Page 1


84 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

85


CONTENTS: SPRING 2016

18

28

36

20

Directories

4

ORDER BRINGS PEACE

Directories & Facilities by Location

6

GROW YOUR GARDEN ANYWHERE

46 How to Use

By Yelena Sapin

48 Adult Day Care Facilities

50 Aging-in-Place

10

Communities

52 Alzheimer’s Care Facilities

58 Assisted Living Facilities

62 Home Health 69 Independent Living 71 Nursing/Rehab Facilities

77 Personal Care Facilities

79 Helpful Resources

By Tiffany White

ESCAPE THE CLUTTER TRAP

By Amanda Beam

14

WHAT I KNOW NOW

16

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

20

CAREGIVER CIRCLE By Torie Temple

For advertising information, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

2 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

24

YES, YOU CAN GET AWAY

By Mary Ellen Bianco

28

FOOD FOR THOSE YOU LOVE

By Melissa Donald & Anita Oldham

38

YA-YA SISTERS’ SATURDAYS By Connie Meyer

40

FIVE FIRST STEPS FOR NEW CAREGIVERS By Torie Temple

44

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MEDICARE & MEDICAID

56

UPDATES & HAPPENINGS

32

BOOK CLUB

34

WISE & WELL

By Mark Kaelin

78

CAREGIVER WINNER

36

TECH TALK

80

WHAT TO WEAR

DEAR ME

By Madeline Abramson

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR HOSPICE HELPER

By Megan Willman

By Lucy M. Pritchett

By Yelena Sapin

18

22

38

By Anna Patterson & Gioia Patton

By Patti Hartog

By Megan M. Seckman

By Alissa Hicks


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

3


From the Editor Volume 13 / Number 1 PUBLISHER

Cathy S. Zion cathy@todayspublications.com

Order Brings

Peace

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Anita Oldham anita@todayspublications.com EDITOR

Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Lucy M. Pritchett

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com MEDIA ASSOCIATE

Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

B

efore moving into my new home, I couldn’t escape clutter — either because of procrastination or sentimentality. I had old papers, clothes I hadn’t worn in years, and a framed print that had been given to me when I was 16. Instead of hanging it on the wall, my closet became its permanent home, and my other copious piles of stuff went in there too. I wouldn’t have guessed it, but moving made the process of eliminating junk much easier for me to do. I would be living in 800 square feet of space and realized I had to use it wisely. Since moving in October, I’ve focused on bringing items into my home that are functional rather than just take up space. Right now, I don’t have much in my place, but I appreciate the bareness because I’m not rummaging through tons of unnecessary items to get to the things that are necessary. The simplicity of my environment is calming. If getting rid of junk is an unachievable feat for you, read our feature story about downsizing (page 10). You’ll learn about tips for clearing out the clutter and making room for the things that matter.

April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER

Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHY

Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jillian LeMaster officeadmin@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

W. Earl Zion COVER ART

Silvia Cabib TODAY’S TRANSITIONS is published by: Zion Publications LLC

Got something to say? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events. 4 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 TodaysTransitionsNow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. The staff has made good-faith efforts to provide comprehensive and accurate listings in all directories. Information included in the directories is based strictly on that supplied by each entity. Zion Publications does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2016 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

5


Grow Your

GARDEN Anywhere BY YELENA SAPIN

As spring wafts through the air, your green thumbs might start itching to get back into the dirt to plant and weed and nurture life out of the earth and into the warm sunshine. But just because you live in an apartment or in a home without a yard doesn’t mean gardening is beyond your reach.

M

any plants can be cultivated indoors or in containers on a balcony, patio, deck, or porch. With the right tools, a little preparation, and these helpful tips from the pros, you can continue to enjoy a garden no matter how — or where — it grows. THE BASICS Whether they’re outside or on your kitchen windowsill, all plants need light, water, soil, and room to grow. Different varieties of plants need different types and amounts of these resources. Some thrive with just the

bare minimum and are quite happy with benign neglect, while others are more sensitive and shrivel up without your constant vigilance. You’ll get the best results when growing plants whose needs align with the environment and level of care that you’re able — and willing — to provide, says Jessica Pendergrass, president of the Jefferson County Master Gardeners Association. A basic gardening tool kit should include a hand spade or trowel, a pair of gloves, a watering can, good potting soil mix, and appropriate-sized pots, planters, or containers. Some plants like to feel snug; others like to stretch out their roots. Make sure to choose

the right kind of plant for your space and put it in the right-sized container. You’ll also want to keep a stash of old newspapers to protect your surfaces from soil and water when you’re working, Jessica says. INDOOR GARDENING Before you bring home a plant, you have to assess what kind of light you can provide and how much time you’re willing to commit. Jessica suggests starting with low-maintenance philodendrons, Chinese evergreens, spider plants, and snake plants, which thrive in any type of light. Succulents and cacti don’t require much attention either. PAGE 8 >>

CLASSES

Upcoming Garden Events Get your green on with these local gardening opportunities.

Patio Gardening 101: Early Spring Greens April 16,12:30-2:30pm. Create and take home one spring container for a patio or terrace, planted and ready. LOCATION: Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, 6220 Old LaGrange Road, Crestwood, yewdellgardens.org. COST: $45 (members) or $55

6 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Patio Gardening 101 April 30, 10am-4pm (9am for members) and May 1; noon-3pm. Build your own herb or succulent patio container. LOCATION: Yew Dell Botanical Gardens Patio Gardening 101: Container Water Gardens May 14, 12:30-2:30pm. Each participant will take home everything needed to

assemble a container water garden. LOCATION: Yew Dell Botanical Gardens COST: $55 (members) or $65

PLANT SALES Gardenaganza! April 24, 10am-4pm. Jefferson County Master Gardener Association LOCATION: Louisville Nature Center (3745 Illinois Avenue), jcmgaky.org


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

7


<< PAGE 6

Decorative bamboo will even grow in a container with just some rocks and water. If you want to eat the fruits of your labors, you can start with rosemary, thyme, oregano, basil, and other herbs. Most edibles require more light and water than the hardier house plants, however, so you’ll need to provide a sunny window and a more humid environment. A large array of food plants can be grown indoors: green onions, microgreens, lettuces, eggplants, peppers, carrots, beans, and compact varieties of tomatoes, for starters. More experienced gardeners can also cultivate fig, citrus, and dwarf fruit trees in the home, but getting them to actually bear fruit can take a bit of effort. CONTAINER GARDENING When it comes to putting together your outdoor container garden, the sky’s the limit. Literally, because the amount and type of sunlight available — full, partial, direct, or indirect — determines what you can plant, says Yew Dell Botanical Gardens marketing director Jackie Gulbe. Depending on the light, however, you can grow pretty much anything in pots and planters: herbs, vegetables, annuals and perennials, succulents, small trees, and topiary shrubs. In areas without much sun exposure, a shade or water garden can create a cool and welcoming oasis.

PLANT SALES (continued) Yew Dell Botanical Gardens Plant Sale April 30, 10am-4pm (9am for members) and May 1; noon-3pm Free with regular admission GARDEN TOURS The Kilgore House & Garden Tour May 21 & 22, 10am-5pm.

Tips for Safer Gardening • Use plant stands and elevated planters to raise your garden to a more comfortable height. • Choose containers and pots made of lightweight plastic instead of terra cotta or cement. • Use smaller pots and containers to make them easier to move when filled with soil, or place on rolling bases. • Look for padded and ergonomically designed tools that are gentler on arthritic hands. • Use a hose to water plants to avoid multiple trips to the faucet with a heavy watering can. • Keep your garden area free of clutter to minimize tripping hazards.

Timing is another factor to consider. Some plants can survive outdoors in cooler weather, but most vegetables, herbs, and other potted edibles need warmer temperatures. In general, you don’t want to put anything outside until the last freeze is over. After Derby is a good rule of thumb, says Jessica, but if the weather is still chilly, it might be better to wait another couple of weeks. Roots are very sensitive to temperature fluctuations, and containers don’t provide much insulation. Peppers and tomatoes, in particular, should not be outside before June. OTHER OPPORTUNITIES For more hands-on experience, you can volunteer at the Yew Dell Botanical Gardens (yewdellgardens. org) and work alongside the garden manager. “There’s always something to do out here, and we welcome involvement at any skill level,” Jackie says. To tend an outdoor plot of your own, you can apply for membership in one of the many community gardens sponsored by schools, churches, or other organizations. Louisville Grows (louisvillegrows.org) runs the People’s Garden in Shawnee and the Shippingport Memorial Garden in Portland. The Jefferson County Extension Office manages 11 community gardens throughout the Louisville area (see full list at jefferson.ca.uky.edu/ horticulture_communitygardens).

