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june/july 2013

CONTENTS

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Beautiful Baby Contest Winners

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Introduction

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See You @ TodaysFamilyNow.com

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By Carrie Vittitoe

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PAGES 14-28 BABY SECTION Will Your Birth Plan Hold Up, or Start to Disappear? By Megan Seckman

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To Circumcise or Not Circumcise? We Said Yes!

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To Circumcise or Not Circumcise? We Said No! By Carrie Vittitoe

The Waiting is the Hardest Part Compiled by Elaine Rooker Jack

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Family Wellness By Lorie Gant Leitner

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Things to Do

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D.I.Y: Resin Pendant

By Megan M. Seckman

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Make Your Baby a Jar of Love: Homemade Baby Food By Tami L. Pyles

Cloth Diapers By Angel Lyn Nance

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Reflux Goes Beyond Spitting Up By Meredith Ball

Kid-Free Vacationing By Meredith Ball

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After Baby: Making a Decision to Quit Work

By Miranda G. Popp

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Before We Go‌ By DeLisa Cuiccio


on the cover Winner

2013

By Hayli Goode

Vigorous voting made for a great 2013 Beautiful Baby Contest. The winner

receives a $1,000 savings bond and one year of dental care ($400 value) from the contest sponsor, Derby City Pediatric Dentistry. Both the winner and the runner-up also received a basket of goodies, and the runner-up receives a free dental checkup by Dr. Korie Acord, owner of Derby City Pediatric Dentistry.

Runner-Up

Ivy Claire Kilgore Cover photos by Emily Kay, emilykaystudio.com

Ivy Claire Kilgore will steal your heart with her big blue eyes and strawberry blonde hair. When not shopping around in her sister’s or mother’s closet, Ivy, who is 14 months old, can be found writing or doodling, which is a habit she picked up from her older sister. Ivy also enjoys playing outside and swinging on the family’s swing set! Seafood and candy top her list of favorite foods. Dr. Korie Acord, of Derby City Pediatric Dentistry, congratulates 14-month-old Ivy on her Today’s Family magazine Beautiful Baby Contest win.

Jace Graham Jace, who just turned one in June, is an active baby. He loves chasing his momma and dada, two words he recently learned. This potential NASCAR driver’s favorite TV show is “Thomas the Tank Engine.” His mother, Shalexis, says he has always been a happy baby and loves to laugh, especially when it’s time for a diaper change!

PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

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Intro...

Baby — This is a Great Issue!

T

his issue of Today's Family is full of information about the parenting of babies. The beautiful baby winner graces our cover and parent writers from the area talk about dealing with some of the day-to-day dealings of babyhood — from diapers to food to the dreaded spit up. Our bi-monthly magazine is only part of Today's Family — we want to be part of your daily world. Our online site, TodaysFamilyNow. com, carries a new story everyday. Sometimes it is about how to keep

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You can sign up to get the announcements in your email box by going to TodaysFamilyNow.com and clicking here.

your child learning and other times about how to have fun with your family. Special regulars you won't want to miss are Giveaways every Wednesday and Fun Local Activities every Friday. We are also looking for awesome coaches, teachers, tutors, and music instructors who should be recognized. Give them special recognition by entering them in our Awesome Coach contest before June 30.

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Cathy S. Zion

publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR

Anita Oldham

editor@todayspublications.com

Volume 22 • Number ASSISTANT EDITORS 4 Elaine Rooker Jack

PUBLISHER elaine@todayspublications.com

Cathy S. Zion

See You @ TodaysFamilyNow.com See You @

Look forTodaysFamilyNow.com these stories... • Modified Cry It Out

The Great Camp Adventure Giveaway!

• Fur Babies

Every Wednesday you have a chance to win a different summer camp experience. • To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate

• Co-Sleeping as a Last Resort • Advice for a New Grandparent

A Mom’s Favorite Things

Learn about local things that you should try to help your family life get better.

Tiffany White publisher@todayspublications.com tiffany@todayspublications.com EDITOR Anita Oldham ADVERTISING DIRECTOR editor@todayspublications.com Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITORS Elaine Rooker Jack SALES DIRECTOR elaine@todayspublications.com Cheryl Suhr cheryl@todayspublications.com Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT ExECUTIVES

Rose Helm ADVERTISING DIRECTOR rose@todayspublications.com Susan Allen

susan@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com SALES DIRECTOR

Suhr SENIORCheryl GRAPHIC DESIGNER cheryl@todayspublications.com April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com account executives

Rose Helm PHOTOGRAPHER rose@todayspublications.com Melissa Donald

melissa@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Smith SENIOR graphic Designer jessica@todayspublications.com April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Emily Burke photographer

Giveaways (they happen every Wednesday!)...

TODAYSFAMILYNOW.COM EDITOR melissa@todayspublications.com

• Indianapolis Getaway

miranda@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER

• Opportunity to throw out the Ceremonial Pitch at a Louisville Bats game and 4 reserved seats Vote for a Beautiful Baby!

jessica@todayspublications.com Published bi-monthly by:

It is the only place you can vote for one of the

• Summer DreamWorks Experience Vacation babies in this issue. The winner of the package atcontest Gaylord Opryland Beautiful Baby appears on the cover of our June/July issue.

• Holiday World tickets

• Kentucky Railway Museum tickets • Stephen Foster Productions tickets

Friday Free Things to Do

• Louisville Slugger Museum and Factory admittance You can make out your weekend family fun schedule by looking online every Friday. All the listings are either free or low-cost.

Strike a Pose...

Model Search Voting For ages 5-13

Win Other Great Prizes

Tickets to: Home, Garden and Remodeling Show — March 1-3 Gotta HaveLego It!...KidsFest — April 5-7 Sesame Street Live — April 12-13

Miranda’s Favorite Things Find out what items make the editor’s list...

Melissa Donald Miranda Popp

Jessica Smith

Zion Publications LLC COVER Station PHOTOGRAPHY 9750 Ormsby Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Emily Kay (emilykaystudio.com) Phone (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 EDITOR TODAYSFAMILYNOW.COM

Miranda Popp www.todaysfamilynow.com

miranda@todayspublications.com www.facebook.com/todaysfamily

INTERNS Subscriptions are available by sending $15 to the above address 6 bi-monthly issues. AlissaforHicks

Hayli Goodeis published Today’s Family magazine bi-monthly by Zion Publications LLC Published by: and distributedbi-monthly free to the people of metropolitan Louisville Zion Publications LLCand Southern Indiana. Circulation 33,000. 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 The opinions expressed herein are Louisville, KY 40223 exclusively those of the writers and do Phone (502) 327-8855 not necessarily the position Fax (502)reflect 327-8861 of the publisher. Today’s Family magazine does not endorse or guarantee any www.todaysfamilynow.com advertiser’s product or service. www.facebook.com/todaysfamily Copyright 2013 Zion Publications Subscriptions areby available by sending $15LLC to theallabove address for 6 bi-monthly issues.or with rights reserved. Reproduction use of editorial or graphic content in any Today’sisFamily magazine is published manner prohibited without permission bi-monthly by Zion Publications from Zion Publications LLC.LLC and distributed free to the people MEMBER Greater Louisville, Inc., Metro of metropolitan Louisville andChamber of Commerce, Area Chambers of Commerce, Southern Indiana. Circulation 25,000. Better Business Bureau. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Family magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2013 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC. BBB Rating of

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Enter Now...

For advertising information, call (502) 327-8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

Today’s Girl Essay Contest (by July 31) Win tickets to the American Girl Style Show!

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Kid-Free Vacationing

How to make plans for your kids when you’re away By Meredith Ball

W

hen it comes to vacation preparation, I’m a list-maker. When

we went on vacation without our kids, I made an entire binder. It was like planning two vacations for myself — in two different places simultaneously — except one of my selves still needed diapers, medical release forms, and a “helpful hints for bedtime” list. My husband and I went on a cruise in the southern Caribbean for a week, but between packing for ourselves and arranging transfer of our kids between my parents and my in-laws, we might as well have been planning a month-long excursion. Going on vacation without our kids was an undertaking, for sure, but it was well worth it. I would do it again in a heartbeat. Part of what allowed us to de-stress was knowing that our kids were in good hands and everyone was equipped for the week. With the right consideration and preparation, you too can enjoy some time away.

