Page 1

YOUR TOTAL SOURCE FOR LATER LIVING

WINTER 2015-2016

Embrace race c YOUR R AGE

Have a

Ba l Ball this winter nte

300+ 3 0 OPTIONS FOR CAREGIVER SUPPORT

How to organize your meds

10 PARENTS

THINGS TO ASK

YOUR


CONTENTS: WINTER 2015/2016

88 after p.

28

38

Directories

4

KEEP IT SIMPLE

22

CAREGIVER CIRCLE

Directories & Facilities by Location

6

MANAGING YOUR PILLS

24

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DIRECTOR OF NURSING

54 How to Use

Facilities

57 Aging-in-Place

10

Communities

58 Alzheimer’s Care Facilities

68 Home Health 76 Nursing/Rehab Facilities

14 16

83 Personal Care Facilities

85 Retirement

Communities

87 Helpful Resources

TURBO-CHARGE YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

By Sandra Gordon

Facilities

64 Assisted Living

By Tiffany White

By Carrie Vittitoe

56 Adult Day Care

20

48

28

WHAT’S IN OUR CART?

By Melissa Donald & Anita Oldham

34

BOOK CLUB

By Torie Temple

36

WISE & WELL

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

38

TECH TALK

40

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PARENTS

By Yelena Sapin

For advertising information, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

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42

UPDATES & HAPPENINGS

By Tiffany White & Gioia Patton

46

ELEMENTS FOR YOUR LIFE STORY By Bob Mueller

By Tiffany White

WHAT I KNOW NOW By Lucy M. Pritchett

By Torie Temple

48

HOPING FOR A HAPPY ENDING

By Lucy M. Pritchett

49

FIGHT CAREGIVING MISCONCEPTIONS By Lisa Petsche

By Patti Hartog

50

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MEDICARE & MEDICAID

By Megan Seckman

74

CAREGIVER WINNER

WENDELL & DADDY

88

WHAT TO WEAR

By Mark Kaelin

By Connie Meyer

By Alissa Hicks


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From the Editor WE’RE PROUD!

Today’s Transitions won seven awards, including first place for General Excellence, from the North American Mature Publishers Association!

Volume 12 / Number 4 PUBLISHER

Cathy S. Zion cathy@todayspublications.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Anita Oldham anita@todayspublications.com EDITOR

Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Lucy M. Pritchett

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com MEDIA ASSOCIATE

Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

B

eing a caregiver is tough. You are responsible for handling your loved one’s needs in addition to trying to manage your own life. Juggling constant needs and worry can be stressful, but simplifying your tasks can make it easier. In this issue, we show you how to do it. Our caregiver winner, Karen Whalen, had to rethink her approach to caregiving when her husband and mother both became ill. Find out how she streamlined her caregiving duties with help from her family (p.74). You can also read our Caregiver Circle feature for advice and practical tips on being more efficient every day (p.22).

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER

Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHY

Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jillian LeMaster officeadmin@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

Are you having trouble managing your caregiver stress? Read our Fight Caregiver Misconceptions feature to help you maintain a positive attitude when difficulties arise (p.49). Or prepare yourself for future situations by reading 10 Questions to Ask Your Parents (p.16).

Got something to say? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events. 4 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

W. Earl Zion COVER ART

Silvia Cabib TODAY’S TRANSITIONS is published by: Zion Publications LLC

9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 TodaysTransitionsNow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. The staff has made good-faith efforts to provide comprehensive and accurate listings in all directories. Information included in the directories is based strictly on that supplied by each entity. Zion Publications does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2013 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.


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Managing Your BY CARRIE VITTITOE

The use of five or more prescription drugs per month among the 60 and older crowd has increased significantly in the past decade. Add in doctor-approved other-the-counter medications, and often patients are looking at a staggering amount of medication information to keep track of on a regular basis.

W

This pill box from Apothecary Products divides pills by time of day as well as day of the week. PHOTO Used with permission of Apothecary Products LLC Copyright 2015

ith some medications, taking a dose too soon or at the same time as another medication isn’t a big deal, but in other instances, such medication errors can cause lifethreatening side effects. For example, niacin may be considered harmless, but when taken in conjunction with high doses of statins, it can lead muscle cells to break down in a rare condition called rhabdomyolosis. Fortunately, patients who do take numerous medications multiple times a day have more and better tools for keeping track of their pills

than just the classic sevenday-a-week, one-pill-per-day, rectangular plastic boxes. Valerie Early, a pharmacist with Norton Healthcare, says there are pill boxes on the market to help with more complex regimens. Apothecary Products, for example, sells a variety of containers that offer four compartments per day (morning, noon, evening, and bedtime) and cost between $10$15. These types of pill boxes can be found in most local pharmacies as well as online. Group Medical Supply’s Med-e-Lert is an automatic pill dispenser that dispenses pills up to six times per day. PAGE 8 >>

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<< PAGE 6

It has a locking device to prevent tampering and includes a loud alarm with a blinking light to remind patients when it is time to take their medication. Although this is considerably more expensive than the simple plastic pillboxes, at around $80 it might be worth the cost for having peace of mind due to the locking features. Early says another product many caregivers like is MedMinder (medminder.com), which can be rented on a monthly basis ($40+ per month). In addition to multiple compartments, a locking device, and reminders for patients, some models also offer medical alert features that open a two-way voice channel with professionals who can assist the patient. Many of the models can send text messages to caregivers to notify them when patients have taken their medications or if there has been any tampering with the medication. Technologically savvy patients may find the free Apple/Android app Medisafe (medisafe.com) to be more to their liking, especially if they don’t have memory conditions such as dementia that make medication management more challenging. Patients with chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis can get reminders to take their medication on their phones, and their caregivers or loved ones can also receive alerts if medications aren’t taken on time. The app allows patients to keep track of all their medications, dosages, prescribing physicians, and pharmacies, making it easy to have on hand at doctor appointments instead of bringing every pill bottle into the exam room. When it comes to refill reminders, some of the aforementioned products

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come with the option of pre-filled medication trays that can be refilled by pharmacists to reduce the chance of medication errors. Most pharmacies offer phone, email, or text reminders when it is time to refill scripts, and some even refill automatically. Early says pharmacists check reports that signal them when patients’ medications are due for refill. Some pharmacists or technicians will call patients directly to see if they want or need their medication refilled. The computer systems that pharmacies use have built-in security features that red flag when a patient has tried to refill a prescription too soon, which may be a result of not taking their medication at the proper time or proper dosage. “This red flag prompts pharmacists to talk to the patients and help tailor a plan to simplify their medication regimen,” Early says. Many of these featured products can ease the worry of caregivers, who are often unable to be with their patients or loved ones at all times. Still, Early says caregivers need to maintain a sense of awareness about their patients’ physical symptoms to be able to identify if medication is inadvertently taken too often or not often enough. For example, most heartburn medications have to be taken for a while before symptoms abate, so if a patient continues to complain of heartburn symptoms, this can be a clue that he or she is not taking the prescription as directed. As pharmaceuticals have grown increasingly varied and complex over the years, patients and their caregivers can find some comfort that technology is keeping pace, ensuring that they can successfully manage their medications and remain healthy.

The Medisafe app reminds patients to take medications and tracks dosages, prescribing physicians, and pharmacies. PHOTO MEDISAFE PROJECT LTD


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TurboCharge Your

Immune System BY SANDRA GORDON

It’s cold and flu season, and you’re probably already in the habit of washing your hands or using hand sanitizer often and coughing and sneezing into your elbow. But why stop there? Here are additional easy ways to mobilize your immune system’s illness-fighting forces — the T cells, natural killer cells, and antibodies — this winter and beyond. Give yourself a shot against illness. Vaccines aren’t just for kids. Adults need them too. In fact, there are 11 vaccine-preventable diseases adults can protect themselves against, including shingles (for adults 60 and older), hepatitis B (for adults with diabetes or who are at risk), and measles, mumps, and rubella. Except for the flu shot, which is recommended yearly for everyone age 19 and older, many of the vaccines require only one or two doses over the course of a lifetime. Protecting yourself also safeguards others. Adults, especially those in close contact with infants younger than 12 months such as parents, grandparents, babysitters, and nannies, should also get the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine and a booster every 10 years. For a complete list of vaccines for adults, visit the CDC at cdc.gov/Features/AdultVaccines/.

