senior Care is partnering with local community organizations to seek out seniors who might be overlooked this holiday season. Home Instead works with local businesses and retail stores to help purchase and deliver gifts to these seniors. Visit beasantatoasenior.com to find out how you can spread Christmas cheer to those who need it most. To find our more about what is happening this season, visit hcmlouisville.org/ seniors.

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Run for Your Wife

> DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE Run for Your Wife is an outrageous comedy about a taxi driver who gets away with having two wives in different areas of town because of his irregular work schedule. Complication upon complication is piled on in this example of a classic farce. And as the exhausted, yet determined cad rushes back and forth from wife to wife, the cabby’s predicament will have the audience counting the minutes until he’s caught. Or is he? WHEN: January 11- February 19, various performances WHERE: Derby Dinner Playhouse, Clarksville, Indiana TICKETS: $38-$43 (group rates available for 20 or more) CONTACT: 812.288.8281 or derbydinner.com

See, Stop, Sketch!

It’s easy when looking at great art to be swept up by the beauty, the creativity, the bold statements. It may even inspire some to delve deep into their own creative minds and make something of their own. But where to start? Beginning January 7, the Speed Art Museum is kicking off its weekly workshop, “See Stop Sketch.” Guests will be invited to take sketch pads through the art museum, sketching what they see or whatever comes to mind. On this first Saturday, an instructor will be there to guide participants through several sketching exercises and techniques before going out to draw on their own. Every Saturday going forward, art supplies will be available at the front desk for guests to pick up, along with a creative prompt. For more information, visit speedmuseum.org.


Helpful Resources EXECUTIVE CAREGIVERS NEEDED

FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

We’re Looking for Amazing Caregivers

Premier Caregiver Services is a boutique caregiver service. We are locally owned-not a franchise. If you want to work for a highly regarded company serving the Louisville area for more than 8 years - Call or email to be connected directly to our owner.

Contact us today! John O’Callaghan • 502.548.1239 jocallaghan@premiercgs.com • www.premiercgs.com

NO COST REFERRAL SERVICE

Assisted Living Locators

Path Forward of Kentucky, Inc. Providing coordination and monitoring of an individual’s health services along with education and support based on a comprehensive assessment to establish a plan of care. Providing accompaniment to medical visits to improve communication and information transmission to family and other health providers.

MEDICAL ADVOCATE

TRANSPORTATION

Brittney Poppe, Ph.D., Geriatric Psychologist Dr. Poppe is a psychologist who specializes in geriatric mental health. She offers help to those with a wide range of concerns including depression, anxiety, adjusting to changes in physical functioning, coping with chronic illnesses and pain, and dealing with loss and grief. She also offers help to caregivers of those with dementia who may be feeling overwhelmed or dealing with possible challenging behaviors related to dementia. Brittney Poppe, Ph.D. • Poppe Psychological Services, LLC 11730 Old Shelbyville Rd. Louisville, KY 40243 • 502.883.4073, ext. 4 www.drpoppe.com

FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

Able Care, Inc., since 2001 Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation. Our service is available for: • Physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy • Social functions and daily errands • Evenings and weekends with advance notice Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business. Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 • 502.267.1911 • ablecareinc.com

HELPFUL RESOURCES ADVERTISING

After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs. I can also help connect you with resources to help financially. Patti Naiser • SeniorHomeTransitions.com • 502.396.9228

Assisted Living Locators is a No Cost Referral Service. As professional Eldercare Advisors, we provide personal assistance in locating the right options for your elderly loved one. We can reduce your stress by providing a free consultation and help you find the right Assisted Living, Personal Care, Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care, Nursing Homes and Retirement Communities. Assisted Living & Home Care Options • Arthur & Kathy Lemons 502.208.4072 • arthurl@assistedlivinglocators.com wwwAssistedLivingLocatorsLouisville.com

pathforwardky.com • 502.451.2565 alex.scholtz@pathforwardky.com

All at NO COST to you!

Providing a structured program balancing physical & cognitive activities designed to help frail older adults function at their highest levels. State licensed medical model providing nursing services, medication administration, personal care, memory care, meals, & caregiver respite for over 24 years. Medicaid Waiver, VA, LTCI, & Private Pay.

9300 Beulah Church Rd. 40291 • 502.762.9612 adcdir@fchum.org • fchum.org

CARE MANAGEMENT AND MEDICAL ADVOCATE

Senior Home Transitions

Fern Creek/Highview United Ministries Adult Day Health Center

Today’s Transitions Reach more than 75,000 caregivers and seniors with your business message. The resource is in a colorful, easy-to-read format, providing readers with helpful information about your products or services. Each Directory Listing includes: • Approximately 650 characters – including punctuation and spaces. • Contact information • Production services • Change Listing for each issue • Deadline for Spring issue: May 9, 2017 Call or email us for additional information at 502.327.8855 or advertising@todayspublications.com

If you would like to advertise in the Helpful Resources Directory, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. – THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT –

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What to Wear

BY ALISSA HICKS / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD /

MAKEUP MARIE FULKERSON

What to Wear to a

Holiday Party With the holidays approaching, the party invitations will soon be in the mail and you’ll be looking for that perfect holiday outfit. Here, Ellen Bland, realtor at Wakefield Reutlinger Realtors, sports a festive look that she can dress up or down depending on the party or event. We chose this peplum, marigold top because of its versatility and flair. It is paired with black slacks with a legging-like feel and flats. For those casual parties, this look is festive but comfortable. If you’re heading out to a more upscale event, you could easily swap the flats for heels. We also added this transitional blanket scarf that can be worn multiple ways or removed when inside. Don’t forget to accessorize: we chose this festive bracelet resembling those sparkling Christmas decorations. Ellen’s wearing: Top, $81; pants, $65; scarf $30; earrings, $26; bracelet, $39; shoes, $22. All items available at Colonial Designs, 3712 Lexington Rd, 502.896.4461.

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Instead of wearing the traditional red or green for holiday pa rties, opt for something warm and cheerful but strikingly different lik e marigold or a rich navy blue.


Profile for Today's Media

Today's Transitions Winter 2016/2017  

Premier Publication for Later Living

Today's Transitions Winter 2016/2017  

Premier Publication for Later Living