Featuring six of Louisville’s premier gardens along with three beautiful homes. kilgoregardentour.org The 22nd Annual Crescent Hill Garden Tour June 4. Featuring a number of private gardens in the historic Crescent Hill neighborhood. crescenthillgardentour.org

8 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

the nation’s largest Victorian residential neighborhood. oldlouisvillegardentour.com

The Old Louisville Hidden Treasures Garden Tour June 11 & 12, 10am-5pm Garden lovers can venture into the private green spaces of

The Audubon Park Annual Garden Tour June 25, 10am-4pm. Features the hidden beauty of local gardens in the City of Audubon Park. audubonparkky.org


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

9


Escape the

Clutter Trap How to let go of the things you don’t need and simplify your life BY AMANDA BEAM

Three years ago, Adele Vinsel felt overwhelmed. In her 80s, the Louisville resident knew she had made the right decision to move into an independent living facility. Her change in residence would provide a sense of community and safety, something she craved. Deciding what to bring with her to these much smaller living quarters, though, would become an issue. Adele needed to downsize. “I knew I had to do it because I was compromised,” Adele, now 85, says. “I didn’t really have room to bring all of it.” More and more in today’s world, seniors are deciding to make do with less. Like Adele, circumstances force some to part ways with their beloved belongings. Others may crave a simpler lifestyle, one without the hassle of an untidy home. PAGE 12 >>

10 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

11


<< PAGE 10

I

n either situation, sorting through papers, mementos and household goods can be stressful mentally as well as physically. Through their business Staging Your Next Move (stagingyournextmove.com), co-founders Lynn Medeiros and Kathi Jaggers want to help reduce this anxiety by decluttering both homes and lives. “It makes your life simpler,” Lynn says. “We’re always bringing things into our houses, but try and think about how much goes out of the house. No matter what age you are, we should all be looking at our items and trying to discard them.” On oxygen and unable to pack or prepare on her own, Adele hired the pair to assist in her move. “I just knew I couldn’t do this without some help,” she says. “These two young, wonderful women came and they just did an absolutely beautiful job, plus they made it fun.” For Lynn and Kathi, making the process fun is only the beginning. In addition to hiring movers, staging homes for sale, and creating custom space plans, the women assist their clients in purging unneeded belongings. And through the years, they’ve offered invaluable advice to those who require a little help in trimming down their households. “We’re just there to make sure it happens and to take that stress off of them,” Kathi says. “They’ve got too much other stuff on their mind. We can take that piece away.” But how do you start ridding yourself of your prized possessions? Lynn and Kathi suggest starting small. Go through a drawer of that dresser in the spare room of your

“Getting rid of an item doesn’t take the memory away.”

12 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

basement. Begin sorting through just one of the old boxes stored from your last move. “Some people say they can’t do it because it’s too overwhelming and they can’t get started,” Kathi says. “Take baby steps and do just a little bit.” “And once they do it once, you know what? They want to do some more,” Lynn adds. “Usually, it lights a fire, and they just go on. It’s great.” Once you get started, what happens if you can’t decide what you should and should not part with? First and foremost, the partners recommend that you ask yourself if the item in question brings you joy. Also, do you truly need it? If not, then why should it take up valuable space in your home? For many people, objects with sentimental value are the toughest to discard. Our knick-knacks, no matter their price tag, can invoke powerful recollections. That antique butter churn in the attic might bring back feelings of your grandmother’s old kitchen, but do you really require it to keep her memory alive? Not necessarily. “The biggest thing we remind [our clients] is just because you get rid of an item, the memory is still there,” Kathi says. “Getting rid of the item doesn’t take the memory away.” But what about giving away gifts? Some imagine that the person who gave the present might be offended if you donate it elsewhere, no matter how long you have owned it. Don’t worry about insulting anyone, Kathi advises. You enjoyed the gift when you had it. Permission isn’t needed to let it go. “It was all about the giving,” she says. “And once the giving is over, now it’s yours and you can do with it as you please. You don’t have to hang on to it just because a special person gave it to you.”

So, you’ve effectively gone through your abode and found a plethora of objects to eliminate. What do you do now? That’s up to each individual. Selling, consigning, or auctioning the objects are always options, as well as donating pieces to charities. After considering these possibilities, throwing away items can also be used as a last resort. “Primarily, if the person can sell it and make money, that’s ideal,” Lynn says. “You have to take a look at what you have, what kind of condition it’s in, and how much of it you have before you can determine the best scenario.” Adele handed down some of her furniture and other keepsakes to her children and grandchildren. But not all family members might be as open to receiving these gifts as in previous generations. “We’ve come to find out that kids these days do not want all of their parents’ stuff,” Lynn says. “Times have changed, and kids just want to live a simpler life. They don’t want everything the parents think they want. I’ve seen it time after time after time.” When all is said and done, those who have downsized report positive feedback. “When you get too much stuff around you, it really weighs you down,” Kathi says. “And so, it takes a lot of energy to just walk into those rooms where you have packed things away. Once we get through those rooms, you can just see the clients’ shoulders rise, and their smiles, and they’re just amazed.” Adele agrees, providing her own encouragement for folks who want to simplify their lives. “You can do it. You just have to bite the bullet,” she says. “You’ve just got to move on. That’s the way it goes. That’s the way life is. And you can’t live in the past, that’s for sure.”


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

13


WHAT I KNOW NOW

Jane Starr

Jane Starr has embodied her mantra of ‘Be Peace‘ in her 30-year career as a psychiatric registered nurse and in her other roles as a health care connector, faith community volunteer, and activist. She currently focuses her energies on issues of aging, elder transition, and end-of-life planning. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

What was your greatest loss, and how did you get through it?

My father died of a cardiac arrest when I was 12. He was at home, and only my mother and I were there when it happened. The grief I felt taught me how important friendships are, and I am grateful for the emotional support of my teachers and our minister and his wife. His death and the aftermath really affected my faith journey. What were your plans for yourself?

I would have preferred to be a medical doctor, but I didn’t know how I would manage that career, marriage, and children. I had no one to model that for me. What motivates you now?

The desire to be a bridge connecting others for the purpose of being an agent of change. I do this by being a health coach and doing volunteer work in the community. I connect people and ideas. What did you learn from your mother?

Perseverance and compassion. How did being a mom affect you?

It is the best learning lab for

understanding what it is to be human. My children (son Chris, daughter Jennifer) have taught me so much and have become my counselors at this stage of my life. What experience should every woman have?

A spiritual retreat. What woman had a lasting influence on you?

Dr. Dianna Moore. She is a feminist theologian and clinical pastoral therapist who now lives and practices in Colorado Springs. I met her here in the ’70s when she was a student at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. She was an activist and was very insightful about the world and the human condition. She introduced me to the writings of Thomas Merton. How do you motivate others?

By listening and helping them identify what they think they can do and affirming that. By empowering them to do what they are ready to do. How do you end a relationship?

Have a celebration with friends to reframe the transition to a new beginning rather than the loss. Bring

14 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Jane is a certified integrative health coach and a member of Kentuckiana Holistic Nurses Association.

people together who love, honor, and support you. When should a woman take a political stand?

Ideally, she should stay informed and be part of the political process throughout her life. What do women often overlook?

The importance of self-care over the continuum of life. Body, mind, and spirit. What books have influenced you?

The Bible. No Man Is An Island by Thomas Merton. Why Am I Afraid to Tell You Who I Am by John Powell. A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle.

What skill should every woman have?

She should have her own toolbox of tools and know how to use them. What have you learned about yourself?

That I need to be better disciplined and organized with my time. Do you have a pet peeve?