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Get some shut-eye. Studies suggest that sleep deprivation causes sluggish production of natural killer cells, a type of white blood cell that can obliterate certain microbes and cancer cells. Similarly, a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that catching a cold is more likely if you sleep less than seven hours a night. All 153 participants in the study were given a solution containing live rhinovirus (a common cold virus). Those who slept eight hours or more each night were three times less likely to catch the cold. If it’s not possible to get a solid eight hours of sleep each night, catch a nap when you can. Pile on the produce. A healthy diet has the power to prevent heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and some forms of cancer.

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and give yourself permission to have time just for you,” Marshall advises. Schedule in at least 20 minutes of daily downtime and find a hobby.

<< PAGE 10

Only 25 percent of adults and children consume the minimum recommended intakes of vegetables, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. As a general rule, half of your plate should be produce. “Focus on eating more produce in whatever way it’s convenient for you,” says Marisa Moore, R.D., L.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Minimize nutrient loss during cooking by steaming or microwaving veggies in a small amount of water until just tender-crisp. Guard against weight gain. Research shows that obesity might alter your immune-system response. Add to that the many health risks associated with being overweight (including heart disease, diabetes, and sleep apnea), and avoiding the 20- to 30-pound gain that many adults pack on as they age becomes an important way to safeguard your well-being, says Madelyn H. Fernstrom, Ph.D., founding director of the Weight Management Center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The number you don’t want to hit: a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher, which is considered overweight. 12 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

Exercise your options. Moderate workouts (such as walking or jogging) for at least 30 minutes five or more times a week can increase the circulation of immune-boosting natural killer cells in your body, even when you’re at rest, according to Susanna Cunningham-Rundles, Ph.D., director of the Weill-Cornell Cellular Immunology Laboratory in New York City. But more isn’t better. The stress of intense exercise (approximately 75 minutes or more at a strenuous pace, or anything that makes you feel as if you’re pushing yourself too hard) may stimulate stress hormones such as cortisol, which some studies suggest can suppress natural killer cells. If you’re a long-distance runner or serious athlete, you may be at increased risk for colds and flu. Take a breather. Evidence suggests that unmanaged stress sets off a chain of hormonal events that can decrease the activity of natural killer cells, says Gailen Marshall, M.D., Ph.D., director of the division of allergy and immunology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Runaway stress can also make you susceptible to colds and aggravate chronic conditions such as asthma and allergies. “Recognize your limitations

Get more zinc. Beef, fish, poultry, beans, and nuts are excellent sources of zinc, a trace mineral that’s needed to enhance the quality and number of your body’s T cells, your immune system’s front line against viruses and bacteria. Many older Americans fall short of the daily recommendation for zinc (8 milligrams for women, 11 milligrams for men). So be sure to fill your grocery cart with these zinc all-stars. If you feel a cold coming on, try a zinc-based cold remedy, such as Cold-Eeze. “It can help boost your immune system to lessen the duration of a cold and severity of symptoms,” says Bob Stout, a pharmacist in Candia, New Hampshire. Cold-Eeze works by sealing the receptors on cells so that cold viruses can’t enter and replicate. For best results, pop a lozenge or give yourself two spritzes of the oral spray version within 24 to 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. Don’t go it alone. Can you name someone who’d help you in a pinch? Do you have a confidante? Answering yes puts you at lower risk for illness, particularly heart disease. Studies show that people who have a diverse social network (including friends, family, coworkers, etc.) have greater resistance to colds too. But don’t just “friend” someone on Facebook. Strengthen your connections by meeting in person occasionally for coffee or a fun night out.


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WHAT I KNOW NOW

Phyllis Fitzgerald This 75-year-old wants us all to show some respect for Mother Earth. She has had quite a career in public relations and television, and she currently has a Saturday radio show, The Local Life, on WCHQ 100.9 FM. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

What drives you now?

I want to continue to encourage people to eat healthful foods and about sustaining our environment. Also, I want to spend time with my children and grandchildren and be a role model for them. What were your plans for yourself?

I knew I wanted to teach in some way. I just didn’t know what that way was. I wanted to be a cooperative extension service agent and teach homemakers how to live a good family life — how to raise healthy families and eat good food. When should a woman raise her voice?

When she won’t be heard any other way. What piece of advice has served you well?

When you have to make a speech or write a paper, list your three main points and then list your three main points under each of those. Focus on what you want to say. What should a woman taste at least once?

Truffles. They have a very intense flavor. The first time I ever tasted them was in Italy in a risotto dish.

What skill should every woman have?

Knowing how to live without a man. What books have most influenced you?

Cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead's autobiography, Blackberry Winter, and Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes. There is a lot to be learned from these two books, but mainly if women don’t learn to be independent, they are at the mercy of everyone. What was your greatest loss, and how did you overcome it?

My husband died when I was 39, and I was left to raise our five school-age children — three boys and twin girls — on my own. At times, that was so hard. The path was never smooth. There was no life or health insurance. I immediately got a job and had lots of help from friends and family. Many people did nice things for me. What can a woman learn in the kitchen?

Simple meal preparation. Everything doesn’t have to be fancy. You don’t have to be a gourmet cook. Steamed broccoli can be the best.

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Phyllis also teaches Aging as a Transformational Journey at the Earth & Spirit Center. What advice would you give to the younger you?

Stand your ground. Don’t let anyone run over you. What do you find to be difficult about aging?

Health issues. The body just doesn’t feel like it used to feel. And, you have to come to terms with your looks. After a certain age, we tend to become invisible because of how we look. What do you find to be rewarding?

Accepting who you are and not having to try and impress anyone. This is who I am — take it or leave it. How do you jump-start your day?

For so many years, I got up at 4:30 in the morning and would exercise and walk before work. Now I get up at 7 and have breakfast and read The Courier Journal and The New York Times — the real newspapers, not online. I don’t own a television, but I do listen to NPR.

What does the average American not understand about the world?

That their actions can harm the world or make the world better. If they are wasteful, they are harming the world — the people, resources, the entire environment. What piece of music do you enjoy?

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. It’s best heard live. What can’t you quite get the knack of?

Preparing an Excel spreadsheet. The world would be a better place if...

People knew and accepted their role in making the world a more sustainable, peaceful place. What books are on your nightstand?

The Grace in Aging by Kathleen Dowling Singh and Secrets from the Eating Lab by Traci Mann. Words to live by?

Take responsibility for your own actions. Think of others before you think of yourself.


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10 Questions to ask your

PARENTS BY TORIE TEMPLE

2

$

It’s hard to think about our parents aging, but being prepared can ease the stress and make difficult decisions go more smoothly. Being able to make choices about the continued care of your parents while they still have the cognitive abilities to express their wishes is the first step. Use these 10 questions to start the discussion every adult child should have with his or her parents. They were compiled by expert advice from Corey Vallandingham, marketing director of Springhurst Pines, and Kelly Gannott, elder law attorney. You might want to think about these questions for yourself as well. Who do you want to handle things if you are unable to handle them yourself? “It’s important to know who your parents want to handle their finances or health care decisions if they are not able to anymore,” Gannott says. “It may be you, your sibling, or someone totally different. It’s important to designate this person before decisions need to be made. Also, always have a backup person just in case the first person that was designated is unable to make the decisions.”