Tag, You’re It! The most important decision facing you in traveling without your kids is with whom to leave them. Whether a family member, close friend, or a sitter, it should be someone you trust and the children feel comfortable with. Some things to consider when picking your surrogate for the week: • Are they accustomed to handling children of this age? • Do my children enjoy being around them? • Are they physically able to handle the demands of my kids? • Does their schedule mesh well with my kids’ schedule? • Are they willing to follow my ‘childcare rules’ (at least to my comfort level)? The more this person knows your children and their daily life, the less preparation you have to do. page 12

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page 10

Around the House in 80 Days

Keep It Together

A big part of the planning has to do with where your children will be. Having your kids in their own home may be a comforting environment and mean you don’t have to pack for them. But it does mean you have to completely familiarize the child-sitter with your environment and house rules. Where are the medicines, clothes, cleaning supplies, things the kids can’t get into, important documents, emergency supplies, doctors’ numbers, and the Poison Control number? Do they need to feed the pet, get the mail, take out the trash (and when)? What are the kids allowed to do and where are they allowed to go? This is especially important for older kids and essential if they can drive. You also need to familiarize your sitter with the schedule. Think through the entire time period and make note of school times as well as any practices, games, or standing appointments. Then get down to the nitty-gritty details. When do the kids typically get up in the morning? Are there daily/weekly medications, and what are the times for these? When’s bedtime, and is there a bedtime routine they are accustomed to? You know your children better than anyone, so you will know what information you need to pass along. Typically, the younger the children are, the more details you have to leave.

If your head is spinning with all of this information, you understand my need for the binder. It can hold all your instructions, documents, schedules, information and be a working list from the moment you start planning, and it will be easy to transfer to your childcare person. If you choose to store all your information electronically, remember to transfer the information to your childcare person in a format with which they are comfortable. During the months prior to our trip, I made lists of what clothes to pack, what things I needed to purchase, questions I needed answered, and things I needed to do. I had a section of the binder for my own trip and a section for the kids. This binder was practically attached to me for a month. When we left on our trip, we gave a packet of information to my parents and to my in-laws, tailored to their time with the kids.

Legal Matters These things you set in place with the hope that none of it is necessary during your trip. In case of a medical emergency, an illness or injury that requires a trip to the doctor, or even allergy shots, your child-sitter needs to have permission to have your child treated. One way to do this is to write a letter detailing what this person has authority for in your stead and then sign it. I would also recommend signing a form at your pediatrician’s office stating who is allowed to bring your child in. Make sure to leave a copy of your insurance card with the sitter. If you haven’t written a will prior to this trip, now is the time to do it. No one wants to think about these things, but if something were to happen to you, you would want a say in what happens to your children. Unfortunately, if you are injured and can’t speak, or if you die without a will, your kids could end up in foster care, pending hearings (even with available relatives). Just bite the bullet and get it out of the way. You can do this through a lawyer if you’d like, or you can purchase software that allows you to do it on your own computer. Then you need to sign it and have it notarized or witnessed. If your child will be in school during your time away, make sure the school is aware of the arrangements. You may need to sign some papers granting permission with them as well.

Don’t forget to include:

• Where to find things • Medication dosages (even Tylenol or Motrin) • Doctor and Poison Control numbers • Phone numbers of friends or family who can provide help if needed • Schedule for the kids • Schedule of where you will be on which days as well as contact numbers to reach you (are all reservations under your name?) • And save that binder! It will give you a place to start when you are planning your next trip.

An Ocean of Emotion With all the logistics taken care of, you can focus on the more human aspects. Depending on the ages of your kids, there could be a lot of tears. And the kids might cry, too. Spend plenty of time talking with your kids about what they can expect while you are gone. Work with them and the sitter to find measures of comfort during the time away. We found it wise to schedule phone calls during the week. This is especially important if you will be unreachable at times. Being able to Skype or do Facetime can also be great for younger kids. With all of these preparations in place, you and your kiddos will be ready for some time apart. Bon Voyage! When Meredith Ball is not on vacation, she’s keeping the home fires burning in LaGrange with her husband Reggie and their kids Coen (7), Weston (5), and Kairo (6 months).

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Will Your

Birth Plan

Hold Up, or start to disappear? By Megan Seckman

Y

ou’ve meticulously drawn up your birth plan like stage directions for your life’s opus — the attendants and amenities for the big day, the positions and props for labor and birth, a variety of researched and rehearsed pain management strategies — all culminating in a flesh-to-flesh, awe-inspiring, breastfeeding denouement. But have you heard the old adage about best laid plans? My own children’s births detoured ironically from their chosen courses, proving to me, before I’d even seen their tiny faces, that I wasn’t really in charge. I was adamant about having a natural hospital birth for my son, but after 30 hours of intense labor, I delivered him after an epidural. The image of me before the epidural: tear-streaked, contorted face. Afterward, peace and lipstick. My daughter, who I was sure would be delivered with that blessed epidural, came naturally. This is the story of two best-laid birth plans and their outcomes. Sisters, pregnant and due within months of each other, both planned home births. Both were armed with empowering, careful decisions concerning their bodies and babies and when needed, equipped with some soul-saving flexibility. After all, that is the nature of plans: they often need a plan B. page 16 14

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The plan:

The plan: Nora Christensen had successfully delivered a 10-pound, 11-ounce baby at home 12 years prior. In month eight of her first pregnancy, after writing a detailed plan for a natural, vaginal birth, she discovered the practiced c-section rate of her doctor’s group. “It seemed like everything was based on emergency, and I felt like I was losing power,” Nora says. “The doctor told me my hips were too small to birth a baby and my plan wouldn’t be honored. My birth plan was just a document in a folder that couldn’t fight off the doctors, so I went to Rainbow Blossom and found a midwife. It was my most life-changing experience. “Everything feels so homey and sweet. I’m a homebody by nature, so it was empowering to me. I had my family around, and there was a sense of peace. My daughter came out in absolute silence. I heard tiny whispers, ‘It’s a girl, it’s a girl,’ then she laid on me for the rest of the night. No matter how progressive a hospital is, they can’t help but sanitize. The baby is always whisked away and scrubbed down. Hospitals cause me stress; that’s where sick people go. I wanted to be at home.” So the decision for a second home birth with the same midwife was an easy one for Nora.

The outcome: Nora began her prenatal treatment at a hospital “for the machines and monitors,” but was turned away as a patient after she informed the staff of her home birth plan. For liability reasons, the hospital would no longer see Nora, so she finished her prenatal check-ups with her midwife without a plan B. When labor started, she called her midwife, and in eight hours, start to finish, Nora gave birth to her second child, Oscar, on the bathroom floor. “It was beautiful and pretty fast. I could do whatever I wanted — get in the shower, sit on the toilet for two hours, eat and drink — without having to ask for permission. After I delivered, we laid down and went to sleep for the night.” The only problem Nora faced was with the postpartum pediatric check-up. “The pediatrician made a big deal about the home birth, that we didn’t put the drops in his eyes,” Nora says. “It seems the medical world wants a problem to fix. When I didn’t follow protocol, I got flack. It’s hard to stand up in the face of the norm, but I believed in my choice so much, I wrote a puppet show about it; it’s called The Crowning.”