The hysteria and misunderstanding generated by the media. We don’t hear enough about the good things that happen, the successes, the positive stories. What is an important issue facing America today?

Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring inspires me more than anything else. It brings up a sense of hope and new beginnings.

The lack of understanding and insight about mental health. We all have maladaptive behaviors, but we fixate on the tragedies of isolated events. We don’t look within. We all need to be part of a group of people that will let us learn compassion for each other.

What advice would you give to the younger you?

The world would be a better place...

What piece of music speaks to you?

Be in the now. Develop a practice of meditation.

If we all slowed down and took deep breaths.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

15


! d l O g n i t t e G k Hec

It’s PROBLEM:

BY YELENA SAPIN

ed to don’t work the way they us es di bo r ou en wh r fo ns Solutio

Ear and Nose Hair

M

en often wish they had more hair. Nature gives them what they want as they get older, but not quite where they want it. Once they hit middle age, men tend to find unsightly hair sprouting on and in the ears, says Dana Barker, manager of the U.S. Highway 42 location of Fritz Salon & Spa for Men. Nose hair, which can make an appearance at any age, is less discriminating and can poke out from women’s nostrils just as often as from men’s. No matter where it strikes, however, there are some simple ways to tame the hairy beast.

PROBLEM:

Constipation

W

e may not like to think about it, and we certainly don’t like to talk about it, but maintaining a regular, comfortable bathroom routine is important to our health and well-being. Constipation and hard bowel movements can cause bloating, bleeding, and be a symptom of something else going on. While what’s normal varies greatly from person to person, any sudden change of bowel habits is a red flag that should be discussed with your primary care doctor, says Norton Healthcare gastroenterologist Dr. Rajesh Joseph.

16 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

SOLUTION:

DIY Methods

SOLUTION:

Salon Services

Armed with good lighting, a magnifying mirror, and maybe a willing partner who can see into places you can’t, you can safely groom your ears and nostrils with one of many personal ear and nose hair trimmers available on the market. For better access and visibility into the nostrils, tilt your head up and push up on the tip of your nose. Stubborn strays can be handled with tweezers, but plucking will definitely bring tears to your eyes, Barker warns. Just stay away from scissors, since it’s easy to nick sensitive areas.

The most effective way to remove unwelcome ear and nose hair is with a professional wax. It only takes an extra 10 minutes during your salon visit, and the results last several weeks, Barker says. Waxing the outside of the ears is accomplished the same way as waxing the eyebrows; a waxing stick tipped with a special hard wax is used for getting into the nostrils and around the ear canal. The process removes the hair all in one move and isn’t nearly as painful as tweezing the hairs one by one.

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Your first step is to drink more water. Stay away from sugary drinks and aim for eight to 10 glasses of water a day. Eat a well-balanced diet, get regular exercise, and increase your intake of fruits and vegetables — their naturally occurring sugars, especially in the old standbys of prunes, raisins, and prune juice, have a laxative effect. Coffee and tea can also stimulate your bowels, but too much fiber (a bulking agent) can actually worsen bloating and constipation, Joseph cautions. Work with your doctor or nutritionist to tweak your diet.

When natural remedies aren’t enough to offer relief, ask your doctor about medications that are safe for you. Common overthe-counter stool softeners can help make bathroom visits easier and more comfortable, and laxatives can expedite the process and make it more efficient. There are also some newer remedies available by prescription. To rule out any physical obstructions or more serious conditions, your doctor may refer you to a gastroenterologist for a more in-depth evaluation.

Natural Remedies

Medication


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

17


DEAR ME:

Advice you’d give your younger self

Dear 23-year-old Madeline, Congratulations! On August 17, 1978, you were awarded your associate degree in paralegal studies from the University of Louisville. You earned this degree while working and living on your own. Your plan was to continue studying to earn a Bachelor of Liberal Studies. At the end of 1979, you decided to take a semester off. Well, that “semester off ” lasted more than 30 years. There were attempts over the years to get back on track. You took a class here and there, but somehow, life — both the good and bad things — always seemed to get in the way. Finally, in 2011, thanks to the support and encouragement of Dr. Jay McGowan and Maureen McGowan of Bellarmine University, you began to get serious about completing the task. You had spent many years as an adult telling young people about the importance of education. But you regretted not earning your bachelor’s degree. After meeting with Dr. Carole Pfeffer at Bellarmine, you started thinking, “Maybe I can do this.” It was a challenge. Your technology skills were not those of your average college student. The last time you made a class presentation, you used index cards. Now you were expected to prepare PowerPoint presentations, submit work on Blackboard, and more. You came home after the first day of class and said to your son, Sidney, “I can’t do this!” He was a freshman at Bellarmine at the time. He

18 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

“You had spent many years as an adult telling young people about the importance of education. But you regretted not earning your bachelor’s degree.” said something to the effect of, “Relax, Mom. I’ll help you,” and he did help. You learned how to create pie charts on the computer and various other mysterious tasks. All the while, you received constant enthusiastic encouragement from your husband, Jerry, whom I am sure did not expect to have both a wife and son in college at the same time ($$$). Finally, your family and friends celebrated with you on December 18, 2013, when you were presented with your Bachelor of Arts from Bellarmine University.

If I could go back to 1979, I would tell you, “STICK WITH IT, NO MATTER HOW TOUGH IT GETS!” You don’t want to end up like I did and be the only person in your statistics class who had to wear cheater glasses to see the buttons on her graphing calculator!

Love, Madeline Abramson Community volunteer and former Louisville Metro First Lady


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

19


Caregiver

CIRCLE BY TORIE TEMPL

E

Calm and Collected

Cheryl Hepp Basham, retired project manager with the tech department at Jefferson County Public Schools, got creative to keep her loved one relaxed. “I kept a list of activities based on past interests for occasions when my mom would become agitated or frustrated,” she says. “For example, I had a plastic tub that contained gardening materials such as potting soil, plastic cups, gloves, seeds, a trowel, and a plastic cloth. This could be used to plant vegetables or flower seeds for indoors.”

BOOK IT 4

Gretchen Houchin, program director at Nazareth Home, suggests taking some time to read The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementia, and Memory Loss. This book by experts Nancy Mace and Peter Rabins is filled with the latest information on causes of dementia, how to deal with problems that arise in daily care, and how to get outside support. It’s a great instructional guide for new caregivers. 20 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Strategies for Daily Hygiene Keeping up with your loved one’s regular hygiene can be a challenge. Follow this tip from Denise Peak, speech pathologist at Floyd Memorial Hospital’s Home Health, to make grooming manageable. “I lay things out in their reach and allow them to do as much as possible on their own, then I assist,” she says. “Trimming toenails is a problem, so I have a podiatrist take care of that, and Medicare may pay for this service.”

Log On for Help There are infinite resources on the Internet for both new and experienced caregivers. As a caregiver herself, Lucy Martin, UPS IT manager, uses the Alzheimer's Association of Kentucky and Indiana as her goto resource. With a Web page for caregivers, a 24hour hotline, and a complete overview of dementia, this site offers a one-stop resource shop. alz.org/kyin/

R.E.S.P.E.C.T. As a caregiver, making choices for your loved one could be a daily occurrence. But Janice Baldon-Gutter, instructor of higher education and caregiver, gives an important reminder to show respect. “Treat everyone as respected adults...not children,” she says. “You may now be the one making the final decisions for their safety and wellbeing, but show them dignity and respect by at least informing the loved one what is going to happen, when, and why. Of course, get their input too. Their perspective could surprise you and help you make better final decisions on their behalf.”


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

21


10 Questions to Ask Your

Hospice Helper BY MEGAN S. WILLMAN

My rather businesslike approach to life came in handy when it was time to consider hospice care for my parents. But nothing takes away from the emotional aspects of that moment. What helped me was not only the clear-cut approach but also the compassion (I was so thankful for that!) that I found in hospice care. Because planning ahead helps all of us, I appreciated the opportunity to discuss some hospice basics with an expert in the field: Terri Graham, senior vice president and chief clinical officer of Hosparus Louisville. 1. Are hospice agencies licensed?

Hospice agencies are licensed by the state to provide hospice care and also are certified by Medicare. 2. What services are provided?