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Do you have a power of attorney document in place? Can that power of attorney create a trust? “So many people wait too long to get a power of attorney document in place,” Gannott says. “If someone is in the nursing home and they apply for Medicaid, Medicaid may make them have a trust. A qualified income trust is set up for those whose income exceeds the eligibility criteria for receiving Medicaid. The income that exceeds eligibility will go into the trust and can be used for nursing home costs. If the power of attorney document doesn’t allow the power of attorney to create a trust, they may never get Medicaid.”

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Do you have a trust? Are you interested in setting up a trust? “There are many different types of trusts, one of which is a revocable living trust. This trust can keep your family from having to go to probate court,” Gannott says. “There is an irrevocable living trust, which cannot be changed and will protect your assets. Another trust is a special needs trust that allows beneficiaries with special needs to get an inheritance.”

medical care. If you choose personal care, find out if they have 24/7 medical care.”

What type of long-term care facility are you comfortable with, if needed? “Many places are too fancy for some people, so it is important to know what makes them feel comfortable,” Vallandingham says. “It is also good to find out the differences between assisted living and personal care facilities. Assisted living doesn’t offer medical care, but personal care is licensed to offer

At what point do you feel it would be time to move into an assisted living facility, nursing home, or retirement community? Would it be when it is hard to make meals? Do housework? No longer perform proper hygiene? “Everyone wants to stay at home, and that is the goal, but what is your parents’ idea

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Are you interested in visiting some assisted living facilities? “Visiting facilities now can help ease the process,” Gannott says. “So when the time comes and your parents are not able to make that decision, then you have already visited places and know which ones your parents preferred.”

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of when it’s time to leave home?” Gannott says. “This is important to know so that when the time comes, you can remind your parents of what they said and see if they still agree with making the move.” How much out-ofpocket do you want to spend for long-term care? Do you have long-term care insurance? “All assisted living and personal care facilities are private pay,” Vallandingham says. “Medicare and Medicaid only come into play when a nursing home is needed. Some facilities check finances and want you to have two years of private pay. Look over your long-term care insurance and call to see what their stipulations are.”

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Are you making any gifts to charity? “So many people don’t think about giving gifts to charity,” Gannott says. “They think about wanting their family to benefit, and that’s great, but their church or the Girl Scouts might have played a large role in their lives, and they could leave a lasting legacy.”

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If you have a child pass before you, do you want the inheritance to go to your son or daughter’s spouse, children, or siblings? “Sometimes people assume if a child passes before the parents, their spouse will take the inheritance by default, but this isn’t true,” Gannott says. “The spouse getting the inheritance must be written in the will.”

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How would you like to see your continued care handled? “I know this is an all-encompassing question, but a lot of times we don’t want to have this conversation about the end of life or planning for the future,” Gannott says. “So, if we can think about it as being a continuation of the wishes of our parents, then it becomes an easier conversation to have.”

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! d l O g n i t t e G It’s Heck BY YELENA SAPIN

rk the way they used to wo n’t do es di bo r ou en wh Solutions for

PROBLEM:

Mobility Issues

D

ifficulty getting up from a chair, getting around the house, or walking in general can stem from a variety of factors. Many underlying medical conditions can affect your ability to move around, as can problems with your hearing and vision, says Roberta Kayser, physical therapist and supervisor at Frazier Rehab – Springhurst Sports Medicine. Medications that include dizziness and fatigue as side effects also contribute to the problem. Throw an immobilizing injury into the mix, and you get a vicious cycle of inactivity that leads to muscle atrophy, loss of strength, and further mobility decline.

PROBLEM:

Osteoporosis

S

trong bones depend on maintaining the right balance between the rates of breakdown and renewal of bone cells. With age, this balance can tip more toward the breakdown phase and increase your risk of developing osteoporosis, explains geriatrician and University of Louisville assistant professor “Dr. Raj” Rangaraj Gopalraj, M.D. Characterized by weakened, brittle bones and a higher risk of bone fracture, the condition most often strikes older women but can develop in men as well. Risk factors also include smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, as well as taking certain medications.

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SOLUTION:

Keep Moving

SOLUTION: Stay Safe

Mobility is very much a “use it or lose it” kind of thing. The more you ask of your joints and muscles, the better they serve you. Plan an activity every day, whether it’s participating in an exercise class or going for a walk. Enlist your friends and family for support in staying active, and take advantage of health and wellness services in your community to help improve your strength, balance, and flexibility. “KentuckyOne Health has opened three wellness centers just to address those issues,” Kayser says. See kentuckyonehealth.org/.

“Our balance declines over time, and that makes us at increased risk for falls,” Kayser says. To minimize the risk, get a home evaluation to eliminate any trip hazards in your home. Install grab bars and non-slip mats in your bathroom, and check your hearing aids and glasses. Use devices such as a cane or walker if you need to, but make sure you’re not just carrying them around when you’re not using them so they don’t get in your way. And talk with your doctor to find out what kind of exercise or physical therapy regimen is right for you.

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

See Your Doctor

Nurture Your Bones

A simple, painless bone density scan that measures the thickness of your bones can show whether you already have osteoporosis or are on the way to developing it. “We recommend that women start getting screened at age 65 or older and men at age 70 or older,” Dr. Raj says, “but earlier if they’ve had a history of bone fractures.” Based on the results, your doctor can advise on the best course of action and may prescribe medications and recommend lifestyle changes to help strengthen your bones.

For optimal bone health, you need to maintain a healthy diet that provides the daily recommended 1,200 mg of calcium and 400 IUs of Vitamin D. Supplements can help if you can’t get that from diet alone, but taking too much can cause side effects and health complications, so it’s best to consult your physician. Finally, you need to be physically active. “If you don’t move, the body will cut back on its efforts to maintain bone mass,” Dr. Raj says. Any type of exercise is good, but strength-training and weight-bearing activities are the most beneficial.


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Caregiver

CIRCLE BY TORIE TEMPL

E

Managing Medicine Caregiver Cheryl Basham gives her best advice for keeping track of medications. “I created a daily log to record when medicines were given,” she says. “Overthe-counter medications such as aspirin or short-term antibiotics were recorded at the time administered FIND so duplicate dosing MORE could be avoided. IDEAS ON A log sheet was PAGE 6. printed for each day and compiled into a bound monthly booklet for caregivers to use. Times were listed on the left of the page with a column for each person.”

Playful

PETS An older dog or cat can be a great source of companionship and entertainment for your loved one. Also, don’t forget about day programs or volunteer opportunities that can provide social interaction for your loved one. Source: Christian McCutcheon, owner of Brightstar Care

ENGAGING ACTIVITIES Three tips to help entertain your loved one who needs caregiving due to an illness:

Cheryl is a retired project manager as well as a caregiver for her parents and a sister with special needs.

Planning by Pre-planning According to Janice Baldon-Gutter, caregiving can be made easier by pre-planning, which can fall into two categories: long-term planning that includes looking for a nursing home, home care, or rehab before the crisis hits and short-term planning for doctor visits or transportation. Source: Janice Baldon-Gutter, online instructor and facilitator - Adult Higher Education

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Defeating Depression “Depression needs to be treated by a professional,” says Becky Beanblossom, president of Home Instead Senior Care. “The first step is to talk with your loved one about how they are feeling and if they are open to seeing a therapist or physician. It might be that they feel more comfortable talking with a pastor or some other trusted source. Once the depression is being treated, it is important to keep your loved one engaged and to check in with them to see if there is any improvement.”

1. Remember your loved one’s prior interests before the illness started and try to duplicate those activities. 2. Depending on his or her health and mobility, think about new but related activities that include the prior orientation or interest. 3. Ask and listen. Your loved one is still an adult and needs to be able to make his or her own choices as much as possible. Source: Janice Baldon-Gutter


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10 Questions to Ask Your

Director of Nursing BY TIFFANY WHITE

Choosing a nursing facility for your loved one can be stressful — especially when you don’t have much time to make a decision. Angela Allen, director of nursing with Christian Care Communities’ Christian Health Center Louisville, has the answers.

