Issuu on Google+

Content Catalogue September 2011

Copyright TIPSS 2011

1


Content Articles Special 1: Shopping for School Special2: Geocaching - Fun for all the Family Book Reviews: Some of the Best Short Stories Beauty Tips: Guaranteed Glamour Gardening Feature: Start Planting Now... Design Tips: Double Glazing/Window Replacement Health: Postnatal Illness Humour: The Whole World’s Going to the Dogs... Home & Interiors: Decorating a Conservatory Motoring Feature: Nissan Leaf Road Test Plant of the Month: Chinese Lantern Poet’s Corner: A Contemporary Romance A Proverbial Life...: Bargain Hunting Recipe: Picnic Loaf Science Facts Spice of Life: Caraway Tech Review: Home is where the Handset is Travel Feature: Phnom Penh Working from Home: An Empty Nest

3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 15 16 17 18 18 19 20 21

Puzzles Calcudoku Cartoon 1 Cartoon 2 Children’s Page Codeword Drop Down Cryptic Crossword General Knowledge Crossword Number Cruncher Pictogram Quick Crossword Quiz 1: Beer & Wine Quiz 2: TV Bars & Coffee Shops Spot the Difference Sudoku: Easy & Hard Wordsearch: Occupations

22 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 26 27 27 28 28 29 29 30


Articles Special 1 September, and it’s back to school time. And it’s every September that we’re reminded of the brutal truth that children grow.

Shopping for School During the course of the school year you sort of become used to the fact that the hems of his trousers are gradually creeping further and further up his calf, that the toes of his trainers are getting lumpier and lumpier, that his midriff is no longer reliably covered by the evershortening tails of his school shirt. But as the school holidays draw gratefully to a close you realise with a jolt that his uniform is no longer even decent, and that he needs a whole new set of schmutter. This is even more of a jolt if you have a daughter – you can’t send her back to school looking like a lowrent Britney Spears - and so September becomes the Month of the Ordeal of Shopping for School. This used to be the one time of year when Good Old Woolie’s was indeed a Wonder. It sold not only the necessary clobber but also the new geometry set and calculator and ring-binders and all the other bits and pieces that seemed to need replacing every time they had to go back to school. Now I have found other shops that obligingly provide under one roof the same cornucopia of education-related items that Woolworth used to do, but the shock of the loss of Woolie’s jerked me out of my habituated take-it-forgranted complacency and I found myself becoming increasingly enraged by the need to source an entire suite of new stuff every year. Nevertheless, kids grow; and as a parent you’re faced with two choices every time September comes round: either buy cheap stuff that may or may not last

the year, or buy expensive stuff that they’re going to grow out of well before it wears out. The former is the obvious choice and if, by the time July rolls round, they look like junior Worzel Gummidges – well, they won’t have to put up with it for long. But something inside me says that the cheap stuff is lovingly hand-stitched by six-year-olds in Indonesian sweatshops for 10p a day plus a handful of rice on alternate Thursdays, and my conscience just won’t let me do it. So I go for the nice stuff, and drain the bitter cup of resentful fury at having to ditch perfectly good clobber every July and replace it in September. Now, though, a new initiative is off the ground in my home town. It’s called BootXchange, and it’s a simple trade-in system: you hand in last year’s slightly worn but still perfectly good high-end brand-name sports shoes plus a £5 administration fee, and in return you receive the hand-me-downs from the next generation up. They’ve only been worn once a week for 20 or 30 weeks and, being quality gear, they still have at least two seasons wear in them. Voila – new boots for a fiver. This is a good scheme and should be expanded to other school clothing. Actually, you can hand in the kids’ outgrown sweatshirts and stuff and they will indeed be passed on to the less well-off kids whose folks can’t afford new. At present there’s a stigma attached to second-hand clothes but now we’re all poor, our attitudes should change and we should see it as straightforward and indeed praiseworthy September thrift. In fact I propose to take it a step further. Now I’ve reached a certain age I’m going to start a TrouserXchange scheme, where I can hand in my desperately-clinging-on-to-youth jeans and accept instead a couple of pairs of the high-waist cavalry twill slacks that are appropriate to my years. Oh, and I’ll be exchanging all my Ben Sherman polo shirts for a drawer full of cardies.

Copyright TIPSS 2011

3


Special 2 Last month, we introduced you to Geocaching, its history and how to go about doing it. This month, we are going to share some Geocaching experiences from someone who has actually joined in the fun. Trevor lives in North Wales.

Geocaching Fun For All The Family

“Geocaching is something I’ve done with my family for a few years locally and countrywide and is brilliant fun. While looking for caches, some of the things we have come across include a huge cave just 500m from our front-door, hidden coves leading to the sea and some amazing waterfalls. We also discovered a number of ruined castles and the ancient well of St Dyfnog at Llanrhaeadr along with its beautiful church – home to one of the most amazing stained glass windows in the UK. Along with those great finds, we’ve seen wonderful examples of nature in all its glory – orchids, tadpoles, newts, lizards and wild strawberries are just some of the wonderful array of wildlife and flowers we’ve come across near caches. Knowing where to look for caches is really simple no matter where you are in the world. Once registered on the Geocaching website, you’ll get weekly emails telling you about caches within a 50-mile radius of your location and it’s not unusual for there to be several hundred newly hidden during the week. There’s a whole host of fun events staged around cache-hunting too, like the time around 60 cachers staged a flash-mob in the centre of Chester, put on silly hats and nattered loudly to each other for 15 minutes in-between two whistle blasts. It was particularly enjoyable because all the other people in the vicinity were completely bemused as to what was happening. My children thought this was absolutely wonderful!

What’s great about Geocaching is that it’s so varied; there are lots of different types and sizes of caches to find and many ways to find them. There are drive-bys, which are perfect if you can’t walk too far, while others might be hidden at the summit of steep hills or alongside disused railway tracks. You never know who you might meet either: we once met three sprightly elderly ladies looking for the same caches as me and my family. At the time we were up high on the Great Orme in Llandudno – we got chatting and they told us they had travelled from Birmingham for a Line Dancing Competition and were Geocaching in their free-time. So as you can see, Geocaching’s a great way to spend time with your family enjoying the great outdoors, come rain, shine or snow – yes, we’ve even been caching in the snow.” You don’t have to live in North Wales though to do Geocaching. It’s a world-wide initiative so it can be done on holiday as well as where you live. It’s worth buying a good-quality map or downloading one from the Ordnance Survey website for a small fee to help you become familiar with the terrain before you set out. by Trevor Arnold

4

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Book Reviews Some of the best

Short stories Want to read more but never seem able to find the time? Our collection of fantastic short story books features something for everyone – the perfect way to become involved in a highimpact or touching tale, when all you have is twenty minutes. Collected Short Stories by Roald Dahl

The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

A complete collection of dark, twisted and fantastically written short stories, this is perfect for teenagers and adults. With over fifty lingering tales, this book contains favourites such as ‘Lamb to the Slaughter’, where a guilty wife attempts to conceal the murder of her husband by feeding the only evidence to the police. Genius!