Hospice care is for the patient and the family and is provided by a team of professionals and volunteers. The team includes the patient’s personal physician, hospice agency physician, registered nurse, social worker, certified nursing assistant, grief counselor, spiritual counselor, and volunteers. Care and services provided include: • Control and management of symptoms such as pain, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and restlessness • Medication management • Personal care such as bathing, skin care, and light housekeeping • Counseling, psychosocial and emotional support, and spiritual care • Bereavement services such as individual, group, and family counseling Hospice will also provide durable medical equipment, supplies, medications, and treatments that are necessary. 3. When is it time to consider hospice?

Anyone with a life-limiting illness 22 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

may be eligible for hospice services. Referrals to hospice can come from a physician or from the individual’s family. It doesn’t mean people are giving up when they select hospice care, but instead means they are selecting to have the best life possible in whatever time is remaining. Hospice care never hastens death or shortens life. Some patients actually improve under hospice care and are discharged because they are no longer eligible. 4. Where does hospice care happen?

All hospice services are delivered wherever a patient calls home, such as a personal or family residence, an assisted living facility, or a nursing home. Additionally, services may be delivered in a hospice inpatient unit or a hospital.

5. What payment options are there?

Medicare, Medicaid, and many insurance plans cover 100 percent of hospice services. The benefit coverage generally provides for related medication, medical equipment, and supplies.

6. What kind of support is available?

The hospice team teaches the family what they need to know to participate in caring for the patient, such as how to

administer medications or how to bathe or reposition the patient for comfort. The social worker can help family members identify strategies for support, coping, and self-care to ensure they maintain their own strength and energy. The chaplain will assist in these areas too, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support and help the family members prepare for and manage grief. The hospice team also helps guide and prepare children and teens for the loss of a loved one. 7. How involved is the patient and the family in the process?

The hospice team will talk to the patient and family about their goals and wishes, as well as any problems or needs they may have. This is called the plan of care, which is continuously reviewed and adjusted during the team’s visits to evaluate how well the actions are working. 8. How often will the hospice team check on the patient? What if something happens over the weekend or at night?

The plan of care will determine the frequency of routine visits by the team and will change as the patient's needs change. Hospice agencies have staff available at night and on weekends to address urgent or unanticipated needs. 9. How long is a hospice care contract?

Patients are eligible for hospice care as long as they continue to meet the criteria for life-limiting illness. A patient’s stay is often several weeks to months but may be longer. If the patient’s condition improves and they no longer meet the criteria for a life-limiting illness, the team would work with the patient on a discharge plan from hospice care. Additionally, a patient may decide they no longer want hospice services and may elect to revoke the hospice benefit. 10. What happens once the loved one passes?

In addition to family support services described above, bereavement services such as grief counseling are available to the family following the death.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

23


Yes! You Can

Get Away

Planning a vacation for someone with special needs can seem daunting, but it is possible to take a trip to refresh and relax with your loved one. BY MARY ELLEN BIANCO

I

n 2013, Katherine Autin and her husband, David, who has Parkinson’s disease, hoped to go to Europe to visit France, Greece, Italy, and Turkey. They turned to local travel agent Vicky Spencer-Rouse, who specializes in organizing travel details for those with accessibility challenges. “With Vicky’s help, we were able to go,” Katherine says. “We wouldn’t have traveled for 21 days without her.” Eight years ago, Vicky started Special Needs Vacation by V, drawing from her experience of traveling with her mother, who had Parkinson’s, and with her children with special needs. Vicky herself also has sight and hearing challenges. “I’m passionate about planning vacations for others — even multigenerational trips,” Vicky says. “Doctors can’t predict the human potential. With a little bit of help and support, it’s possible.” Vicky and Katherine met through previous involvement with the Parkinson Support Center of Kentuckiana, as Katherine works as a consultant and patient advocate for clients who are living with Parkinson’s. “We reconnected about five years ago, so I was very comfortable turning over the logistics to Vicky,” Katherine says.

24 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Before the trip: Prepare and organize Katherine and David discussed the trip with his doctor, including what vaccinations were needed for the areas of travel. They set emergency plans in place. From past experience, Katherine knew that the staff at U.S. embassies could help them find a doctor or hospital if needed. She also checked the State Department website for areas with epidemics or terrorism threats and The World Health Organization (WHO) website for disease outbreak news two months before the trip. The couple made copies of prescriptions, legal documents (will, health care surrogates, living will), computer codes, and passwords to leave in a secure location at home.

Vicky says accessibility is the priority for booking lodging. For trips such as attending a family reunion or wedding, she encourages staying at a hotel. “It’s the key to success — you can stay close to the action, but you can choose your time and place to rest,” she says. Vicky often asks for a picture of the hotel to see if the room is on the first floor or if there is an elevator for those who require wheelchair access. “Especially in Europe, we needed to know in advance,” Katherine says. “Also, it’s much better to have a shower instead of a tub.” Vicky says she’s also found that fall and spring vacations are better for adults since temperatures are more moderate.

PAGE 26 >>


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

25


<< PAGE 24

Both women encourage the primary caregiver to have others travel with them for support. “Our son, Michael, travels with us, along with a couple who are dear friends of ours,” Katherine says. “They know how to give David his medication and monitor his needs, which can change moment by moment. I get a little bit of respite now and From right: David and Katherine Autin, their son Michael, and friend Nancy Peck in Paris. Katherine recommends that then.” Getting a group primary caregivers have others travel with them and their designation on airline loved ones for support. tickets helped them get through security together, make sure that they have a level of and they purchased travel insurance and stability so that emergencies are not thought ahead about how to carry and likely to occur.” She says it’s about trying protect their personal items and money. to have the experience. “It’s turning ‘I On the trip: Rest and enjoy While traveling, having a checklist is a priority for Katherine. She includes hotel contact information in case plans change. By organizing everything ahead of time, David is relieved of decisions once the travel goals are discussed. “David is comfortable traveling with me because of my knowledge of his disease,” Katherine says. “He says it’s important to plan downtime, whether it’s going out to dinner or sitting by the pool.” While the Autins were on a cruise ship during part of their European trip, Vicky had a needle disposal box delivered to the cabin since David gets daily injections. “Cruise ships are very accommodating,” Vicky says. “I can also have a wheelchair delivered to the cabin if needed.” When planning activities to do while on the trip, Vicky focuses on the main goal of leisure. “I ask my clients what their special needs are so I can get to know them,” she says. “After that, we

26 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

can’t’ into ‘how can I?’ It’s the mindset, and it helps to have something to look forward to. I really want the whole family to have special moments.” Whether Vicky’s clients want to see a Broadway play or try a variety of food, they can guide the situation. Vicky also suggests her clients take something familiar from home such as a pillow or blanket. A DVD or music can also provide comfort and relaxation. “We would bring the movie Grease when we traveled with my mother,” she says. Katherine adds that it’s important to laugh a lot when traveling. “David inspires me every day,” she says. “And I know that we wouldn’t have done these things without Vicky.” Vicky and Katherine have since planned other vacations, including a 19-day trip last fall to the western United States and Canada. “We have a bucket list of places where David wants to go,” Katherine says.

Be Prepared

Katherine and Vicky suggest that you have things ready before you go. Medication: Order in advance so you’ll have more than you need. Also, research how to dispose of items such as extra vials, needles, and alcohol wipes while on the trip. Phones: Does your plan cover calls and texts outside of the U.S.? Will you have service? Things to bring: • Extra glasses and contacts • Batteries for hearing aids • Washcloths to moisten and use to cool off • Extension cord for scooter or power chair • Protein-rich snacks such as nuts, cheese, and crackers • Water bottle with filter • Straws • Toilet paper and wet wipes • Clothes and shoes that are easy to change (Katherine travels with a small shoe horn) • Power converters—may differ in each country • Anti-theft pockets and neck pouches for ID, money, and medical cards (and copies in each other’s wallets) • Lightweight purse with pockets, inserts and a strong strap that can’t be cut Katherine and Vicky planned the first annual Parkinson’s Creativity Cruise out of Tampa, Florida, from March 3-7. Informal discussions on disease management were offered, as well as creative activities such as jewelry making. David Autin published a book of poetry and facilitated a workshop on poetry and journaling.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

27


These glass containers are the best thing we found for individual servings. Plastic containers are fine, but make sure they are microwave safe and will freeze well. Also, Reynolds has come out with some new cardboard disposable containers called Heat & Eat that can be frozen and microwaved.