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Around Carrie Christensen’s seventh month, she had a gut feeling that gave her the courage to scrap her plans for a natural birth at a nearby hospital and go for a home birth. “The care at the hospital was wonderful, the birthing rooms were wonderful, but seeing the babies lined up in the nursery freaked me out. I’d seen my sister’s home birth and the immediate bonding between mother and child, and these babies lined up didn’t reflect that feeling.” And Carrie’s insurance did not cover maternity care. At the time, the insurance she had paid on through her nonprofit for 16 years would only pay maternity care if she bought the coverage 12 months prior to a pregnancy. Opting for a home birth was an emotional and financial decision that made sense. “I already knew some midwives, and my first visit with one lasted longer than any of my prenatal visits at the hospital. It immediately felt right.”

The outcome: Two weeks before her due date, Carrie began laboring at home. Over the next two days, a rotating midwife team (three midwives, her doula, and a midwife assistant) took 12 hour shifts by Carrie’s side. After 24 hours, her team suggested moving to a hospital, but Carrie decided to keep trying: “I wasn’t interested. I had an interesting state of mind: no fear, no panic.” On the second day of her home laboring, Carrie’s state of mind began to shift. She wasn’t able to keep any food down and hadn’t slept since her contractions began. After 40 hours of labor, the midwives began to be more physical in their interventions, attempting to manually dilate her cervix. Her son’s head was not positioned over her cervix, so she was not progressing. “That was the most painful experience of my life,” Carrie says. “So after that, when the sun started setting for the third time, my entire outlook changed. I just stood up and got dressed. You start to think you’ll never give birth. The sun was setting, and it could be another day before I . . . I just knew what I had to do.” When they arrived at a hospital specializing in high risk deliveries and known for their excellent trauma care, Carrie was immediately berated for attempting a home birth. “I kept hearing everyone shout ‘c-section,’ and that is not what I wanted or needed.” Once in a room, a 25-year-old nurse changed Carrie’s fate. “She whispered, ‘I hear you want a vaginal delivery; we’ll get you that,’ and she took over for me,” Carrie says. “She stood at the door and told the barrage of people coming to witness a rare vaginal birth to get out. She told them we were doing a home birth in here.  “She recommended an epidural. You get caught up in what you think is right and don’t budge. I had made up my mind that this was bad, but I trusted her, so I did it. After that, I was a different person: eating popsicles and smiling. She hunted down a doctor willing to deliver a vaginal birth. “I delivered in a hospital, but with all the hippy love I’d read about with a home birth. And I got my vaginal delivery.” The after story of Carrie’s birth involves excellent post-natal care and a bill for $25,000. “The postpartum care was wonderful,” she says. “They treated me with such respect for breastfeeding and never took my baby away from my side. I couldn’t have been more pleased. But, when we left, not only did I pay for the midwives ($2,000) and the prenatal care at the original hospital [if chosen, an upfront $4,000 delivery fee], I also had to hire lawyers to negotiate the $25,000 for my birth. I spent the first three months of my son’s life contesting bills.” Birth plans empower women to orchestrate one of the most monumental days of our lives. So do your research, ladies. Build your team. Create your ideal. Make a most perfect playlist. But, most importantly, have a backup plan. Seasoned parents never leave home without one. Megan M. Seckman lives in Louisville with her husband Billy and their kids William (8) and Nadine (5). She is a frequent contributor to Today’s Family magazine.

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Cloth

Diapers By Angel Lyn Nance

W

hen I first became a mom,

I never considered cloth diapering. I remembered the old kind of cloth, with metal pins, plastic pants, and dunking dirty diapers in the toilet, so I was surprised when my sister told me she was considering switching to cloth. Her comments led me to research the idea myself. After seeing the cloth diapers available now, I switched my then 5-month-old daughter to cloth and never used disposables again. Melissa Chaffin uses cloth diapers because she doesn’t want the chemicals in the disposables against her baby’s skin. “Plus, cloth seems more comfortable for the baby, and they are cute, too,” she says. Many parents are also concerned about the environmental impact of disposable diapers that end up in landfills, where they take hundreds of years to decompose. Proponents of cloth diapering often cite the economical benefits of using cloth. You can save a great deal of money by using cloth, but the amount depends on the type of cloth diaper you use. Most cloth diaper retailers offer discounts for package deals. In addition to the cost of diapers, factor in another $36-$122 over 2.5 years for the extra energy costs of laundering the diapers. Those initial investments might seem high, but compared to disposable diapers, they are still a big savings. Currently, one box (of 86 in size 3) of Huggies Snug and Dry diapers retails at Wal-Mart for $19.47. If you buy a box of diapers every 10 days for a year — 36 boxes — it would cost you $700.92. Washing diapers makes some people nervous, but it really isn’t a big deal. Dirty diapers are stored in a wet bag or a diaper pail with a liner.

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Have you considered them?

You don’t need to rinse the diapers before you put them in the wet bag, but you do need to knock solid waste off into the toilet first. Some people like to use disposable diaper liners to make it easier to get the poop off. Others use a diaper sprayer to spray off waste. However, I didn’t find it difficult to flick the poop into the toilet without either of these expenses. It is best to launder diapers every other day by simply emptying the wet bag into the washer and then adding the bag to the load. Read the care instructions when you purchase your diapers to know what types of detergent to use and the amount. If you plan to use the dryer to dry your diapers, make sure the brand you buy can be machine-dried. Diapers will typically last longer and have less staining if they are line-dried. Another option for parents who don’t want to wash dirty diapers is to use a diaper service. This option allows busy parents to reduce their environmental impact, but it does involve higher costs. In the Louisville area, the Diaper Fairy will pick up dirty diapers from your home and deliver clean ones once a week. For washing 70 cloth diapers a week, the Diaper Fairy charges $21.50. Two Lines Baby Planner owner Aimee Monsky reminds, “It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing venture. Many parents use cloth at home and disposables on trips or at night.” Some use disposables for those first few weeks with a newborn before starting cloth. Often parents try out cloth diapers and then switch to using them full-time once they realize how easy and costeffective it is. It may take a little trial-and-error to decide which diapers work best for your family, but today’s cloth diapers are a great option.

Angel Lyn Nance lives in LaGrange with her husband Nathaniel and their kids Elijah (10), Malachi (8), and Lydia (4).

If you decide to try cloth diapering, you have some decisions to make. There are three main types of diapers: prefolds or fitted diapers with covers, pockets, and all-in-ones.

PRE-FOLD DIAPERS are the most economical option. On the downside, prefolds have to be folded and are often more confusing to caregivers. The prefold is folded and placed inside a diaper cover, which closes with Velcro or snaps. For 12 Dappi brand covers and 36 prefolds, it costs only $79. From Imagine, 24 prefolds in each of the small, medium, and large sizes plus 8 covers cost $232.

All-in-ones are a complete diaper all together, so there is no folding or extra cover needed. But they take a long time to dry and are more expensive.

pocket diapers are my personal favorite and are the easiest for those who have never used cloth. Twenty of the more expensive and extremely popular pocket diapers, Bum Genius, cost $359. Pocket diapers have to be stuffed with an insert before using, and then the insert is taken out of the pocket before washing. They don’t take as long to dry as allin-ones, and heavy wetters can have extra protection by stuffing with more inserts. Pocket diapers can close with either plastic snaps or hook and loop, which are Velcro-like tabs. The hook and loop pocket diapers are the closest to disposable, which makes them easier to use. Snaps do have benefits, though, in that they tend to last longer than the hook and loop. And if you have a baby who likes to undress himself, the snaps are much harder for him to undo.