Although this is more of a novella, it is one of the greatest short stories: dark, captivating and with a torrent of hidden meaning flowing beneath the surface. Beautifully written and darkly magical, it’s a must-read.

Sleep by Roddy Doyle For an introduction to this charming Irish writer, Sleep is a lovely text, in which a husband admires his sleeping wife and reflects upon his life with her. Despite the brevity of the tale, Doyle develops strong characters, combining context with emotion to create a softness and affection which is incredible touching.

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka This wonderful story tells the tale of Gregor Samsa, who one day wakes up to find that he has turned into an insect. Exploring the themes of man and the natural world, alienation and morality, this tale is darkly funny and brilliantly written.

The Bottle Imp by Robert Louis Stevenson The Bottle Imp can grant any wish, but with a chill-

ing caveat: die with it in your possession and your soul will burn in hell for eternity (not a happy thought) - and the bottle can only be sold for less than the purchase price. When Keawe finds himself in desperate need of the bottle, he discovers it only to realise it has a sinister value of just one cent. This is suspense story-telling at its best.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman This is the brilliantly written account of postnatal depression in the Victorian era, recounting the decline of a young woman’s mental health and the lack of understanding from her family as she is imprisoned in a room of her house. Both sinister and desperately sad, this will grip any reader until the very last line.

Copyright TIPSS 2011

Oscar Wilde’s Stories for all Ages by Oscar Wilde and Stephen Fry This wonderful collection combines some of the best tales of Oscar Wilde, presented in a beautifully illustrated book, featuring a foreword and introduction to each story by his biggest fan, Stephen Fry. For first time visitors to Wilde’s work, ‘The Selfish Giant’ is a must-read, telling the enchanting story of a giant who lives perpetually in Winter, until he allows children into his castle and his heart.

5


Beauty Tips Now that the long, hot days of summer have faded to memory and the crisp nip in the air has marked the arrival of autumn, the low maintenance, casual and laidback beauty styles that have seen us through last season are in much need of updating.

Guaranteed

Glamour The light covering of tinted moisturiser and sweep of mascara that seemed so effortless yet effective when paired with beach tanned skin, becomes totally redundant when competing with a weather-beaten face. Although the dark nights take a little getting used to, it’s not all doom and gloom, as this time of year provides the perfect opportunity to expand your make-up bag, commit to a skin care regime and experiment with some brand new beauty looks. And we’ve certainly seen some exciting trends hitting the catwalk for this season. All of the top designers have showcased clothing collections full of sumptuous, indulgent fabrics that epitomise winter chic. But these collections would not have been half as effective if not combined with styled make-up and hair that, of course, is crucial in completing the look. The top make-up trends for this season have been established, so all that’s left is for us to take style inspiration and exchange our usual staid beauty routine for a truly inspired new look. Sporting ‘swinging sixties’ style, Anna Sui focused all attention on the eyes, with thick black lines of liquid liner and superbly volumised lashes, teamed with nude lips and natural hair. In contrast, Oscar de la Renta chose striking blusher shades, heavily defined brows and a prominent pink pout, with hair swept off the face in a classic ponytail; whilst Donna Karan used autumnal shades of orange, tangerine and rust to create striking eyeshadow hues. The nineties were revisited by Vera Wang. Grunge style was recreated with smudgy black liner, roughly applied metallic shadow and frosty pink lips finished with mussed-up hair - in true ‘rock chick’ style. But the trend that really seems to stand out is classic Hollywood glamour. Adopted by Diane von Furstenberg the look combines ravishing red lips, flawless foundation, a light smoky eye, curled and subtly mascara’d lashes and, of course, immaculately blow dried hair. It’s a return to full on glamour that pays homage to a bygone era. The vampish style is undeniably sexy and the vintage edge makes it unquestionably chic. It’s sophisticated, classy, refined and totally feminine. As a high maintenance trend you might think that it’s all a bit too much trouble, but it’s amazing what a difference embracing even just one element can make - it is well worth a try.

6

Copyright TIPSS 2011


To create the look you need the right tools... A flawless base is essential. Begin by using a light moisturiser and add a creamy matt foundation to even out skin tone. (1. All About Face foundation, Ivory, £1.49 ).

studio 28 design & print

NOT YOUR AVERAGE MAGAZINE DESIGNERS We go that extra mile so your best magazine always looks its best!

Brows must be tamed so use a brush to create a sweeping arch, pluck unwanted stray hairs and set in place with a gel.

“We have used Studio 28 from the business very beginning of setting up our totally venture. Ed at Studio 28 has been a supportive in helping us to produce quality magazine, his expertise and knowledge of the industry has been invaluable to us.”

Gisella Wiley

Combine a mixture of smoky shades on eyes and add a flick of black eyeliner, curl lashes and finish with mascara. (2. Body Shop eyeshadow £16, 3. Next black kohl pencil £3, 4. Body Shop ‘big and curvy’ waterproof mascara £10).

Wolverhampton West Magazine

Call Ed for a quote: 01332 780087 or email: studio@s28.co.uk For examples of our work please visit our website: www.s28.co.uk

Sweep a soft shade of blusher onto cheeks (5. Next blusher £4) and then concentrate on the all important pout. Find a red lipstick that compliments your skin tone

(6. Body Shop lipsticks, various shades).

Cool skin tones suit pink undertones, warm complexions are complemented by orangey reds and by choosing blue undertones in red lipstick, teeth will appear noticeably whiter. byHelen Jane Taylor

Copyright TIPSS 2011

7


Gardening

Start Planting Now for a Great Display of Spring Flowering Bulbs

I love this month, not least because it gives me carte blanche for thinking about something I adore: spring flowering bulbs such as daffodils and other narcissus. Why? Because for best results the bulbs for these spring delights need to be planted in the autumn. Planted from now onwards, they have a good chance to grow roots and start to build up energy for making a great display next spring. Choose your daffodils carefully and you can have a display starting in late winter (from varieties such as ‘February Gold’) right through until mid-spring. When looking through the selection in catalogues or on garden centre shelves, just check flowering times which will be clearly indicated on the pack. Sometimes this will be as numerals rather than actual dates. For example, February to March could be indicated as 2-3 or sometimes even II-III. Spring flowering bulbs are generally completely hardy in our climate so unless hit by serious extremes of weather (such as prolonged flooding), they will

8

keep coming year after year. There should be planting depths written on the packs of bulbs you buy or order, but if not it is generally better to plant slightly too deep rather than too shallowly. As a guide, I would advise planting at roughly three times the height of the bulb. If planted too shallowly they don’t perform so well and are more likely to be accidentally dug up when you’re planting other things. Buying larger quantities of bulbs usually makes them significantly cheaper per bulb and there are always multipack offers to be found, so shop about and choose carefully, but whatever you go for, unless you choose the very elite super-pricey bulbs, they’ll represent superb value for money. If you’re looking to plant a large expanse, perhaps a bank or the area along the sides of the drive, go for daffodils by the sack rather than by the bag. I’m a real fan of crocus – choose from purple, lilac, striped, cream, yellow, orange or white. They’re very good value, but here’s a word of warning – I always find that the super-bargain priced megabags of crocus contain a lot of yellow and orange crocus which the sparrows love to shred. It’s better value to pay a little more for smaller single colour bags and avoid the yellows and oranges. Once established, spring bulbs multiply quite rapidly, so you should end up with more than you started with – this means it’s important to plant at the suggested distances apart, even if it may feel a little sparse for the first year or two. If you want a high-impact look from the start, then you can plant a little closer than suggested, but bear in mind the bulbs will become congested and need lifting and replanting all the sooner. Spring flowering bulbs need little attention once established – just give them an occasional feed and once the clumps become congested, divide and replant them to give each bulb more space so it can fulfil its potential.