Food for Those You Love BY MELISSA DONALD & ANITA OLDHAM PHOTOS MELISSA DONALD

W

hen you are helping someone, treating them with food is a natural response. Treats and comfort food can add to the mental and physical healing of those who are going through pain. However, things change when you realize there is a need to Simplify help with regular meals dinner for your for someone you love. loved one using Locally, there are one of these many places where meal ideas. you can order or pick up meals (featured in previous issues of Today’s Transitions — go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com), but we wanted to offer some meal ideas you can prepare at home for your loved one. Don’t worry so much about offering variety; these meals offer nutritional balance, delicious tastes, and easy-to-eat foods. One of the keys is to make sure the food is in individual servings versus dropping off a large casserole, because a large amount of food is overwhelming and gets old. Also in this example, you can make several meals at a time and then deliver them once or twice a week to your loved one. Once you discover which foods they find especially tasty, you could modify the items in the meals.

Step 1: Find the right containers. Delivering food to someone for a few days requires some thought. You want the food to be in individual portions and look appetizing. And, the containers should be able to be microwaved and run through the dishwasher.

Meal 2: Chicken, broccoli, and brown rice

Step 2: Decide on some basic food items and do the grocery shopping. We are introducing you to three meals that taste great with some seasonings. MEAL 1 • Chicken breast

MEAL 2 • Chicken breast

MEAL 3 • Ground beef

• Sweet potatoes

• Brown rice

• Red pepper

• Zucchini

• Broccoli

• Frozen green beans

(3-4 oz per meal) (½ medium-size per meal) (½ medium-size per meal)

(3-4 oz per meal)

(½-¾ cup per meal) (1 cup per meal)

(3-4 oz per meal) (⅓ per meal) (1 cup per meal)

• Red peppers

(⅓ pepper per meal)

28 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

PAGE 30 >>


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

29


<< PAGE 28

Completed Big Little Meal: Chicken Latin Veracruz with brown rice

If You Want to Make Fresh Meal 1: Chicken with sweet potato, red pepper, and zucchini

Step 3: Prepare the food. A great way to make a week’s worth of meals is to do all the preparation at one time. You can make a week of meals for your loved one and maybe some for your own family’s busy nights. • Chicken — Sprinkle with your desired seasonings. We really liked it sprinkled with Kosher salt, pepper, and a squeeze of a lemon. Another good one is Trader Joe’s Everyday Seasoning (which is good on everything!). But you can use any seasonings. Bake for 30 minutes (until juices flow clear). • Crumble and fry hamburger until done. • Bake or microwave sweet potatoes and cut into rounds. • Cook brown rice according to directions. • Dice red peppers into small pieces. • Cut up zucchini or spiralize for an even prettier look. • Microwave or steam green beans. • Microwave or steam broccoli.

If your loved one prefers preparing a fresh meal, or you would like to prepare a fresh meal with someone and eat it with them, Fresh Market, 10480 Shelbyville Road, offers something called Big Little Meals every Thursday. You can pick up all the ingredients for a couple of different preplanned meals (they change each week) including prechopped veggies and sauce and make it at home. The price is cheaper than if you bought all the ingredients separately. We tried one of the recent meals, and it took about 45 minutes to make because of the brown rice, but it was healthful and flavorful.

Step 4: Measure out food into individual containers. Refrigerate and deliver to your loved one. The food should be eaten within the week. If longer, you can freeze the meals. You can add salt or butter to additionally season the food or even a sweet treat or two for desserts for the week. Grapes or cut-up fruit work well, too. Fresh Market Big Little Meal ingredients for Chicken Latin Veracruz

30 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

31


BOOK CLUB: PAGE TURNERS

Catching Up Here’s what other area clubs are reading next:

From the book:

“In a war that you cannot win, you don’t want a general who fights to the point of total annihilation. You don’t want Custer. You want Robert E. Lee, someone who knows how to fight for territory that can be won and how to surrender when it can’t.” (Regarding the question of continuing a harsh health treatment for little gain)

PAGE TURNERS

WHEN: 1st Wed. of each month WHERE: Members’ homes CONTACT: Teresa McLeland tmcleland@twc.com

CARMICHAEL’S COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB Voracious by Vara Nicolletti Contact: Corin Hindenach info@carmichaels.com

Have you read this? STORY & PHOTOS BY PATTI HARTOG

The Page Turners book club was wrapping up its discussion of Being Mortal by Atul Gawande, and the conversation turned to the origins of the group. By best recollection, this group came together in 2002 and has a record of each month’s book selection dating back to 2004. Membership stands at 15, with only one of the original members still in the group due to moves and changing schedules. Many of these women are moms who met during their children’s school activities, and they have continued their relationships through the book club long after their children graduated from high school. We asked Kelly Colomb, who chose and facilitated the discussion of this month’s selection, a few questions about Being Mortal. What did you learn from the book? Being Mortal is a clear-eyed, compassionate, thought-provoking book about aging and terminal illness. One theme is that the medical system and many elder care facilities often fail in helping people live out their lives in meaningful ways. It describes the doctor we all need: someone who knows her patient’s wishes and can guide them to choose the best path near life’s end. How did it change your thinking? It radically transformed the way I think about aging and dying. One of the crucial messages is about “hard conversations.” We should all talk honestly with our loved ones and ourselves about what we value most and how we want to 32 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

SEVEN GUYS AND A GAL The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother by James McBride Contact: Larry Hartog larryhartog@twc.com

live out our remaining days. You may discover that what you want for your mom is not what she wants. Then we use the information from the discussion to help our loved ones live the best life possible. We need to have these discussions well before a crisis arises. What did it bring to mind? It brings to mind my mother. Most of us past a certain age know someone who is facing the challenges of how to best live life with the effects of aging or terminal illness. My mother is dealing with illness, and so I read this book from that perspective. I feel better prepared to help her and my family after reading this book. I would recommend it to everyone I know.

WOMEN, WINE AND WORDS The Light Between the Oceans by M.I. Stedman Contact: Marilyn Faulkenburg mjfaulkenburg@aol.com


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

33


Wise&Well

Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet

t a h t f f o t Dus ! e v o l g l l softba

BY MARK KAELIN

35

— percent of diabetics have attended a formal education program on how to manage diabetes, according to registered nurse Ronda Merryman-Valiyi of Baptist East Hospital. To address this, Baptist now offers diabetes education classes where you can learn about medication management, meal planning, exercise, and how to prevent complications for this complex, chronic disease. To learn more, contact the Diabetes Management Program at 502.897.8831. Screening Location: Baptist Health Eastpoint, 2400 Eastpoint Parkway

Registration is starting now for the spring season of senior softball leagues. “Last year we had 14 teams in our over-60 and over-70 leagues,” says Al Benninger, Metro Parks senior league director. The league even had a traveling team for players in their 80s. For additional information about league play, call 502.458.7727.

MEN: HOW TO KEEP YOUR LEVELS UP

Every month is heart month! Fitness Five screenings at Baptist Health EastPoint are one way you can increase your heart-health knowledge. You can find out your estimated 10-year coronary heart disease risk and get one-on-one counseling with a nurse practitioner. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 502.897.8888. 34 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Testosterone levels naturally decrease as we age. Keep in mind though that diet and lifestyle play a huge role in maintaining peak levels. “For the aging male to preserve testosterone, he needs lots of exercise, lots of good food, and lots of good sleep,” says Bryant Stamford, professor of kinesiology and integrative physiology at Hanover College.

Walk and learn Starting in April, physicians with KentuckyOne Health will be leading walks at Bernheim Forest on the second Saturday of each month to provide exercise and educate about health topics. For specific information on dates and times, visit kentuckyonehealth.org/walkwithadoc.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

35


TECH TALK

TV Tech Tricks Tweak your television for optimal viewing pleasure BY MEGAN M. SECKMAN

A

ccording to the Nielsen media ratings report, seniors watch more TV than any other demographic in America. In fact, those over age 65 watch an average of 50 hours and 34 minutes each week. But as eyesight and hearing begin their inevitable deterioration, TV viewing can become increasingly frustrating. Let’s keep it simple with a few suggestions meant to enhance the viewing performance of America’s television enthusiasts.