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1. How can I start looking for a reputable nursing home?

“Go to Medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare. Type in a specific facility or zip code in the search bar. A list of different facility names will appear. When you click on the facility you want to look at, the site will give you the facility’s star rating in different areas of care.” 2. What else should a caregiver look for when searching for a nursing home?

“Pay attention to the overall cleanliness of the building and appearance of the staff. Does the staff smile at you and greet you? Request a tour of the building from the admissions director. Find out what the staffing ratios are because ideally a facility would have adequate staffing so that they aren’t giving substandard care. Ask about the activity program and try to view some activities that are going on. Ask to look at the facility’s annual survey and complaint surveys.” 3. My mother just fell and will be going to rehab at a nursing home. What should I know?

“First, ask what kind of fall prevention program the facility has. You want to find out what types of interventions are used for a new referral

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(resident) coming to the facility. The facility should consider room placement so the resident can be close to the nurse’s station to prevent future falls. Second, ask how often the nurses check on the residents. People will want to know their loved one will not be left alone for a long period of time. Third, find out what the staffing ratio is for the unit and if the staff is on a consistent assignment. You don’t want a different nurse taking care of your mother every day. Keeping the same nurse allows the nurse to know your parent’s needs because they have formed a relationship with your parent.” 4. What’s a secured unit in a nursing home?

“For some facilities, you have to type in a certain set of numbers on a keypad to enter the facility. This is needed to promote safety for residents who might be at risk of leaving the building and getting lost or hurt because they are cognitively impaired and have poor safety awareness. This typically applies to residents with Alzheimer’s and dementia.” 5. How are meals planned out in a nursing home? Who determines the menu?

“The dietary director and dietitian will review sample menus from a food provider such as Gordon Food Service, and they decide what best fits the facility. The menu usually changes from season to season. However, they may not use every meal on the menu. The menu will provide details on how much to cook for portions. If people are on special diets or if someone is diabetic, the menu will let you know what you can substitute.” 6. What kinds of planned activities are typical?

“All licensed nursing homes have planned activities. They can be in a group setting, or if a resident can’t come out because he or she is bedridden, some nursing homes will have one-on-one activities in the resident’s room. Typically, activities are based on the residents’ likes and dislikes. Bingo is a popular game

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among many residents and is often played several times a week, but the activities can be altered depending on how much residents like them. Some residents go on outings once a month or participate in a food activity such as baking cookies. The program should always promote activities that allow residents to form relationships with other residents and ward off depression.” 7. How often should a nurse check on residents?

“At least every two hours, or it can be more frequent depending on the resident’s health situation.” 8. How can a family make the environment more comfortable for their loved one?

“Bring in pictures of family members, a photo album, or a favorite movie. These types of items will trigger pleasant thoughts.” 9. How common is staff turnover in nursing homes? Could this affect my loved one’s quality of care? “Turnover

varies from facility to facility. Typically, facilities will have longstanding employees and employees who have been there for less than a year for various reasons. I see a lot of young people enter into this field, and they have attendance issues or the work isn’t what they thought it would be, which can affect the quality of care.”

10. How does the admissions process work?

“We have hospital liaisons who visit a region of hospitals. They receive referrals from the discharge planners at the hospitals. The liaison reviews the referral to see if the patient is appropriate to place at a specific nursing facility. Then the referral goes to the admissions director. The admissions director will see if we have a room available, check if the patient will need any specialized equipment, and verify their insurance for placement. If the patient has been accepted, the liaison notifies the hospital and family. Then the admissions director lets the nursing staff know they’ll be getting a new admission.”

Advice from the DON: “Find out what the staffing ratio is for the unit and if the staff is on a consistent assignment. You don’t want a different nurse taking care of your mother every day. Keeping the same nurse allows the nurse to know your parent’s needs because they have formed a relationship with your parent.”


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What’s In Our Cart? BY MELISSA DONALD & ANITA OLDHAM / PHOTOS MELISSA DONALD

Groceries, flowers, pharmacy, post office, lunch. If you are looking for one-stop shopping that will cover all your needs, check out locally owned ValuMarket. We shopped at the Hurstbourne Plaza location and found several grocery options and services all under one roof. They also offer home delivery for locations within a few miles. Or, you can order online and pick up your order for an extra $5.95 without having to take the time to shop.

WHERE WE SHOPPED:

ValuMarket Hurstbourne Plaza 315 Whittington Pkwy Louisville, KY (Four other area locations)

3

TOTAL COST: $34.36

2 5 4

7

1

6 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

DARE BRETON GLUTEN FREE CRACKERS

VALUMARKET CRANBERRY HERB POULTRY RUB

BEAR CREEK SANTA FE CHIPOTLE SOUP MIX

HOT DELI LUNCH - Pork

VALUMARKET GINGERBREAD MEN SPRINKLES

5th aisle at back of store

3rd aisle midway

TALENTI GELATO BLACK RASPBERRY CHOCOLATE CHIP $4.99

12th aisle near front of store

KENTUCKY PROUD BERNOULLI SMALL BATCH TOASTED ALMOND ICE CREAM

$2.99

3rd aisle

$5.99

$3.85

Loin with Mashed Potatoes and Gravy and Roasted Asparagus $5.99 (Entree, two sides and bread)

12th aisle, midway freezer section

Back right corner of store

$2.99

$5.99

12th aisle, midway freezer section

Other items and features the store has to offer: • WELLABY’S GLUTEN FREE PITA CHIPS WITH OLIVE OIL & SEA SALT Located in aisle 3

• PHARMACY Located far right at front of store • POST OFFICE Located at Service Desk

28 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

• FLORAL SHOP Located at front of store • DELI & SALAD BAR Located at back right of store

Find out what you can make with these items on the next pages.

PAGE 30 >>


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<< PAGE 28

3 Fast Meal Ideas Use the items in our cart (on previous page) for these quick dinners. 1. Easy Chicken Rub

ValuMarket’s Poultry Cranberry Herb Rub is a great way to add flavor to chicken (top). Whether you are cooking a whole fryer, individual cutlets, or bone-in pieces, this rub is delicious and easy to use. We suggest sprinkling it on your chicken the night before and baking it the next day because the flavor intensifies after a few hours. It’s a great way to add some flavor to chicken salad, soup, or pot pie.

2. Hot Food Deli Options This is one of our favorite features in the whole store! ValuMarket’s hot food in the deli section offers homemade food — fast. Choose an entree and one or two sides. You can purchase entrees and sides individually as well. We chose the pork loin with mashed potatoes

and gravy and roasted asparagus (bottom left). The meal also comes with an option of roll or cornbread. Other hot food options available the day we were there included meatloaf, Salisbury steak, fried chicken, baked chicken, stuffed green peppers, green beans, mixed vegetables, corn, macaroni and cheese, and cheesy potatoes. Entree and two sides: $5.99; entree and one side: $4.99; entree only: $3.99; and side only: $1.99.

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3. Dry Soup Mix

What could be easier than adding water to a dry soup mix? If you are having people over, this is a quick and filling meal. Or you can make it and eat it for a couple of days yourself. When mixed with 8 cups of water, this bag of dry soup mix serves eight people! We liked the Santa Fe Chipotle flavor (pictured bottom right). It’s shown here with the Dare Breton crackers and the Wellaby’s pita chips. PAGE 32 >>


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<< PAGE 30

Add a crunchy topping such as ValuMarketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gingerbread Men sprinkles, which are gluten-free.

A Sweet Ending Both the Talenti Gelato (above) and the Kentucky Proud Bernoulli Small Batch Toasted Almond Ice Cream (lower right) we found at ValuMarket are rich, creamy, and filling. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a large serving to enjoy them. All I need is a quarter cup to fulfill a small sweet ending to my main meal.