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Where to grow them: Try simple daffodils like ‘Carlton’, ‘King Alfred’ or English bluebells grown in random plantings, scattered and then planted where they fall, beneath trees in your garden. They’ll look great and often produce a really good display beneath the outer spread of trees where it may otherwise be difficult to encourage much else to grow. Shrubs and even climbers can also be used for naturalised bulb plantings, but because they’re smaller, grow the more diminutive bulbs such as miniature Narcissus ‘Tete a Tete’, ‘Hawera’, ‘Peeping Tom’, rich blue grape hyacinths or delicate Chinodoxa. On steep banks where gardening is difficult, why not grow masses of bulbs? Planting on the near vertical may be tricky, but once there you can enjoy the display for years to come. Pots or other good-looking containers make great homes for bulbs. If you’ve fallen for anything particularly small or expensive, pots can be the answer and will mean you can enjoy and not lose those tiny spring bulb jewels amongst their larger relatives.

Larger planters including tubs and window boxes are brilliant for bulbs too – try a host of golden daffodils in a smart blue pot, some delicate dwarf iris or Iris reticulata in a window box or pot on the front steps where you’ll be able to enjoy their good looks and their subtle perfume. Whichever type of spring bulb you have in mind, and wherever you intend to grow them, start planning and buying now so that they can be in the ground promptly.

You can get great Grow Your Own Veg results with Pippa’s unique ‘Grow Your Own with Pippa Greenwood’. Order your veg plants from www.pippagreenwood. com and your garden-ready plants are delivered in May at a great time for planting. What makes it unique is that Pippa will email you every week about what you’re growing – lots of tips and help, ensuring great results. It’s great value with various pack sizes available, eg up to 66 plants plus 6 packets of seed for just £39.00, plus that weekly advice. by Pippa Greenwood

Design Tips Design Tips Double Glazing / Window Replacement Many people believe that a house loses most of its heat through the roof. However, windows are actually the main cause of heat loss. Replacing your windows is a big and expensive job, but you will reap the dividends by having a warmer house and reduced heating bills. If you are thinking about replacing your windows, you should consider installing double glazing at the same time. As well as its heat saving and draught-proofing properties, double glazing provides better security for your home too. And it also reduces noise pollution from outside. Do your homework before shopping around for the best price and service. Consider the type of frame you want; UPVC, wood, aluminium or metal. Always replace your windows with a style that’s in keeping with your property. Don’t forget that windows can be an escape route in case of fire, so you need to be able to open them fully. A small window at the top will allow you to open it to provide extra ventilation in the summer. Before choosing an installation company ask for recommendations from your neighbours and friends. Obtain at least three quotes and inspect the guarantee that should come with the new windows.

Copyright TIPSS 2011

9


Health Caring for your long-awaited baby should be the most wonderful experience, but for many mums, at some time in the first few days, weeks or months, it simply is not.

Postnatal Illness

Baby blues Around 50-80% of new mums get the ‘baby blues’ when they feel, not surprisingly, exhausted, anxious and weepy during the first few days after the birth. This usually disappears without the need for treatment about 10 days after the birth. Postnatal depression (PND) Around 10-15% of women will suffer more severe postnatal depression, sometimes weeks or months after the birth of their baby. About half of cases occur within the first three months, and 75% of cases by six months. These mums experience more powerful and prolonged symptoms of depression such as: • constant weepiness • anxiety, tension • difficulty in bonding with the baby • loss of libido • sleep disturbances, restlessness • exhaustion • feeling isolated or living in a ‘bubble’ • feelings of guilt and resentment Many women do not realise they are suffering from postnatal depression and battle on without getting the help they need. It is often women who have high expectations of themselves and of motherhood that find the reality of caring for a new baby hard to cope with. If you feel depressed, it’s important to let family and friends know how you feel so that you can get support. Your GP can discuss treatment options with you, such as counselling and anti-depressants and direct you to local mothers’ groups which can be of enormous support to new mums. Puerperal psychosis A very small percentage of women (between one and three in every 1,000), suffer from puerperal psychosis, which causes severe mental breakdown and may include symptoms such as manic behaviour and hallucinations. Treatment options include hospitalisation, drugs and counselling. Getting support Being at home with a new baby that seems to need constant feeding and changing, who takes all your attention and leaves you feeling exhausted, can be an isolating experience. Take up any offers of help and support from friends and family. If you feel you are not coping, always talk to your GP or health visitor.

10

It’s normal to feel emotional and exhausted after having a baby, but symptoms of PND include constant crying, feeling cut off from everyone else, an inability to sleep, feeling anxious and tense and unable to bond with your baby. If you feel low or depressed, don’t try to cope on your own and don’t be afraid to ask for help – all new mums need the support of family and friends. Don’t put yourself under pressure to keep the house clean or prepare big meals – rest when your baby sleeps. If you feel you are not coping, talk to your health visitor or GP – and don’t feel embarrassed or ashamed that you’re not handling motherhood as well as other mums seem to be. Talk to other mums – you’ll find they’re probably feeling just as overwhelmed as you are. Despite greater awareness of PND, it’s thought that only about half of mothers who need help are getting it. So don’t keep your feelings to yourself – the sooner you talk about it, the quicker you can get support and, if needed, treatment.

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Humour

The whole world’s going to the dogs... A few years ago, I was teaching piano to a seven year-old when he asked me why I had never auditioned for the X Factor. This particular student knew all about my band, had seen us perform and even owned several of our albums. From what I could tell, he was simply trying to fathom why we hadn’t yet elected to jump on a train, go see Simon Cowell and make ourselves ridiculously mega-famous. What an excellent question, I thought. Initially I responded by opening up a complex debate on the subject of professional integrity and personal life goals, but I soon discovered that he was far more interested in discussing whether a goat could ride a skateboard, so I let it drop. However, I have often found myself revisiting this moment and trying to sum up exactly what it is that sticks in my throat about Mr Cowell And His Evil Empire. Marginalised music fans claim X Factor is ‘ruining music’. I’m not in the least bit worried about that. It doesn’t matter how many fizzy cola bottles Haribo sell, The Fat Duck will still be booked up ad infinitum and mankind’s pursuit of excellence will ultimately prevail. But this is what bothers me. Last weekend, trumpet-lunged Scotsman Jai McDowall won Britain’s Got Talent 2011. He’s an affable fellow and I wish him all the best, but something he said before his first audition continues to niggle: ‘I sing all the time in the car and the shower, but I’ve never actually performed professionally before’. It makes me want to ask one simple question. Why? I mean, if you loved music - if you really loved it with your heart and soul as you claim to do - why wouldn’t you do a single thing about it? It’s completely loopy. Of course a violin-laden back-story curries