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So... Immediately comes the big question:

TO CIRCUMCISE, OR NOT CIRCUMCISE? WE SAID YES! E

very decision I made during my pregnancies, I made with conviction, based on rigorous research

and pragmatism. But not circumcision; here is my flaky confession. I was certain only female babies could hail from my loins, so the concept of even birthing a creature that needed a circumcision blindsided me. From the moment I witnessed that foreign penis on the ultrasound screen, I never saw it any other way than circumcised (despite my naturopathic philosophies). Call it ignorance, call it vanity, but I’d seen one adult uncircumcised penis in my whole life, and frankly, it freaked me out. My initial thought was: I don’t want to block my son from future romance or cause him ridicule. Ridiculous, I know, but part one in my hasty deliberation.  The official stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics is completely on the fence: may cut down on disease acquisition or UTIs, but may cause

painful complications. No help there. So I sought advice from mothers of boys I knew also on the “keep it natural” bandwagon. While I listened and nodded to all their poignant persuasive points, the only story that resonated with me was from a mom who said that potty training a boy with an uncircumcised penis was a nightmare. Like the stream from a garden hose with your thumb on the top. Following up on the story’s validity, I read that urine might balloon in the taut foreskin, causing infection and the need for “manual stretching.” And that did it for me. Messy is my line in the sand. Go ahead, judge me. With no religious traditions to guide me, I simply followed the trend and opted for what seemed, at the time, to be easiest. All in all, everything turned out just fine. He healed quickly, and I’ve yet to hear of any foreskin lament. What is done is done. I will focus my motherly guilt elsewhere. — Megan M. Seckman

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TO CIRCUMCISE, OR NOT CIRCUMCISE?

WE SAID NO! T

his might sound a little weird,

but I chose not to have my sons circumcised because my daughter had an umbilical granuloma in 2004. I followed the instructions for how to care for Norah’s belly button, but once the stump fell off, the skin remained red and oozy. As a first-time mom, I was anxious just having a newborn in my house, so seeing this unsightly skin really ramped up my worry. Although a little silver nitrate applied by the pediatrician was all it took to heal the wound, the experience left me a little scarred. In 2007, I became pregnant with my son Graeme and was more than a little apprehensive about handling “boy parts.” When my doctor asked about circumcision at a prenatal visit, I thought back to how much Norah’s granuloma distressed me. I couldn’t imagine tending to red and inflamed skin on such a sensitive area of a newborn male, especially if it wasn’t diseased in the first place.

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My husband and I discussed the issue at length. We did Internet research on what actually happens during the procedure. We talked to our pediatrician about the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines. At the time, the AAP said there were no clear health benefits to the procedure. Our pediatrician said if we were living in sub-Saharan Africa, he would recommend circumcision for our son, but since we weren’t, he didn’t think it was necessary. I’ve never doubted our decision for Graeme — or for Miles, who was born in 2009 — even though the AAP revised its guidelines on circumcision stating that while there are clear medical benefits that outweigh the risks, they still do not recommend routine circumcision for all newborn males. For me, the anxiety over tending to a wound made me happy to not fix what wasn’t broken. — Carrie Vittitoe

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After Baby: Making a Decision to Quit Work

I just wanna bang on these drums all day — Carlotta Kustes experienced an identity crisis when she became a stay-at-home mom and says, “I finally feel like I’m coming back into the light. There were some pretty dark days during the first 18 months.” Even though Carlotta wants to be readily available to her son, she says, “When you become a stay-at-home mom, you put yourself on hold even though you need something else besides mothering to fulfill yourself.” Taking time for oneself comes with guilt since you wanted to stay home in the first place.

By Carrie Vittitoe

I

t took me years to adapt to stay-at-home motherhood. Just becoming a mother is lifealtering, but when I left behind my career, my income, and a whole chunk of my identity in the process of becoming a mom, it had all sorts of unsettling effects on me. I’m Trying to Please the Boss — When my daughter was born in 2004, I wanted to excel at my new vocation of stay-athome motherhood. I dove in, trying to give 110 percent at all times. The reality is that even the worst professional colleague isn’t as uncooperative or demanding as a young child can be. Michelle Sherrard, a mom of two, recorded how many times she heard “Mommy” over the course of a day and finally stopped counting at 127. Without lunch breaks or weekends off, it is difficult for stay-at-home moms to muster unbridled enthusiasm for the “grind.” I now understand I cannot measure myself as a mother in the same way I measured my professional performance. It has taken me a long time to find contentment in being the “World’s ‘Okayest’ Mom.” I don’t understand the evaluation criteria — Prior to having children, I taught middle school and loved it. My colleagues and principal gave me feedback both verbally and in written evaluations. Every other week I received a paycheck. As a stayat-home mom, I am not valued in the same way, nor do I receive reliable feedback on how I am doing. It is primarily when I fail to do my “job” (like buying toilet paper or snacks) that my family notices how important I am to the smooth running of their lives. you mean i pay my bosses’ expenses? — My husband and I spent our first six years of marriage living off his salary even though I worked full-time too. We didn’t want to become accustomed to a certain lifestyle and have to drastically cut back if a baby came along. What I didn’t realize is that we still had to change our lifestyle a great deal because we no longer had a large savings cushion. should I splurge on a vending machine snack? — It has taken me almost nine years of stay-at-home motherhood to feel I am justified in spending money on myself. Just because I don’t contribute a salary to my family doesn’t mean I don’t deserve special treats that are only for my enjoyment.

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I need to be relieved of my duties — Even when a stay-at-home mom resolves the guilt of taking time for herself, the next hurdle is finagling occasional childcare. When childcare isn’t locked in on a regular basis, it can be difficult to find, and if you find it, there is the irony of paying someone else to “do your job.” i didn’t burn the bridge; it just disappeared! — Every stay-at-home mother I know worries about what she will do when the time comes for her to reenter the workforce. Not only have they lost contact with former business associates, they haven’t stayed up to date on changes within their field. Zainab Wiseman knows that staying at home for six years with her sons has damaged her ability to go back to the field of aerospace engineering. While not impossible, it would be difficult because of what she has missed. Heather Frazer, a stay-at-home mother of three, says, “I sometimes wonder how I will be able to word changing diapers, entertaining toddlers, and endless cleaning to look like marketable skills on my resumé when it is time for me to return to work.” I know that being a working mother comes with its own set of difficulties and brand of mommy guilt, but even on my worst days, I have never wished to be working full-time outside the home. I know I can stay in my pajamas and not comb my hair tomorrow if my kids keep me up half the night. Still, as with any choice in life, there is a price to pay. Stay-at-home moms give up a tremendous amount of independence and intellectual stimulation to be at home with their children. In moments when it takes every ounce of my strength not to get in my car and drive as far away from my children as I possibly can, I picture myself on my deathbed, reviewing the choices I made in my life. It takes that long-term view to make me glad I have temporarily put myself on hold. Carrie Vittitoe pursues her career in domestic engineering in Louisville with her husband Dean Langford and their kids Norah (9), Graeme (5), and Miles (3). She is a regular contributor to Today’s Family magazine.

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today’s FAMILY

JUNE/JULY 2013 25


Writer Meredith Ball knows the perils of reflux with her son Kairo. PHOTO BY MELISSA DONALD

RefluX

goes beyond spitting up By Meredith Ball don’t know the cure for infant reflux. I wish I

I

did, but I don’t. I’m guessing that if you have a baby with reflux and are reading this article, you were hoping I had the solution. I understand. All three of my boys had reflux — one currently — which means I’ve spent many hours researching online, many conversations with doctors, many trials of reflux medicines, and many moments crying with my babies when nothing seemed to be working. The fact that all of my kids dealt with reflux is not surprising considering its prevalence. Dr. Greg Robson with Oldham County Pediatrics says about 90 percent of babies deal with reflux. The question isn’t so much “Will my baby have reflux?” but “To what degree will my baby have reflux?” According to Dr. Robson, “many infants fall into a category of ‘happy spitters.’ Such infants commonly spit up after feeds but display no additional symptoms.” Our second son mostly fell into that category. We weren’t tipped off to his reflux until we noticed he had constant nasal congestion in the summer and brought that to his pediatrician’s attention. Who would’ve thought that a stuffy nose was a sign of reflux? It wasn’t like our first son, who had colic symptoms on top of spitting up, for which our pediatrician suggested a trial of Zantac. Despite three months of medication, his symptoms remained until he outgrew it after four months. Our second son seemed happy enough to be stuffy, so we didn’t bother with the meds. One would think we would be pros with baby reflux, but then our third son threw us for a loop. At a few weeks old, I noticed he had a really high respiration rate: he breathes fast. After consulting with a few doctors and running some tests to rule out major issues, our pulmonologist diagnosed it as a reflux complication. When he refluxes, he breathes in some of it, and this irritates his lungs, causing him to breathe fast. That’s the simplified, current hypothesis. He is currently on a trial of Nexium in an attempt to stop the complications until his body can outgrow the cause of the reflux. We discovered that MAN Y seemingly unrelated symptoms can be signs of reflux, such as spitting up, colicky crying (especially after a feed), back arching, cough, congestion, other breathing problems, and failure to grow. Some symptoms are not huge causes of concern. Others can make you feel helpless as you watch your child in pain. And still others can be quite scary and warrant medical intervention. According to Dr. Robson, “The present preferred approach for

