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A PUBLICATION OF THE NEWNAN TIMES-HERALD

2017-18 GUIDE TO COWETA COUNTY BUSINESS & INDUSTRY | REAL ESTATE | THINGS TO DO | COMMUNITY | HEALTH & FITNESS | EDUCATION | COUNTY/CITIES


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W H AT A R E SO M E T H I N G S I CA N D O ? Tip ‘n Toss containers after every rain and at least once a week

Clean up around your home and yard

W Hrid ATof anything A R E SO M E need T H Ithat N Gcan S hold I CA N DO? Get you don’t water © Clean up around your home and yard Use larvicides (Mosquito Dunks or Mosquito Torpedoes©) where you can’t dump out water Get rid of anything you don’t need that can hold water

Use larvicides (Mosquito Dunks© or Mosquito Torpedoes©) where you can’t dump out water

Dump out standing water in flowerpots and planters, children’s toys, pet dishes Tip ‘n Toss containers after every rain and at least once a week Don’t let water accumulate in old tires, rain gutters, Dump out standing water in flowerpots and planters, children’s pilespet ofdishes leaves or natural holes in vegetation toys, Cover containers Don’t letwater waterstorage accumulate in old tires, rain gutters, (buckets, cisterns, rainholes barrels) piles of leaves or natural in vegetation Cover water storage containers (buckets, cisterns, rain barrels)

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8 Coweta Living 2017-18

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COWETA LIVING ONLINE

2017-18 GUIDE TO NEWNAN - COWETA COUNTY

cowetaliving.com

President

Vice President

Publisher

News Editor

Creative Directors

Production Director

Debby Dye

Contributing Writers

Kandice Bell

William W. Thomasson Marianne C. Thomasson Walter C. Jones W. Winston Skinner Sandy Hiser, Sonya Studt

Maggie Bowers

Sarah Fay Campbell

Celia Goodyear

Gabe Griffith

Emily Kimbell

Rebecca Leftwich

Juston Lewis

Clay Neely

W. Winston Skinner

Martha A. Woodham

Photography

Megan Bellew Sarah Fay Campbell Susan Crutchfield

James Johnson

Rebecca Leftwich

Beth Neely

Clay Neely

A page-view version of Coweta Living will be available for the entire publication year.

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FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION call 770.253.1576 or e-mail colleen@newnan.com Coweta Living is published annually by The Newnan Times-Herald, Inc. 16 Jefferson Street, Newnan, GA 30263. Coweta Living is distributed in home-delivery copies of The Newnan Times-Herald and at businesses and offices throughout Coweta County. To subscribe to The Newnan Times-Herald, call 770.253.1576.

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2017-18 GUIDE TO NEWNAN - COWETA COUNTY

Table of

CONTENTS

18 BUSINESS & INDUSTRY 15 | German-style apprenticeship puts national spotlight on Coweta | 18 Coweta leaders aim for a business-friendly climate

22 | Utilities serve community two ways 25 | Current filming boom started in Coweta 30 | Q&A with local business people

REAL ESTATE 32 | Housing market grows 34 | Manufacturing, health care, film industries boost Coweta economy

36 | Habitat helps Newnan

continued ➝

Coweta Living 2017-18 11


CONTENTS cont. THINGS TO DO 38 | Outdoors offer diverse attractions 40 | ChildrenConnect in building designed for children in 1800s | 42 Historic displays spotlight Coweta’s past

43 | Coweta a hidden gem for tourists 44 | Music hits a high note in Coweta 46 | Coweta becoming retail destination 48 | Many local thrift stores help Cowetans 50 | Map of Coweta County 52 | Performing arts have long, local history 54 | Dining out: Local charm meets culinary diversity

COMMUNITY 55 | Newnan is ‘home away from home’ for artists 58 | Coweta home to ever-growing medical mecca 62 | The Newnan Times-Herald is Coweta’s oldest business | 64 Small church has big vision for recognizing

40

Photo by Susan Crutchfield

pastors

67 | Coweta cares: and it shows

HEALTH & FITNESS 70 | Coweta County: a destination for golfers 73 | Coweta County recreation facilities 74 | A sports league for everyone 76 | Local horse farm grew from riding lessons for sister

EDUCATION 78 | Move on when ready 80 | Higher ed institutions provide programs tailored to local workforce needs 83 | Coweta’s libraries offer resources, opportunities 84 | Central Educational Center preparing students for real-world workplace | 86 Coweta County private/charter school contact information | 87 Coweta County School System contact information

12 Coweta Living 2017-18

70 COUNTY / CITIES 90 | Chattahoochee Hills to celebrate 10 years 93 | Coweta 411: info you can use 94 | Newnan numbers 95 | Grantville, Senoia numbers 96 | Coweta County numbers 98 | Chattahoochee Hills, Haralson, Moreland, Palmetto, Sargent, Sharpsburg, Turin numbers


R

Real — and literary — living in Coweta “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” Anna Quindlen wrote those words in “How Reading Changed My Life.” As we have been putting together the articles and pictures that have now become Coweta Living 2017, I have been reflecting on how life is like a novel. Coweta County has been the setting for my own story. As you hold this in your hand, then Coweta is a setting for either a chapter — if you are visiting — or a larger hunk of your life — if you live here. Coweta has a fine literary heritage. Most of Erskine Caldwell’s works are set elsewhere, but his “In Search of Bisco” rests upon a boyhood friendship from his earliest days near Moreland. Margaret Anne Barnes, who was a staff member at The Newnan Times and later The Newnan Times-Herald, created a sensation with “Murder in Coweta County.” Lewis Grizzard’s columns and books brought Moreland and Newnan High School to audiences everywhere in a humorous and sometimes sardonic vein. While we were putting Coweta Living together, my wife Lynn and I visited San Francisco and toured The Beat Museum, lingering at the section on William S. Burroughs, whose roots lie in Grantville. So many diverse, maybe even discordant stories have a touch of Coweta in them. You are writing your own novel of life. Coweta has much to offer — great schools, recreation facilities, arts programs, a strong faith community and robust businesses and industries that provide employment and investment. As you access all that Coweta has to offer, The Newnan Times-Herald continues to offer up-to-date coverage of government and the many facets of Coweta living. As the county’s oldest business, we have lots of experience at telling the county’s stories, and giving you the information to “write the story” of your own life here in Coweta County.

— W. Winston Skinner, Editor

Winston Skinner outside the Keystone Korner, one of William S. Burrough’s haunts in San Francisco.

14 Coweta Living 2017-18


— Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle

g

Photo courtesy West Georgia Technical College

German apprentices Julia Daxberger, Leonard Gopp and Sascha Melinz visit the precision manufacturing lab at West Georgia Technical College’s Newnan Campus. At right is Levi Coe, a student in Coweta County’s German-style apprenticeship program who is working with Grenzebach Corporation in Newnan.

German-style apprenticeship puts national spotlight on Coweta Historically strong ties between Coweta County’s businesses and industry and its education community have opened the doors for many innovative programs over the years, including the launch last year of a German-style apprenticeship program — the first of its kind in the United States. Created under the umbrella of the Georgia Consortium of Advanced

WRITTEN BY REBECCA LEFTWICH

Coweta Living 2017-18 15

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

“These students and manufacturers are committed to the kind of workforce development that will revolutionize Georgia’s economy.”


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

Technical Training (GA CAT T), the apprenticeship program offers high school sophomores the opportunity to complete their high school diplomas while at the same time earning credit toward associate degrees in industrial mechanics and participating in paid training with local manufacturers. The inaugural class of industrial mechanics apprentices signed contracts with eight Newnan manufacturers last August, just prior to the start of the 2016-17 school year. “These students and manufacturers are committed to the kind of workforce development that will revolutionize Georgia’s economy,” said Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, who hosted an elaborate signing ceremony at the Georgia Capitol. “This ceremony was more than symbolic. It signals a brighter future for our students who want to pursue meaningful careers well ahead of the traditional education timeline.” GA CAT T — which includes the Coweta County School System’s Central Educational Center, West Georgia Technical College and the German-American Chambers of Commerce of the Southeastern United States — carefully constructed a replica of the German apprenticeship system that has supplied a pipeline of skilled workers for that country’s businesses and industry for more than a century. Cagle lauded the apprenticeship pilot as a game-changer. “This program has the ability to reshape our perception of the role

of public education as we chart a new course in how to better prepare our students for life after graduation,” he said. Cagle is working with college and career academies, school districts and industry leaders to create similar partnerships around the state, but Coweta’s was the first to get off the ground. That’s no surprise when international companies have been a part of the Coweta business scene since the 1980s. An increasingly global approach to local challenges came strongly into play when Martin Pleyer, chief operating officer for Grenzebach Corporation, first brought the idea before similarminded business and education leaders. Pleyer suggested establishing a pipeline of skilled workers similar to the apprenticeship system that has existed in his native Germany for more than a century. With seven other Coweta companies on board, enthusiastic Georgia legislators tweaked state law and local educators adjusted curriculum to accommodate the apprenticeship program. As CEO of the Central Educational Center, Mark Whitlock works to facilitate relationships between businesses and the education community in fine-tuning the courses offered at the school over the years. He said a program like the apprenticeship was the “logical next step.” “Education is driven by business,” Whitlock said. “Education is very much the servant of those experts in business and industry.”

Whitlock said Pleyer, who also serves as CEC’s board chairman, carefully laid the groundwork for GA CAT T by differentiating between rigorous German-style apprenticeships and less formal work-study programs traditionally offered through educational institutions in the United States. “He’s been there to help the whole community understand how it works, and coaching people,” Whitlock said. When Pleyer began approximating the program at Grenzebach four years ago, he demonstrated the German model in which apprentices begin a rigorous course of study developed by the German Chamber of Commerce. That course, designed for use in other countries where German companies have operations, enrolls apprentices at age 15, when formal high school typically ends for German students. GA CAT T matched the German American Chamber of Commerce of the Southern U.S. Inc. with the Technical College System of Georgia to develop the pilot program launched in Coweta County. It was a big job, Whitlock said. “Once the curriculum was translated, West Georgia Technical College had to unpack the competencies and match them up, then present their work to the chamber,” he said. “It took about a year and a half.” In Germany, students are tested after high school to determine their future, whether it’s in continued academic study or in training for a trade. But students

After three years of training, apprentices will have earned as much as $25,000 in pay, their high school diplomas, college credits and credit toward an associate’s degree in industrial mechanics.

16 Coweta Living 2017-18


who opt into GA CAT T are not locked into a career path, Whitlock said. “You’re training for a career, not a job,” he said. “But it’s not ‘This is where you end up.’” GA CAT T will allow students to begin their apprenticeships in 10th grade with a combination of traditional high school classes, college-level manufacturing courses, and apprenticeship modules that will pay them $8/hour. By the 12th grade, students will spend 80 percent of their days learning at the manufacturing site and earning $12/hour. After three years of training, apprentices will have earned as much as $25,000 in pay, their high school diplomas, college credits and credit toward an associate’s degree in industrial mechanics. Apprentices will also have the opportunity to sit for German certification, which is recognized throughout the world. Georgia’s Move on When Ready dual-enrollment program allows participants to complete the apprenticeship program at no cost, opening the doors wide for all students as more career fields add apprenticeship opportunities. “Young people who will gravitate to these programs are from all backgrounds,” Whitlock said. As recruiting got underway for the second class of industrial mechanics apprentices, so did plans to expand the program to include a future apprenticeship program in auto mechanics. As with the industrial mechanics program, it will begin as a “stepped-up internship,” according to Whitlock, to simulate what a full German apprenticeship will look like. “We believe that sets the stage for full GA CAT T apprenticeship in the years to come,” he said. “It worked in manufacturing, so I think this is a very good route to take.” CL

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Rendering of proposed LINC bridge over I-85

Coweta leaders aim for a business-friendly climate Creating a business-friendly and competitive economic climate has been a priority for those seeking to recruit industry to Coweta County. In 2017, the city of Newnan updated its business plan in order to keep the region a leader in economic development and readily available for new opportunities. Newnan currently serves as a regional hub for retail — attracting visitors from the eight surrounding counties. The economic success of the region is clear through an exceptionally low vacancy rate for industrial and commercial space. By keeping an eye on what potential

companies want to see in a community, the city of Newnan aims to maintain a competitive edge over other areas that are also actively recruiting businesses, Assistant City Manager Hasco Craver said. “The city operated in a hyper-competitive environment, not unlike a private enterprise,” he said. “As changing trends create additional pressure, we have to work harder to cultivate sustained economic success." In the past, development opportunities were primarily focused on buildings, dirt and infrastructure. Craver said companies are now seeking elements that focus on

WRITTEN BY CLAY NEELY

18 Coweta Living 2017-18


quality of life. Recent initiatives such as a proposed multi-use trail system called the LINC, and the possibility of a multi-sport complex are among several ideas the city is considering in an effort to address the quality of life demands of business and potential residents. “We’ve heard from economic development partners that having these kinds of facilities in the community is important when

attempting to relocate projects,” Craver said. “Developers are required to monitor housing, recreation, hospitality, and tourism.” In terms of new development, the city is continuing to recruit specific industry development types such as health care, destination retail, higher education, professional services, entrepreneurs and entertainment. “For those seeking new development and investments, those