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BOOK CLUB: THE MOTHER-DAUGHTER BOOK CLUB

Catching Up Here’s what other area clubs are reading next:

From the book: "It was the first time that we had sort of articulated our major problem. She wanted to die and I wanted her to live and we were enemies who loved each other.”

THE MOTHER-DAUGHTER BOOK CKUB WHEN: bi-monthly WHERE: members' homes CONTACT: Pamela Greenwell

BROWN BAG AND A BOOK Electric City by Elizabeth Rosner Contact: Reneta Sancken, rsancken@nafclibrary.org

greenwell@derbycitylaw.com

Have you read this? STORY & PHOTOS BY PATTI HARTOG

The Mother-Daughter Book Club is a fun group of mothers and their adult daughters, stepdaughters, and daughters-in-law who meet every other month in members’ homes. We caught up with Pamela Greenwell, who founded the club about a year ago, and talked with her about the group’s latest read, All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews. Pamela describes the book as a compelling read about two sisters, one successful yet intent on committing suicide and the other, whose life is messy, trying to stop her. Although mother, father, husband, nieces, and nephews play smaller roles, the book is really about the sisters — their upbringing, relationship, and how one reacts to the other’s desire to kill herself. Pamela was surprised that the book was humorous in spite of the intense subject matter. What did you learn from the book? "The tremendous bonds of family in horrible times. There was also lots of discussion of assisted suicide, mental illness, and related topics." What did the book bring to mind? "The book caused us to consider what

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THE BOOK GROUP The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff Contact: Kathy Reed, kathyreed330@gmail.com

we might have to do, or would do, for a beloved family member struggling with a difficult issue such as this." How did it change your thinking? "It put a face on mental illness and suicide and the effects on the survivors."

THE EPICURIOUS READERS Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty Contact: Michelle Maxim, 58600@homehelpershomecare.com


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Wise&Well

Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet

BY MARK KAELIN

Be Well! To keep colds and flu at bay, “every family member in the house should get a flu shot,” says Alice Kimble, director of health services at Bellarmine University. Strategies you can employ to keep your immune system at full strength are getting plenty of sleep, exercising at least three times a week, and managing your stress, she adds.

Just say 'No' to

Snow!

“Know when to say ‘when,’ ” says physical therapist Patrick Myers at ProRehab Physical Therapy in Middletown. If you’ve neglected your exercise program this season, it might be a better idea to let the kids down the street or a professional clear your snowy sidewalks, Myers adds. “Underestimating how physically demanding shoveling snow is can spell disaster for many older adults,” he says.

Beat the winter blahs! “Don’t hibernate,” says Gary Petiprin, counseling center director at Bellarmine University. Even though cold temps and short days make it easy to stay inside, getting out is good for the

Cabin Fever Setting In?

What are you doing for lunch? Metro Louisville’s Community Services Department offers hot, nutritious lunches to seniors (age 60 and older) at 24 neighborhood locations. To find out more, call 502.574.6725. 36 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

body and mind. “Our brains need sunlight,” Petiprin adds. “It helps regulate our sleep cycle and causes endorphins (feel-good chemicals) to be released, which improve our mood.”

Metro Louisville’s Community Centers offer indoor activities to keep you engaged with others this season. “Two of our centers, Beechmont and Wilderness Road, have billiard tables,” says Bobby Merideth, recreation manager at Louisville Metro Parks. “Community centers offer a variety of services from arts and crafts classes, exercise programs like Silver Sneakers, lunch programs, and even day trips.” To find a center near you, contact Bobby at 502.574.2646 or check louisvilleky.gov/ government/parks/ community-centers.


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TECH TALK: COMMUNICATING WITH LOVED ONES

Staying in Touch Four ways to use technology to keep up with friends and family BY MEGAN M. SECKMAN

J

ill Maurey believes staying up to date with technology will help seniors stay in touch with younger family members in this fast-paced world. And while navigating your new iPad may seem daunting, she can help with that and other technological black holes you might encounter in our digital age. Since 2012, when she founded Generations Tech, Maurey has been teaching the 50-plus demographic how to use the newfangled electronic devices that seem to hit the market daily.

Text messaging Texting is the most crucial way to connect to your younger family members, Maurey says. It’s quick and convenient, and family members can respond to you throughout the day without having to completely stop life to touch base. “Texting is not just for teenagers,” Maurey says. “It is unfortunately underutilized by seniors, but it’s the main form of communication today. Deciding not to text means you may be missing out on a great opportunity for frequent communication with those you love.”

Facetime or Skype

iCloud Photo Sharing

Facetime is already installed on most Apple devices and enables users to video chat over long distance. You can catch up, face-to-face, with your grandchild in Michigan without leaving the living room. Downside: Only for Apple products

A great way to stay in touch is by sharing photos of the ones you love or the events you’ve shared with others. This Apple product works best on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac but can communicate via website (icloud. com) to PCs. Set up a photo album (say, “grandkids” or “Peru”) with a group so everyone can share their photos to the album and leave comments for one another. Everyone in the group can stay connected through sharing photos and creating a dialogue.

Skype is a videochatting service compatible with all mobile devices and is a great way to make inexpensive phone calls from your computer to, say, your daughter overseas. Download the app on mobile devices or go to Skype.com. Downside: Quality of service might be poor in some parts of the world.

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Downside: Works best on Apple products

Goodreads Goodreads is an app for mobile devices (phones and tablets) but is also available at goodreads.com. This app allows you to stay connected to your literary friends, almost like a virtual book club. Set up your profile and build your bookcases with the books you have read, are reading, and want to read. You can read reviews and stay connected with others by viewing what they are reading and creating book groups. Downside: It may be difficult to navigate through the site to find how to connect to others through book groups. (Hint: Select the book first!)


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Connie’s World Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

W

henever I take my car to the auto shop, I think of Daddy. He loved his car like a member of the family and treated it as such. He kept it as shiny as the day it came off the line. Now Daddy didn’t know how to fix a car, but he made sure he surrounded himself with people who did. For Daddy, taking his car to the shop was like taking a child to the pediatrician. Like the helicopter parent, Daddy stayed with his car and hovered, asking questions and delivering unsolicited advice. I find myself now dispensing the same advice to my grown sons about always keeping their oil changed regularly. I can still hear Daddy telling me how the oil “is the lifeblood of a car.” Daddy was on a first-name basis with all of the people who worked on his car, and many remained friends long after he was no longer able to drive. Daddy had a gift for making friends, whether it was through church, the 40 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

grocery, or the auto shop. He also had many friends from the rural area where he grew up. Like the friends he made to care for his car, Daddy always managed to find a friend who could help him in times of need. One such friend was Wendell Piper. Wendell was a wiry man—small in stature but large in heart. He and Daddy went way back. Wendell had a gift for fixing things. Back home in Knob Lick, folks most likely called him a “tinkerer,” but after coming to the city, Wendell had advanced his title to “mechanic.” It seemed well-deserved since he could fix just about anything with a motor. Daddy liked to tinker himself, but he rarely fixed anything. When Daddy tried to tinker with anything mechanical, the only thing he was able to get running was his mouth. In no time at all, Daddy was frustrated with his failure and started firing expletives within earshot of anyone who crossed his path.