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To reduce reflux:

breastfeeding mothers is the elimination of dairy products from the mother's diet. In formula-fed infants, change to a hypoallergenic formula would be the first approach. In infants that seem to be irritable as a byproduct of their reflux, a trial of acid suppression therapy is warranted.” Similar answers populate most medical and parenting websites. But these aren’t the only solutions with which people claim to find success. Some mothers say a series of gentle chiropractic manipulations to align their baby’s spine — which according to chiropractors can get misaligned during the trauma of birth — made all the difference. Others speak of homeopathic remedies. There seems to be no end to the suggestions, and yet no cure works for EVERY baby. To add more to the mix, there are contributing factors that can exacerbate or even cause reflux. Angie Roberts, lactation consultant and store manager at Babyology in Louisville, says an oversupply of milk is usually the main cause of severe reflux in babies she sees. “[It’s] often worse for a second or third baby because moms make more [milk] with each baby,” she says. Babies will overfill themselves at a feeding, and the stomach can’t contain it all. A lactation consultant can determine if this is a problem and assist in getting a mother’s supply under control. Sometimes reflux is worsened by sensitivity to a food the mother is eating, most frequently dairy (hence the dairy-elimination diet). Fortunately, this sensitivity often resolves itself within the first year as the child’s digestive system develops. Even without a food sensitivity, reflux usually resolves itself within six to 12 months. Maybe the best piece of advice was from Dr. Robson and can be coupled with any solution you decide to pursue: “Patience... it will get better, sometimes as a byproduct of a strategic approach, but most often via a tincture of time.” Perhaps this resonates with me since I’m comforting my third reflux baby. With my other two boys, in months the stress and struggle of reflux was just a memory, and I was left with happy little boys, none the worse for the wear. So I remind myself of this again and join the rest of you. Waiting.

• Keep baby upright for at least 30 minutes after a feeding • Smaller, more frequent feedings • Burp baby often during a feeding • Dress him/her in clothes that fit loosely on the belly • Elevate the sleeping surface at a 30° angle

Meredith Ball lives in LaGrange with her husband Reggie and their kids Coen (7), Weston (5), and Kairo (6 months).

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today’s FAMILY


Make Your Baby a Jar of Love: Homemade Baby Food

By Tami L. Pyles

M

ake it or buy it? That is the question some moms ponder as their babies turn the corner from formula or breast milk to solid foods. When my youngest was ready for solids, I decided to make her food. My decision was partially out of a love of cooking, but mostly because I wanted to know exactly what my baby was eating. It would have been much easier to load my cart full of little jars of fruits and vegetables, especially since I was working full-time, but instead I embarked on a baby-food culinary adventure. This adventure may or may not be for you, but if you choose to become your baby’s head chef, here are things I learned about tools, techniques, and ingredients. While the lure of fancy baby-foodmaking systems did entice me, the reality was I could do it without spending $100. I found most of what I needed was already in my kitchen. My must-haves included a blender, a food mill, a tablespoon, multiple ice cube trays, small storage containers, and freezer bags. The food mill was the one purchase I had to make. I went to Bed Bath and Beyond armed with my 20 percent off coupon and found the OXO Food Mill for $50. It is a hand-powered tool with interchangeable discs that allow you to control the consistency of the purée. It is a snap to assemble and washes up easily. It was invaluable while making baby food, especially since the discs allowed me to make chunkier food as my daughter got older. I still use it in my kitchen today even though we are now serving big girl food at our table. My first baby food delicacy was applesauce. It was so simple to make: peel, cut, boil and a quick spin in the food mill. It was delicious! After applesauce success, I was ready to tackle

more. I shopped Whole Foods and farmer’s markets for fresh, organic ingredients, but I also got frozen fruits and veggies when fresh options were not available. Basically, anything I could boil and purée, I made for my daughter. There are baby food recipe books and a plethora of Internet sites that will give you ideas for what to make. I stuck to simple fruits and veggies. I served them on their own or combined them for interesting baby fare. The applesauce blueberry combo was a favorite in our highchair. There were three ways I made my baby food. First, I tried to capitalize on what we had for dinner, which also forced us to eat more fruits and veggies. I made extra and then puréed and froze the leftovers. Other weeks, I needed to plan a night to make food, especially as our growing baby’s appetite increased. In about an hour, I could have two to three different foods cooked and puréed. I also used foods that only required mashing. Bananas and avocados are great quick homemade options. When cooking the food, the key was to chop small. This allowed for quicker boiling and easier puréeing. After everything was puréed, I scooped out tablespoon-sized helpings into the ice cube trays. This yielded the perfect serving size to freeze for later and allowed me to make multiple servings at one time. Once frozen, I popped the cubes out and put them in freezer bags

labeled with the food name and date. I used these cubes for up to three months. I simply pulled out what I needed the night before and let the cubes defrost in the refrigerator. Through trial and error, I learned some tricks for making baby food. I found carrots, potatoes, and apples puréed easier in the food mill rather than the blender. Reserving the cooking liquid to add back in during the puréeing process helped a great deal, no matter which tool I used. When making peaches, blanch them first, which allows for easy skin removal. When our second daughter arrived, I approached baby-food making with the same gusto as I had with my first daughter. Despite my enthusiasm, I found that the demands of caring for two kids and managing my full-time job left me cruising the baby food aisle more often than I would have liked. She got fresh food as often as I could swing it, and I learned there were great jar options to supplement my fresh-made selections. There is no doubt baby food in jars is convenient, but with just a little planning and preparation (and room in your freezer), you can make fresh and affordable baby food. Call it an adventure or call it crazy, but I will always be glad that I played a part in making my girls’ first foods. Tami L. Pyles lives in Prospect with her husband Matt and their daughters Claire (4) and Sydney (2).

PHOTO BY MELISSA DONALD

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The Waiting is the Hardest Part Compiled by Elaine Rooker Jack

A

ll eyes were glued to my friend Sabrina’s face as she lobbed questions to my 10-year-old daughter in the doctor’s waiting room.

Not just the little eyes, but the teen-aged eyes as well.

“Brownies or cookies?” “Hotdogs or hamburgers?” “Swimming or tennis?” It was the allergy-shot hour after school: 30 minutes of enforced waiting. My friend hadn’t seen my daughter since she was tiny so she was engaging her in conversation that went beyond “what’s your favorite subject in school?” And it turns out that everyone likes to be asked for her opinion, even if she’s playing the inside-the-head version. Let’s face it, this parent gig is fraught with waiting: at soccer practice, in the carpool line, in line at the movies, even at “fast” food restaurants. Yes, the kids can “check out” with their devices, but those mandatory islands of wait are good chances to engage with them. And sometimes batteries die. Gracelyn’s review of Sabrina’s game? “I hope she’s here next week; that was the most fun I’ve ever had in the waiting room.”