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

Greg Wright at the Coweta County Development Authority

are the areas where we feel we can offer our most attractive incentive package,” Craver said. “We’re very specific in attempting to recruit in these types of areas.” By offering a variety of incentives such as expedited permitting, waiving fees associated with opening businesses and construction projects, affordable plan-review fees and occupation-tax fees, the city and county hope to help recruit new growth to the area. “In order to remain competitive, you have to be willing to provide certain types of incentives to certain types of projects,” Craver said. “What we have done in Newnan is, instead of giving everyone an incentive regardless of their project, we have chosen to be very specific. “Because we’re good stewards of our city’s resources, we’re specific on what we will give and what we will not give.” Greg Wright, president of the

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BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

Coweta County Development Authority, knows the value of city and county government going the extra mile to recruit new business and to help existing industry expand. “Local government works closely with the development authority to meet the needs of both existing and new businesses,” Wright said. “Between the educational opportunities that exist in our community and the excellent relationship that industry shares with local government, it’s a perfect environment in which to grow or establish a company.” However, simply having a warehouse or available acreage to provide a perspective business isn’t enough for industries these days, according to Wright. “In Coweta, we’re able to demonstrate to potential employers the quality of workforce available,” Wright said. “Quality is more important to them than a location or incentives. None of those matter if you can’t find the workforce for your company.” Wright cited the numerous institutions in the community such as the Central Educational Center, West Georgia Technical College, University of West Georgia’s Newnan campus, and the recent launch of a Germanstyle apprenticeship program — the first of its kind in the United States. The Georgia Consortium of

Herring Road facility for Variety Wholesalers

The Herring Road facility built for Kmart had been vacant since that company moved out in January 2015. In August 2016, Variety Wholesalers Inc. announced it had signed a lease with the building’s new owners for 1.4 million of the 1.9 million square feet of space. “I knew they had a lot of options available, but they chose us,” Wright said. The building’s size and readiness were major factors in the decision, as was use of the racks and conveyor systems that Kmart left in place, according to executives who say there are few buildings of that size available anywhere in the country. The equipment simply allowed Variety to move in faster and get up and running sooner than other sites. Variety President Wilson Sawyer gave credit to local and state officials for streamlining the processes for permits, hiring and training. “Lots of communities like to say they are business-friendly,” he said. “But I’ll tell you most of them are not serious about it. The folks here are serious.” CL

Advanced Technical Training offers high school sophomores the opportunity to complete their high school diplomas while at the same time earning credit toward associate degrees in industrial mechanics and participating in paid training with local manufacturers. The program is a replica of the German apprenticeship system that has supplied a pipeline of skilled workers for that country’s businesses and industry for more than a century. As CEO of the Central Educational Center, Mark Whitlock works to facilitate relationships between businesses and the education community in fine-tuning the courses offered at the school over the years. He said a program like the apprenticeship was the “logical next step.” “Education is driven by business,” Whitlock said. “Education is very much the servant of those experts in business and industry.” Evidence that the approach of local leaders works came last year. A huge warehouse that helped establish Newnan’s reputation as a distribution hub once again was housing hundreds of jobs and acres of merchandise.

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BUSINESS & INDUSTRY Kid’s Castle is just part of Newnan Utilities’ 14-acre park on Sewell Road. Visitors can play on the playgrounds and exercise on the jogging paths year-round. During the hot summer months, kids can cool off in the fountains and splash pad.

U

Utilities serve community two ways Along with providing homes and businesses with heating, air conditioning, water and other services, the utility companies of Newnan and Coweta County also take great pride in giving back to the community. Georgia Power employees pride themselves with the motto of being “A Citizen Wherever We Serve.” In 2016, Georgia Power invested $16.6 million in nonprofits and charitable causes across the state with employees and retirees donating 154,200 hours of volunteer service. Key initiatives include: Earth Day, MLK Day of Service, March of Dimes and the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life program. WRITTEN BY CLAY NEELY

22 Coweta Living 2017-18


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

The company recognizes that involvement at the local level is essential. So far in 2017, Georgia Power and its local employees have supported organizations such as the Coweta Samaritan Clinic and One Roof Ecumenical Outreach. In addition, current employees (through their Citizens of Georgia Power chapter) and retirees (known as Georgia Power Ambassadors), identify and support various local causes and organizations which directly benefit their neighborhoods and communities. Some of the organizations the company has been involved with in Coweta County this past year include: Coweta Schools Superintendent advisory board, Habitat For Humanity, Summit YMCA, Newnan Rotary Club and Kiwanis Club. Newnan Utilities’ guiding business principle is not only to provide power and water service to their customers, but to be an outstanding corporate

Each year, Coweta-Fayette EMC employees participate in raising funds to benefit Relay For Life. This year, co-op employees cooked a large amount of food to sell to their coworkers for Relay proceeds.

citizen. Its employees are encouraged to serve in their working and personal lives, giving their time to dozens of local committees, little leagues, churches, and other organizations. “They go above and beyond in their jobs, pulling over to help an elderly couple change a flat tire, returning a found wallet to its owner, or helping

a mom whose child locked her keys in their car during their visit to our park,” said Dennis McEntire, general manager of Newnan Utilities. “I spend a lot of time out in the community, speaking to people of all influences. One of the most common things I hear when I introduce myself is how great our employees are,”

For over 100 years, Newnan Utilities has helped Coweta County grow and prosper. We’re proud to sponsor projects that continue to enrich and strengthen our vibrant community. — Newnan Utilities’ Carl Miller Park — Holiday lighting and summer baskets on Newnan’s historic court square — Customer Appreciation Day

70 Sewell Road | Newnan, GA 30263 | 770-683-5516 | www.NewnanUtilities.org NU coweta living 2017.indd 1

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Coweta Living 2017-18 23


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

The utility companies of Newnan and Coweta County also take great pride in giving back to the community. McEntire said. “I am always proud to hear that, and it makes me feel blessed to be a part of this great organization every single time. I truly believe that in many ways, these reactions come from our employees’ involvement in the community.” As an organization, Newnan Utilities is involved in over 100 events and charitable causes annually, donating time and resources to help, including hanging and maintaining the flower baskets that enhance the beauty of downtown Newnan during the spring and summer, as well as the holiday lights and Christmas tree downtown. Newnan Utilities’ employees individually contribute to their Lighthouse Committee, a committee that exists to help fellow employees and organizations in need. Last year, that committee, funded solely and directly by Newnan Utilities employees, donated $14,000 to various causes. The utility’s 14-acre park on Sewell Road was constructed in the late 1980s for everyone to enjoy. Visitors play on the playgrounds and exercise on the jogging paths year-round, and kids can cool off in the fountains and splash pad during the hot summer months.

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24 Coweta Living 2017-18

Visitors can also enjoy special events at the park’s pavilions. The pavilions are reserved more than 1,000 times annually. “Newnan Utilities is proud to be a part of this great community, and we encourage other businesses to take part as well,” McEntire said. “When the community thrives, businesses thrive.” Serving more than 76,000 consumers across Coweta, Fayette, Heard, Fulton, Clayton, Spalding, Troup and Meriwether counties with power since 1947, Coweta-Fayette EMC also knows the importance of neighbors helping neighbors. Such a large territory provides employees of the electric cooperative with countless opportunities to assist others. Each work day, they arrive ready and willing to offer support at a moment’s notice, wherever they are needed, often at all hours. “Concern for Community” is one of the seven co-op principles that guide Coweta-Fayette’s business model. To that end, Coweta-Fayette EMC is a strong supporter of education in Coweta, working with several schools to provide linemen-led safety programs and the ever-popular cooperative utility vehicles with buckets when requested. The co-op has partnered with Western Elementary School for 27 years, serving on the school council, helping with classroom materials, providing safety programs and delivering gifts for Teacher Appreciation Week. Each year, EMC employees also raise money for months in preparation for Relay For Life. Cooperative personnel host large, family-style breakfasts, hold gumbo and soup sales, organize a Chicken-Q open to the community and more to benefit the worthy cause. In just six years, Coweta-Fayette EMC has raised more than $100,000 for a local cancer research/ recovery organization, and the co-op often has one of the largest groups present the night of the event. Through Operation Round Up, more than $200,000 annually goes to various groups and individuals in need in the EMC service territory. Cooperative members can elect to “round up” monthly bills and donate the difference, which amounts to no more than $11.88 per year. Although individual contributions may seem small, together EMC consumers can change thousands of lives. CL


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

C

Photo by Sarah Campbell

It’s just another day in Coweta as crews film in downtown Newnan outside Golden’s on the Square.

Current filming boom started in Coweta

Georgia’s film and television industry continues to grow, and Georgia was the filming site of 17 of the top 100 highest-grossing movies in 2016 — more than any other state or province. The film industry is flocking to the state thanks to its generous tax incentives for film and television production, and even more studios are under construction. That’s no secret. But what many people don’t know is that the current boom started in Coweta. Senoia’s Riverwood Studios, now known as Raleigh Studios Atlanta, opened in 1989, and was involved in movies such as WRITTEN BY SARAH FAY CAMPBELL Coweta Living 2017-18 25


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY The Netflix original movie “Candy Jar” films at a home on Temple Avenue in the spring of 2017.

“Fried Green Tomatoes” and “Consenting Adults.” Filming was fairly robust in the early ‘90s — movies filmed locally included “Pet Sematary Two” “The War” and “Andersonville.” And Riverwood was the only independent studio in Georgia at the time. But then a recession hit, Canada began offering tax incentives for film projects, and things dried up in Georgia. In 2003, Louisiana started offering tax incentives, and productions began moving down South. Around that same time, Scott Tigchelaar with Riverwood and his uncle Paul Lombardi sat down with then-state Sen. Mitch Seabaugh, R-Newnan, whose background is accounting. “We said we need an incentive in Georgia or we need to get out of the film business for good,” Tigchelaar said. Seabaugh asked them how a sustainable incentive could work. And he got busy making it happen. Tigchelaar put him in touch with the head of taxes for Disney, and Seabaugh made some visits to Hollywood. He worked to craft Georgia’s first tax incentive, which went into effect in 2005, and the more generous one that began in 2008 — and remains today. “Mitch is an unsung hero of this industry, and he hasn’t 26 Coweta Living 2017-18

Photo by Sarah Campbell

ever profited from it,” Tigchelaar said. “He was an absolutely perfect civil servant and what you’d want in a politician. Since the 2008 incentives went into effect, the industry has grown steadily. Raleigh is a small studio, and a lot of what is filmed there is also shot on location in and around Coweta. Larger studios such as Pinewood in Fayette County have massive sound stages for action blockbusters such as “Captain America: Civil War” and “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.” But sound stages don’t make very good tourist attractions. Nor do sets that are torn down after filming ends, such as the Andersonville prison. So much of what was used in the filming of “The Walking Dead” in Senoia — and “Fried Green Tomatoes” and “The Fighting Temptations” and even “Pet Sematary Two” — still stands. “What’s nice about that from a tourism perspective is there’s a tangible set that will be here forever,” said Tigchelaar. “You’re not visiting a field where they say, ‘This is where the castle stood.’” Visiting downtown Senoia “is like going to Universal Studios and Harry Potter World. This is ‘Walking Dead’


WE want to make YOU a car loan! Decisions are made LOCALLY! Tray Baggarly is Coweta’s Film Ready Liaison. He experienced Georgia’s early filming boom first hand as an extra in “Guyana Tragedy: The Jim Jones Story” in the late 1970s.

world,” he said. “That doesn’t always happen in the film business.” The film tourism industry is growing every year in Georgia, and locally, it’s not just about “The Walking Dead.” Though that’s the major attraction in Senoia — helped by the existence of The Georgia Tour Company that offers walking tours hosted by actor lookalikes such as “Senoia Rick” and “Senoia Abraham.” There’s also The Walking Dead Store and The Waking Dead coffee shop, and Nic and Norman’s, the restaurant and bar partially owned by Greg Nicotero, who is executive producer of the show and has directed and been the head of makeup, and actor Norman Reedus, who plays Daryl Dixon. There is also a Walking Dead tour in Haralson, and there are filming locations all around Coweta County, from Grantville to Newnan to Sharpsburg. “Fried Green Tomatoes” is still a big tourism draw. In downtown Senoia, there’s the Bridge Street bridge and railroad track, where Buddy lost his life, and the house that was the Threadgood home. Newnan’s Starcrest nursing home, now Avalon Health and Rehabilitation, was the facility where Evelyn first met Mrs. Threadgood. The famous Towonda scene in the Winn Dixie parking lot, however, wasn’t filmed in Newnan, despite some reports to the contrary. It was filmed at Bank’s Crossing in Fayetteville. “Sweet Home Alabama,” filmed at Starr’s Mill in nearby Fayette County and Wynn’s Pond, still gets tourists, Tigchelaar said. “The Fighting Temptations” was filmed at Senoia United Methodist Church, and “Meet the Browns” was filmed on Main Street and at a local home. As the industry grows, crew members are starting to get homes here and stay year-round. And eventually, Tigchelaar thinks producers, directors and writers will do the same. Currently, most content originates in Los Angeles and then it’s decided to do filming in Georgia. “The industry-wide goal is to start seeing this all evolve into an indigenous Georgia film industry

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BUSINESS & INDUSTRY The Caldwell Tanks buildings in downtown Newnan, top, have proven to be popular filming sites, and were used in “The Walking Dead,” above, and “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1.”