public favour. The folks at home want to hear that Mary McVoteForMe lives in a bedsit with seventeen cats, plastic bags for shoes, eating spam crumpets and knitting her own furniture out of spaghetti. Nobody likes an aspiring singer who’s actually had a go at singing. I do understand that. But here’s my concern - I don’t think this is a good example to be setting the younger generation. Yes, I know. Comments like that can only mean one thing. I’m getting old. But this genuinely troubles me. The aspects of my career that have given me the most pleasure are the hours of hard work eventually blossoming into small (sometimes large) successes, the bond between four guys who have toured, performed and lived together, manifesting itself in those intangible onstage moments that you simply cannot fake - not the fifteen minutes of fame I once inadvertently experienced appearing in a mobile phone advert. Bah. Maybe I’m an old humbug who needs to Get Wit Da Times, but I hope that if I have kids they don’t grow up believing that appearing in your pants in Heat magazine is more important than creating work you are truly proud of. That’s it. Rant over. I’m off to program the Sky Plus box. Apparently Ant & Dec are doing a special on boybands who work in McDonalds. Chris plays piano in South London power-pop band The Lightyears. The Lightyears, voted the UK’s BEST POP/ROCK ACT at the Indy Awards, have played Wembley Stadium, toured four continents and released a record with Sting’s producer. Read more of Chris’ blogs and tour diaries at www. TheLightyears.com.

by Chris Russell

Copyright TIPSS 2011

11


Home & Interiors A conservatory extends summer through to winter and creates the perfect link between the house and the garden. But how do you ensure that this is a truly versatile room, one that’s useable all year round and that suits your look and your lifestyle? Katherine Sorrell looks at ways to make your conservatory a space that’s functional, beautiful and great to be in.

Decorating a conservatory Building a conservatory is one of the most popular home improvements. But aside from the question of whether it will add value to your property, will it add value to your life? A good place to start is with the overall colour scheme. By painting the walls the same colour as the adjacent room, you’ll ensure that the conservatory really feels like part of your home, rather than a last-minute addition. Use the floor, too, as a bridge between the conservatory and the house. Tiled, slate, stone and terracotta floors are beautiful but tend to be rather cold and hard underfoot, so it would be a great idea to scatter one or two rugs to add instant warmth and character, perhaps in a colour used in the next room so as to create a visual link. With the background colours, textures and patterns established, it’s time to consider the key pieces of furniture – probably a comfortable sofa and some armchairs, perhaps a dining table and chairs – and soft furnishings. Many people choose rattan furniture for a conservatory, and it can look fabulous, adding a touch of exotic, Far Eastern style to the room. To emphasise this look, accessorise with wooden boxes with large brass handles (handy for coffee tables), woven baskets, carvedstone buddhas or elephants, paper lanterns and carved-wood mirrors. For blinds, cushions and throws, choose fabrics in sand, mustard,

12

Pleated Conservatory Blinds in Calming Blue, from £750, Thomas Sanderson, 0800 051 54 04; www.thomas-sanderson.co.uk

deep red, orange and earthy brown. Alternatively, you could aim for a cool, New England look by teaming white-painted rattan with cottons and linens in plains and checks, tongue-and-groove cabinetry and simple floor and table lamps with pale fabric shades. Or go for a soft, English country look by adding chintzy cushions, painted ceramics, botanical prints, delicate chandeliers and vases of informally arranged flowers. Another favourite in a conservatory is metal furniture, though it’s best to avoid chairs and tables specifically designed for the garden, as they can look unsophisticated and clumsy; instead, opt for curly, decorative metalwork, which looks really pretty, especially painted in a soft pastel colour. Team with toile de Jouy fabrics, old metal café signs, oversized chocolate mugs, painted wall clocks and enamelware with French lettering for a conservatory à la Francais. For a more contemporary effect, faux wicker furniture (for both inside and out) now comes in all sorts of vivid colours and surprisingly sculptural shapes, while high-tech fabrics, which resist staining and fading and are water-resistant, allow you to include upholstered furniture – so you could go for long and lean sofas, or European-inspired, modular forms. The finishing

Copyright TIPSS 2011


touches for this look should be sleek, chic and minimal – an oversized floor lamp, perhaps; a piece or two in acrylic (maybe a curved coffee table or a dining chair), a modern chandelier and maybe some framed black-and-white photographs. And there you have it: glamorous or laid back, traditional or modern, the decoration of your conservatory can reflect your personal style and really make this room an integral part of your home.

Use your conservatory all year round Heating is essential if you plan to use your conservatory in winter, and this is something that’s ideally considered at the planning stage – though a retrofit is always possible. The options are simply to extend your current central heating to the conservatory, placing radiators against the dwarf walls, or to fit underfloor heating, in the form of either warm-water pipes or electric cables. Some systems use convectors, set under the perimeter of the floor and covered with decorative grilles. In the summer months, your main consideration will be to keep the conservatory cool enough to be pleasant to sit in. As well as opening windows and vents, you can

John Lewis Nomad conservatory furniture, 08456 049 049; www.johnlewis.com

provide a cool waft of air with a central ceiling fan, and block dazzling sunlight with blinds, which will control the heat in the summer and insulate in the winter. Choose from pleated, roller or roman blinds, vertical and Venetians, wood-weave or simple calico, in colours to suit your décor. by Katherine Sorrell

Copyright TIPSS 2011

13


Motoring

Nissan Leaf Road Test Model: Nissan Leaf Price: £25,990 (including

It’s the first five-seater mass-produced electric car, but James Baggott finds out the Leaf isn’t for everybody

£5,000 government grant)

Engine: electric motor Power: 107bhp, 280Nm Max speed: 90mph 0-60mph: 11.9s MPG: 109mile range Emissions: 0g/km Residual values (three years): 37 per cent

What is it?

Nissan would have you believe it’s revolutionary. It’s the first five-seater, all-electric car in production, producing zero emissions and costing just £2 to ‘fill up’. The benefits don’t end there either. Buyers enjoy zero road tax and company car drivers won’t be clobbered by any Benefit in Kind. That means someone driving a 1.6-litre diesel Ford Focus, paying £4,000 company car tax per year, would see that amount back in their pay packets.

What’s under the bonnet?

A big fat electric motor. Flip the catch, show any non petrolhead the unit and most will be convinced it’s a standard engine – to the uninitiated it certainly looks that way. It’s the fat power cables that give the game away. That motor produces 108bhp but it’s the big dollop of 280Nm of torque, available immediately, which really makes the difference. That’s equivalent to a Porsche Boxster and certainly makes the Leaf feel sprightly enough.

What’s the spec like?