Here are some more ideas for the next time someone tells you your turn will be in about 20 minutes. We play a guess-who type game. We pick a theme like animals. I give clues about the animal and we see who can guess first. Then, that child gets to give their own clues for someone else to guess. The game can go on and on because we never run out of animals to talk about, they are learning during the game since they must describe the animal and it doesn't require a single supply! — Stephanie White

One of my kids’ favorites is “the humming game.” Simple. One person hums, the rest try to guess the song. Be prepared for many songs to sound the same when they are hummed by a 5 year old! — Barb Hartman

We often play the, “I’m going on vacation game.” This game begins with one person saying what they would bring (toothbrush). The second person has to name what the first person named and then add their item (toothbrush and comb). The game continues until someone forgets or mixes up items. It’s always fun to see what my son comes up with. I love peeking into his mind. — LaDonna Kennedy

Play a fingerplay game. One of our favorites is Mr. Wiggle/Mr. Waggle. — Erin Nevitt

We play the game “Going on a Boat” where the “it” has a pattern in her mind (i.e. double letters, blue items, starts with “k”) and the guessers name items they would bring if going on your boat. If the item fits the pattern, they get to go; if not, they don’t. First one to guess the pattern wins. — Megan M. Seckman

And don’t forget! • Hunt for the alphabet (what starts with A, B, C, etc.) • License plate hunting • I spy And if you’ve got paper and pencil! • Hangman • Tic Tac Toe — Mary Ellen Bianco


today’s FAMILY


By loriE gant leitner

Kids Weelicious.com

Pea Wee Kiwi Popsicles From Weelicious.com

Ingredients (makes 6) 4 kiwis, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup orange, apple, or pineapple juice 3/4 cup frozen peas 6 dixie cups*

Preparation Is your kid moving? These age 2- to 6-year-olds love to groove, move, and shake to fun, energetic music. Instructor Alison Cardoza at Baptist East Milestone Wellness Center incorporates creative movement to get kids moving, such as leaping over colorful images, swimming like a fish through water, and twirling with ribbons. “This class allows children to explore their creative side while increasing self-confidence,” she says. (Classes last four weeks per session.) PHOTO BY MELISSA DONALD

Family Farm Day

On June 15, the Food Literacy Project will host its Family Farm Day at Oxmoor Farm. Visitors can enjoy activities such as baking homemade bread, tasting tour, veggie based arts and crafts, and a farm scavenger hunt. Pre-registration is required. Visit http://foodliteracyproject.org/programs/family-program for more details.

Introducing New Foods Buying and Learning Locally

Warmer weather marks the return of local farmers markets that provide a source of fresh fruit, vegetables, and local goods for the community. The Louisville Farmers Market has been growing strong for 3 years. John Mudd, market manager, says “Our market provides an opportunity for visitors to speak directly to the farmers, watch cooking demos, learn easy recipes, and sample the richer flavor of the items.” Create an outing for the entire family. Attending a local farmers market is a fun way to introduce healthier food options to your children and plan family dinners. For a list of Louisville’s farmers markets, visit http://www.louisvilleky.gov/ HealthyHometown/healthyeating/FarmersMarkets.htm.

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1. Place the kiwis and juice in a food processor and purée until smooth. 2. Place 2 tablespoons of peas in each Dixie cup. 3. Cover peas with kiwi puree and stir to evenly distribute peas. 4. Freeze pops for 4-6 hours or until frozen through. * These can also be made in popsicle molds.

Helmets Make sure they fit! Bicycle helmets should be worn by every member of the family. Many bicycle accidents involve a head injury and helmets are designed to take the force of the blow. When selecting a helmet, follow these tips to ensure it fits well: • Sits level on the head • Isn’t tilted forward or backward • Has strong, wide straps that fasten snugly under the chin • Is tight enough, so that after fastening, no sudden pulling or twisting could move it around Source: http://kidshealth.org/ parent/nutrition_center/ exercise_safety/bike_safety.html#

Park Finder Mobile App Find Your Way Around Louisville Outdoor Fun Whether you are searching for a splash park or hiking trail, Metro Parks offers it. Download the Park Finder mobile app at www. louisvilleky.gov/metroparks/ parks to search 120 parks by name, features, or location.

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June sunday

monday

Information Compiled by Alissa Hicks

tuesday

wednesday

thursday

friday

saturday

1 Through September 15 June 1-2 June 8-9 DAY OUT WITH THOMAS

MYTHIC CREATURES Examine the legends of the natural world, like unicorns and dragons. Frazier History Museum $18.50 for adults, $14.50 for students, $10 for children (5-13) and free for children ages 4 and under. http://www.fraziermuseum.org/ 502.753.5663

Times vary • $22 day of event Kentucky Railway Museum Kyrail.org

Through June 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 $1 Hot Dog/ Pepsi Nights @ the Bats

LYNDON SUMMER FESTIVAL

WEEKLY Giveaway @ TodaysFamilyNow.com

Enjoy fun kid activities and live entertainment from 5-7 p.m. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Saturday. 4-10 p.m. Friday and Noon-10 p.m. Saturday Robinson Park Free

Join special guest Iron Man for an heroic adventure unlike any other. Dress as your favorite super hero. June 15-16 @ 12- 4 p.m. Louisville Zoo Regular admission fees apply 502.459.2181 louisvillezoo.org

14 Also July 12

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FRIDAY MOVIE NIGHTS

YOUTH SCIENCE SUMMIT 2013

Bring blankets or lawn chairs and relax as you watch your favorite movies on a giant inflatable screen. 5 p.m. • Louisville Zoo Free for Zoo members and $5 for non-members louisvillezoo.org 502.459.2181

Students ages 11-18 will discuss hot science topics and interact with leading professionals in speed mentoring sessions and hands-on industry labs. Kentucky Science Center $10 (lunch provided) 502.561.6100 kysciencecenter.org

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At every Tuesday home game, fans can purchase $1 hot dogs and $1 12 oz. Pepsi products. June 4, 11, 25 & July 2, 30 Louisville Slugger Field $7-14 batsbaseball.com

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check out places to have water fun!!

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$1 Hot Dog/ Pepsi Nights @ the Bats

WEEKLY Giveaway @ TodaysFamilyNow.com

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See full info on June 4 listing.

D MOD A KyI’s Family!

8 SUPERHERO DAY AT THE ZOO

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WEEKLY Giveaway @

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TodaysFamilyNow.com

E FOR da rch! VOT in the Toodel Seaow .com N Kid M Family ys a 17 d To OF JUNE

father’s DAY

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$1 Hot Dog/ Pepsi Nights @ the Bats

WEEKLY Giveaway @ TodaysFamilyNow.com

See full info on June 4 listing.

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the best products and services for you and yours

Jane Owens Family Therapy, LLC

Family Finds

Directory

My Bel Amour Children’s Boutique

If you’d like to advertise in the Today’s Family directory, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

Life is all about growing and moving forward — hard to do if you feel stuck.

ChiLd/AdOLeSCenT deVeLOPMenT

Square One

What is holding you back? I can help you find out and transition through your challenges to have the life you want.

Located in Crescent Hill janeowensfamilytherapy.com 502.436.9504 Accepting new clients for individual, family and couples counseling.

Visit My Bel Amour to check out our selection of playful and chic swimwear…just in!

11701 Main St., Middletown Shop online @ mybelamour.com 502.742.5401

Medical, Psychiatric, Psychological, SpeechLanguage Intervention: Evaluation & Therapy for Children and Adolescents Ages 1-24 Developmental & Mental Health Specialists: Our multidisciplinary expertise encompasses develop-mental and mental health concerns including ADHD, learning, emotional, mood and anxiety disorders, autism, speechlanguage disorders and social skills abilities. Team-Based Evaluation: Medical, psychological, educational and speech-language evaluations help patients, parents and professionals in the community understand differences in children and adolescents that impact on development, behavior and emotions. Comprehensive Therapy: Our doctors provide ongoing collaborative therapeutic inventions working closely with your child’s pediatrician and school personnel to address developmental, behavioral and speech-language differences identified through our evaluations. Judith Axelrod MD • Ann Ronald MEd • Michael Mayo MD • David Causey PhD • Sherri Stover LCSW • Lisa Ruble PhD • Ashley Redenbaugh CCC • 6440 Dutchmans Pkwy • 502.896.2606 • squareonemd.com • info@squareonemd.com

ChiLdCAre

Order Today’s Family Photos

Little Treasures Kid’s Sale Looking for a smarter way to shop for your kids? Look no further than Little Treasures Kid’s Sale, the area’s leading seasonal consignment event held every March and August.