Not until Daddy had totally exhausted his colorful vocabulary did he finally throw in the towel — or lug wrench, along with any other tools that had failed him. I remember just such an occasion when Daddy had done everything in his limited power to start his lawn mower to no avail. This was a huge crisis for Daddy since he mowed and manicured his yard with the regularity of the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace. Daddy was king of his house on Bourbon Avenue, and it was imperative that his lawn reflect his own sense of royalty. Frustrated and all “fired-up,” Daddy finally gave in and called for backup. For Daddy, the closest thing to the pit crew for the Indy 500 was Wendell Piper. Good-natured and prompt, Wendell would arrive in record time as Daddy paced. I will never forget how Daddy would finally settle into the small chair next to the front window where he could look out for Wendell, whose arrival prompted a familiar routine. Wendell would walk in the front door with his usual greeting directed to Daddy. “How air ya, ya ol’ bald-headed son of a b----?” As Wendell delivered this same salutation, he always reached over and patted Daddy’s bald head. Daddy would stand with fists balled in his best fighter stance while his wrinkled, weathered face worked itself into a huge grin. This habitual hello always ended with Daddy and Wendell slapping each other on the back in their common salute to days gone by. Once they both wound down, they headed for the garage together where Wendell tinkered and Daddy directed. In spite of Daddy’s unnecessary administrating, his lawn mower soon started purring like a kitten as Daddy reached for his wallet in order to settle with Wendell. It has been many years since Wendell and Daddy delivered their Abbot and Costello-style routine. I imagine them now in that “sweet by and by” tinkering and joking together.


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Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY TIFFANY WHITE & GIOIA PATTON

Powerful Pain Relief Older adults who experience chronic pain have another option for finding relief: electrical stimulation therapy. Researchers at the University of Florida discovered that — with the proper dosage — transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is helpful in alleviating back pain in older adults. The low-voltage electrical currents come from a small batteryoperated machine by way of electrodes placed on the skin. Scientists believe the therapy’s effectiveness comes from its ability to activate opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord.

Whodunnit Murder Mystery > Bristol Bar & Grille

Healthy Bites

It's Christmas Eve at the Sundae Valley Ski Resort, and the feuding Nutcracker and Sweet families gather for a holiday feast ... but murder and mayhem await, as the guest of honor turns up dead! Everyone has a motive, but whodunnit? What do they all have in common, and what would they all kill to prevent? Who is the unexpected visitor who turns the tide? And what is the mysterious gift, wrapped in black? The Nutcracker-Sweet Murders is pure delight ... a treasure not to be missed!

Instead of having meat for dinner, try making Butternut Squash Risotto. The vegetarian recipe, which comes from Chef Wesley Morrison, owner of the personal chef services company Flavor You Can Savor, is loaded with delicious ingredients that will stimulate your taste buds and satisfy your appetite. Chef Wes also caters for KentuckyOne Health’s Ornish Reversal Program, a lifestyle change program focusing on slowing the progression of heart disease.

WHEN: Saturday evenings thru January 9.

Find the recipe on TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

gratuity. A cash bar is available. CONTACT: 502.426.7100 or whodunnitky.com

Seating @ 6:30pm/Show starts @ 7pm WHERE: Bristol Bar & Grille, downtown Louisville TICKETS: $48, includes dinner, show, tax and

Fighting Alzheimer's The Greater Kentucky and Southern Indiana chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association is giving healthcare providers guidance on how they can help Alzheimer’s patients and their families gain more insight about the disease. Home Instead Senior Care has given the association a grant to be used for distributing educational materials, called Packets of Hope, to 1,000 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and their families. The packets, which will be given by healthcare providers, include resources for assisting families with planning upon diagnosis. 42 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

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Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

Ann Hampton Callaway sings Streisand > Louisvillle Orchestra Pops Series

Vocalist Ann Hampton Callaway, dubbed 2014 “Performer of the Year” by BroadwayWorld.com, joins the Louisville Orchestra to perform the amazing song catalog made famous by Barbra Streisand, including: “The Way We Were,” “People,” and “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” Callaway is one of the leading champions of the great American Songbook, having made her mark as a singer, pianist, composer, lyricist, arranger, actress, educator, TV host, and producer. A born entertainer, her unique singing style blends jazz and traditional pop, making her a mainstay in concert halls, theatres, and jazz clubs as well as in the recording studio, on television, and in film. She is best known for a Tony-nominated performance in the hit Broadway musical “Swing!” and for writing and performing the theme song to Fran Drescher’s (1993-’99) hit CBS sitcom “The Nanny.” WHEN: January 16 at 8pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: $26-$69 CONTACT: 502.584.7777 or louisvilleorchestra.org

Southern Fried Funeral > Derby Dinner Playhouse

Funerals bring out the best, the worst, and the funniest in people, and the Frye family is no exception. Southern Fried Funeral is a big-hearted comedy about family, southern style! When Dorothy should be grieving the sudden (and absurd) death of her husband, instead she is playing referee for her dimwitted son Dewey, her type A daughter Sammy Jo, her wild child Harlene, and her brother-in-law Dub. Throw in some nosy neighbors, well-intentioned but comical friends, and a lawyer with ulterior motives, and this comedy will keep you laughing. WHEN: January 12 through February 21, times vary WHERE: Derby Dinner Playhouse Clarksville TICKETS: $37-$46 CONTACT: 812.288.8281 or derbydinner.com

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BY TIFFANY WHITE & GIOIA PATTON

They're On the List Floyd Memorial has been selected as one of the top 500 home health agencies in the United States for the fifth consecutive year. The designation comes from OCS HomeCare, which uses publicly available data from Home Health Compare and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Cost Reports to create the annual HomeCare list of agencies.

Show Boat

> Kentucky Opera Spanning the years from 1880 to 1927, this lyrical masterpiece concerns the lives, loves, and heartbreaks of three generations of show folk on the Mississippi, in Chicago, and on Broadway. The primary plot follows Magnolia, the naive daughter of the show boat captain, as she marries a gambler and moves with him to Chicago. His gambling continues as his debts compound, and soon he deserts her and their young daughter. A subplot concerns the potential arrest of Magnolia's selfless best friend on charges of miscegenation when it's discovered that she is mulatto, and her subsequent downward spiral into despair. The passing of time reunites Magnolia and her now-grown daughter with her family on the show boat as well as with her husband, who eventually returns offering a hopeful second chance at familial fulfillment. Featuring legendary songs such as “Ol’ Man River,” “Can’t Help Lovin’ dat Man,” and “Bill.” WHEN: February 18-20 @ 8pm, February 21 @ 2pm. Come an hour early for a free preview discussion. WHERE: The Brown Theatre TICKETS: starting @ $34 CONTACT: 502.584.7777 or kentuckycenter.org


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Elements for Your

Life Story BY BOB MUELLER

W

hat makes a good story? What is our own story? What nourishes us as we navigate the ups and downs of life? How do we shape a story that encourages gratitude rather than rage, spite, or self-pity? Here are some elements that build our story. None of them is sufficient on its own. How many of these elements exist in your story? • The message that life is a gift. We need stories that encourage our sense of wonder at life’s blessings and nourish our sense of gratitude. • A generous vision. Our story must show that being alive and aware is a privilege and an adventure. • The promise of hope. Our story must be contained

by some spiritual vision. We need to know not only what is but also what might be. • The belief that we are part of something bigger than ourselves. The stories we inherit from our grandparents and greatgrandparents, directly or indirectly, help us understand our family history. Stories about the history of our neighborhood, city, and country help us feel like participants in a community with a shared purpose. Creation stories and other

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religious narratives help us find our place in the universe. • The possibility of revision. We need to know that we can rewrite our story as our life unfolds. We must change our stories in order to grow. For generations, people have come to the United States in search of a new story, and many have found one. In the most elevated version, the story is about freedom. At its worst, it’s about power, greed, and wealth. Whichever version we tell, it is a sustaining story and has given millions a new sense of identity. Our personal stories have beginnings and middles and will surely have endings as well. But because we can’t know the endings, we must be open to revising our stories throughout our lives. In doing so, we must be careful to revise in the light of honest self-appraisal and a grateful spirit rather than to cover up misdeeds or rationalize bad behavior. It’s easy to create villains on whom we pin the blame for our suffering. It’s harder to become the heroes we want to be. We need to be conscientious editors, jettisoning the parts of our story that no longer further its development. We need to add elements that create a more unified and meaningful narrative — one that sustains us through the challenges of work and family life, one that gives us hope and strength.