Newnan High School was the site of a pivotal search for medical supplies in season 2 of “The Walking Dead.”

28 Coweta Living 2017-18

Photo courtesy of AMC Networks

Photo by Jeff Leo

where content originates here. And it’s starting to happen,” Tigchelaar said. On the south side of Atlanta, there are Pinewood, Raleigh, Screen Gems at the old Lakewood Fairgrounds, the new Atlanta Metro Studios in Union City at the former site of Shannon Mall, and Tyler Perry’s new studio project being built at Fort McPherson, just north of East Point. Tigchelaar says he gets asked often if there are too many studios being built in Georgia. “Eventually, if people keep building them, we’re going to have too many,” he said. But not yet. Raleigh has been booked up with “The Walking Dead” since 2011. And “I still get calls for stage space every two weeks,” Tigchelaar said. Some movies filmed in Coweta are only here for a few days, and if the filming is done on private property out in the county, it may happen with very few people knowing about it. Other times, productions spend weeks or longer in Coweta. The movie “Lawless” set up its basecamp in the former Bible Baptist Church on U.S. Highway 29. “The Founder” used the parking lot of the Coweta Administration Building as the site for one of the very first McDonald’s. While the setup, filming and tear down was going on, county employees had to park elsewhere.


The Caldwell Tanks property has vast open areas under a roof, and a bit of postapocalyptic trappings that made it just right for a scene in “The Hunger Games” and for the Woodbury battle arena in “The Walking Dead.” The courthouse is a big attraction “just because it’s gorgeous,” Baggarly said. “You don’t see too many courtrooms that look like that one.” He has to be careful with the courtroom. Several years ago, the courthouse was restored in a multimillion-dollar project, and through extensive research it was returned to its original paint and furnishings, including faux wood-graining. One location director wanted to paint the courtroom. He assured Baggarly that it would be put back the way it was, but there was no way that was going to be approved, Baggarly said. Another big attraction is historic homes and farmhouses with lots of land. Filming on acreage, far off the road, is easy for everyone. There is a database of photos from all around the state that location managers can use to help find locations. Cowetans who

Coweta Living 2017-18 29

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

“That was the longest month of my life,” said Tray Baggarly, Coweta’s Film Ready Liaison and event services director. It’s Baggarly’s job to talk to location scouts and work with production crews for the use of county buildings and property and public roads. He also keeps up information on particular sites in the county that may be attractive to movie makers. The old hospital on Hospital Road, the Caldwell Tanks buildings and the 1904 Courthouse are all popular filming sites. It’s rare to find a hospital that is both vacant and still in decent shape. For several years after the hospital closed, Baggarly said, the owners, Piedmont, were not interested in it being used for filming. But then “The Walking Dead” used it to stand in for Atlanta’s Grady Memorial. Baggarly said he asked the location manager how in the world he got Piedmont to let them use the hospital. It involved an executive who is a big fan of the show. Since then, the building has been available for filming, most recently for the Robert DeNiro movie, “The War With Grandpa.”


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

would like to get their properties listed on the database can contact the Coweta Visitor’s Center for more information or call 770-254-2627. Baggarly is a native of Senoia and lives in downtown, so he gets a good view of the goings on. Once, he was out in the yard playing with his son and saw what looked to be a location scout across the road, taking some photos. He called out to her, and they had an impromptu discussion of

filming locations. Baggarly got his start in the film industry early — as an extra in “Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones,” which was released in 1980. The Jones character was getting married at the church across the street from Baggarly’s grandmother’s house. “She heard they were looking for extras, so I got chosen to be in the wedding party.” Since Baggarly works so much with the film industry, he’s often asked how

many famous stars he’s met. So far, none. Not even Norman Reedus, whom half of Coweta seems to have taken a selfie with. However, “I talked to Senoia Rick yesterday,” he said with a laugh. He was asked if there was any Hollywood star he’d really want to meet. “I’m a big Julia Roberts fan,” he said. “If ‘Pretty Woman’ was here, I’d probably be asking for some favors.” CL

Q&A with local business people John Hall, president United Bank, Newnan 1. How long have you worked in Coweta? I have worked here since 2000 and started here with BB&T when they first came to Newnan. I worked for Synovus in both Peachtree City and Newnan until coming to United Bank three years ago. 2. What makes Coweta a good place to do business? Coweta County is a great place to be in the banking industry because there are many prosperous businesses that are located here and do business here. The business leaders seem to communicate very effectively with each other and city and county government, educational leaders, builders and developers, etc. The recent review of our school system accreditation has really made this a destination for many and shows in the influx of homeowners to the area. Our health care industry has grown dramatically over the past few years and helped increase our overall workforce. 3. What do you have planned as the 2017 Newnan-Coweta Chamber of

30 Coweta Living 2017-18

Commerce board chair? I am fortunate to be chairing the chamber board this year, and we have a great team. The ESPLOST vote was a success, and we hope the linear park concept will be as well. There are a lot of new members getting involved in various capacities and bringing in fresh, new ideas. Coweta County is fortunate to have such a dynamic group helping bring business to our area with our chamber, development authority, and city and county leaders.

Linette Ward, co-owner Roscoe Jenkins Funeral Home 1. How long have you lived and worked in Coweta?

born in Newnan, therefore I have roots here. She spoke of Newnan all of my life. There's a strong sense of community, great schools, wonderful people, church, gracious living, and it is beautiful.

Jeff Morgan, owner, Morgan Jewelers, Newnan 1. How long have you been in the jewelry business in Coweta? I began learning to size rings after school at age 16 to work in our family jewelry business. I am grateful to still maintain our downtown store of 55 years as owner and jeweler.

In 1990, my family and I moved to Sharpsburg, and in 1993, I joined my husband to manage his law practice, Ward Law Office. In 2006, I became a partner of Roscoe Jenkins Funeral Home Inc.

2. Why do you like doing business in Coweta?

2. What do you think makes Coweta a unique place to do business?

3. What's makes Coweta unique?

Small businesses make a town. We can serve our customers as friends and family. I am proud to continue my dad's “little man” legacy in our community.

3. Why do you enjoy calling Coweta home?

Coweta is unique in that it is part of metro Atlanta with a big city vibe in one area, but still has historic downtown Newnan that hosts many Main Street events and highlights local merchants, which are the heart and soul of the county.

My paternal grandmother was

CL

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Coweta Living 2017-18 31


REAL ESTATE

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Home construction is steady throughout Coweta County. The Northgate school district is the hottest spot for new and existing home sales.

Housing market grows The residential real estate market has seen

steady expansion in Coweta County recently, and new construction is common throughout the county, but real estate experts say the inventory of available houses is still below average. Chip Barron with Lindsey’s Inc. Realtors in downtown Newnan said there were 620 single-family homes on the market in Coweta County near the end of May. “A few months ago, we were down to 550, so things have improved, but still low, however,” Barron said. He said 1,000 is usually the average, especially during the spring and summer months when many families are making their final moves before school starts in August. He said there were 187 new homes on the market in May. “So, they are a big part of our inventory,” he said.

The Coweta market is vibrant for one reason, experts say. “New homes will be built, and the growth happening here, primarily because of the good I-85 infrastructure in comparison to other neighboring counties,” said Pitts Wilson, real estate agent with Berkshire Hathaway. The university is forecasting the local building boom will continue. It foresees 2 percent more single-family permits next year followed by an additional 3 percent on top of that in 2018. Coweta’s growth is expected to outpace the rest of metro Atlanta, according to Rajeev Dhawan, director of the Forecasting Center. The increased housing supply locally hasn’t prevented prices from rising for new and existing residential property.

Many moving to Coweta

Where it’s hot

Coweta ended 2016 with 844 permits for new, singlefamily houses, according to the Georgia State University Economic Forecasting Center. Permits for multi-family units — apartments, condos and retirement homes — totaled 301. That compares to 348 single-family permits in Fayette County and just 15 for multiple units. Spalding County was even more tepid with only 209 permits for new house construction and none for apartments.

All zip codes in Coweta County reflect two-and-a-half month inventory supply for new and resales homes for all price points at the end of May, according to Yetta Richardson, a construction-loan specialist at United Bank. “Northgate’s school district is still the most soughtafter location for new homes and resales. The price point has increased to $400,000 and higher, mainly due to land costs,” she said. Richardson said current new construction price points are increasing due to increased land costs, increased material costs, and increased labor costs and due to the insufficient number of subcontractors in the market. “There is no inventory of new construction at $100,000 mainly due to land costs. There is some activity with resales at $100,000, with a nearly two-month supply.”

WRITTEN BY KANDICE BELL AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY BETH NEELY

32 Coweta Living 2017-18


Industrial real estate in Coweta Businesses small and large are locating to Coweta because of the close proximity to I-85 and the quality of life in the community. Newnan native Wesley Budd, an industrial representative broker and Realtor with CBRE Group Inc.’s global commercial real estate firm, said Coweta will see a spike in industrial real estate. “The main thing that is driving the market is e-commerce,” he said. “You can drive from Newnan to Atlanta and see distribution facilities for large retailers. They bring in their goods, and they have to be able to distribute them quickly. People are buying goods online and expect it quickly — within one to two business days.” Although Budd concentrates on industrial and commercial real estate, his clients share a similar issue with residential buyers, which is the shortage of inventory. “In the South, there is over 8 million square feet of industrial product planned to come out of ground on the I-85 south corridor, which is new construction,” Budd said. “Investors have an appetite for industrial product. Right now, Atlanta’s industrial product is very popular. The buildings that will be coming out of the ground will have a decent return and safety for many of their asset classes.” Budd said Atlanta is the fourth largest industrial hub in the country because of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, major interstates and the expansion of the Savannah Port. “All of these are connecting with a booming population,” he said. “Tenants are looking to come here.” Budd said Newnan’s market for industrial property is on the rise, citing the opening of Variety Wholesalers Distribution Center in the old Kmart building on Herring Road, and Niagara Bottling. “You’re going to see a big expansion in Newnan in the next three to four years,” Budd said. “This is coming from tenants in the logistics and commerce world seeking space. Land around Atlanta is dried up, and developers are looking farther out to I-85.” Coweta County Development Authority President Greg Wright said the county has more than 600,000 square feet of industrial space available, with 478,000 of that remaining in the Kmart building. CL

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REAL ESTATE

M

Manufacturing, health care, film industries boost Coweta economy

Coweta County’s economy

has been progressing since the Great Recession, with booming business in manufacturing, health care and the film industry.

New manufacturers in Coweta Manufacturing is a large and vibrant sector of the local economy, the largest non-farm private sector besides retail and health care, according to the Georgia Department of Labor, which pegs factory employment at 13 percent of Coweta’s private workforce. And local industry recruiters have had some recent luck in getting new facilities to open here. A new Mingledorff distribution center opened at Creekside Business Park off of Ga. Highway 34 in Newnan. Mingledorff is a distributor of heating and air conditioning equipment and has 33 locations in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and South Carolina. NYCO America, a maker of specialty lubricants in the aviation

market, brought its U.S. headquarters and operating platform to Shenandoah Industrial Park in Newnan. It officially opened in January 2017. Lowell Smith, NYCO sales director, has lived in Newnan for 17 years and said the city’s location was well-suited for business. “The location is strategic in order to provide lubricants in the aviation industry,” he said. “Our products are manufactured in Belgium. Bringing products into U.S., we’ll use the ports of Savannah and Miami.” He said the company had been searching for the ideal location for a while before finding the Coweta property. “Newnan has a really great environment for growing companies, and, to be honest, this facility met every one of our needs,” Smith said. NYCO America also purchased two adjoining properties in the Shenandoah Industrial Park in late August 2016, and installed a variety of safety, fire protection, health WRITTEN BY KANDICE BELL

34 Coweta Living 2017-18

equipment and emergency devices prior to occupying the office area. Manufacturing here should be operating in 2019, which would raise the number of employees to between 12 and 15, NYCO America CEO James Mustacchio said, noting the location’s advantages for the logistics of transporting the product to market. NYCO was the second international company to locate to Coweta within the past year. Blickle U.S.A., which manufactures and distributes wheels and casters, located its U.S. headquarters in Coweta County in October 2016. “This is a great testimony to the competitiveness of our community,” said Coweta County Development Authority President Greg Wright. Coweta’s proximity to HartsfieldJackson International Airport and I-85 also make the county competitive for business, according to Wright. “A lot of it has to do with existing industrial base,” he said. “Coweta is viewed as a very positive area


— Lowell Smith

for manufacturing. (Existing local employers) Yamaha and Niagara are well-recognized companies. Some of it has to do with the fact we put forth a lot of effort to take care of our existing companies and do what we can to meet their needs and help them be successful.” Variety Wholesalers Inc. established its second major distribution center here in Coweta County last year and is expected to add at approximately 320 jobs. Roses Express, a retail merchandising chain owned by Variety, opened a store late last year in Newnan’s Merchant’s Crossing shopping center. PetSmart is another company with both a local distribution center and a retail store. Wright said the authority is also involved in making sure quality jobs are available in the county. He said the average wage for the county is $18.28 per hour. The average wage of manufacturing is at least $19 per hour and more than $24 per hour for health care. Wright said the workforce in Coweta is favorable, mainly because of programs such as the Georgia Apprenticeship Program, Central Educational Center, the University of West Georgia and Brewton-Parker College. Such aggressive industry recruitment isn’t new here. The authority celebrated its 50th anniversary in November 2016.