Trouble with sight? Try a larger TV. How’s that for simple? High-definition TVs (HDTV) work best in a 42-inch or larger set. The closed-captioning becomes crisper so you can actually read the subtitles, and the overall picture quality will help you see what’s on the screen. Buy a universal remote with larger buttons. Large-button remotes are specifically geared toward seniors who might be squinting to see the volume button and include a minimalist design (who needs more than volume and channel, anyway?).

Trouble with installation? If you buy your new gadgets at Best Buy, you can also hire the services of The Geek Squad. These experts can help with home theater installation, remote control setup, TV repair, and can teach you to use your new system.

36 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Trouble with sound? Andy Strelsov of Andy’s TV Sales and Service of St. Matthews says he has a constant stream of customers concerned with hard-to-hear sound in their televisions. “These are not just seniors — everyone is asking the same question: ‘Why can’t I hear my TV?’” he says. “It’s a real problem when people can’t hear, but the truth is that nothing’s wrong with the television. That is why the industry created soundbars: the speakers on TVs simply aren’t strong enough.” Soundbars are slim speaker boxes that include stereo speakers and a built-in amplifier within one streamlined device. The small, thin speaker creates amplification and surround sound, making TV sound quality crisper and fuller. If soundbars sound intriguing to you, Andy’s advice is to keep it simple. “There is so much possibility out there,” he says. “You buy

something new, bring it home, and then you don’t know how to use it because it’s too complicated. Ask questions and don’t buy a gimmick.” Soundbars aid in channeling sound by amplifying both high and low frequencies lost when using conventional speakers, but if you’re concerned with disturbing your partner or neighbors, then try headphones, which work the same way. Overthe-ear headphones provide the best sound quality and comfort. Headphones can be plugged into the headphone jack of many mid-sized TVs. This will help to drown out ambient sound and to keep the rest of your house quiet for others. Wireless headphones eliminate the “being chained to your TV” feeling but need to be charged daily. These work through your TV’s Bluetooth connection.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

37


Connie’s World

Ya-Ya Sisters’ Saturdays

O

ne of life’s greatest gifts is friendship. I celebrate this special gift every Saturday morning with girlfriends. It started close to 20 years ago with my writing friend Penny. We discovered we both liked going to yard sales, so we began meeting early on Saturday at my house for breakfast. I would cook, and since I am directionally challenged, Penny would drive. Before you know it, we expanded. My youngest son had his first steady girlfriend for about three years. When they broke up, I could not bear to break up with her mother, Benita. Benita loved yard sales, and she soon started joining Penny and me on Saturday mornings. As the years passed, my next door neighbor Sandi became a regular. We named ourselves the Ya-Ya Yard Sale Sisters, and Saturdays became sacred. I would talk about the Ya-Ya Sisters with other groups of friends. Occasionally we would have Saturday morning visitors. Some of my tennis friends came for breakfast on occasion, and I once had a special dinner just so the Ya-Ya Sisters could meet my church friends. The girl I teach kindergarten with was a special guest one week. The overlapping of friendships was inevitable. My tennis friend Bonnie became a regular followed by another tennis friend, Amelia. Bonnie now helps Penny with the driving. Our most recent attendee is another dear neighbor, Janice, who lost her husband just a year ago. When Penny and I first started going to yard sales, we loved the thrill of the hunt. Some treasured find was always finding us. Now that we’re in our 60s, the last thing any of us needs is more stuff, so we use the yard sales more for supplying children and grandchildren with much-needed items than finding something for ourselves. 38 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

OFFICIAL TEST FOR YA-YA YARD SALE MEMBERSHIP 1. What do you do when you feel a yard sale item you want is priced too high? a. Pay it without question because their stuff looks really good. b. Say in a loud voice to Benita and Penny, “Hey, this stuff is so overpriced, we might as well go to the Goodwill store.” c. Quietly hand it to Benita because you are too chicken to ask for a lower price. (Try to conceal the smile on your face when Benita gets it for half the asking price.) 2. How do you know when a yard sale is going to be good? a. Everything is crammed into old boxes with broken-down exercise equipment nearby. The sellers are dragging even more old boxes out of the house. The smell of mildew mingles with the morning air. b. Everything is neatly arranged on tables with different items such as lamps, glassware, and purses. Prices are clearly marked. Clothing is neatly displayed on racks and books in bookcases. All prices are marked $1 or less. The sellers joke and laugh with us. c. There is a huge sign out front saying, “Prices are NOT negotiable.” 3. How do you know when a yard sale is trouble with a capital “T”? a. Shoes are marked $5 or more. Books are marked $3 or more.

Saturday mornings are about friendship, prayer, and shared laughter. We celebrate birthdays with silly poems and questionable singing. When winter comes and the yard sales are over, the Saturday breakfasts continue. We have even devised a yard sale membership test we love to give to new members, which you can read above. Our membership “test” represents a small part of the fun and laughter we share each week. Along with the love and

Some pretty pottery is marked $25. When you ask about the pottery, the owner starts into a long monologue about how they bought it for $350 in the Caribbean since it was made by an up-and-coming artist who uses only the finest clay with a special glaze from Paris. b. There is nothing displayed except rusty old tools and broken-down furniture. c. When you walk up and discover the balloon on the mailbox is for a birthday party, and you are definitely not invited. d. All of the above. 4. What do Ya-Ya Sisters detest at yard sales? a. When items are not marked at all, and you have to ask about each item individually. b. Signs so poorly marked that Penny must pull over and let one of us out to try to read it. c. Snooty, unfriendly, no senseof-humor sellers. d. All of the above. 5. What do you do when you see something you like, but you are not sure it is really YOU? a. Consult Benita and Penny b. Consult Bonnie, Amelia, and Sandi c. All of the above, and then do what you want regardless.

laughter, we share loss, faith, family, and the bad times along with the good. One member now needs a walker, and we all share in helping her get it in and out of the car. Much like a marriage, we are in it for the long haul. Our Saturdays might have started out being about yard sales, but in the end, it’s all about friendship and love.


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

39


5

FIRST STEPS for New Caregivers BY TORIE TEMPLE

We play many roles within our lives, but when we’re cast as a caregiver for a loved one, it may take more preparation than just switching hats. Evelyn Hunter, facilitator for the Floyd Memorial caregiver support group, and Terry Graham, registered nurse at Helping Hands Companion Services, give five recommendations to consider when stepping into a caregiver role.

2. Learn to Communicate 1. FIND RESOURCES Educate yourself on the resources available within the community so you can find help at your fingertips when needed. “First-time caregivers may not realize all the resources that are available to help with the caregiving process,” Evelyn says. “For example, they may not know the doctor can order physical and occupational therapy that can be given at home. The occupational therapist can also provide suggestions like which medical equipment would work best to make life easier. “There are excellent resources in every county in every state. Harrison, Clark, Floyd, and Scott counties in Indiana have Lifespan as a resource (visit lsr14.org). Also, not many people realize that if your loved one is on Medicaid, it will help with more than just your medical bills. It can also help you find in-home care services. Oftentimes you can find resources just searching the Internet.” For those in Jefferson, Oldham, Trimble, Shelby, Spencer, Bullitt, and Henry counties, the Area Agency on Aging and Independent Living (kipda.org/aging_social_services/) is available to help you find resources in the community. Eldercare Resources Louisville (eldercareresourceslouisville.com) serves the greater Louisville Metro and Southern Indiana area in finding local health care providers.