Have you or your children lent your beautiful faces to our magazines lately? You can order the photos we use in our magazines through our SmugMug account.

We promise brand names and BIG savings on anything and everything for baby, big kid, teen and maternity. Get in on the fun:

littletsale.com

Go to todayswomannow.com and click on “Order Photos.”

Sullivan University Take the guesswork out of your nanny search. Hire your next nanny through Sullivan University’s nationally acknowledged Professional Nanny Program, an institution with more than 20 years experience training and placing qualified childcare professionals. Our graduates hold Certified Professional Nanny credentials from the American Council of Nanny Schools and are trained in CPR, First Aid and Water Safety. Available for in-home day or live-in services. Visit sullivan.edu and click “Hire a Nanny,” or call 502-413-8607. Sullivan University 3101 Bardstown Road • Louisville, KY 40205 502.413.8607 •sullivan.edu

ChiLdren’S CLOThinG

Little Treasures Kid’s Sale Area’s most anticipated kid’s consignment event held every March and August. Parents can earn money on the things their kids have outgrown and save up to 90% on new and delicately used brand name items. For more information about the sale, visit www.littletsale.com. 502.541.4446 • littletreasuressale.com

Find more Directory Listings on page 37

—ADVERTISEMENT—


July sunday

monday

tuesday

wednesday

thursday

friday

saturday

July 3 & 4 July 4 & 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 Muppets Take Manhattan

8:30 p.m. Iroquois Amphitheater Free iroquoisamphitheater.com

WATERFRONT INDEPENDENCE FESTIVAL

$1 Hot Dog/ Pepsi Nights @ the Bats

See full info on June 4 listing.

Celebrate on the waterfront with two days of free concerts, fireworks, and family entertainment. 5-10:30 p.m. Great Lawn Free

7 8 9 10 THE LORAX

8:30 p.m. Iroquois Amphitheater Free iroquoisamphitheater.com

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Crescent Hill 4th festival

independence day

13 Through July 28 HOMEARAMA

GIRLS NIGHT OUT WITH SHAKESPEARE

Getting ready to remodel or redecorate your current home. Locust Creek and Rock Springs $10 per person per site; $15 per person for Dual Site ticket; children 12 and under free http://HBAL.com or http:// hbal.com/signature-events/ homearama/

Every Monday, Shakespeare in the Park movie night. 9:30 p.m. Old Louisville’s Central Park. Free.

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CONGRATULATIONS!

THE TODAY’S FAMILY HERO CONTEST WINNERS GOT TO RIDE A FLOAT IN THE KENTUCKY DERBY FESTIVAL PEGASUS PARADE!

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Crescent Hill Old-Fashioned 4th of July and Art & Music Festival 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. PetersonDumesnill House Free

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Through July 21 19

20 Through July 21

BLUES-N-BARBECUE FESTIVAL

TRAIN ROBBERY

Feast on barbecue and hear the sounds of New Orleans and Memphis. Times vary The Louisville Water Tower $10; Children 10 and under free (free parking) 502.583.0333 louisvillebluesandbbq festival.com

Join Kentucky Railway Museum for a wild ride as your train gets robbed. Proceeds from the “robbery” benefit the Crusade for Children. 2 p.m. Adults $19, Children ages 2-12 $14, free for under age 2. Kyrail.org

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THE LION KING

8:30 p.m. Iroquois Amphitheater Free iroquoisamphitheater.com

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COMING UP:

$1 Hot Dog/ Pepsi Nights @ the Bats

AMERICAN GIRL EVENT

— and announcement of Today’s Girl!

Saddle up with Saige, the American Girl of the Year! An event for girls ages 5 to 14. Today’s Girl Essay entrants get in free!

See full info on June 4 listing.

y’s Girl Toda Contest y Essa

!

nter e o t Y A D T LAS

Winners get tickets to the American Girl Fashion Show!

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August 24 • 9:30 a.m. - noon, 2-4:30 p.m. (Today’s Girl winners announced at 2 p.m. event) Louisville Equestrian Center, 6720 Mt. Washington Road, Taylorsville, Ky. $25, sold on first-come, first-served basis 502.629.KIDS SEE PAGE 6 FOR DETAILS ON HOW TO ENTER OUR TODAY’S GIRL ESSAY CONTEST (deadline July 31)!

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Directory continued from page 35 extracurricular

Kentucky Science Center

Formerly known as the Louisville Science Center, the State Science Center is perfect for all ages. With three floors of interactive exhibits and a fourstory IMAX Theatre, you’ll never be bored. Visit anytime for explosive demonstrations, hands-on lab experiences and much more. Visit after July 15 to PLAY at Science in Play, the 2nd installation of the original exhibit which features your favorite experiences - and some new ones - to delight the senses, inspire imagination, and tickle curious minds. Hands-on everyday science experiences come to life in six different activity zones including the Sensory Course, Testing, the new ‘Get Moving’, Big Shapes, Small Build, and the expanded Shapes & Stuff Store. Innovative elements will be introduced that encourage children and their caregivers to build, test and engineer new science activities through experimental play. Visiting the Science Center couldn’t be easier with affordable membership plans granting unlimited admission for the whole family! Enjoy fun in the museum, School’s Out Science Camps, Super Genius Birthday Parties, special events, family reunion packages, Scout programs, and more! 727 W. Main St. Louisville, KY 40202 502.561.6100 • KYScienceCenter.org

Maternity/BaBy

Clark Memorial Hospital Family Birth Place The Family Birth Place offers expectant parents a personalized birth experience. With spacious labor and delivery suites, in-room waiting areas, and garden tubs, the Family Birth Place has the ambience of a luxury hotel. Providing quality care to mom and baby is of utmost importance, that’s why the Family Birth Place promotes Kangaroo Care, the practice of a mother holding her baby skin-to-skin, and Quiet Time. Clark Memorial is also the only hospital in the area to have two Certified Nurse Midwives on staff and an on-site Breastfeeding Center staffed by a Certified Lactation Consultant. Childbirth Classes: Prepared Childbirth, Lamaze, Breastfeeding, Brothers and Sisters To Be, Infant CPR and Safety, and Doula Night. A complete class schedule is on our website. Breastfeeding Center: Breastfeeding supplies including bras, pads, and pumps for purchase. Breast pump rental, free weight checks for baby, and individual consultations. Hours: 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Mon.–Sat. Phone: 812.283.2901 1220 Missouri Ave., Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812.283.6631 • clarkmemorial.org

OBstetrics/gynecOlOgy

Women First of Louisville, PLLC Women taking care of women. At Women First of Louisville, professional women in all stages of life, career and motherhood take care of other women who are balancing the same issues. So we’ve built our medical practice by focusing on women first, in everything we do. We offer comprehensive care for women with many innovative technologies and even surgeries available right in the office. Our services include digital mammography, osteoporosis screening, OB/GYN ultrasounds, genetic and preconception counseling, high risk obstetrics, lactation counseling, urinary incontinence testing /surgery, sterilization, minimally-invasive GYN surgeries, menopause counseling and hormonal therapy management. We make it easy, too, with our online patient portal so you can pre-register and schedule appointments, pay your bill online, and renew prescriptions – all through our website, wfoflou.com. We know you take care of a lot. At Women First, we take care of you. Find out more about us online or call and set up a new patient appointment. Baptist East Medical Pavilion • 3900 Kresge Way, Suite 30 (40207) • 502.891.8700 • wfoflou.com

suMMer caMPs

JCC Summer Camp JCC Summer Camp has something for every child. JCC Summer Camp offers traditional camp for children 20 months through 6th grade with arts ‘n’ crafts, sports, free swim, swim lessons and more! Children 2 years old receive private swim lessons twice a week, children 3 and 4 years old receive group swim lessons three times a week and children in kindergarten through 3rd grade receive group swim lessons daily. Specialty camps are also offered, which include: Football, Soccer, Theatre, Dance, Horseback Riding, Lego, Sailing and more. All specialty camps swim once a day. Also, Middle School students have their own camps, which include: Community Service and Counselor-in-Training program. Beautiful campus with two outdoor pools, baseball and soccer fields, basketball and tennis courts, as well as indoor gymnasiums, auditorium and more! Call for brochure and information. 3600 Dutchmans Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 502.459.0660 • jcclouisvillecamp.org