Nissan made little noise about spec on the launch, concentrating more on the

technology, but customers will be pleased to hear there’s lots to entertain. Headliners include sat nav and reversing camera as standard, as well as central locking, alloys, climate control, a CD player and electric windows and mirrors. The only option is a solar panel on the spoiler that tops up the 12v battery. That costs £250.

What’s it like to drive?

Nissan says the Leaf’s range is 109 miles and has calculated 95 per cent of daily car travel is less than 25 miles and the average journey is 8.5 miles. There are two power modes, a normal and an eco. In eco, power is seriously reduced but the range improved and in normal the Leaf is surprisingly swift. What’s immediately apparent is how quiet the car is and how well it rides over bumps – you forget very quickly you’re driving an electric car.

What does the press think of it?

Autoblog said the Leaf could possibly be the most impressive car it has driven all year. The Green Car Website loved it and said owners would claw back the higher purchase price with lower running costs. Autocar

also said that despite the ‘real world range’ being only about 80 miles it was ‘easy to see its huge potential as a comfortable and practical school run car’.

What do we think of it?

We like it a lot, but the 26 dealers currently selling it will need to heed the maker’s advice and ensure the right buyers are snapping them up. It’s true that at £25,990, with the government’s £5,000 grant thrown in, the Leaf looks expensive but we’d liken it to a new Apple Mac: It might do the same thing as a normal computer, but knowing you’re at the forefront of technology and slightly wacky-cool for owning it, will make that extra cash worth spending.

Selling Points 1. £1 will take you 73 miles – in a Focus diesel £1 is good for 11 miles 2. On a PCP (most popular buying method) it costs £399 per month 3. Company car drivers will pay no Benefit in Kind

Deal Clincher

You can fuel it at home for just £2 a fill up

by James Baggott, editor of Car Dealer Magazine (CarDealerMag.co.uk)

14

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Plant of the Month

Physalis alkekengi - Chinese Lantern If you have some ground with poor soil and want a spectacular plant that thrives on neglect, then Chinese Lanterns are for you. These very hardy herbaceous perennials grow to around 60cm tall. Once their white flowers are over, the plants produce stunning orange ‘lanterns’. These lanterns hide a small, orange, edible fruit that also goes by the name of Cape Gooseberry. However, all other parts of the plant are poisonous.

The fruits are only tasty if you’ve enjoyed a long, hot summer, but the attractiveness of the ornamental lanterns far outweighs this. The lanterns can be dried and used in long-lasting flower arrangements or left to skeletonise for added impact. Sow seeds outdoors on the surface of the soil in spring or summer and the ensuing plants will readily propagate themselves. Sometimes they reproduce a little too vigorously. The extensive root system spreads far and wide, sending up new plants all over the place, so keep them in check. Although they do cope with inattention they need a sheltered, moist soil, but don’t require feeding. Full sun or partial shade is fine, yet they also do well in full shade depending on your local environment.

Poet’s Corner A Contemporary Romance He was wearing a grey hoodie, and a dab of ‘Eau de Skate’ He chose a wicked restaurant for our brilliant first date, He ordered two huge hamburgers, with relish and some fries, And across that plastic table I gazed deep into his eyes When I saw his ‘HATE’ tattoo, I knew I’d found my perfect heaven, And I got to know him well, from half past ten until eleven. We had to leave quite quickly as his lovely pit bull Clyde, Was frightening all the customers; and snarling, just outside, He took me for a lovely walk just by the local tip And there over the council bins, I dropped my bag of chips, We have a brand new baby now, a lovely little boy, I’ve dressed him in a hoodie and I’m going to name him Troy I know his Dad still loves me but my best mate’s not convinced, She’s told me I should ask him…but I haven’t seen him since.

©Jan Jack’s Perfect Verse 2011 www.perfectverse.co.uk

Copyright TIPSS 2011

15


Proverbial Life...

A Proverbial Life... Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves

Bargain Hunting Every evening, at around 6.30pm, my local supermarket helps me to save...I think. Those items nearing their ‘sell by date’ are reduced – drastically – in price. Nothing seems to be off limits: fresh salads, lamb chops, curries, scotch eggs (there’s always lots of scotch eggs – does no-one eat them anymore?), sandwiches, etc. Thus you can nab all sorts of bargains: if you’re in the right place at the right time. Now remember that phrase: ‘Right place at the right time’. By 6.30pm I’m in the supermarket, basket in hand and hovering. The ability to hover is crucial to the success of the operation. If you fail to hover in the right place at the right time then you are doomed for failure. I normally hover around the low fat yogurts; you don’t often get interrupted by anyone wanting to buy one. It’s also useful if you can appear to be engrossed in something whilst, in reality, your attention is elsewhere. For example, whilst I appear to be debating the merits of ‘low fat’ versus ‘no fat’, I am in reality waiting for ‘The Door’ to open. It is through this door that ‘He’ will come, carrying with him a list of items to be reduced and a hand held computer loaded with bright yellow stickers. ‘He’ will then pick out those goods and place them in a trolley. It’s very important that he’s not interrupted at this stage. ‘He’ won’t start to make reductions until all the necessary items have been selected and is likely to disappear back through the door if you ask: “Oh,

are you going to be reducing that?” He (and it’s always a ‘he’ at my supermarket), will then wheel his trolley to that small empty spot in the fridges reserved for the ‘yellow sticker’ items. Now, I find it useful at this stage to reposition to a more advantageous spot. By that, I mean a place where you can clearly see what ‘He’ is doing, while still managing to appear engrossed in some other items on offer. I always use this as an opportunity to peruse those little pots of olives and garlic that cost an absolute fortune; these never seem to be reduced. A crowd of fellow bargain hunters will now have begun to gather. At this point I always have to resist the urge to charge forward, elbow them out of the way and shout: “Get back, I was here first.” I don’t know what stops me really...one day I’ll have my moment of madness in the supermarket aisles. You’ll probably hear about it on the news: “Woman threatens shoppers with a French stick over a penny off.” Items are now scanned, reductions made, stickers stuck and the ‘treasure’ is tossed in an untidy pile into the fridge. The crowd erupts into a scramble of clashing baskets, grabbing hands and hard elbows. I hold back: waiting for a pause, a gap, a chance to get something... anything! Finally, the crowd parts, disperses, and I can see the end in sight. Two tubs of spicy couscous, two egg salads, a madras curry and several cartons of fresh soup. The chops, sandwiches, chicken breasts and cream cakes have already been snapped up. No scotch eggs tonight. I share the soup with a young woman who has a toddler in tow. She graciously lets me have both pots of couscous and I allow her two egg salads. We leave the madras curry behind for someone else. I spot the reduced chicken breasts in a fellow shopper’s basket and resist the urge to grab them and run for the tills. I’ve already saved a fortune...I think. by A. O’Brien

16

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Recipe

Ser v Fou es r

Perfect for outdoor eating, this filling Mediterranean flavoured portable feast makes a change from the usual sandwiches and sausage rolls.