40 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Take steps to learn how to communicate with your loved one despite any disabilities that might hinder his or her ability to speak or communicate effectively. Understanding how to communicate with one another can put both a caregiver and the one being cared for at ease. Hearing loss, vision loss, dementia, and stroke are just a few medical issues that can make communication difficult. Terry says patience is the key to communicating more effectively and suggests some ways to overcome obstacles: • Communicate your care and concerns through your words, facial expressions, and gestures. Remember to smile or soften your expression. Make your tone soothing if the elderly person is agitated. • Be sure you have the person’s attention by making eye contact or touching their hand or shoulder to get their attention. • Listen when they speak to you. Turn your face to them and respond. • Adjust the environment if necessary. Turn off competing noise from televisions or radios. • Older people sometimes have trouble processing language. Give them time to think about what you’ve said and to answer your question. • Use familiar language and be clear. Avoid long explanations or complicated instructions. • If the person’s physical abilities to communicate are impaired, you may need to use pen and paper, notecards with pre-written words on them, or other non-verbal methods. • People with dementia cannot handle a lot of options, so limit the choices you present to them to two. • If misunderstandings happen in your communication, be willing to take responsibility and apologize. The most important lessons to learn about communication are to be willing to change your responses and to be flexible and understanding, Terry says. PAGE 42 >>


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

41


<< PAGE 40

3. Understand the Stages of Grief Most people associate grief with the death of a loved one. However, the stages of grieving can also be seen with a loss of someone still living. Caregivers who have a loved one suffering from a chronic illness can experience this. “Everybody wants the person they are caring for to be happy,” Evelyn says. “But you have to think about how it will change your life as the caregiver. There is a grief process with this because there is not just a personal loss like taking time off from work to care for your loved one. There is also grieving for the person Mom or Dad used to be. “Caregivers need to give themselves permission to recognize their feelings. They can be sad, irritable, or in disbelief as long as they recognize this as a part of the grieving process and have others to talk to or a family member that can share the responsibilities.”

4. Know How to Recognize Abuse Though you may be the main caregiver for your loved one, there could be times when full-time medical care in a facility or help from a relief caregiver is needed. Sadly, elder abuse is a growing problem in the U.S. It is important to learn about different types of abuse and how to report it. Terry advises watching out for these warning signs of physical, psychological, and financial abuse as well as neglect: • Unexplained bruises or injuries • Signs of being restrained, such as rope marks on the wrist • Behavior that mimics dementia such as rocking, sucking, or mumbling to oneself • Unusual weight loss, malnutrition, or dehydration • Improper hygiene If you suspect your loved one is being abused, the local Department of Community Based Services will work with law enforcement to investigate the situation. Also, the Adult Abuse Hotline is available for those needing a quick reference at 1.800.752.6200.

WARNING!

5. Consider a Support Group The question of going to a caregiver support group depends on each person and his or her personality, Evelyn says. “Go to one meeting and see if it’s for you. A lot of people think that when they go to a support group they will have to share their story, but that isn’t always the case. You can go just to listen. “It is an excellent starting point for new caregivers to get information and resources,” Evelyn continues. “It is also an excellent way to get ideas by listening to others who have been through what you are going through. Everyone does things differently, and what works for one doesn’t necessarily work

42 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

for another. But it could generate ideas or validate feelings. Sometimes going to a support group the first time can open people up and help them realize that what they are going through is normal.” The caregiver support group at Floyd Memorial meets the first and third Thursday of every month with doors opening at 5:30pm and meetings beginning at 6. The group invites outside speakers and educators to give more insight on topics they have been discussing. This or any local support group provides a way to help caregivers care for not only their loved ones but for themselves as well. “A caregiver has to take care of themselves,” Evelyn says. “They need enough sleep. They need to eat well and always keep up good habits.”


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

43


5 THINGS TO KNOW About Medicare & Medicaid Insights & tips to help you navigate your benefits

1 Every Dollar Counts The “donut hole” for 2016 begins when you and your prescription plan have spent $3,310 on covered drugs. After that, you will pay 45 percent of the plan’s cost for brandname prescriptions and 58 percent of generic prescriptions. When you have paid $4,850 total out of pocket, you will escape the donut hole.

2

Prepare for the Payback Having a life estate in a home will not disqualify a person from receiving Medicaid nursing home benefits. But after the person dies, Medicaid places a value on that life estate and seeks repayment.

— three — Another Option Some private companies offer Medicare replacement plans called Medicare Advantage plans. They are required to cover the same things as traditional Medicare Parts A and B and may cover other things.

5. Big Changes

Medicare will pay for short-term rehab after a threemidnight hospital admission. But many people are placed under “observation” status and not “admitted.”

Kentucky is implementing a new Medicaid application system where some information can be submitted online, but an in-person application will still be required to provide the remaining information.

Information compiled by Kelly Gannott, attorney with Kentucky Elderlaw. 44 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

4

Did you know?


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

45


How to Use These Directories CONTENTS

These directories are organized first by this location chart. On the following pages, you’ll find descriptive listings of local facilities in each of the eight categories listed under Contents at right. Larger enhanced listings are listed first and are paid for by the facility. Regular listings follow.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory:

Adult Day Care............................48 Home Health.....................62 Aging-in-Place Communities.....50 Independent Living............. 69 Alzheimer’s Care.....................52 Nursing/Rehab..................... 71 Assisted Living.........................58 Personal Care..................... 77

Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost

of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Facilities by Location Use this chart and the map at left to quickly view facilities by location. Facilities are organized by zone letters and colors that coordinate with the map.

Zone

gi

n-

Pl ac Al e zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv In in de g Liv p e in nd g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca re

Zip Code

Ag in

Facility Name

Ad u

lt D

ay

Ca

re

If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

ElderServe, Inc.

40202

A

X

Christian Care Communities (Chapel House, Christian Health Center, Friendship House)

40203

A

X

Treyton Oak Towers

40203

A

The Altenheim Eastern Star Home

40204 40204

A A

Highlands Community Ministries Outreach Program

40205

A

Nazareth Home

40205

A

Twinbrook Hotel Apartments

40205

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

A

X

Golden LivingCenter - Mt. Holly

40206

A

Sacred Heart Home

40206

A

X

X

Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

40217

X

46 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

X

A

X

X


Ag

in

g-

in

-P la Al ce zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d L iv in In g d L iv e p e in n d g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re Pe ha rs b on al Ca re

re Ca ay tD

Zone

ul

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name Belmont Village

40207

B

Golden LivingCenter - St. Matthews

40207

B

X

Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Louisville (Sally’s Garden, Sam Swope Care Center, Masonic Home Village, Miralea, The Pillars Assisted Care Center)

40207

B

X

X

Westport Place Health Campus

40207

B

X

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

40222

B

X X

X

Episcopal Church Home

40222

B

40222

B

X

40222

B

X

B

X

Park Louisville

40223

The Forum at Brookside

40243

Clarity Pointe Louisville Forest Springs Health Campus

40245 40245

Magnolia Springs East Senior Living

40245

X

B

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

B

X

X

Oaklawn Rehab & Wellness Center

40245

Franciscan Health Care Center

40219

Wesley Manor Retirement Community

40219

C

Golden LivingCenter - Hillcreek Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway Barton House

40220 40228 40241

C C C

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community Springhurst Pines - (Cornell Trace, Parr’s at Springhurst, Springhurst Health and Rehab

40241 40241

C C X

Sunrise of Louisville

40241

C

Morning Pointe

40291

C

Traditions at Beaumont

40291

C

Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Good Samaritan Society

40299 40299 40299

C X C C

The Gathering Club

40214

D

Heartsong Memory Care Park Terrace Health Campus

40272 40272

D X D

Autumn Woods Health Campus

47150

K

Green Valley Care Center

47150

E

The Villages at Historic Silvercrest Baptist Health La Grange Short-Term Rehabilitation

47150 40031

E G

CountrySide Meadows

40031

G

Providence Richwood Friendship Health & Rehab

40031 40056

G G

Hometown Manor Assisted Living Communities Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Shelbyville

40065 40065

H H

Green Meadows Health Care Center

40047

ElderClub

40211

Hampton Oaks Thornton Terrace Health Campus

47170 47243

B

C

X

X

X

B X B

X

X

Golden LivingCenter - Camelot Magnolia Springs Senior Living

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

I

J

K K

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

47


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Adult Day Care Directory Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

48 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

49


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Aging in Place Communities Directory

50 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

51


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

52 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

54 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimer’s Care Directory Alzheimer’s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimer’s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY ANNA PATTERSON & GIOIA PATTON