“In the end,” writes St. John of the Cross, “we shall be examined in love.” All human beings are called to being in love. This is the lesson we have to learn in the end, embracing lovers of all persuasions — believers, half-believers, and unbelievers alike. Life and love cannot be possessed or clutched at. Think of the three ways of ripening: being awake, choosing wisely, and learning to love. Prayer and meditation are ways of becoming more awake to what the world has to offer. Choosing well requires self-knowledge. And living deeply requires relating to others in community and communion. Each of our lives is the greatest comedy and drama of all. We struggle to say “yes” to life, accept it as a gift, knowing we pass this way but once. We live as courageously as we know how since we are not in control of the unknown and unexpected. We embrace hope as a way of living into the thanks we struggle to say every day. The new really is possible. We expect it. We work for it. We fail. We succeed and fail again. In short, we gain the glory of being human by accepting our place in a family of actors in a moral adventure. We bless what is real, and we’re astonished at the wonder of being alive. It doesn’t get any better.

Bob Mueller is vice president of development at Hosparus. Visit his website at bobmueller.org.


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At my age, I can’t expect to be young. Although, I recently read a survey that shows that people believe middle age now extends to the age of 68. I guess that means I still have enough time to have a few more middle-of-life crises. I may be having one now... The drop in my Shop Till You Drop comes quickly now. I can embrace the silver in my hair but not the bristles that the Chin Hair Fairy deposits overnight. I don’t know why they didn’t teach us anything useful in high school, such as how to care for aging parents or how to care for our aging selves. They could have warned us — instead of filling our heads with geometry theorems and history dates — that our joints would not last forever, nor would our hearing, sight, teeth, hair, or taste buds. And there was something else. I forget...oh, yeah. Our memory. Now we are on our own. Checking in with friends: Do you have this ache? This thought? This condition? Hoping for some guidance. Hoping for some hope. We do the best we can with what 48 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

stamina and good cheer we have left. Now when I think about buying new towels, I wonder if perhaps the old, soft ones will last me after all. Is it time for a new mattress? Perhaps the one I have could survive a few more years — maybe longer than I will. I do think the media does the baby boomers a huge disservice. I read headlines for articles telling me how much money I need to have for retirement. Really? Is there ever going to be enough money? And then there are stories about the 90-year-old woman who plays tennis every day. Or the 80-year-old who looks 70. Or the 70-year-old who is having sex five times a week. Or the 60-year-old who just climbed Mount Everest. Are these articles meant to inspire us or shame us? I am not, nor will I ever be any one of the above. I have my own list of events, activities, and adventures that are a little quieter and for me more fulfilling and most likely would never make the headlines. Exercise has never been a form of entertainment for me. Although at times I have been a walker and a jogger, I

had two hip replacements before I even qualified for Social Security. Now I am in what I call Old Lady Yoga class once a week combined with gentle stretches in the morning. And meditation. There is the complaint that members of the older generation have become invisible. How could that be? With our silver hair and wrinkles that come with wisdom, how can you not see us? I think about death, but not in a morbid way. They say that growing old beats the alternative. But we don’t know what the alternative is like, do we? It seems there are plenty of ways to die, none of them pleasant. There is something to be said for dropping dead while browsing the shelves in the library. Science has helped us to live longer, but the health care system isn’t helping us live longer very comfortably. As I watch the leaves fall layer upon layer in my yard — the coming of another season — and the squirrels gathering stores for the winter, so will I gather my thoughts and my wishes for another spring. My one hope is that I die soon enough to have a happy ending.


Fight Caregiving Misconceptions BY LISA M. PETSCHE

Caring for a chronically ill or frail senior relative can offer many rewards, but it also involves physical, psychological, and emotional demands. Stress can be further compounded by certain thoughts and belief systems. Read on for some common misconceptions and unhealthy behaviors among caregivers and what you should do instead.

UNHEALTHY COPING

Caregivers can fall into misconceptions in both thinking and behavior. Faulty thinking • You can and should do all the caregiving alone. • No one else can take good care of your relative. Maladaptive behavior • Devoting all of your time and energy to the caregiving role. • Promising the care receiver or their family that you will never place the relative in long-term care. • Withholding information from other family members about your relative’s condition and needs. Lisa M. Petsche is a social worker and a freelance writer specializing in boomer and senior health matters. She has personal and professional experience with elder care.

HEALTHY COPING

Use these strategies to prevent unhealthy behavior patterns. Acceptance • Accept the reality of your relative’s illness. Allow yourself to experience all emotions that surface. Let go of any bitterness resulting from unrealized plans and dreams.

Simplification • Eliminate unnecessary stress in your life. Set priorities, streamline tasks, and learn to settle for less than perfection. Hire help if finances permit.

• Accept that what your relative can do may fluctuate. Be flexible about expectations.

• Take things one day at a time so you don’t become overwhelmed.

Information • Ask a friend to research your relative’s health condition and share information among family members.

Self-Preservation • Look after your body. Eat nutritious meals, get adequate rest, exercise, and see your primary physician regularly.

• Be open to learning practical skills, such as proper transferring and bathing techniques. Mastering these tasks will make caregiving safer and less stressful. The local office on aging is a good resource for information. Communication • Be patient. Keep communication lines open as you and your relative adjust to the illness. • Keep the family up to date about changes in your relative and include the rest of the family in decision-making. Preparation • Find a medical specialist you and your relative respect and trust. Ask what to expect in terms of symptom progression as well as caregiving skills, medical equipment, and community support that might be needed. • Talk openly with your relative about his or her wishes regarding living arrangements, surrogate decision-making, advance directives, and funeral arrangements. Don’t make promises you may not be able to keep. • Arrange for your relative to complete advance directives, powers of attorney, and a will.

• Set aside quiet time to nurture your spirituality and help to keep you grounded. • Do something that provides you with meaning and purpose outside of caregiving. • Find something relaxing you can do to give yourself daily enjoyment — perhaps reading or listening to music. In addition, schedule regular breaks from caregiving duties. Connection • Stay connected to friends. Find at least one person you can talk to openly who will listen and empathize. It’s important to express your thoughts and feelings. • Connect with other caregivers who understand what you are going through. Join a support group in your community or on the Internet. Assistance • Accept offers of help. Ask other family members to share the load and be specific about what’s needed. • If you don’t have family nearby or they’re not willing or able to assist, take advantage of respite services in your community. Winter 2015/2016 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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5 THINGS TO KNOW About Medicare & Medicaid Insights & tips to help you navigate your benefits

1 Never Miss a Payment You can have your Medicare prescription drug plan premium automatically deducted from your monthly Social Security check. The first deduction will take three months to start and three months’ worth of premiums are deducted at once. Contact your drug plan to start the deductions.

2

Free Diabetes Testing If you’re at risk of developing diabetes, getting tested is the best way to stay on top of your health before problems arise. Medicare covers up to two fasting blood glucose tests each year. If your doctor agrees to pay the Medicare-approved amount for the services, you pay nothing for these diabetes screening tests.

— three —

4

Help With Hospice Medicare covers hospice care, a service that provides palliative care for terminally ill patients. Hospice care includes support for caregivers, physical care, counseling, drugs, equipment, and supplies for the terminal illness.

In Kentucky, Medicaid pays for nursing home care, but not assisted living or personal care services. There are some limited home-care Medicaid benefits.

5. Watch Your Gifting

If you give away any assets in the five years before applying for Medicaid, your application for benefits will be denied for a certain period of time based on the amount of the gift. Medicaid presumes you made the gift to get out of paying for your care.

Information compiled by Kelly Gannott, attorney with Kentucky Elderlaw and Medicare.gov 50 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

Did you know?