Booming health care industry In addition to manufacturing and distribution, Coweta County has a significant employment base in health care, a sector responsible for one out of every eight jobs locally. And the sector continues to grow, not only offering additional jobs but also

improving the local standard of living, a plus for wooing other employers. Wright described the strategy as building on what has developed as a regional health care hub. “We do what we can to attract quality health care services in Coweta,” he said. Piedmont Newnan Hospital received required state approval to move forward with a new interventional radiology area and a second catheterization lab. The $5 million project was announced in February 2017. The Newnan nonprofit health care center will renovate space on the hospital’s first floor and in the cardiology unit to include both an interventional radiology room and an additional cardiac catheterization lab. Dr. Ryan Crisel, an interventional cardiologist with Piedmont Heart Institute, said offering this service at the local hospital will provide “rapid intervention” and “better outcomes” for patients. In a press release, Crisel said patients suffering from heart attacks have “a 90-minute window to regain blood flow to the heart to prevent heart failure and save their life.” Coweta County has a higher-thanaverage rate of complications related to obstructive heart disease, with more than 30 percent of local adults being obese or inactive — or having high blood pressure, according to Piedmont. These specialized services in heart care will serve to further promote the hospital’s goal of allowing patients to seek treatment close to home. Construction began for the renovation projects at Piedmont Newnan and is expected to be completed the fall of 2017. Piedmont Newnan received an

“A” in the two most recent grading periods by the Leapfrog Group, a foundation established and funded by national employers who were seeking a way to improve health care. Just 16 Georgia hospitals earned an “A” in the assessments.

Booming film industry It is not uncommon for locals to see celebrities hanging out at their favorite restaurants or other popular spots around town, mainly because big screen movies are being filmed right in their backyard. Georgia’s film industry is booming, mainly due to tax credits that have brought nearly 80,000 jobs to the state and more than $4 billion in wages. Pinewood Atlanta Studios is a full-service film and entertainment studio in neighboring Fayetteville on 700 acres. The studio has 18 sound stages and is expected to grow even more, according to Brian Cooper, vice president of operations. The impact is felt beyond the movie industry itself, according to Tray Baggarly, Coweta County’s event services director and liaison to the production companies. “But looking at the big picture, these production companies bring many, many jobs to the local communities,” he said. “I know many people who live here who are now working in the film industry locally. I see how the industry has brought new jobs and new retail to the area and how towns, like Senoia for instance, have been given an economicdevelopment shot in the arm.” For the year 2016, there were 245 productions filmed in Georgia, with $2.2 billion spent and an economic impact of $7 billion. CL Coweta Living 2017-18 35

REAL ESTATE

“A lot of it has to do with existing industrial base. Coweta is viewed as a very positive area for manufacturing. Yamaha and Niagara are wellrecognized companies. Some of it has to do with the fact we put forth a lot of effort to take care of our existing companies and do what we can to meet their needs and help them be successful.”


REAL ESTATE

“I see us going into true neighborhood revitalization . . .” — Cristina Bowerman

H

Volunteers roll a wheelbarrow out of a house during a construction project. Habitat for Humanity aims to build safe, affordable homes for people around the world.

Habitat helps Newnan

Newnan’s branch of Habitat for Humanity has been helping Coweta County families for more than 20 years. Tucked away on Pine Road, Habitat for Humanity is somewhat of a hidden gem of the Coweta area. The organization aids families facing difficult housing situations and assists in providing improved homes that can change the direction of their lives. Loretta Stinson is a member of the Homeowner Services Committee for Habitat for Humanity, but she also was a part of the Homeownership Program. In May 2017, she paid off her 20-year mortgage to Habitat. She attested to the good that Habitat does in the community. “I was living on a real bad street in Newnan,”

Stinson said. “There were drugs, shootings, and I was a single mother with three kids.” Stinson says that she found out about Habitat from a friend and applied for homeownership. She says that she was impressed because of how close everyone affiliated with Habitat was. It was like a family because everyone looked out for each other. “It’s not a handout, it’s a ‘hand up,’ ” Stinson said about the misconception that homes are given away. In order to receive a home, the recipient must demonstrate a need for a new home. An application must be filled out, and a committee of citizens must approve the applicant. An inspector comes out to check living conditions. If approved on all prior stages, “sweat equity” must be paid.

WRITTEN BY JUSTON LEWIS

36 Coweta Living 2017-18


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REAL ESTATE

From pouring sacks of topsoil for a landscape planting to nailing siding, there are aspects to Habitat for Humanity projects for every age and ability level.

The applicants must either work to build their home or commit to volunteer in some way. That may involve working in the Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore, a surplus buildingmaterials shop, cleaning up a build site, or meeting some other need of the organization as a volunteer. Sweat equity can be paid by friends and families of the applicant, which makes it a community affair. The last step is attending eight classes about homeownership. The classes vary from fire safety to money management. The goal of the classes is to teach applicants how to be homeowners and how to properly take care of a residence. Executive Director Cristina Bowerman has been at the Newnan-Coweta branch for two years but has 20 years of experience in nonprofits. Bowerman is looking to expand the Habitat brand in Coweta. She says she has run into building restrictions and people who feel like Habitat doesn’t do enough in the community. Still, she is excited for the future. That future includes building the first Habitat-built housing development in Coweta. The development will feature 11 townhomes and is expected to be completed within the next few years. Another part of growth is moving operations from Pine Road to the Shenandoah Plaza on Bullsboro Drive, where its neighbors will be Goodwill, Big Lots, and Dollar General. As for the long term, Bowerman says that the development will open doors for bigger expansion projects. “I see us going into true neighborhood revitalization,” Bowerman said, “where we go into areas that are older and dilapidated and we help clean them up, but be aware of gentrification and other situations like that. We never want to make a situation worse than it already is.” In the 20 years that Habitat for Humanity has been in Newnan, countless families have been helped. Habitat creates a new chance for people to have a home, and that can open the door for a world of possibilities. “You can go back to school, you can do other things,” Bowerman said. “We’ve seen it happen.” CL


THINGS TO DO

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Cochran Mill Park in nearby Chattahoochee Hills has miles of trails, including hiking, mountain bike and equestrian trails, and several creeks.

Outdoors offer diverse attractions

From passive parks to playgrounds to Chattahoochee Bend State Park and several large parks just outside Coweta County, there are plenty of local options for quality time outdoors. The newest park in Coweta is the skate park in Grantville. After years of planning, the small skate park opened in September of 2016. The park is open daily from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and can be used by skateboarders, cyclists and inline skaters. It’s located in the same park with the ClementsMalcolm Recreation Center, and there is a playground and picnic area, including grills and a pavilion. Grantville also has a splash park open Tuesday through Sunday, from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The park is located on Post Street, and admission is $1. Semi-private and private parties are available. The city of Newnan is awash in parks. In downtown, there is Greenville Street Park at Greenville, Salbide, and LaGrange street. The colonnade is the most prominent feature of the park, which has benches, picnic areas, lovely landscaping, a fountain and a stage. Across LaGrange is the First Avenue Park, with a playground, pavilion, and a large field for kite flying, Frisbee tossing, and running around, and a paved track for walking and biking. Dogs are allowed on leash. Both parks have restrooms (a fairly recent addition) and occasionally play host to city events. Also downtown is the city park at Temple Avenue and Jackson Street, which is home to the veterans plaza, benches, and a fountain — which features multicolored lights at night and is a pleasant place to spend a summer’s evening. The city’s other passive park is Cranford Park on Jackson Street. The three-quarter acre park is tucked next to the Carolyn Barron Montessori School. The most popular park in Coweta is Carl Miller Park on Sewell Road in Newnan, owned and operated by Newnan The new skate Utilities. It’s the home of Kid’s Castle Park, as well as two other park in Grantville is playgrounds, including one designed for young toddlers. In the warmer months, there’s proving popular with a the splash park, and there are four pavilions that can be reserved by Newnan Utilities skateboarders, BMX riders and inline customers, one first-come-first-served pavilion, snack machines, a walking track, skaters.

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C.J. Smith Park on Farmer Street has two playgrounds, including

one that is heavily shaded, and two ball fields. The park is adjacent to the African American Heritage Museum and cemetery. Ray Park on Spring Street was extensively rebuilt by the city a few years ago, and now includes a pavilion, playground, walking trail, tennis courts and grassy areas. First Avenue, Greenville Street, Carl Miller and Ray parks have public restrooms. Senoia has the city park on Seavy Street and the Marimac Lakes Park. The Seavy Street park has a large playground that was recently redone, picnic areas, restrooms, and the Freeman Sasser building which can be rented for special events. Marimac Lakes has three lakes and a walking trail. It’s a popular fishing spot — though fishing is catchand-release only —  and fishing is free for city residents, as long as they have a Georgia fishing license. For those who live outside of the city limits, you can purchase a permit from city hall. Permits are $10 for a day or $40 a year.

Chattahoochee Bend State Park, which celebrated its fifth

anniversary in 2016, includes nearly 3,000 acres along the Chattahoochee River. The park features an extensive network of hiking trails and a growing network of mountain-biking trails. Equestrian trails are planned. The park has two developed campgrounds, as well as several platform tent sites along the river. The day-use area at the river features wellshaded picnic tables and a swing along the river, a boat ramp, playground, and small picnic pavilions. There are bicycle and canoe rentals available. The majority of landscaping at the park’s visitor’s center is blueberry bushes. In the early summer, there are thousands ripe for the picking. Regular events are hosted by the park’s naturalist. The park has an active friends group, which builds trails and holds regular cleanup days. Membership in the Friends of Chattahoochee

Bend State Park includes a park pass good for 12 months of free entry to every Georgia State Park. Standard admission is $5. For more information about the park, visit www.gastateparks.org/ chattahoocheebend or call 770-2547271. For more information about the Friends of Chattahoochee Bend State Park, visit www.bendfriend.com. For a smaller nature experience, there is the Jim McGuffey Nature

Center at the Coweta County Fairgrounds, 275 Pine Road. The

area includes a small pond and short trails featuring native plants, including one paved, wheelchair-accessible trail, benches and restrooms. There is no charge for entry. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

The Brown’s Mill Battlefield Historic Site is a 100-acre

interpretive park on the site of the 1864 Battle of Brown’s Mill. The park has an interpretive trail and large field. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to dusk Monday through Saturday and 1:30 p.m. to dusk on Sundays. Volunteers have recently worked on constructing additional walking/jogging trails. The park is located at 155 Millard Farmer Road, Newnan. For more information, call 770-254-2627 or visit www.brownsmillbattlefield.org. Cochran Mill Park, Line Creek Nature Center, and McIntosh Reserve are large nature parks just outside Coweta.

Cochran Mill in Chattahoochee Hills has an extensive network of

hiking, mountain-biking, and equestrian trails. There is also a playground and reservable picnic pavilion. There have been extensive improvements and trail additions in the past several years. The property was the former site of a grist mill and features two large streams. Across the street from the parking area and down a hill is the main waterfall, where portions of the old mill run can still be seen, and a trail takes hikers up to the top. After you go to the top of the main waterfall, a great hike for first-time visitors is to head in the other direction until you reach a small bridge. Cross the bridge, then turn right to follow the stream past several

waterfalls and granite outcrops to the breached mill pond. The bridge near the main waterfall has been closed off for years, and there is no dry crossing. The easiest way to cross is to slip off your shoes and cross in the shallow part of the stream to the left of the bridge. Mountain-bike trails, which have become popular, as well as equestrian trails, are accessed from the parking lot, and trailer parking is available. Parking is $5 per two-axle vehicle or free for Chattahoochee Hills Residents. You can purchase an annual pass for $25. Passes expire Dec. 31. Nearby is the Cochran Mill Nature Center, where you can visit the reptiles and birds of prey who live at the center. The center is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Line Creek Nature Area in Peachtree City has a network

of trails along Line Creek, and can be great for wading in the warmer months. The park is open daily from dawn to dusk, and admission is free.

McIntosh Reserve outside Whitesburg is across the

Chattahoochee River from Coweta. There are many campsites — with no hookups — along the river. There is an extensive network of equestrian trails and hiking trails, playgrounds, a splash park, fishing lakes, a wide and pleasant trail along the river and a river overlook in the 527-acre park. The reserve was the home of Creek Chief William McIntosh, who was executed by fellow Creeks who were angry over his signing of the Treaty of Indian Springs, which ceded Creek land east of the Chattahoochee. McIntosh is buried on the property, and a log cabin on the site is similar to one that he might have lived in. The park is open daily except for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s. Park hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the summer and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the winter. Splash park hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Camping and pavilion reservations can be made 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Admission is $5 per vehicle. For more information, call 770-830-5879. CL Coweta Living 2017-18 39

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restrooms, and plenty of covered picnic tables and swings. The park closes at night.