Picnic Loaf To serve 4 people, you’ll need a large round, oval or oblong fresh crusty loaf. Slice the top off and scoop out the inside of the loaf, leaving a 1cm (1/2in) thick wall. Brush the inside wall of the loaf with some good quality olive oil. For extra flavour spread a thin layer of red or green pesto sauce or sun dried tomato paste inside the loaf. Choose a colourful selection of 3-4 fillings. Cold chicken, smoked ham, salami, cheese, firm sliced tomatoes, roasted vegetables (such as peppers, courgettes or aubergines), baby spinach leaves or fresh herbs like parsley and basil are all ideal. Chopped olives, capers or anchovy fillets will give extra flavour. Avoid watery sliced cucumber and salad leaves as they will make the bread go soggy. Layer the fillings of your choice in the loaf, packing them down well. Drizzle with a little olive oil as you go and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. You can make an extra filling layer with the breadcrumbs removed from the loaf by blending them in a food processor for a few seconds with a little olive oil, crushed garlic and fresh basil. Press the lid on top of the loaf and wrap tightly in foil. Chill in the fridge for 3-4 hrs or overnight. Slice thickly or in wedges to serve. Keep the kids happy with their own individual versions using small t i o n crusty a rolls. Fill with layers of mild Cheddar or Edam cheese and wafer i r Va thin ham or sliced cold sausages adding a thin layer of pickle or tomato relish. Alternatively, mash a can of drained tuna with some mayonnaise and layer with crisp little gem salad leaves and grated carrot.

Copyright TIPSS 2011

17


Science Facts

Only f or sub scriber paying s for tw o or more p ostcod es exclus ivity

Spice of Life Spice of Life - Caraway

Caraway seeds are one of the oldest cultivated spices. The caraway plant is easy to grow and the leaves and roots are also edible. Julius Caesar’s army made bread from the ground roots of the caraway plant, which look like parsnips. The small, brown, ridged caraway seeds look very similar to cumin but their flavours are very different. Caraway seeds have an aniseed taste and are used in many European dishes including sauerkraut, rye bread, sausages, various cheeses and the delicious British seedcake. The seeds keep their flavour for a long time if stored in an airtight container in a dark place. Due to its long history, caraway has a number of intriguing beliefs attached to it. Ancient Egyptians put the seeds into tombs with their dead to protect against evil spirits. Other cultures made it into a love potion. Another belief was that it prevented theft and voluntary straying. Anything from possessions, people and livestock would have been rubbed with caraway. Medical applications of caraway are mainly as a digestive. It has been recommended for curing colic and for settling nausea. Seeds are also chewed to freshen breath and flavours mouthwash, toothpaste and chewing gum.

18

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Technology Review TECH SPEC

Home phones don’t get the same attention as smartphones, but they’re often smarter buys: cutting-edge telephones won’t cost you several hundred pounds or tie you into a two-year contract that takes £40 per month from your bank account. So how do you choose the one that’s right for you?

How to choose the perfect home phone

Home is where the handset is The first thing to consider is how smart you want your home phone to be. Many manufacturers offer phones that can send SMS text messages, or have colour screens, or can use the Skype internet chat service, but unless you think you’re actually going to use those features then there isn’t much point in paying extra for them - and in the case of SMS messages, your mobile phone contract probably includes a bundle of free SMS messages, whereas ones you send from your home phone will cost money per text. With the exception of the very cheapest telephones, home phones these days tend to be cordless. Most systems have a main base station, which plugs into your telephone line, and any supplemental handsets then connect to that base station so you don’t need to run extension cables around your house or get BT to stick in new sockets. If you opt for an answering machine version, this will be built into the main base station. The key technology to look for in a cordless phone is DECT (pictured here), which is short for Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications.

This ensures reasonable call quality and enables multiple handsets to share a single phone socket, but take manufacturers’ claims about handset range with an enormous pinch of salt: like wireless computer networks, those “100m range” claims are only achievable in ideal conditions where there aren’t walls, radiators and other obstacles to obstruct the signal. However, unlike earlier cordless phones, UK DECT devices shouldn’t interfere with or suffer interference from wireless networks, baby monitors and other wireless devices. There are other issues to consider. Handsets with 150-name memories sound great, but if those numbers aren’t shared with your other handsets - something BT Stratus phones don’t do - then that selling point soon becomes an annoyance. Watch out for answering machines with tiny recording times, too: 5 minutes of recording sounds reasonable, but a few wordy messages when you’re on holiday will quickly fill all the available memory. Remember too that unlike traditional corded phones, cordless models don’t work in the event of a power cut.

Copyright TIPSS 2011

Remember too that some services cost money, so for example Caller ID and Caller Display require you to sign up to a particular service, which may incur an extra charge. Some phones offer additional technologies, such as Voice over IP, or VoIP for short. This routes calls over the internet, and the Skype internet calling system is probably the most famous example of VoIP in action. Firms such as Gigaset do a nice line of Skype-compatible VoIP phones, but they need to be connected to your broadband line to make VoIP calls - and if you’ve got broadband, that probably means you’ve already got a Skype-capable computer, smartphone or tablet. When it comes to actually spending money, we’ve got two pieces of advice: look online for reviews and never pay the RRP. User reviews on retailers’ websites will tell you whether the speakerphone is actually audible and whether the LCD display is legible, and using price checking sites such as Kelkoo.co.uk soon demonstrates that discounts of nearly 50% are widely available on many models.

19


Travel TRAVEL

Sizzling in the sun or drenched in monsoon rain, Phnom Penh takes you by surprise. Chaotic and relaxed all in one, with bustling lanes and tree-lined boulevards, Buddhist temples, exotic markets and three rivers, the Mekong, the Bassac and the Sap, meeting within sight of the Royal Palace.

Phnom Penh

Cambodia’s beguiling capital

The Mekong is the stuff of legends but it is the Sap which flows closest to the city and gives it a particular charm. There are fishing craft painted like rainbows, houseboats, fast ferries to Angkor Wat, cargo vessels, sampans and frail tourist boats bobbing at anchor. Sail down to the Mekong and you discover bamboo houses along the shore and floating villages where children dive in brown waters and fishermen haul in their nets in the setting sun. The city roofs glow coppery gold across the water and when the cool evening breeze sweeps along the promenade, locals come down to the river, friends holding hands, families sharing a picnic, hawkers selling incense and lotus bloom for the shrines. Flags from many nations fly high above it all and across Sisowath Quay, outdoor cafés with plush cushions and rattan chairs add a whiff of colonial days.

an ‘Emerald Buddha’ made of crystal and a Pagoda claiming 5000 silver tiles, mostly tucked under a carpet. Visiting monks pose for photographs among the bougainvillea and marvel at the lofty flourishes of Khmer architecture. Others head for the nearby National Museum and its fabulous treasures displayed in a maze of lotus ponds and open galleries. Today, Buddhism is back after the dark Pol Pot years and spirit houses and temples pop up all over town. Most popular is Wat Phnom, perched on the only hill around. On this spot some 600 years ago, Lady Penh found sacred Buddha images, thus giving the city its name, the hill (Phnom) of Penh. City folk climb up the steps, past mythological lions and snakes, to burn incense and make a wish. Fortune tellers make a brisk trade, monkeys scamper on the slopes and the resident elephant waits for his next ride around the park.