Bobby McFerrin

> The Kentucky Center

The Mystery at Raven Hall

> Bristol Bar & Grille in downtown Louisville Meet WhoDunnit’s most enigmatic crime solver, The Listener, who exists outside of time and space! In the dark and compelling The Mystery at Raven Hall, The Listener is consulted by a senator who was executed in 1952 for the murder of his wife. The senator has no memory of the events on the day his wife was killed. He has to know: did he do it, or did someone else frame him for murder? What was the web of intrigue that led to her death? And will the answer change history? WHEN: Saturday evenings, now through April 2. Show starts @ 7pm WHERE: Bristol Bar & Grille, downtown Louisville TICKETS: $48 includes dinner, show, tax and gratuity CONTACT: 502.426.7100 or whodunnitky.com

Music industry rebel Bobby McFerrin will host Bobby Meets Louisville, a one-of-a-kind interactive collaborative performance with local artists and audience members. McFerrin is known for his 10 Grammy Awards and single-handedly redefined the role of the human voice with his 1988 a cappella hit Don’t Worry, Be Happy. His collaborations with cellist Yo-Yo Ma, jazz and fusion pianist Chick Corea, the Vienna Philharmonic, his improvising choir Voicestra, and his legendary solo performances all helped McFerrin set a new standard for a cappella groups everywhere. WHEN: April 1 @ 8pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: Starting @ $25 CONTACT: 502.584.7777, 800.775.7777,

kentuckycenter.org/presents and at the box office

A Stroke of Excellence

Taxes Too Taxing?

Congratulations to Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital (SIRH), recently recognized at the Raising Awareness in Stroke Excellence (RAISE) Awards. SIRH was chosen as the Outstanding Group for its annual Stroke Camp — a program designed to provide a getaway weekend for stroke survivors — and associated fundraising efforts.

As we are all too aware, tax season is once again upon us. Crunching all those numbers can be a frustrating process, so AARP wants to lend a hand. Through April 18, AARP is providing free tax services at The Altenheim Senior Health Care Community, Mondays and Wednesdays from 10am-2pm.

56 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

58 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

60 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

62 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

64 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

66 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY ANNA PATTERSON & GIOIA PATTON

Broadway Rocks! Legally Blond: The Musical > Derby Dinner Playhouse

Legally Blonde: The Musical tells the story of Elle Woods, a sorority girl who enrolls at Harvard Law School to win back her ex-boyfriend Warner. She discovers how her knowledge of the law can help others and successfully defends exercise queen Brooke Wyndham in a murder trial. Throughout the show, no one has faith in Elle, but she manages to surprise them when she defies expectations while staying true to herself. Recommended for ages 13 and up. WHEN: April 6-May 15 WHERE: Derby Dinner Playhouse, Clarksville TICKETS: $33-$46 Senior citizens discounts available CONTACT: 812.288.8281 or derbydinner.com

68 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

> The Kentucky Center A trio of talented Broadway veterans, Christiane Noll, Capathia Jenkins, and Rob Evan, share the spotlight in a high-energy concert performing both rock and contemporary Broadway hits. Join the Louisville Orchestra for a celebration of music featuring songs from Wicked, Hairspray, The Lion King, Mamma Mia!, Rent, The Wiz, Phantom of the Opera, and more. WHEN: April 22 @ 8pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: $26-$69 CONTACT: 502.584.7777 or louisvilleorchestra.org


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Independent Living Directory Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

69


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Independent Living Directory Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

Welcome to Wesley Manor Wesley Manor Retirement Community has recently been selected as a 2016 Best of Senior Living Award Winner on SeniorAdvisor.com â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the largest ratings and reviews site for senior care and services in North America. Winners of this award represent the top tier of in-home care, assisted living, and other senior living providers, as based on the online reviews 70 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

BY ANNA PATTERSON & GIOIA PATTON

written by seniors and their families. This designation places the winners in the top 1 percent of senior care providers according to those who matter most â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the consumers. Of the nearly 100,000 providers currently listed on the website, just over 1,000 were recognized with this award. Wesley Manor Retirement Community is one of the only winners in Louisville, Kentucky, and regularly receives highly positive reviews from their families.


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

71


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

72 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

73


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

74 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

76 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

77


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

Caregive r winner

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

T O D AY ’ S T R A N S I T I O N S

Meet our “Care Package for the Caregiver” contest winner! Gradus Shoemaker is our quarterly caregiver winner. His prize includes tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse performance and four hours of sitter service from Home Instead Senior Care. Why He Won: At 95, Gradus has been caring for his 88-year-old wife, Florence, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease six years ago. Despite dealing with his own health problems, Gradus cooks for Florence and manages her medications, in addition to handling other household chores. His daughter Elizabeth Dotson says her dad’s selflessness makes him an exceptional caregiver. “He deserves recognition, because without his tender loving care and dedication, Mom would not have anywhere near the quality of life that she enjoys now,” she says. Gradus Shoemaker

78 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com to complete the nomination form.


– THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT –

Senior Home Transitions After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs. I can also help connect you with resources to help financially.

All at NO COST to you! Patti Naiser • SeniorHomeTransitions.com • 502.396.9228

EXECUTIVE CAREGIVERS NEEDED

Join Premier Caregiver Services

An independent, local, Personal Services Agency licensed in KY. Looking for Executive Level Caregivers to help our GREAT CLIENTS. - Professional company providing the highest level of customer service. - Retirees looking to help others - RN, LPN, CNA or clinically trained professionals to make a “one on one” difference helping seniors - Professional and Experienced Caregivers looking for higher hourly pay - Immediate needs in: 40204, 40206, 40207, 40222, 40223

Go to: premiercgs.com/apply • info@premiercgs.com • 502.384.1840

LAW

Timmel Law LLC – KY & IN lic.

ELDER PLANNING WORKSHOPS & CONSULTATIONS NO CHARGE • MEDICAID & VA BENEFIT

Helping individuals and their families including those with elder or special needs issues identify, evaluate and plan for long term care, estate and life care options. Call or email to join us for a workshop where you can learn about Estate Planning and protecting your loved ones’ assets.

Timmel Law, LLC • 812.590.2771 • aa@timmellaw.com timmellaw.com

NO COST REFERRAL SERVICE

Assisted Living Locators Assisted Living Locators is a No Cost Referral Service. As professional Eldercare Advisors, we provide personal assistance in locating the right options for your elderly loved one. We can reduce your stress by providing a free consultation and help you find the right Assisted Living, Personal Care, Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care, Nursing Homes and Retirement Communities. Contact us today!

Assisted Living & Home Care Options Arthur & Kathy Lemons • www.161.assistedlivinglocators.com arthurl@assistedlivinglocators.com • 502.208.4072

TRANSPORTATION

Able Care, Inc., since 2001

Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation. Our service is available for: • Physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy • Social functions and daily errands • Evenings and weekends with advance notice Caregivers or family members can ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages available. Payment requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business.

Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 • 502.267.1911 • ablecareinc.com

Helpful Resources

FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE


What to Wear

BY ALISSA HICKS / PHOTO SUNNI WIGGINTON

Take a

WALK When spring begins to blossom, it’s the perfect time of year to get out of the house, enjoy the fresh air, and get a little exercise. Going for a brisk walk can do the body good, but since the weather in our area can be so indecisive, here are a few tips on what to wear when enjoying spring days. Start with a good pair of pants. Find a pair that feels comfortable and fits your needs, whether you’re taking a leisurely stroll or a more fast-paced jog. Next, a tank is light and moveable. We love the spring color Rita Vest is wearing here. Don’t forget a good sports bra underneath! Look for a light jacket since the weather can be unpredictable. You can roll the sleeves up, unzip for your comfort, or take off and tie around your waist if temps get warm. It can be challenging to find athletic shoes that fit properly. Just like when you’re looking for the right pair of pants, the key is to try on several pairs and styles to see what fits best for you. Rita is wearing: Tank, $17; Jacket, $40; Shoes, $60; All available at Nordstrom Rack, 4600 Shelbyville Rd, 502.899.4940

80 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016


Spring 2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

87


82 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2016

Today's Transitions - Spring 2016  

Your Local Source for Later Living

Today's Transitions - Spring 2016  

Your Local Source for Later Living