LifeTimes April 2021

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Living well after 50

Tampa Bay Times | Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Butterfly Whisperer Anita Camacho’s passion for Florida’s butterflies and gardens has led her down a beautiful path Pages 4 and 5

Photo by Patty Langgle


CROSSWORD Go Figure, by Merl Reagle ACROSS 1 5 9 12 17 18 20 22 23 27 28 29 30 31 32 39 41 42 43 44 46 48 49 50 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 68 71 72 73 74 75

Negative yardage, e.g. Word in the definition of “akimbo” Bridge action Syrian president Whale movie Made one’s way sideways Brainstorm Jargon A classroom contradiction J.P. Morgan, for one Author Amy This second Final analysis The Hartford’s bus. With 98 Across, an Italian contradiction Work on the copy desk CBS competitor Refrain from A snap ___ Enter Uncoordinated one Mrs. Michael Corleone Columbus’s mo. With 80 Across, a dietary contradiction Computer command Paper amount “Put the bracelets on” Care-limiting co. Gutenberg’s city Ill-mannered one Turf Philippine island With 68 Across, a driving contradiction See 66 Across Forest grump Little yipper Muffin ingredient Author-poet Heinrich Bally follower

76 78 79 80 84 85 86 87 91 93 95 97 98 103 104 105 106 107 109 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123

Canadian flag image Resist stubbornly Writer Zora ___ Hurston See 50 Across Manage Start of a pencil game Droop Parlor items Twice LVI ___ Lawrence College Layer? “Little” Dickens girl See 32 Across Presidential nickname Say the wrong thing Robot work Fairness arbiter Brunei bigwig A pugilistic contradiction Coarse stuff for manicurists The going price? Danger Party cheese Put back to 000 On the ___ Ram, for one Cauterize

DOWN 1

Had a special-interest job 2 Magic home 3 Digitizes for computer use 4 Hopping-race need 5 Abraham’s home, in the Bible 6 Promising words 7 Country club grp. 8 Mattress maker 9 Pen maker 10 Humphrey’s High Sierra costar 11 Mischievous Mitchell 12 Type of math.

13 14 15 16 19 21 24 25 26 33 34 35 36 37 38 40 45 47 49 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 73

The crossword puzzle solution is on Page 7.

Sidney Poitier, to Lulu Villainous looks The CIA, for one War orphan of 1950s comics 1944 event Better than Crucial Food stand Ovine one Wolf pack unit Operation mark Fortify anew Funny Martha Drink for the palpitationprone Chow “You were only waiting for this moment ___” (McCartney lyric) A hand for Morticia? Cavalry comedy of ’60s TV Word after buzz or flake Singer Stuarti Cry of pain Tree-to-be African antelope with corkscrew horns “___ and only” Permeate No good, as milk Speaker of the house? Animated myope Poker stratagem Antes, for example Auto repair authority The Roy in Angels in America WWI plane Raise, as an eyebrow New York stadium Seuss’s Horton ___ a Who Merchants on Pork Avenue?

76 Schmeling smasher, 1938 77 Millennium 78 Actor Keith 79 Israeli desert 81 Pleased look 82 Other, to Jorge 83 “Oh, very funny” 88 Full-length film 89 Mother Teresa’s birthplace

90 Svelte 91 Auto trim 92 Persian king 93 Blue cartoon character 94 Car-radio aid 96 Get cozy 98 Bowling legend Dick 99 The PBA, e.g. 100 Knievel feat 101 Stephanie Zimbalist’s dad

102 108 110 111 112 113 114 115

Big ___, Calif. Lofting shots Urge to throw things? Manhattan newspaper monogram Gun grp. Shiny keepsake Prohibition, for one Nothing

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|  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |  Tampa Bay Times  SSP

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STEP BY STEP

Sally Anderson

Tech neck troubles Mothers gave us good advice when they reminded us to stand up straight and not slouch. These days, using modern technology can result in poor posture. “Tech Neck,” sometimes called “Text Neck,” is the name given to poor posture as a result of added neck strain from holding the head forward and looking downward for extended periods of time while working on electronic devices. When this occurs, the shoulders begin their slow journey of

Photos by Dan Canoro

becoming rounded, making it difficult to heed mother’s advice. Generally, your head weighs 10-12 pounds. For every inch you move your head forward off the center of gravity, the perceived weight of your head doubles. By moving your head forward just one inch, the perceived weight of your head increases to 20 pounds. When poor posture comes into play, not only are the neck, upper back and shoulders vulnerable to pain and stiffness, but the lower and middle back are also negatively impacted. Complications from poor posture can include back and joint pain, spinal dysfunction and even a pot belly. Good news: we can reverse Tech Neck. For starters, check your computer posture

and include the strengthening and stretching exercises shown in the Your Move column below.