Phnom Penh is easy to explore on foot, as long as you don’t cross too many roads. Streets are on a grid pattern, enclosed by Parisian-style boulevards fragrant with frangipani. You find gold shops and shoe-shine boys, tailors and printers working on the pavements, smoke-filled barbecues and honking traffic ready to pounce at countdown lights. Rickshaws and bicycles weave through it all, laden with multicoloured balloons or Phnom Penh’s household goods, orange-robed monks carry alms bowls and main attractions are umbrellas and now and then a wedding party files through an conveniently close to the waterfront. Built during the entrance draped in lilies and silver bananas. What looks like bottles of squash at the roadside is motorbike fuel. The old French protectorate, the Royal Palace is a delightful French Quarter is worth a peep for its leafy lanes and stylish mansions but for local colour, the markets are a must, whether oasis of lawns and trees, you are looking for fresh fruit or fried spiders, bags, books, dotted with colonnades, clocks, silk, fake designer goods or stone carvings. Bargaining spires and overlapping is hard work but there is always time to relax at the end of the roofs. You find a pavilion day and watch the sunset over the Mekong. donated by Napoleon III, by Solange Hando

20

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Working From Home

Working from home An empty nest It hardly seems 19 years ago that the obstetrician looked up from the operating table where she had just finished delivering our twin bundles of joy by C-section and enquired of the room at large: “Has anybody seen my pen?” Oh how everyone laughed! But 19 years ago it was, and now my little darlings are preparing to fly the coop. Well, the daughter is: university beckons, and a glorious career in marine biology. The son has decided university isn’t for him and (if he ever fills in his bloody application form) is only going as far as the tech down the road to study music technology and sound engineering. But now he’s of legal drinking age we hardly see him anyway, so I suppose we shall soon be technically empty nesters. So, then. No more trying to work while daytime TV drones and buzzes away in the next room. No more abstemious Saturday nights because I’m going to be on dad’s taxi duty later on. No more chiding letters from school about missed homework. No more arguments about rooms that look like Coventry after the Blitz (no – that’s not true: the son’s staying). Will it be bliss? Or will all that unwonted peace and quiet translate into loneliness and loss, as some say it does? Whichever turns out to be true, it’s going to be weird. The weirdness has actually been creeping up on us for some time, and their separation has come in well-spaced stages. Our last holiday as a family (the Pyrenees – I recommend it) was a couple of years ago now, and I don’t suppose there will ever be another. They turned 18 and started going drinking with their mates (well actually, they started going drinking with their mates a shade before their 18th, but the less said about that the better). They have jobs, he in a call centre, she in a pizza joint. Weirder still, they developed opinions and ideas of their own, which they expound forcefully despite my status as paterfamilias. So they aren’t afraid of me any more!

This is all cool with me: I’ve loved watching them grow up and become independent. But now suddenly they’re going to have to stop becoming independent and actually be independent and I’m reminded of their very first day at school, however many years ago. We dressed them in their new uniforms and dropped them off at the school gates. As I watched them melt into the crowd of almost-identical five-year-olds I had an overwhelming urge to plant a video camera in their classroom so that I could continue to watch over them and be certain they were happy and unharmed. But somehow they thrived and flourished without my supervision and although there were times when I could cheerfully have punched some of their teachers, I suppose there were just as many times when some of their teachers could equally cheerfully have punched me. So: childhood’s end, and more departures. This time, though, I don’t feel that urge to plant a roving CCTV so that I can watch over them. Quite the opposite, in fact: the things they’re going to do are things I definitely don’t want to see. All I can do now is hope that we, as parents, have given them the equipment they’ll need to survive and thrive. And God knows, the world we’re ushering them into is a damned sight rougher and tougher than the world that confronted us at that age. by Ted Bruning

Copyright TIPSS 2011

21


Puzzles, Quizzes & Cartoons Calcudoku Calcudoku

Cartoon 1 x12

4

3

ŠPuzzlepress.co.uk

Fill each cell with a number from 1-6. No number can be repeated in any row or column. The numbers in the heavily outlined set of squares (cages) must combine in any order to produce the target number in the top corner, using only the mathematical operator speciďŹ ed: +, -, x or /. Numbers can be repeated within a cage, but not in the same row or column.

Cartoon 2

22

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Children’s Page NU SQ MB n y UA ER the ou w R nu mis ork E

Ca

mb sin ou t ers g ?

21 2 2 0 3 43 2 8 4 8 3 0 7 41 1 3 5 3 3 1 8 3 2 4 2 2 7 2 0 43 6 1 0 1 6 38 9 5 9 6 8 1 8 2 8 41 5 1 6 1 9 32 7 4 26 31 column 3 3 3 2 7 2 and ! 24 34 row re eachlue squa 25 26 l of tota in the b The is

WORD SEAR CH

P L U S N U T E R E S N D G H A SLIDE

A Y T G N I F K L D I L D D A O S J Z M K K A B

I M E W S O A L I S E M L N B G N E X U J B T C

L ADDE R FUN SWINGS TUNNEL PL AYTI ME

rn atte he p out tumbers? k r wo the n you Can nd fill in a

1

11

7 17

23 ?

?

?

d oun r g y Pla zzlers Pu

31

?

?

Q: What do you cal A: A Jumbo-Jet! l an elephant with wings?

Copyright TIPSS 2011

23


Codeword 8

CODEWORD Each letter in this puzzle is represented by a number between 1 and 26. The codes for three letters are shown. As you find the letters enter them in the box below.

17

6

14

1

16 19

26

12

22

19

8

9

6

9

1

3

19

19

23

19

12

R

11

24 9

1

23

I

N

24

17

18

20

6 25

23

9

23

26

14

16

5

26 6

12 12

24

24

17

12

4

2

23 7

2

2 14

2

6

15

1

22 12

5

12

CEOLY

EIKLQ LRSTU EEIOS CEEEY DDKNR

2

12

22

2

19

16

2 12

19

23 8

3

↓ ↓ ↓ ↓

Only f or sub scriber p s a → ying for tw o or → more p ostcod es → exclus ivity → → ©Puzzlepress.co.uk

24

Copyright TIPSS 2011

23

22

The letters to the left belong in the squares immediately to the right, but not necessarily in the given order. When entered correctly, they reveal the names of five actors, reading downwards.