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“. . . a museum in the sense that you come here with a purpose to learn, but it’s not a museum in the sense that there is absolutely nothing stagnate here. It’s constantly changing. It’s constantly evolving.” — Ellen Jenkins

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ChildrenConnect in building designed for children in 1800s In 1883, the Male Academy opened as a private school for boys, then known as the Newnan Male Seminary. The historic building has come full circle and is once again being used as an educational facility for local children. The Male Academy now houses the ChildrenConnect Museum, whose mission is to “encourage all children to discover the connections in the world around them through meaningful play and creative exploration.” Headed by Ellen Jenkins, executive director of the museum, ChildrenConnect is seeking to make an impact on the community’s youth through innovative workshops and focus on making the everyday item an extraordinary learning experience. The ChildrenConnect Museum began as a

brainchild of the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society to create a resource for children in the community. After several years of planning and fundraising through the “Horses, Trains, and Pick-up Trucks: All Roads Lead to Newnan” city-wide art project, the museum opened in September 2016. Jenkins describes ChildrenConnect as “a museum in the sense that you come here with a purpose to learn, but it’s not a museum in the sense that there is absolutely nothing stagnate here. It’s constantly changing. It’s constantly evolving.” There is always something new to do at the museum’s weekly structured workshops and free play for toddlers to preteen-aged children. The museum also offers free Saturday programs a couple of times a month open to

WRITTENBY EMILY KIMBELL AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY SUSAN CRUTCHFIELD

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we wouldn’t think about building with normally.” One of the most unique aspects of the museum is a room Jenkins designates the “Tinker Lab.” Filled with broken appliances, technology and gadgets, this room allows children the opportunity to deconstruct and repair “broken junk” to learn how these items operate. Collin Hannasch loves visiting the Tinker Lab “because I like taking apart things.” Jenkins believes that this space fosters creative thinking, collaboration and ultimately, true learning through perception and questioning. The ChildrenConnect Museum has become a routine part of the Hannasch household who first visited the museum for a special homeschool event. Since the event, the family has participated in several more classes and has been attending the Thursday afternoon class almost every week for the past several months. Christa

Hannasch, mom to Cooper, Carver, and Collin, says. “We love going to ChildrenConnect and seeing what fun things Ms. Ellen has planned. Ms. Ellen has an incredible way of engaging with the kids and asks them questions to get them thinking.” Jenkins strives to encourage this type of thinking and foster a sense of experimentation. She encourages learning from mistakes, and asserts that collaboration is a valuable tool to have. She believes being able to critically evaluate your work is “really important.” The museum pays tribute to the educational focus of Newnan’s history yet extends the original purpose of the historic building. Jenkins hopes to create “a learning environment that empowers all children to ask questions, make mistakes, explore their creativity and connect to the world around them.” CL

› The ChildrenConnect Museum at 30 Temple Avenue is open Tuesday through Friday from 2-5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Those wishing to support the museum can volunteer time, donate financially or donate materials. More information about the museum, including workshop/programming information, can be found at www.childrenconnectmuseum.com.

ChildrenConnect recently brought big trucks and small children together for a time of learning and fun. Top left, Chad Jones lifts his son, David, onto his shoulders so he can get a better look. At left, Elizabeth Maddux expresses delight at the massive tires on a rig.

Coweta Living 2017-18 41

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all members of the community. Each month typically focuses on a different topic or theme that Jenkins says is designed in response to conversations with families and community feedback. Ultimately, the museum is designed for the kids and their interests. Jenkins relays that this focus “lets me be able to engage kids on whatever level they are as an individual, but it also lets me appeal to whatever is a driving interest to them.” Jenkins uses household items and common materials to inspire creativity and ingenuity in museum visitors. Cooper and Carver Hannasch, frequent visitors of the museum, particularly enjoy this aspect of the museum. Cooper states that his favorite part of ChildrenConnect is “that you get to build cool stuff with stuff you find at your home.” Cooper’s brother, Carver, agrees expressing that the best part of the museum is “that we can build things with things


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Historic displays spotlight Coweta’s past Coweta County’s history is on display at museums all over the county. Newnan’s McRitchie-Hollis Museum, located in a stately home next to the University of West Georgia’s Newnan campus, is operated by the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society. It features rotating exhibits and a permanent collection, as well as programs and special events. The museum, which opened in 2013, was made possible by the bequest of the late Edgar Hollis. The museum is named for him and his mother. Hollis left a bequest for the establishment of a furnishings museum, and many 1930s furnishings — including a fully apportioned kitchen — are part of the museum’s permanent collection. The McRitchie-Hollis Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $5 or $2 for students and senior citizens. Admission is free for members of the NewnanCoweta Historical Society. The historical society also operates The History Center at the historic Atlanta and West Point Railroad freight depot. The depot frequently hosts special events, and there is a Civil War-related exhibit. For more information, visit www. newnancowetahistoricalsociety. com or call 770-251-0207.

ChildrenConnect children’s museum is Coweta’s newest and most unique museum, providing kids with hands-on learning activities and opportunities to create, build, engineer and refine creative projects using simple materials and their imagination (see story, page 40). It’s open from 2-5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Admission is $5 per child. Adults are free. For more information 42 Coweta Living 2017-18

call 470-414-2455 or visit www. childrenconnectmusuem.com.

The Senoia Area Historical Society’s museum has a large display of items from Senoia’s past and present, including historic documents and memorabilia, furniture, clothing, and an extensive postcard collection, as well as items related to the film industry, and the “Portrait of Senoia” series. There is also a small research library. The society accepts donations of historical and cultural assets related to Senoia, in accordance with its acquisition policy. The museum is located in a historic home at 6 Couch St. and is currently open Fridays and Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. and can also be opened for private tours. For more information visit www. senoiaareahistoricalsociety.org.

The McRitchie-Hollis Museum has rotating exhibits but is also a lavish house and furnishings museum.

The Senoia Buggy Shop Museum on Main Street contains a variety of artifacts from Senoia’s past including a buggy that was used to deliver the U.S. Mail and many items from the Baggarly Brother’s store in which it is located. The building at one time functioned as a Coca-Cola bottling facility. The museum opens for events in downtown Senoia, and can also be open for appointments with two weeks’ notice. For information, email wbaggarly@gmail.com.

Moreland’s Hometown Heritage Museum is a tribute to humorist and newspaper reporter Lewis Grizzard, and “The Little Manse” is the birthplace of author Erskine Caldwell. Caldwell is known for his two Great Depressionera novels, “Tobacco Road” and “God’s Little Acre.” The two museums are located across from each other at 7 Main St. Current hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday and by appointment. For more information, visit morelandadventure.com.

Maureen Schuyler and Dub Pearman with the Senoia Area Historical Society show some of the artifacts of Senoia’s film history at the society’s museum.

The Coweta County AfricanAmerican Heritage Museum and Research Center is located in a restored shotgun-style house and includes memorabilia and artifacts from Coweta’s AfricanAmerican community and a research library. The museum is located at 92 Farmer Street, adjacent to the Farmer Street Cemetery, where many AfricanAmerican residents of Newnan were buried before and after the Civil War. Only one grave is marked. The museum is currently open by appointment only. For more information, call 770-304-9111 or 470-215-3106. CL


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— Tray Baggarly

Coweta a hidden gem for tourists

Visitors continue to find their way to Coweta County to visit historic sites, various stores, “Walking Dead” locations and rural countryside. According to Tray Baggarly, director of the Coweta County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the busiest months of the year are July and April, when an estimated 1,000-1,140 people visit Coweta. As tourists spend time in the county, they spend money that helps grow and strengthen the community. “They are here. They are eating in our restaurants, visiting our attractions, purchasing gas, shopping and staying in the hotels,” Baggarly said. The local hospitality industry is a significant part of the state’s overall travel sector. According to the U.S. Travel Association and Tourism Economics, the Peach State’s total tourism spending generated more than $3.2 billion in state and local tax revenue in Georgia. In addition, every Georgia household would need to be taxed an additional $900 per year to replace the tourism taxes received as a result of the industry’s tax contribution. “Tourism continues to be one of our state’s leading industries, even outpacing the average growth rate nationwide of 2.1 percent,” said Georgia EconomicDevelopment Commissioner Pat Wilson. “These recordsetting numbers have a positive impact across the state, impacting every community and household in Georgia by spurring job creation, attracting investment, and providing residents with an improved quality of life.” Newnan has a strong revenue center compared to other counties. Getting people to the city is one of the key components in marketing to tourists. Many visitors get the tourist information from the Convention and Visitors Bureau, but other hooks to bring in tourists include Main Street Newnan, historical societies, businesses and local municipalities. The city’s burgeoning medical community is also a draw, with at least 65 percent of the patients at the local Cancer Treatment Centers of America coming from

Mark Puckett greets visitors at the welcome center in the Coweta County Courthouse.

outside the state, usually staying for weeks at a time during their repeated visits. Other facilities like HealthSouth Rehabilitation are also drawing patients from across the multi-county region. While these visitors may not be what’s considered the usual leisure traveler, their patronage of local hotels, restaurants and shops contributes to the county’s tourism economy. “Once we get them here, we all offer them opportunities to experience something different,” Baggarly said. Coweta has one of the largest Georgia state parks, Chattahoochee Bend State Park. Tourists looking for Civil War atmosphere can visit the Brown’s Mill Battlefield. Visitors also come to see historic homes, old cemeteries including Oak Hill, the Lewis Grizzard and Erskine Caldwell museums in Moreland, Dunaway Gardens in Roscoe, McRitchie-Hollis Museum, the ChildrenConnect Museum, now housed in the former Male Academy building, and the African-American Heritage Museum, located in a shotgun-style house operated by the African-American Alliance. These are some of the many opportunities for people to learn more about Coweta’s rich history and enjoy the friendly community. Special events also bring visitors. Among the events held annually are the Coweta County Fair, the Cattlemen's Rodeo, the Cruisin’ to the Oldies Car Show, Light Up Senoia, the Candlelight Tour of Homes, Summer WinedUp, Octoberfest and Santa on the Square. Art Walks bring visitors downtown twice yearly, and the Taste of Newnan, held in the spring and fall, is a favorite. Events related to Memorial Day, July 4 and Veterans Day also have a following. Coweta is not only well-known throughout Georgia. Thanks to frequent filming projects in the local area, the county has gained global attention. CL

WRITTEN BY GABE GRIFFITH Coweta Living 2017-18 43

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“Once we get them here, we all offer them opportunities to experience something different.”


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Local musician James Tiernan, a member of the Coweta-based band SWEETBAY, plays the electric violin at the downtown Newnan bar and live music venue, The Alamo.

Music hits a high note in Coweta

Not every small city can claim a thriving

music scene, and despite Newnan’s being the home of country-music great Alan Jackson, it’s only in the past few years that Coweta County appeared on the map for attracting newcomers and locals to hear local bands and live music. Well-known local musician and music instructor Doug Kees settled on Newnan for his musicservices business in 1993. The hub of Coweta wasn’t exactly “the place to be” at the time in terms of music. “There was no music scene,” Kees said with a laugh. “The entire downtown literally closed at 9 p.m.” Coweta County was gradually becoming an extension of the Atlanta metropolitan area, however, and by 1999, local restaurants began to

welcome musicians. These days, there are few full-service dining venues that don’t include a corner devoted to an up-and-coming guitarist or a stage for a live performance. In downtown Newnan, The Alamo once served the community as the area movie theater. Now owned by local entrepreneur Amy Murphy, the former picture show is home to a full-service bar and stage where talented Coweta artists perform. The marquee, which once announced the theater’s weekly film, now calls attention to the latest fan favorites. And no new musician — or music style — is off-limits. The Alamo is home to a variety of performances with a broad appeal extending all across the county.

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44 Coweta Living 2017-18


The local music scene isn’t just about youthful indie bands, country or folk. Coweta is also home to classical performers like opera singer Courtenay Budd who is best known in Newnan for her performances and work as host of the annual “Friends of Wadsworth” concert series. By hosting the series, Budd aims to continue the legacy of Charles Wadsworth, who is thought to be the first to bring world-class performances to the once small city. The Wadsworth Auditorium, a music hall located at 25 Jefferson St., was named for Wadsworth, a Newnan native who led chamber music series at Spoleto and Lincoln Center and is now retired. The structure, erected as a Municipal Building in 1938 and restored in 1998, seats just over 600 guests and is known nationally for the auditorium’s sound quality. The Wadsworth is just one of several area indoor performance spaces, this one boasting live concerts by opera singer Indra Thomas, clarinetist Narek Arutyunian, violinist Soovin Kim, cellist Sang-Eun Lee and pianist Andrew Armstrong. Variety is the name of the game at the Donald W. Nixon Centre for the Performing and Visual Arts. The Nixon Centre, directed by Cathe Nixon, wife of the late Donald W. Nixon, is committed to bringing unique performances in both music and arts to the county. From local school choral concerts

and masterworks performances by local musicians to memorable tributes to famed singers like Patsy Cline, world-renowned acrobats, and honored military ensembles, The Nixon Centre serves to round out the music scene in Coweta in a way that both educates and celebrates. The Centre’s 48,000-square-foot structure is located at 1523 Lower Fayetteville Road in Newnan and includes a 1000-seat state-of-the-art theater and performance space. Nearby Senoia, best known for being home to filming of AMC’s hit television series, “The Walking Dead,” is a piece of the county often recognized as being both charming and surprisingly contemporary. The city was once home to Southern Ground Social Club, a live-music venue in downtown Senoia associated with musician Zac Brown. Though the music venue and adjoining eatery, La Mesa Del Sur, are now closed, Senoia remains a favorite spot for Zac Brown Band fans. Nic and Norman’s replaced La Mesa Del Sur, but retained the space’s musical background by including live music at the unique venue named for two of the restaurant’s owners, actor Norman Reedus and producer Greg Nicotero, both of “The Walking Dead.” Around the corner is Maguire’s Irish Pub which also features live music most weekends and many weeknights. CL

Coweta County is home to opera singer Courtenay Budd, center, who is best known for her work as host of the annual “Friends of Wadsworth” concert series.