Computer Tips

• Avoid working on your computer on a couch or bed. Instead, sit at a table or desk. • When sitting, your head should be right above shoulders and hips, not leaning forward. • Feet should be flat on floor directly under knees, using a foot stool if needed. Forearms and thighs should be parallel to floor. • Avoid leaning to one side. • Avoid working at computer longer than an hour at a time.

• Incorporate stretch breaks. • Take a 10-minute break each hour. • To keep yourself from falling forward, keep your head approximately armslength away from the screen.

Easy Desk Stretch to Relieve Neck and Shoulder Tension

• Sitting on edge of chair, reach hands behind you, holding onto back of chair. • Press chest forward, arching your spine. • If comfortable for you, let your head fall back slightly. • Hold this position for 20-30 seconds; avoid holding your breath. • Slowly lift head up, straighten your spine and release holding chair.

Your Move | Demonstrated by Bonnie Ruth Always begin with a 5- to 8-minute warm up.

WALL SLIDE Stretches and strengthens shoulders and back.

SHOULDER, NECK AND BACK STRETCH

• Standing about a foot and a • Try to reach hands all the way half away from the wall, place to above your head while shoulders, back and head keeping your back and arms against the wall with feet hipagainst the wall. width apart. • Do not force arms upward, • Contract abdominals. just reach to your personal level. • Bend arms, placing elbows and lower arms against the • Slowly return arms to original wall, just below shoulders, position and repeat 8-10 times. palms facing forward. • Arms will look like mini goal posts. • Slowly slide backs of hands up the wall.

BIRD DOG Strengthens core muscles that support your spine, core muscles and back. Improves balance and coordination. • Start on your hands and knees with hands directly below shoulders and knees directly under hips. • Contract abdominals. • Keeping spine straight, extend right arm straight out from shoulder with palm of hand facing inward. • At the same time, extend left leg to hip level, keeping leg straight and toes pointed downward.

• Hold for 6-8 seconds. • Focus on not allowing your back to sag or lift up. • You want to be in alignment from head to toe, no hip tilting. • Return to starting position and repeat on opposite side. • Alternate sides for 5-10 repetitions.

• Place left hand on lower back while right arm stretches over top of head, placing hand on left side of head. • Gently move head toward right shoulder while looking straight ahead until you feel a stretch in your neck. • Hold 15-30 seconds, repeat on other side. • Repeat pattern 3-4 times.

SEATED FIGURE 4 STRETCH Opens up hips and stretches lower back. • Sitting tall near the edge of a bringing thigh as close to parallel stable chair, place feet on floor. to floor as you can. • Place right ankle on opposite thigh, • Hold 20-30 seconds, repeating just above knee. 2-3 times; repeat pattern with opposite leg crossing thigh. • Slightly lean forward from hips and gently press thigh with your hand,

Check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program. Sally Anderson is happy to hear from readers but can’t respond to individual inquiries. Contact her at slafit@tampabay.rr.com SSP  Tampa Bay Times  |  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |

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If you plant it, they will come Anita Camacho’s passion for Florida’s butterflies and gardens has led her down a beautiful path. BY MAUREEN FAMIANO Anita Camacho is gently holding a just hatched butterfly by the wings. She looks at it from all sides, whispers encouragement and carefully lets it go. The butterfly stays on her hand, slowly opening and closing its wings, taking assessment of its beautiful new habitat before it flies away. Camacho is the owner of Little Red Wagon Native Nursery in South Tampa. The nursery is home to numerous native plants and the butterflies that rely on them. And soon, it will house the Butterfly Conservatory of Tampa Bay. Camacho is a lepidopterist, better known as a butterfly specialist. Some folks call her a butterfly whisperer. Camacho’s devotion to butterflies and gardens began as a young girl. Her passion project has grown into the beautiful fulfillment of a dream. Her nursery is dedicated to education, and nurturing and providing the best environment for pollinators in and around our region. A CPA by trade, Camacho graduated from The University of Tampa with a degree in accounting. But growing up in Land O’Lakes, she loved gardening with her mother and grandmother. Together, they discovered butterfly gardening. Sadly, as their gardening progressed, Camacho’s mother was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. After much research, Camacho discovered the long-term effects of pesticides and chemical exposure. It was then she decided to find a healthier way to have a beautiful garden, one without toxins. Today, Camacho’s goal is to put chemicalfree Florida plants back into Florida gardens. She is also the president and founder of the Tampa Bay Butterfly Foundation and the Tampa

If you go:

Bay Chapter of the North American Butterfly Association. This year, she plans on opening the Butterfly Conservatory of Tampa Bay at the nursery. It will feature insects, cocoons and chrysalises, a research lab and an immersion butterfly area. The immersion area will be an enclosed section where visitors can get close-up with up to 500 butterflies in their natural habitat. “I have wanted to bring a butterfly conservatory to the Tampa Bay area for many years. After visiting many of them around the world, I felt it was a much-needed asset in our community,” Camacho said. “There’s a lot to do in Tampa Bay, but this is different from other attractions. It will be a peaceful, tranquil place where people of all ages can come to reconnect with nature and learn about the important roles native plants and insects play in our environment.” Photos by Patty Langgle

Recently, Camacho planted a butterfly garden at the ENCORE! Technology Park project within a 40+ acre mixed-use redevelopment district in Downtown Tampa. She designed a section dedicated to native plants to attract both bees and butterflies. Volunteers gathered to help create the two beautiful, tranquil spots that Tampa residents and nearby neighbors can enjoy for years to come. While planting this pollinator garden, she excitedly called volunteers over just after the soil covered over the roots of plants. A metallic green bee had begun buzzing around gathering nectar. “This was exactly what the garden was designed to do,” she said. “To attract the pollinators. If you plant it they will come, and they did within just a few moments of adding those plants!”

Anita Camacho’s Little Red Wagon Native Nursery/Butterfly Conservatory is located at 4113 Henderson Blvd., Tampa, FL 33629. The number to call is (813) 755-9579.

For more information about native plants and butterflies, you can head to the website, www.ButterflyTampa.com

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|  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |  Tampa Bay Times  SSP

Photo provided by MEFMedia

“I’ve always been fascinated by the metamorphosis of a butterfly. It’s amazing to watch what the tiny creature undergoes as it begins as a tiny speck of an egg on the underside of a leaf and transforms into a beautiful creature with wings.” ~ Anita Camacho


To attract this butterfly

Giant swallowtail butterfly laying egg on wild lime plant

Plant these plants

Black Swallowtail

Mock Bishopweed, Golden Alexander, Water Dropwort, Dill, Parsley, Fennel, Rue

Cassius Blue

Wild Plumbago

Cloudless Sulfur

Cassia Species including Partridge Pea

Common Buckeye

Twinflowers and Plantain (Plantago Species)

Dainty Sulfur

Spanish Needles

Giant Swallowtail

Rue and Wild Lime

Great Southern White

Pepperweed

Gulf Fritillary

Maypop Passionvine

Monarch

Native Milkweeds and Milkvines

Orange Barred Sulfur

Cassia Species including Partridge Pea

Pipevine Swallowtail

Wooly Dutchman’s Pipevine

Polydamas Swallowtail

Wooly Dutchman’s Pipevine

Queen

Native Milkweeds and Milkvines

Spicebush Swallowtail

Spicebush

Tiger Swallowtail

Sweet Bay Magnolia

White Peacock

Water Hyssop and Frogfruit

Zebra Swallowtail

Corkystem Passionvine

Create your own butterfly garden Butterflies are specific to their host plants to lay eggs for the caterpillars, so what you plant depends on what type of butterfly you want to attract.

Florida soil; rosinweed, another yellow flower; and coneflower, which can be pink or purple.

To attract the monarch butterfly, you only need one milkweed and one large flowering nectar plant to start. You can create your own butterfly garden in one pot, placed outside. The monarchs will find you, even several stories up, as they fly high to find their milkweed. If you are planting a garden in your yard, a few of each plant is a great way to start. In addition to milkweed, butterfly gardens need a flowering nectar plant. According to Camacho, tropical sage is a popular nectar plant, especially the red ones. The plant also comes in pink and white. Other options include the coreopsis, our state wildflower, a beautiful yellow meadow wildflower that does very well in

Pearl crescent butterfly feeding on a coreopsis flower. Photo courtesy of Little Red Wagon Native Nursery SSP  Tampa Bay Times  |  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |

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The gender vaccine gap:

More women than men are getting COVID-19 shots By Laura Ungar Kaiser Health News Mary Ann Steiner drove 2½ hours from her home in the St. Louis suburb of University City to the tiny Ozark town of Centerville, Missouri, to get vaccinated against COVID-19. After pulling into the drive-thru line in a church parking lot, she noticed that the others waiting for shots had something in common with her. “Everyone in the very short line was a woman,” said Steiner, 70. Her observation reflects a national reality: More women than men are getting COVID vaccines, even as more men are dying of the disease. KHN examined vaccination dashboards for all 50 states and the District of Columbia in early April and found that each of the 38 that listed gender breakdowns showed more women had received shots than men. Public health experts cited many reasons for the difference, including that women make up three-quarters of the workforce in health care and education, sectors prioritized for initial vaccines. Women’s longer life spans also mean that older people in the first rounds of vaccine eligibility were more likely to be female. But as eligibility expands to all adults, the gap has continued. Experts point to women’s roles as caregivers and their greater likelihood to seek out preventive health care in general as contributing factors. In Steiner’s case, her daughter spent hours on the phone and computer, scoping out and setting up vaccine appointments for five relatives. “In my family, the women are about a million times more proactive” about getting a COVID vaccine, Steiner said. “As of early April, statistics showed the vaccine breakdown between women and men was generally close to 60% and 40% — women made up 58% of those vaccinated in Alabama and 57% in Florida, for example. States don’t measure vaccinations by gender uniformly, though. Some break down the statistics by total vaccine doses, for example, while others report people who have gotten at least one dose. Some states also have a separate category for nonbinary people or those whose gender is unknown. A handful of states report gender vaccination statistics over time. That data shows the gap has narrowed but hasn’t disappeared as vaccine eligibility has expanded beyond people in long-term care and health care workers. In Kentucky, for instance, 64% of residents who had received at least one dose of vaccine by early February were women and 36% were men. As of early April, the stats had shifted to 57% women and 43% men. A few states break the numbers down by age as well as gender, revealing that the male-female difference persists across age groups. In South Carolina, for example, the gender breakdown of vaccine recipients as of April 4 was slightly wider for younger people: 61% of vaccinated people ages 25-34 were women compared with 57% female for ages 65 and older. Arrianna Planey, an assistant professor who specializes in medical geography at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, said it’s often women who manage medical appointments for their households so they may be more familiar with navigating health systems.

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|  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |  Tampa Bay Times  SSP

See VACCINE, 8


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“Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse” on Amazon Prime (Words in parentheses not in on puzzle) “Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse” Amazon Prime

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS puzzle page 2

SSP  Tampa Bay Times  |  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |

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. VACCINE

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Decades of research have documented how and why men are less likely to seek care. A 2019 study in the American Journal of Men’s Health, for example, examined health care use in religious heterosexual men and concluded masculine norms — such as a perception that they are supposed to be tough — were the main reason many men avoided

seeking care. Attitudes about the COVID pandemic and the vaccines also affect who gets the shots. Dr. Rebecca Wurtz, director of public health administration and policy at the University of Minnesota, said women have been more likely to lose jobs during the pandemic, and in many cases bear

the brunt of teaching and caring for children at home.

covid and hasn’t seen some of her grandchildren in a year and a half.

“Women are ready for this to be done even more than men are,” Wurtz said.

Steiner, who has now received both doses of the Moderna vaccine, said she doesn’t regret taking the more difficult step of traveling five hours round trip to get her first shot in February. (She was able to find a closer location for her second dose.)

Steiner, who plans to retire at the end of the month from editing a magazine for the Catholic Health Association, said she was eager to be vaccinated. She has an immune disorder that puts her at high risk for severe illness from

“It’s for my safety, for my kids’ safety, for my neighbors’ safety, for

the people who go to my church’s safety,” she said. “I really don’t understand the resistance.” KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

ASTRONOMY Daryl L. Schrader

May Skies Dusk: This is a great time to observe our inner most planet Mercury till near the end of the month. Venus is in the western sky for May. Mars is also visible and will set about midnight. Dawn: Jupiter and Saturn both rise after midnight and are visible at dawn.

Sky Calendar May May 3: Last quarter moon. Low in the west-northwest, Mercury is to the lower left of the Pleiades at dusk. May 4: At dawn the moon, Jupiter and Saturn form a triangle above the southeastern horizon. May 11: New moon is at apogee (furthest) at 252,595 miles. May 13: Toward the west, a very thin crescent moon is just to the left of Mercury at dusk. May 15: At dusk, Mars is next to the crescent moon toward the west. May 17: Mercury is at its greatest elongation – its greatest angular distance from the Sun. May 19: First quarter moon.

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|  Wednesday, April 28, 2021  |  Tampa Bay Times  SSP

May 25: The moon is closest at 222,023 miles. May 26: Full moon. A lunar eclipse starts at 5:45 this morning, just in time for us to miss out. Look to the southwest before sunrise to find Antares just to the left of the moon. May 28: At dusk in the west-northwest, Mercury and Venus are next to each other. Venus is the brighter of the two. May 31: High in the south-southeast, at dawn, Saturn is to the upper right of the moon. Daryl L. Schrader is professor emeritus at St. Petersburg College and has taught astronomy at the University of South Florida.