2

9

Drop Down

ABMPS

12

1

Drop Down

24

20

2 14

6

2

6 25

1 18

3 12

14

9

10

10

22 2

1

23

12 16

8

1

21 9

24

13

23 10

2


Cryptic Crossword Cryptic Crossword Across 1. Wine cartel in disarray (6) 4. Hit-and-run? That’s careless (8) 9. Double negatives? They’re out! (2-4) 10. Forged Somalian painting (4,4) 12. Turn on a quiet mathematical statement (8) 13. Wrong ethics lead to strong urges (6) 15. Frozen water after five leads to corruption (4)

1

2

3

4

9

5

6

7

8

18

19

10 11

12

13 14

15

16 17

1 22

20

21

23

24

25

26 27

28

29

30

31 ©Puzzlepress.co.uk

31. Tidy direction to be taken in (6)

11. He toils to become the most sacred (7)

Down

14. Bad omen about coy thriftiness (7)

1. Swindle and dish up jam (8)

17. Offer one should love to accept? (8)

2. Girl with a little weight, say (8)

18. Trawl for an instrument (8)

3. Secret surgery constructs (6)

19. Tuners go wild for this fish (8)

5. Beast working after fifty-one (4)

22. No mutt worried this sheep! (6)

29. Pegs on spoilt cake (6)

6. Quiet snake or one who talks (8)

23. Company ordered to Peru (6)

30. Unnecessary and lessened somehow (8)

7. Perch on fire (6)

24. Pair left in a car (6)

8. Transport for late passengers? (6)

27. Planet of ruins (4)

16. Room hidden in the nick (7) 20. Gift dispatched in advance? (7) 21. Foolish lawyer on foot (4) 25. Green prune I diced (6) 26. Troops I’m deploying for the deceiver (8) 28. Wed follower (8)

Copyright TIPSS 2011

25


General Knowledge Crossword General Knowledge Crossword 1. Black and yellow stinging insect (4) 4. Wild headlong rush of frightened animals (8) 8. Three-sided figure (8) 9. Communist state of Asia (4) 10. Office worker (5) 11. Rumbling sound associated with lightning (7) 13. Concurred (6) 15. Modify, tone down (6) 18. Native of Kampala, for example (7) 20. Tiny morsel of bread or cake (5) 23. Threesome (4) 24. Proof, verification (8) 25. Family member

from the remote past (8) 26. Wheeled vehicle that runs on rails (4)

1

Down

6 9

10 13

7

4

5

8 12

14

15

16

22 26

28

20 23

24

25

27 29 ©Puzzlepress.co.uk

Across 1. 4. 6. 9. 11. 12. 13.

26

Seven cubed (3) 5 Down plus 14 Down plus 35 (3) 28 Across multiplied by 96.5 (5) Double 2 Down (2) 27 Down multiplied by five (3) Weeks in one year (2) Six squared (2)

7

11

15

16

20

17

21

22

26

19. Loop formed in a cord or rope (5) 21. Birthplace of Mohammed (5) 22. Stand to support a coffin (4)

15. 16. 17. 18. 20. 21. 22. 24. 26. 28. 29.

Cube root of 1728 (2) 3 Down plus 4 Down plus 22 Down (4) 15 Across plus 56 squared (4) One fifteenth of 11 Across (2) Square root of 1936 (2) 22 Down minus 25 (2) 9 Across plus 1 Down (3) Square root of 324 (2) 6 Across plus 19 Down plus 1789 (5) One ninth of 19 Down (3) 1 Across minus 109 (3)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 7. 8. 10. 12. 14.

1 Across plus four (3) 13 Across plus two (2) 4 Across multiplied by four (4) Months in seven years (2) Ounces in seven pounds (3) 4 Down minus one (2) One quarter of 11 Across (2) 12 Down plus 10982 (5) 21 Down squared (5) 1 Down plus 11 Across minus one quarter of 12 Across (3) 2 Down multiplied by three (3) 13 Across multiplied by 21 Down (4) 24 Across plus 15 Down plus 26 Down plus one (3) Months in four years (2) Pints in four gallons (2) 13 Across multiplied by 18 Across (3) Double 22 Down (2) Months in six years (2)

Down

17 19

6

9

10

11

21

5

Only f or sub scriber paying s for tw o or more p ostcod es exclus ivity

3

18

4

2. Month with 30 days (5) 12 3. Grassy plain (7) 13 14 4. Aromatic greygreen herb (4) 5. Bluish-violet 19 quartz used as a 18 gemstone (8) 6. Tower supporting 23 24 high-tension wires (5) 7. Bishop’s see (7) 10. US government 25 unit (inits) (3) 12. Having a cosmonaut who made common the first manned space boundary or flight (7) edge (8) 16. Penalty or fine for 14. Yuri ___, wrongdoing (7) Russian 17. Pen tip (3)

NUMBER CRUNCHER 2

3

8

Number Cruncher 1

2

©Puzzlepress.co.uk

Across

15. 19. 21. 22. 23. 25. 26. 27.

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Pictograms Pictograms 2 words

+DEEF 4 words

OT 1

2

4 words

SIGH_

Quick Crossword Across

Quick Crossword

1. Hairy and unkempt (6) 4. Detector (6) 9. Make comprehensible (7) 10. Vagabond (5) 11. Fear greatly (5) 12. Empowered (7) 13. Sections (11) 18. Replicating (7) 20. Ransack (5) 22. Presses (5) 23. Where plays are performed (7) 24. Required (6) 25. Remained (6)

Down 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Firm (6) Round fleshy fruit (5) Your parent’s mother (7) Surplus (5) Type of onion (7) Fast running waterways (6) Make inquiries (11)

2

1

3

4

5

6

7

8 10

9

12

11

13

14

15 17

16 18

19

22

24

14. Detonate (7) 15. Sincere (7) 16. Activity (6) Copyright TIPSS 2011

20

21

23

25

17. Rely upon (6) 19. Publication (5) 21. Not lean (5)

27


Quiz 1 Beer And Wine 1. Which brand of beer is also the name of a river that runs through Amsterdam? 2. Which American state produces around 90% of all of America’s wine? 3. According to a TV advertising campaign, which beer “refreshes the parts other beers cannot reach”? 4. Who was the Roman God of Wine? 5. Which popular lager has a two word name, the first of which means “star” in Latin, and the second of which was the surname of a brewery owner? 6. The five basic steps in wine tasting are sometimes known as the five “S” steps, where the fourth and fifth steps are “sip” and “savour”. What are the first three steps? 7. From which country does the beer Hoegaarden originate? 8. Well known for producing wine, in which country would you find the Barossa Valley? 9. Which German city hosts the beer festival Oktoberfest? 10. Which two number one singles of the 1980s had the word “Wine” in the title?

Quiz 2 also available TV Bars and Coffee Shops as a quarte Choosing from the list on the right, can you work out which r TV shows the bars and coffee shops on the left feature in? page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

28

Hollyoaks Only f The or sub Simpsons ribVampire ers Slayer paying BuffyscThe Neighbours for tw Frasier o or more p ostcod Emmerdale Friends e s And Horses exclus Only Fools ivity Shameless

Moe’s Tavern The Dog In The Pond The Woolpack The Espresso Pump Aidensfield Arms The Jockey Central Perk Charlie's Café Nervosa The Nag’s Head

Heartbeat

Copyright TIPSS 2011


Spot the Difference

Sudoku - Easy

Sudoku - Hard

Copyright TIPSS 2011

29


Wordsearch

30

Copyright TIPSS 2011


TIPSS catalogue September 11