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How to Use These Directories CONTENTS

These directories are organized first by this location chart. On the following pages, you’ll find descriptive listings of local facilities in each of the eight categories listed under Contents at right. Larger enhanced listings are listed first and are paid for by the facility. Regular listings follow.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory:

Adult Day Care............................56 Home Health...................... 68 Aging-in-Place Communities.....57 Nursing/Rehab..................... 76 Alzheimer’s Care.....................58 Personal Care..................... 84 Assisted Living.........................64 Retirement Communities.... 85

Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost

of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Facilities by Location Use this chart and the map at left to quickly view facilities by location. Facilities are organized by zone letters and colors that coordinate with the map.

-P la Al ce zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv in Nu g rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca re Re Co tir e m m m e un nt iti es

g-

ElderServe, Inc.

40202

A

X

Christian Care Communities (Chapel House, Christian Health Center, Friendship House)

40203

A

X

Treyton Oak Towers

40203

A

The Altenheim Eastern Star Home

40204 40204

A A

Highlands Community Ministries Outreach Program

40205

A

Nazareth Home

40205

A

Twinbrook Hotel Apartments

40205

Golden LivingCenter - Mt. Holly

40206

Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

40217

Belmont Village

40207

Golden LivingCenter - St. Matthews

40207

Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Louisville (Sally’s Garden, Sam Swope Care Center, Masonic Home Village, Miralea, The Pillars Assisted Care Center)

40207

54 todaystransitionsnow.com | Winter 2015/2016

in

Zone

Ag

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name

ul

tD

in

ay

Ca

re

If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

A

X

X

X

A

X

A

X

B

X

B

X

B

X

X

X

X X

X


Ag

in

g-

in

-P la Al ce zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv Nu in g rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca Re re t C o ir m em m e un nt iti es

re Ca ay tD

Zone

ul

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name Westport Place Health Campus

40207

B

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

40222

B

X X

Episcopal Church Home

40222

B

Golden LivingCenter - Camelot

40222

B

X

Magnolia Springs Senior Living

40222

B

X

Providence Park Louisville

40223

B

X

Brookdale Blankenbaker The Forum at Brookside

40243 40243

B B X

X

Clarity Pointe Louisville Forest Springs Health Campus

40245 40245

Magnolia Springs East Senior Living

40245

Oaklawn Health & Rehabilitation

40245

Genesis Klondike Center

40218

C

X

Presbyterian Homes of Louisville (Westminster 40218 Health & Rehab Center, Rose Anna Hughes Home) Franciscan Health Care Center 40219

C

X

C

Genesis Regency Center Wesley Manor Retirement Community

40219 40219

Genesis Regis Woods Golden LivingCenter - Hillcreek Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway Barton House

40220 40220 40228 40241

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community Springhurst Pines - (Cornell Trace, Parr’s at Springhurst, Springhurst Health and Rehab

40241 40241

X

X

X

B

X

C C X

X

X

X

X X

X

C

C

Traditions at Beaumont

40291

C

Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Good Samaritan Society

40299 40299 40299

C X C C

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

40214

D

40272

D

Heartsong Memory Care Park Terrace Health Campus

40272 40272

D X D

Green Valley Care Center

47150

E

The Villages at Historic Silvercrest Baptist Health La Grange Short-Term Rehabilitation

47150 40031

E G

CountrySide Meadows

40031

G

Providence Richwood Friendship Health & Rehab

40031 40056

G G

Genesis Crestview Center Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Shelbyville

40065 40065

H H X

I

X

X

40047

J

X X

X

X X

The Gathering Club

40211

X

X

Brookdale Stonestreet

ElderClub

X

X

40241

Green Meadows Health Care Center

X

X

40291

X

X

X

Morning Pointe

X X

X

Sunrise of Louisville

X

X

C C X C C C C

X

X

B

X

X

B X B

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X X

X X

X

Genesis Kensington Center

42701

J

Presbyterian Homes & Services of Kentucky - Helmwood Healthcare

42701

K

X

Autumn Woods Health Campus

47150

K

X

Hampton Oaks Thornton Terrace Health Campus

47170 47243

K K

X X

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Helpful Resources FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

ADULT DAY CARE

Fern Creek/Highview United Ministries Adult Day Health Center Providing a structured program balancing physical & cognitive activities designed to help frail older adults function at their highest levels. State licensed medical model providing nursing services, medication administration, personal care, memory care, meals, & caregiver respite for over 24 years. Medicaid Waiver, VA, LTCI, & Private Pay.

9300 Beulah Church Rd. 40291 502.762.9612 • adcdir@fchum.org fchum.org

LAW

After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs. I can also help connect you with resources to help financially.

All at NO COST to you! Patti Naiser SeniorHomeTransitions.com 502.396.9228

SENIOR MOVING SERVICES

Timmel Law LLC – KY & IN lic. ELDER PLANNING WORKSHOPS & CONSULTATIONS NO CHARGE MEDICAID & VA BENEFIT Helping individuals and their families including those with elder or special needs issues identify, evaluate and plan for long term care, estate and life care options. Call or email to join us for a workshop where you can learn about Estate Planning and protecting your loved ones’ assets.

Timmel Law, LLC 812.590.2771 aa@timmellaw.com timmellaw.com

Senior Home Transitions

INSURANCE

Robin Brown, 21 years with State Farm,

says she likes to help people plan a good life:“We help people protect the things they can least afford to lose: their home, their car, their income when they’re sick or hurt, and their earning capability. The unexpected happens often in life. I want my clients to be prepared for it. We’re also here to help clients assemble and preserve wealth in the most tax efficient ways possible. We educate clients to help them take care of the people who are special to them and to plan for retirement.” Let Robin help you plan for your dreams and manage risk to protect what is yours now and in the future.

Robin Brown, CLU, ChFC, CASL Agent State Farm 4209 Shelbyville Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 502.897.6476 • robinbrowninsurance.com

TRANSPORTATION

Transitioning Services

Able Care, Inc., since 2001

We provide help to senior adults who have decided to relocate to a new home, “rightsize”an existing home or simply organize parts of their home that have been neglected. Pick and choose from our Service Options:

Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation. Our service is available for:

-Personalized move by caring professionals -Recommendations for the best living situation, downsizing or relocation -Packing, moving, transferring utilities -Professional real estate services -Unpacking and settling in We are with you every step of the way! Call to schedule a complimentary visit to assess your needs and get you started.

Linda Hyers, RN: 502.558.5322 Kay Barringer: 502.643.9286 transitioningservices.com

• Physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy • Social functions and daily errands • Evenings and weekends with advance notice Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business.

Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 502.267.1911 • ablecareinc.com

If you would like to advertise in the Helpful Resources Directory, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

– THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT –


What to Wear

BY ALISSA HICKS / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

TravelReady Escaping the cold this winter? If you’re traveling south to thaw out, trying to figure out what to wear from a cold climate to a warm climate can be tricky. Stylist Alissa Hicks shows how to properly layer your clothing when traveling between varying temps. Whether you’re flying or driving, you want to stay comfortable. I would suggest going with a great pair of comfortable leggings. From Stylist Alissa Hicks there, add a lightweight sweater. Instead of a large jacket, try a vest. It’s less bulky yet will still keep you warm. A blanket scarf is a must for anyone traveling, especially if you plan on flying. It’s large and warm so you can keep the chill off by wearing it as a scarf, but when you’re cozying up on the plane for a nap, it’s great to use as a blanket. I always like to take a larger, structured bag as well. It’s easy to slip under your feet on a plane, and it’s also large enough to hold a book and any layers you might shed once you reach your warm destination. Last but not least, a good pair of flats are perfect for this type of travel. Laurie Valentine is wearing: Shoes, $128, available at Modern Elegance, 3921 Chenoweth Sq, 502.883.4721; Scarf, $36, available at Modern Elegance; Leggings, $56, available at Olivia & Co., 4903 Brownsboro Rd, 502.426.4046; Sweater, $65, available at Olivia & Co.; Vest, $95, available at Olivia & Co.; Bag, $69, available at Olivia & Co.

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Today's Transitions - Winter 2015-2016  
Today's Transitions - Winter 2015-2016