PeDiatrics

Jeffersonville Pediatrics

Oldham County Schools Arts Center

At Jeffersonville Pediatrics we want to help you ensure your child’s early years are as healthy and happy as possible. Our physicians provide comprehensive care for children of all ages. Services include physicals, well child exams, sick visits, ADHD evaluations, immunizations and other tests. All with a special emphasis on preventative care. And we do it in a positive, kid-friendly environment. We understand today’s parents are busy. We also know how important your child’s health is. That’s why a primary focus of our practice is convenience. Flexible scheduling and same day sick appointments are available. Placing value on your child’s health now will lay the foundation for a healthy future. When you need a trusted physician to partner with for your child’s health, look no further than Jeffersonville Pediatrics. To find out more about Jeffersonville Pediatrics and to receive a free booklet on children’s health, email marketing@clarkmemorial.org.

The Oldham County Schools Arts Center is truly a unique arts institution that provides cultural opportunities that not only nurture its students, but also the community at large. Classes in music, theatre, visual arts and dance are offered on a quarterly basis for students ages 3 and up. The 2013 Summer Camp quarter runs from June 10th – Aug. 2nd. Do you want to play in a Rock ‘n Roll band or are you hoping to improve your skill when you audition for the next school play? Maybe you prefer creating with your hands and would like to join a clay sculpting camp or you’d love to participate in a choreographed hip-hop dance. This year you can choose from over 45 camps at the Oldham County Schools Arts Center. Camp offerings include half day, weekly camps which can combine to create a full day camp experience, or choose a camp that meets once per week for the full summer quarter. Private music and voice lessons are also available. Please call the Arts Center at 502.241.6018 for more information or visit ocsartscenter.org for a complete listing of camps and to register online.

207 Sparks Ave. Jeffersonville, IN 812.288.9141 • clarkmemorial.org

7105 Floydsburg Rd, Crestwood, KY 40014 502.241.6018 • ocsartscenter.org

suMMer caMPs

Floyd Memorial Hospital Birthing Center

Douglass Hills Kids TRY-athlon

Floyd Memorial’s Birthing Center offers spacious labor/delivery suites, state-of-the-art surgical suites for emergency and scheduled c-sections, an expanded nursery and remodeled post-partum rooms. Moms and babies come first at Floyd Memorial, which is why we offer moms the choice of delivering with a certified nurse midwife or an OB/GYN physician and promote mother/baby skin-to-skin kangaroo care and quiet time on our unit. We also offer a wide array of natural childbirth options, including birthing tubs, birthing balls, remote fetal monitoring, acceptance of birthing plans, and doula-assisted births. Childbirth Classes: We offer classes covering pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding and c-sections as well as classes for new siblings, infant health and CPR and infant massage. Breastfeeding Support: We are one of only two hospitals in the region to be recognized as a “breastfeeding-friendly hospital” by the International Board of Lactation Consultants. Our certified lactation consultants offer a 24hour breastfeeding support hotline, as well as unlimited follow-up care and advice.

Kids’ Triathlons provide the perfect launching pad for kids to break into the sport of Triathlon, not to mention are a great way to stay active and have fun! The swim will take place in the Douglass Hills Swimming Pool. The bike and run will take place in the park and streets that surround the pool. The event is open to kids ages 6-15. The three age groups are: 6-7 yrs: 50 yd. swim, 3K bike, 1K run 8-9 yrs: 50 yd. swim, 3K bike, 1K run 10-12 yrs: 100 yd. swim, 5K bike, 2K run 13-15 yrs: 200 yd. swim, 10K bike, 2K run Each child that participates will receive a T-Shirt, Medal and Goodie Bag. After the event, hang around for some great snacks and fun!

1850 State St., New Albany, IN 47150 1.800.4.SOURCE, floydmemorial.com/baby

Douglass Hills Swimming Pool c/o Nikki Weis 501 Gatehouse Lane 502.775.9224 kpweis@gmail.com douglasshillskidstryathlon2012@gmail.com

Music, sports, the arts, tutoring help – find the perfect extracurricular activities for your children right here in Today’s Family! In our next issue, we’ll be including a complete, comprehensive directory of local extracurricular activities for your kids. If you’re interested in listing your business in this special directory, contact Alissa Hicks at 502.327.8855 ext. 17 or alissa@todayspublications.com. Deadline: July 9.


d•i•y By Miranda G. Popp PHOTOS BY JASON POPP

Resin Pendant

It’s always fun to be able to wear something that you made, especially when it is something unique and special to you.

1

SUPPLIES: all found at

Fluxe Enameling Resin (Clear) Silver Circle or Square Pendant Silver Chain Road Map

2

3

FINISHED PRODUCT: Run a silver chain through the pendant’s loop and enjoy!

2 Place your paper into your pendant.

INSTRUCTIONS: 1 Cut out your desired location on the road map by using the provided stencil in the pendant packaging, or using a photo copier, copy your map onto a piece of cardstock for a better end product. (We used Louisville, but you can choose any city on any state map you have!)

Be sure to check out our variations on this project at TodaysFamilyNow.com. We’ll be using photos and more to make these fun resin pendants! 38

JUNE/JULY 2013

3 Using a foil-lined baking sheet, fill pendant with the powder resin, allowing it to form a dome on top. 4 Place in a 250 degree oven and heat for 10 minutes or until powder has dissolved into a very clear liquid. Remove from oven and allow about 20 minutes for product to fully harden.

4 4 4 todaysfamilynow.com 4 4 4www.facebook.com /todaysfamily 4 4 4 @todaysfamilynow


Before

FAMILY ON THE GO

WeGO...

A family of five, Christy Roberts, who works at Johnson’s 2 Day Care, and her husband Gary, a network engineer for Meredith Machinery, are “always on the lookout for free or cheap activities for the family.”

Christy and Gary Roberts; Aubrey, 6; Lucy, 3; Logan, 1 LIVE IN Jeffersonville, IN

By DeLISA CUICCIO

Photo by melissa donald

TO SHOP

TO GO

Selling items the kids have outgrown at consignment sales like KidStuff and Little Treasures, Christy takes the money made and rolls it back into new clothing choices for the kids. She also makes sure to attend the seasonal sales. A stop at a yard sale or a peek at Craigslist is a great way to find gently used toys.

Researching off season rates and planning to avoid extra spending is this family’s strategy for a budget-friendly trip to Walt Disney World, which they try to do every two years. Travelling by car and packing snacks and games for the kids not only keeps them occupied but cuts down on cost along the way.

TO DO TO EAT Christy and the kids always go to the grocery with a list and make choices based on a prior review of the sale ads and coupons clipped before shopping. A great way to dine out is by researching which local restaurants offer “Kids Eat Free Nights.”

Online contests are a great way to score things like free admission to events. The kids always enjoy a trip to the drive-in, and a family of five can go for just about $25. The Kentucky Science Center’s $5 after 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights is an educational and affordable option.

...Out for (Affordable) Fun! Follow all-terrain vehicle guidelines on how to safely ride on them. This photo was set up so everyone is visible — ­ not for safety. (The vehicle was not in motion.) 4 4 4 todaysfamilynow.com 4 4 4www.facebook.com /todaysfamily 4 4 4 @todaysfamilynow 40 JUNE/JULY 2013


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Today's Family magazine  

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