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Within walking distance of  The Alamo, both The Cellar Chop House & Bar and RPM Full Service Pub & Grill have embraced the nightlife in Newnan — especially during the warm months of spring and summer, where each offers an outdoor stage for musicians to entertain diners enjoying a meal alfresco. Brickhouse Grille and Tavern, at Newnan Station Drive near the town of Sharpsburg, is another popular eatery presenting live music performances. Open until the wee morning hours on weekends, Brickhouse serves supper, snacks and locally brewed beer with performances by bands like Hudson Road and One Hit Wonderland. Across the county, Twilight Bar & Grill, at 311 Raymond Hill Road in Sharpsburg, welcomes charity events for local nonprofits, open mic nights, and a steady stream of musical performances from artists favoring classic rock to country tunes. Main Street Newnan, an organization created to support and promote the community downtown, also has a hand in local music entertainment. The program works closely with area businesses and art associations to offer residents access to a variety of educational recreation that includes musical performances, both classic and trending. In 2017, Main Street Newnan introduced a program meant to inspire newcomers and natives alike. Tucked Away Music Day allows local performers to play outside of standard venues. Instead, singers and instrumentalists come together in the streets and in lesser known corners of the town such as parks, alleys and on the steps of the historic courthouse. Newnan’s Cultural Arts Commission sponsors concerts such as the Jazz in the Park, free concerts in Greenville Street Park, located just south of the court square. Other performances have a small fee, like last year’s shows by the Les Still big band and country singer Brian Wright, who grew up in Newnan among a family of prominent musicians.


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Coweta becoming retail destination From boutiques to antiques, outdoor malls and bargain outlets, shopping is everywhere

in Coweta County, and more than just the locals are taking advantage of the county’s opportunity for “retail therapy.” In the last decade, Coweta has become what many are calling a retail destination, a place where county residents and visitors alike can purchase

Kendra’s

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clothing, technology and household items with ease and variety. If you’re looking for the popular national chains, you’ll find them in Ashley Park or along Bullsboro. The selection runs from electronics to fashion, tools to gifts, and eyeglasses to ethnic groceries. Nearly all the major stores are represented. For many shoppers, the best retail experiences are dependent upon the unique items buyers are able to find. Downtown Newnan is known for its one-of-a-kind shops around the historic courthouse square. The local stores offer a wide array of items and a standard of customer service often unmatched in larger, commercial shopping districts. In Newnan’s downtown, shoppers will find independent boutiques featuring clothing and accessories, fashion and cosmetics, hobbies and toys, and catering to avocations like running, cooking and craft beers. As the county continues to grow, along with the diversity of the population within it, the city of WRITTEN BY MAGGIE BOWERS


THINGS TO DO Ashley Park

Newnan has expanded to include not just boutiques and department retailers, but bargain outlets as well. The city is home to several consignment shops, surplus stores and thrift and antiques boutiques. One major shopping venue is Newnan’s lifestyle center, Ashley Park. Anchored by two popular department stores, the Ashley Park complex includes nearly 58 total retail outlets and services from clothing to food, books, cosmetics and jewelry. The family-friendly shopping center is popular among locals of all ages because of the inclusion of a variety of specialty stores and unique offerings including family photography, painting parties and a one-of-a-kind popcorn venue. Coweta’s other cities also have their own attractions for savvy shoppers.

Maybe head to Grantville to find architectural features like doors, windows and flooring reclaimed from older homes and buildings. Or drive to Moreland for embroidery beautiful enough for artwork and durable enough to use for furnishings. Pick up personalized screen printing and monogram embroidery in Sharpsburg. Or swing by a consignment shop in Palmetto. Senoia, the county’s second-largest city, is bustling with new boutiques, artisans and galleries. Chattahoochee Hills’ Serenbe community offers the chance to get back to nature. Throughout the county are antique shops that make browsing any community the place to discover guaranteed conversation starters for your home. CL

Carriage House

Country Antiques, Gifts, Collectibles

As it continues to grow, Coweta has expanded to include a variety of boutiques, department stores, and bargain outlets, making the county a popular retail destination.

“Tanks for 3 4 Years!”

770-599-6321

NEW! RECYCLED! VINTAGE JEWELRY & LINENS

Fri & Sat: 10 am-5pm • Sun: 1-5 pm

7412 E. Hwy 16 • Senoia (1 mile west of GA 85)

carriagehousesenoia.com

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Tony Caro is manager of New Beginning’s by Community Welcome House, a thrift store that benefits the domestic-violence organization.

Many local thrift stores help Cowetans If you have clothes, furniture, toys, books, or household items that you no longer want or need,

there are a number of places you can donate items that will help others in our community. Several local thrift stores use the money made from selling donations to directly make a difference in Coweta County. And, of course, the donations go on to help others by providing gently used items at a low cost. Some organizations also give items to the people they serve.

ReNew Thrift Store, a ministry of Crossroads Church, carries clothing, household items, arts and crafts supplies, toys, shoes and more. Debbie Deeb is the store manager.

48 Coweta Living 2017-18

In addition to accepting donations, many organizations welcome volunteers to help out at the stores. Locally operated thrift stores are ReNew Thrift Store, operated by Crossroads Church, Bridging the Gap’s Storehouse, One Roof’s resale store and New Beginnings by Community Welcome House. NewnanCoweta Habitat for Humanity has the ReStore, which sells building materials, furniture, and related items. The Salvation Army and Goodwill Industries also have locations in Coweta. Another place to shop for bargains — or make a little money on things you no longer want — is the Franklin Road Flea Market, located at 54 Franklin Highway on the west side of Newnan. Though the flea market is officially open seven days a week, most vendors are only there on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, with Saturdays being the busiest day. For the best deals and biggest selection — get there early. For more information about selling at the flea market, stop by or call 706-594-4510. ReNew Thrift Store is located at 1741 Turkey Creek Road, Newnan, at the corner of Turkey Creek and Ga. Highway 16. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds

WRITTEN BY AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH FAY CAMPBELL


go to Crossroads Church’s benevolence ministry, which helps those struggling financially in the community. For more information, call 770-755-7082. The Storehouse helps support Bridging the Gap’s ministries, which include a weekly food giveaway, and services including food, laundry facilities and showers for the community’s homeless and others in need. The Storehouse is located at 19 First Avenue, and is open Thursdays and Fridays only, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Prices are based on a suggested donation. For more information, call 770-683-9110.

1690 Hwy 34 E • Newnan

One Roof Ecumenical Alliance Outreach is a group of several local churches. The organization helps provide temporary housing for homeless families in Coweta, and issues vouchers for the Coweta Community Food Pantry, which is next door and shares a director and staff, and for thrift store items. One Roof provides nonfood items such as toiletries and has limited financial assistance. Profits from the thrift store help offset operating costs and allow the organization to offer more assistance. One Roof’s thrift store is one of the largest in Coweta and has a variety of household items and furniture as well as clothing. However, there are no dressing rooms. The store is located at 255 Temple Avenue. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 770-683-7705. New Beginnings by Community Welcome House supports the organization’s work with women who have experienced domestic violence. Donations are first used to support the women the organization serves. Furniture and household items are given to women setting up new homes, as well as clothes and children’s items. Remaining items are sold to raise money to help with services. The store doesn’t accept donations of mattresses, car seats or televisions. The store is located at 7 West Washington Street in downtown Newnan. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 770-683-8029.

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Newnan-Coweta Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore carries appliances (other than dishwashers) building materials, doors, windows, cabinets, electronics, household goods including furniture, and sporting equipment. Donated items must be in good condition and free of rips, stains, odors and major scratches. The ReStore is currently located at 150 Pine Road, Newnan, with plans to move to a new location on Bullsboro Drive. Pickup of large donated items is available. For more information, call 770-252-4061. The Salvation Army’s Newnan Service Center helps Cowetans in need with food, clothing, and financial assistance. Sales from the thrift store are the organization’s major funding stream. The store is located at 670 Jefferson Street. Hours are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Donations are accepted until 4:45. For more information, call 770-251-8181. Goodwill has two stores in Coweta - at 228 Bullsboro Drive and 2730 East Highway 34 at Thomas Crossroads. The stores carry a variety of items, and there are also satellite donation centers. Proceeds from Goodwill’s thrift stores go to fund the career centers at each store as well as career resources, training, and job connections. Store hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information call the Bullsboro location at 770-254-8480 or Newnan East at 678-854-6839. CL

Antiques • Vintage • Retro & Today!

Aromatherapy • Heirloom Tradition Paint & Howard Products

Offering top quality items and incredible variety.

Mon.-Sat. 10-6 • Sun. 1-6

678-423-1551


THINGS TO DO

To Carrollton

er Riv

ROSCOE

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Riverside Park

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Dunaway Gardens

Boat Access

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ive r PANTHER CREEK COMMUNITY CENTER

Chattahoochee Bend State Park

SARGENT PARK

Boat Access, Camping and Hiking

Newnan Country Club

ARNCO PARK

K JAC WELCOME COMMUNITY CENTER

COWETA CO. REC. DEPT. ASA M POWELL EXPO CENTER

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MILLARD FARMER INDUSTRIAL BLVD

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University of West Georgia

Male Academy Carnegie Library

CLAY WOOD COMMUNITY CENTER

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4TH STREET BIG POPLAR RD

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Battle of Brown’s Mill Historic Site

Powers Crossroads

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Coweta Co. Fairgrounds & Conference Center

Erskine Caldwell Museum Hometown Heritage Museum

GRANTVILLE PARK

COWETA HEARD RD

GRANTVILLE BALLFIELDS LARSON PARK

To Columbus

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Ashley Park H

Historic Courthouse

CARL MILLER PARK

To Franklin

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To Atlanta

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COLLIN

ME TTO

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-TY RO NE RD Canongate I Golf Club

Arbor Springs Golf & Resort

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Canongate on White Oak

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To Peachtree City & Fayetteville

Cancer Treatment Centers of America

The Centre for erforming and Visual Arts & The Newnan Centre

Piedmont Newnan Hospital

J WENDELL WHITLOCK RECREATION PARK

Parks Golf Points of Interest

ANDREW BAILEY BALL PARK

Canongate at Summergrove

POPLAR RD

HUNTER PARK COMPLEX

LEROY JOHNSON PARK

EAST COWETA COMMUNITY CENTER

Senoia Area Historical Society Buggy Shop Museum SENOIA CITY PARK

Raleigh Studios Atlanta

To Griffin

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Performing arts have long, local history The performing arts have a long history in Coweta County, beginning with the traveling theater groups of the early 1920s. Today, both for-profit and nonprofit local theater companies are as important to the community as any local business or historic site. One of the earliest 20th-century plays performed in the county was “The Flapper Grandmother,” a comedy written by Hetty Jane Dunaway, founder of Coweta’s own Dunaway Gardens. Dunaway was more than just a gardener, according to county history. She was also an actress, playwright and coowner of the Wayne P. Sewell Production Company. According to local historian and director of the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society Jeff Bishop, the production used a comedic fable to entertain local

Newnan Theatre Company Managing Director, Mary Caroline Moore, left, and Artistic Director Tony Daniel, right, work directly with volunteers of the Newnan Theatre Company to offer up to ten productions each year for audiences of all ages.

The Newnan Theatre Company is located on First Avenue in historic downtown Newnan and offers theater-related entertainment, education and community involvement.

audiences. The show was part of a series of performances brought to the public by the Sewell troupe that included Dunaway. The troupe would travel by train across the Southeast with trunks of costumes, scripts and promotional materials, bringing theater to parts of the nation not often exposed to the arts. “These acting troupes went all over the country,” Bishop explained. “People didn’t have access to what we think of as culture.” By the 1950s, rural communities began to form their own troupes of actors who would perform in their respective towns for both education and entertainmtent. In Coweta, the theater group was known as the Playmakers. Playmaker productions eventually moved performances from the outdoor theater at Dunaway Gardens to the Wadsworth Auditorium located in downtown Newnan. In the 1970s, the former Playmakers began to combine with other acting groups making Newnan their home. Many members of those original performance groups established within the county evolved into what is now known as the Newnan Theater Company. Community theater, as many have come to know it, is a company of performers acting on a central stage or performance venue developed by the community and supported by the community. In most cases the facility — however small or whether a for-profit or nonprofit organization — contributes to its city, town or county by including productions in direct response to the needs, concerns and interests of that specific community.

The Newnan Theatre Company Newnan’s own nonprofit theater organization has been entertaining audiences for 40 years. The company produces up to 10 shows each year for audiences of all ages. The theater is comprised solely of volunteers,

WRITTEN BY MAGGIE BOWERS AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY SUSAN CRUTCHFIELD

52 Coweta Living 2017-18


Serenbe Playhouse

under-served audiences. The Playhouse offers a feature unique to modernday performances but central to the origins of theater. All Playhouse productions are performed outdoors by repurposing existing structures, using nature as props, and using as much natural light as possible. The Playhouse also uses sets constructed with reclaimed and recycled materials, minimizing waste and environmental impact. The practices of  The Playhouse make the theater a pioneer in the county for Green Theater Practices. The Playhouse was founded in 2009 under the artistic direction of Brian Clowdus, an actor, educator and director. Serenbe Playhouse is at 9110 Selborne Lane, Suite 210, in Chattahoochee Hills.

The Donald W. Nixon Centre for the Performing and Visual Arts The Nixon Centre, located at 1523 Lower Fayetteville Road in Newnan, offers a variety of performances to the community, including theatre. From Broadway plays like Hairspray to classic theatre productions like Grapes of Wrath, the Centre is well-known in the Coweta theatre community. In addition to several annual shows by talented actors in organizations like the National Players, the Centre is recognized as an “extension of the classroom” for students of all ages, and offers summer theatre camp alongside classes in art and performance. CL

Following with the original intention of community theater, the Serenbe Playhouse “uses theater as an artistic and educational tool for both artists and audiences,” according to the company’s website. The Playhouse is a professional, for-profit company with paid actors, though it was established under the umbrella of a nonprofit parent organization, The Serenbe Institute for Art Culture & the Environment. The company includes established theater professionals along with community members such as high-school and college students to offer masterwork opportunities and a “training ground for promising artists.” As with most community theaters, the goal of The Playhouse is to bring access to art and culture to

Coweta Living 2017-18 53

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including directors, actors, and backstage assistants. “Newnan Theatre Company serves the community by bringing culture and news and by educating our patrons,” said the group’s Artistic Director, Tony Daniel. “We also produce shows that have underlying messages — messages that might raise a few eyebrows — but sometimes, eyebrows need to be raised.” According to Daniel, not every show must have a lesson or “greater meaning,” but the theater company welcomes suggestions for shows from the public and seeks to produce shows that reflect the community’s interests. Many members of the Newnan Theatre Company have been with the organization throughout its development from the early Playmakers and subsidiary performing groups in the 1970s. “I did my first show with the Newnan Playmakers when I was 11,” Daniel said. “I performed in what is now the Wadsworth Auditorium with Herb Bridges as my director. Now, several years later, I myself am the artistic director of the company.” The Newnan Theatre Company is located on First Avenue in historic downtown Newnan and offers entertainment, education and community involvement. In addition to comedic and dramatic productions, it produces improvisational comedy performances, interactive murder mystery evenings, special events and theater camps for children.


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Dining out: Local charm meets culinary diversity Coweta blends a dash of familiar, a spoonful of uniqueness and a pinch of Southern charm for local diners Meat ‘N’ Greet, a unique restaurant in downtown Newnan serving gourmet burgers and more, is one of many venues contributing to Coweta’s “small town charm” including its notable local dining scene.

An evening out on the town in Coweta County begins much the same as it might in townships across the world — with food. Variety, as the saying goes, is the spice of life, and Coweta brings plenty of dishes to the table. Fine dining, casual restaurants, and fast-food franchises are scattered throughout the eight cities and municipalities that make up Coweta, but the majority of the foodie-inspired trends can be found at the county seat, in the city of Newnan. More than 100 restaurants are available in the city, including both fast-food and upscale options with offerings ranging from traditional Southern fare to international favorites. “I think more restaurants are coming to Coweta to follow the crowds of people that continue to move to the area,” offered Moreland resident Tracie Hicks. She said she often makes her way to Newnan for its many dining choices. “We are both a small town and a city rolled into one, and that is appealing to most people here.” Newnan is also known as the county’s health care destination, with the Cancer Treatment Centers of America and Piedmont Newnan Hospital’s stroke center and Level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Patients and visitors travel from across the nation,

arriving in Newnan for health care needs or to visit loved ones. They're bringing a diverse array of dining expectations, and helping to broaden the local market. “It is a collection of all of these things that brings restaurants and other businesses to the area,” explained Newnan Assistant City Manager, Hasco Craver. The county, and especially Newnan, continues to develop land, adding more homes and access to health care and other amenities. “Employment, a rise in income levels, and being a regional retail destination, all contribute to the county’s appeal.” Newnan residents like Denise Gunnels often remark that residents’ willingness to “stay local” is a large part of what contributes to the small-town feel of cities in Coweta. “We have such a diverse demographic. Personally, I go out of my way to only patronize locally-owned businesses,” she said. “We’ve got it all.” Local restaurant owner Amy Murphy agrees that a strong focus on “mom-and-pop” stores and diners is key to perpetuating the charm of a small town while still encouraging variety. “The better I can make downtown and more I can do for my community, it really helps everybody,” she said. CL

WRITTEN BY MAGGIE BOWERS

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In early summer 2017, fine artist Deedra Ludwig moved into Gray Cottage, transforming the Artist-in-Residence space into an artist’s retreat filled with abstract, nature-inspired artworks.

Newnan is ‘home away from home’ for artists Since being renovated for guests in 2015, Newnan’s Gray Cottage, a small home-turned-art-studio, has become a nontraditional destination for traveling and visiting artists. Like many locals, the artists-in-residence are often enthralled with Newnan, noting that the ever-growing town offers many aspects of city living with all the charm of a small town. The one-bedroom bungalow is located at the edge of the College-Temple neighborhood in downtown Newnan, next to the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society’s McRitchie-Hollis Museum. Named for its original owner, longtime Coweta Clerk of Superior Court Wallace Gray, the cottage offers a respite and temporary home for visiting artists, sculptors, writers and poets. Creative guests visit Coweta County by way of Newnan for WRITTEN BY MAGGIE BOWERS Coweta Living 2017-18 55


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up to six weeks, sponsored by the Newnan’s ArtRez program and the University of West Georgia. The idea is said to have come from Newnan Artist-In-Residence board member Millie Gosch. Gosch is a well-known plein air artist who noted that throughout her career she has often traveled to paint. Like many artists, Gosch says she sometimes leaves the familiar behind to “not be bothered by the daily grind.” She noted that a place away from home can provide inspiration and energy. Now entering its second year of availability to guests from across the world, Gray Cottage has played host to nearly a dozen artists, writers, poets and musicians. Two muralists, the first of their particular specialties to visit the area as artists-in-residence, left their marks on the city in 2016. Molly Rose Freeman, the first muralist, explained that, for her, painting murals seemed the perfect way in which to translate drawing into something that felt more accessible, and less confined. “I really like to be outside, and I

Poet Allison Joseph visited area high schools and offered recitations of poetry during her short stay at Gray Cottage in Newnan.

really like to move my body,” she said. “I love murals, and it has become my primary source of art and inspiration.” Freeman noted that it was on a preliminary tour of the city that she first began to get a feel for the type of painting that might suit the small town of Newnan. She said she enjoyed not only the history of the city, which can be found in every corner, but the lush, green spaces that bloom in summertime. Freeman’s geometrically inspired floral painting can be found on the side wall of  The Alamo in downtown Newnan. A second muralist signed on for the ArtRez program in Newnan with an entirely different approach in

Molly Rose Freeman, the first muralist to participate in Coweta’s Artist-inResidence program, created a geometrically-inspired, large-scale painting in downtown Newnan.

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mind as to how he would “paint the town.” Corey Barksdale’s work can be found on Spring Street on the wall of Glover Insurance Company facing the post office. Created in lively primary colors, the work depicts the image of two musicians, both playing guitars. “This mural is bold and ethnic and celebrates music,” said local art instructor and ArtRez board member Bette Hickman. “This piece is very different from the first downtown mural, but I think it will blend in just as well.” In addition to visiting large-scale painters, Newnan’s Gray cottage has also served as a work studio and temporary home for fine artists, poets and writers from across the nation. Throughout 2016, residents included Newnan-native fine artist Connor Heindel, University of West Georgia Carrollton professor of painting Eilis Crean, poet Allison Joseph of Illinois, installation artist Christina Laurel of South Carolina, and abstract and mixed-media artist Deedra Ludwig of Louisiana. “I like it here,” Joseph said of Newnan during her stay in March 2017. “I enjoy a place where I can simply walk right into town.” The poet echoed that sentiment in an anecdote she offered to Newnan High School students during a visit to the school. She noted that she grew up in New York where public transportation is the norm and, as a consequence, she is not a driver. “I’ve been telling people all over town that I am a member of an oppressed minority group,” she explained to students. “And, I’m tired of the way I have been treated in this country. My anger and frustration is mounting, and I will reveal my status to you today… I am a ‘Pedestrian American.’” At home, Joseph is director of the Young Writers Workshop at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, a program she founded in 1999. Artist Christina Laurel spent much of her time in Newnan during


Visiting artist Corey Barksdale left his mark on Newnan with bold portraits made of lively primary colors.

the month of April 2017 teaching about creating art installations or sculptures. She explained the concept and much of the process at a lecture that was open to the public and took place at the Newnan Carnegie Library. Just as spring turned to summer in Newnan in 2017, Deedra Ludwig moved into Gray Cottage, transforming the space once again. This time the studio was filled with abstract, nature-inspired pieces. The works, according to Ludwig, included representations of local flora and even particles of the nearby environment. She visited the Chattahoochee Bend State Park daily while in Coweta, taking inspiration from the natural landscape, both figuratively and literally. “There are heaps of inspiration here in Newnan,” Ludwig said. “I have been working every day and have been going to the Chattahoochee Bend and working there, even adding a bit of red clay to the pigments of the paints.” Newnan’s ArtRez program maintains Gray Cottage, which belongs to the city of Newnan, and provides a stipend for up to two visiting artists each year, according to Hickman. The university, Coweta businesses, local organizations and programs will sponsor additional artists throughout the year, allowing many creative and inspiring visitors to explore and enjoy the community and all of its many hidden gems. CL Coweta Living 2017-18 57

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ArtRez board member Bette Hickman described Barksdale’s Spring Street mural as, “bold and ethnic” and “in celebration of music.”


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Piedmont Newnan Hospital celebrated the successful delivery of quadruplets in December 2016. The infants, from left, Brandon, Brayden, Bryant and Kenlee were welcomed home by their parents and big brother Bentlee, right.

Coweta home to ever-growing medical mecca Often referred to as the hub of Coweta County, Newnan is home to a variety of business and industry including, since 2012, two major health care centers, Piedmont Newnan Hospital and the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Dubbed a “medical mecca,” the city also maintains a number of outpatient- and emergency-care services, a Veterans Affairs health clinic, and specialty treatment centers like HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital.

Piedmont Newnan Hospital Piedmont Newnan Hospital opened a newly built facility in Newnan in May 2012, offering the county and surrounding areas the latest in health care technology, treatments, and patient amenities. The nonprofit hospital — located on Poplar Road — completed an addition to the labor and delivery department in late 2016, adding a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the 364,000-square-foot structure. The NICU includes four beds dedicated to the care of infants born before 32 weeks gestation, as well as those born with critical illnesses. Since opening the specialty unit, Piedmont

physicians were able to achieve two major medical milestones. Baby William Henderson was born 17 weeks early (at 23 weeks gestation) at Piedmont Newnan Hospital in October 2016, making the infant the earliest in pregnancy a baby was delivered at the local health center. William was 1 pound, 7 ounces at birth, and despite tremendous concern, his family was thankful to have had the care William needed so close to their home in Newnan. William Henderson remained in the newly upgraded NICU for 98 days. The first set of quadruplets to be delivered at Piedmont Newnan Hospital arrived via cesarean section in December 2016. The four infants, each healthy and thriving, were released to their family’s care in March 2017. The local health care center will also expand to include the latest technology used to treat cardiac patients, including top-of-the-line imaging equipment and advanced treatment of percutaneous coronary intervention. PCI is used in patients with obstructive heart disease. “This is an exciting time for Piedmont Newnan as we continue to grow and add new services needed in our community,” said Mike Robertson, CEO of Piedmont Newnan. “Providing high-quality, patient-centered care close to home is a top priority and has a positive impact on both the patient and their family. We thank our local community for their support and helping us grow.”

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In August 2012, The Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Southeastern was opened in Newnan, bringing more than 800 jobs to the area and tens of millions of dollars in economic development.

The specialized treatment facility focuses primarily on patient care and practices in the area of complex cancers. “From the beginning, we committed to serving patients and serving the community,” said CTCA of Newnan President and CEO Anne Meisner. “Demand for this care model has been beyond any of our most enthusiastic projections. We look forward to working with our partners in health

care and the community to continue to bring new options to patients and their families.” CTCA Chief Operating Officer David Kent was the second employee hired at the Newnan location in April 2011. “We’ve grown to be the second largest CTCA facility in three and half years,” said Kent. “We are also the newest facility.” CTCA has four other locations in Philadelphia, Tulsa, Chicago, and Phoenix. Kent said one of the biggest highlights has been the expansions CTCA has completed. “We’ve added 64 new rooms to our hotel,” he said. “The hotel rooms are for our patients and their families to stay in while they’re receiving treatment. We’ve also added treatment and physician support as well as clinical conference rooms. The hotel expansion puts us at a total of 120 rooms, which makes us the largest hotel in the county. We would have to search in the metro Atlanta area for rooms for our patients, so there was a need for more rooms. The closer they are, the better.”

Kent said the facility is also expanding the dining area, which is expected to be completed in the summer of 2017. “We’ve grown in terms of number of patients, and we have to have the space to take care of our patients,” said Kent. “Unfortunately, there are a lot of cancer patients in the South. We will continue to treat more patients as necessary, and we will plan expansions as necessary to better serve our patients.” According to Kent, CTCA also generated $1.3 billion under four years, which is exceeds the $500 million CTCA was projected to generate in the first five years.

Ansley Park Health and Rehabilitation The Ansley Park facility offers inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation therapy, but it aims to set itself apart by providing upscale amenities, especially to inpatients. Facilities include a physical and occupational therapy gym that offers treatment for pain and muscle weakness as well as NuStep equipment for strengthening and

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Cancer Treatment Centers of America


COMMUNITY physical exercise. Located at 450 Newnan Lakes Boulevard, off Newnan Crossing Bypass, the facility offers only private rooms for live-in patients needing long- or short-term therapy. The patient rooms and other living, dining, relaxing, and therapy areas were professionally designed to give Ansley Park a luxurious ambiance similar to that found in the finest hotels. Meals are prepared by an executive chef. There is an on-site beauty salon, and patients are permitted pet-therapy visits.

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital The site for HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, located at 2101 E. Newnan Crossing Boulevard, represents a $22 million investment in the community. “The difference between us and a nursing home is that we are licensed as a hospital,” said HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Newnan CEO, Ilona Wozniak. The HealthSouth CEO explained

that, much like the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, HealthSouth is a specialty facility that treats a distinct set of patients. The range of care the rehabilitation facility can offer the community, however, is far less limited than many residents understand. Wozniak said that initially, it was difficult to make the distinction to residents. Many locals thought HealthSouth was a place for elderly patients suffering from conditions from 60 Coweta Living 2017-18

which they were unlikely to recover. “Much of the community didn’t know the difference between a rehabilitation hospital and a rehabilitation center,” Wozniak said. “A rehab center is really a nursing home that denotes itself as a place for rehabilitation.” HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital physicians and nurses are specially trained, and services are designed to help return patients to the healthy, active lifestyles they enjoyed before injury, stroke, or a number of other life-altering medical events. The practice is growing, and HealthSouth has the highest number of rehabilitation beds in the country. More than 130 HealthSouth hospitals can be found across the United States. Currently, HealthSouth cares for primarily stroke patients (55 percent), and those with neurological illnesses, including Parkinson’s and Multiple Sclerosis. A total of 47 percent of patients at the specialty facility are treated for traumatic injuries including those in automobile accidents.

Coweta Samaritan Clinic One of the most valuable assets of the health care landscape is the Coweta Samaritan Clinic (CSC), a free clinic for the uninsured and underinsured of Coweta County. The clinic is located in the former Coweta County Health Department facilities on Jackson Street near downtown Newnan. The CSC was founded by Dr. Kay Crosby, who left a private practice of internal medicine in 2008 with the hope of bringing a free clinic to her hometown of Newnan. With the support of the Coweta County Hospital

Authority, the building, located at 137 Jackson Street, became the clinic’s home. Newnan Hospital Foundation continues to provide a portion of the clinic’s operating funds while Piedmont

Newnan contributes free lab and radiology services. Together, sponsors, community donations and contributions, and skilled medical specialists allow the clinic to function as the primary-care facility for indigent – uninsured and medically underserved – patients in the county. “This isn’t about me,” Crosby stated. “This event and the clinic is all about the community, our sponsors and the volunteers that help make the clinic successful in providing care to the people of Coweta.” According to Crosby, the most recent additions to CSC services include a monthly clinic provided by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Newnan, dental services by Complete Dental Arts, advanced diagnostic imaging from American Health Imaging, and the installation of electronic medical records in a system called Epic, which will streamline patient files between Piedmont Newnan Hospital and CSC. Another benefit to the county is that along with dental care, gynecology, and a range of primary medical care offerings, the clinic also serves to offset the amount of traffic in local emergency rooms. The clinic provides care to those who might otherwise seek the emergency room for its lack of up-front costs.

Newnan VA Clinic The Newnan Veterans Clinic, a local unit of the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Health Care System based in Decatur, is located at 39-A Oak Hill Court in Newnan. The clinic, though not an emergency services center, provides a variety of services to veterans of Coweta County and nearby areas. The clinic, which opened in 2009, is directed by Leslie Wiggins, Atlanta VA Medical Center Director. “Our top goal will always be to ensure veterans receive the high-quality health care that they have earned and deserved,” said Wiggins. “Focusing on our core values — integrity, commitment, advocacy, respect and excellence — will guide our actions toward accomplishing this most important mission.” CL


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William “Billy” Thomasson, who owns the newspaper today, has been a part of the Times-Herald’s operation for decades. In this photo from years ago, he catches sections of the newspaper coming off the press.

The Newnan Times-Herald is Coweta’s oldest business

Read local.

You can’t get more local than The Newnan Times-Herald. We’ve been publishing the news and offering advertisers a way to sell their wares since just after the Civil War. Our

James Thomasson oversees work in The Newnan Times-Herald’s pressroom. He and his father founded The Newnan Times, which later absorbed its older rival, The Newnan Herald.

owner, Billy Thomasson, is a Newnan native and the third generation in his family at The Times-Herald. We’ve been anchoring a corner of downtown real estate for more than 50 years, and we’re continuing to change with the times — offering stories through a comprehensive internet website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages, as well as a bimonthly Newnan Coweta magazine, the annual Coweta Living, and the newspaper itself four days a week. During my years here, The TimesHerald has had a family atmosphere. My daughters sometimes did homework in the breakroom, and several staff members have children who we see from time to time. Charlie and Anna are the children of Clay and Beth Neely. Beth, Billy and Marianne Thomasson’s daughter, is our proofreader — poring over all the newspaper copy to make sure everything is spelled correctly and

makes sense. Clay covers public safety for the newspaper and is the prime mover in our social media presence. I always enjoy seeing Charlie and Anna, who are almost exactly the same ages as my two oldest grandchildren. Occasionally, I stop to reflect that they are the fifth generation of this newspaper family that I have known. The Newnan Times-Herald is 152 years old. As the first newspaper started in Georgia after the Civil War, it has a rich history. One of its first editors, Jesse Calaway Wootten, is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery beneath a stone that features delicatelycarved, crossed quill pens. I first came to work at The TimesHerald as an intern in 1978, writing stories about the swine show at the fair, home remedies and Powers Crossroads. I already had a great love of history and wrote countless

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articles based on interviews with older folks. As an intern, I sat next to Mr. E.W. Thomasson, who — with his son James — founded The Newnan Times in 1935. He told me stories about setting type by standing on a box when he was a boy, for his father was a newspaperman in Carroll County and, for a time, in Arkansas. Mr. E.W. could communicate in sign language, left from the days when the newspaper hired graduates of the Georgia School for the Deaf at Cave Spring as typesetters. James Thomasson and his wife, Ida Askew Thomasson, were running the newspaper in my intern days. Ida Thomasson, bookkeeper Ella MacNabb and society editor Ruth Welch all took a personal interest in the young folks who were joining the staff as interns and reporters in those days, encouraging us as we got our start as journalists. After college and a short sojourn in south Georgia, I came back to The Times-Herald in 1982, so I have been here continuously for 35 of the newspaper’s 152 years. It has been a time of change — weekly to twice a week to daily, an increasing move toward online news, periods of economic growth in the county and one really devastating economic downturn. Through it all, The Times-Herald has always been forward-looking. Several years ago, I was among the staff members sent to a seminar about the coming changes in the newspaper industry, mostly related to technology and the rise of the Internet. Those changes add challenges that keep my job from ever feeling rote. If you want the real, inside local scoop on what’s happening in Coweta County, we’ve got it. Our staff live here. We shop here, participate in community life and spend time with our children and grandchildren in places you also enjoy. Since we are not part of a corporate chain with owners who live miles away, we stay focused on Coweta County. When I picture the “typical reader” in my mind, that reader is someone who lives right here. Tap into the continuing history of Coweta County by reading local. The stories in today’s Newnan TimesHerald will be our history tomorrow. CL

E.W. Thomasson spent most of his 95 years working in some capacity in the newspaper business. In later years, he shared the wisdom from the hot-type days with young reporters who came to Newnan to put their journalism training to work.

Clay Neely, left, talks with summer interns Madeline Schindler and Juston Lewis about social media. As the news industry changes, The Newnan Times-Herald is finding new ways to cover the news and meet the needs of readers.

If you want the real, inside local scoop on what’s happening in Coweta County, we’ve got it.

How to get the most out of The Newnan Times-Herald Subscribe: If you call 770-304-3373, you can talk to a real Coweta County resident who knows where your neighborhood is and can tell you the options for subscribing. You can also subscribe online at: www.times-herald.com/subscription-options

Advertise: Get the information about what you have to sell to readers who want to buy. Whether it’s a classified ad, help wanted or for a yard sale, call 770-253-1576.

Check out our website: www.times-herald.com Get Pushify: This free service will notify you of local, breaking news on your desktop and mobile phone. Click the box that appears at the top of our website to sign up.

Get our free Daily Headline email: Click the "Get News Alerts" blue box on the left side of the times-herald.com home page, click on "Sign Up For News Alerts" under Subscriber Services, or email news@newnan.com and let us know you’d like to be added to the list. For anything else, call us at 770-253-1576. Coweta Living 2017-18 63


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Small church has big vision for recognizing pastors

Photo by Megan Bellew

Yolanda Jones-Colton pauses at Smith Chapel United Methodist Church where she served as pastor for several years. The church started a program that honors clergy from throughout the local area.

64 Coweta Living 2017-18

Smith Chapel United Methodist Church is a small church, but the congregation has a big vision for recognizing Cowetans involved in ministry, including those at other churches. One way it’s honoring members of the clergy is with a yearly banquet to showcase all the work they do and the sacrifices they make. “Oftentimes, the work of the pastor goes unnoticed and sometimes unappreciated,” said Pastor Yolanda Jones-Colton. “I began to think of the time spent pastoring, time away from family, neglecting care for self, missing events such as family reunions, weddings, anniversaries and birthdays. Pastors strive to be Good Shepherds, overseeing and constantly preparing to equip our sheep. “As I began to think of how much we give, the sacrifice that is made, the vision was made clear, and the sheep of Smith Chapel were able to envision the vision, and the plan to execute was birthed.” Smith Chapel’s first pastor-celebration banquet four years ago was a success, and it has continued the tradition since. Each banquet recognizes five or so members of the clergy. “The first year we had clergy in tears saying, ‘Thank You!’ ‘I thought my labor was in vain.’ Other such statements were: ‘You all have done for me what my own church family has never done,’” recounted Jones-Colton. The selection process and planning starts a year before the banquet and includes the consideration of seniority, accomplishments, achievements and contributions of the possible honorees. A major part of the selection process is also prayer. Not everyone accepts the recognition. “There are those we have had a desire to honor, but for reasons unbeknownst to me, they declined,” Jones-Colton said. With between 300-350 people in attendance, each year’s event puts the tiny church in the local spotlight. “We critique the event immediately after its occurrence and begin praying, planning, and paying for the next year’s event,” WRITTEN BY CELIA GOODYEAR


TRADITIONAL WORSHIP 8:30 & 10:55 in the Sanctuary CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP 11:00 in the Parish Hall SUNDAY SCHOOL @ 9:45 _______________________________________________________________

www.NewnanFUMC.org 33 GREENVILLE ST. NEWNAN, GA 30263 770.253.7400 (P)

Rev. Charles Robinson SENIOR PASTOR

What can I expect in worship? We have a Traditional service that meets twice on Sunday mornings in our beautiful historic Sanctuary (8:30 & 10:55) that features hymns and choral music led by our Parish and Chancel choirs, organ, and piano. We also have a Contemporary service that meets in our Parish Hall (11:00) and is more “casual” in nature with music led by our Connect band. “Come as you are” to all of our services! What about my children? Children are welcome in all of our services and are free to sit with their parents throughout the worship time. If you prefer, however, J.A.M. (Jesus And Me) starts toward the middle of both 11:00 worship services when children are dismissed, and is a special time of worship for our children aged 4 through 2nd grade. There’s a nursery available for children under 4. Parking & Directions: There are several locations on the Newnan FUMC campus where you can park, but, being a downtown church, space is sometimes limited. Arrive early to get a close spot, or feel free to park at any of the surrounding businesses (Charter Bank, Wells Fargo, or Goodyear) with a short walk across the street. Any downtown parking is also within walking distance. Our address is 33 Greenville St., Newnan, GA 30263, and you can access our parking lots via either LaGrange St. (south-bound) or Greenville St. (north-bound). Both our Sanctuary and Parish Hall face east toward Greenville St. What other ways can I get involved? We’ve got it all! Mission opportunities, Bible studies, Boy Scouts, Job Networking, Parkinson’s Support group, music ministries, Sunday School classes, Fun ‘n Frolic events (for those aged 50+), youth (UTH) ministries, TONS of stuff for children, and much more...there’s a place for everyone at any age at Newnan FUMC. We even have an amazing preschool! Sounds great! How can I find out more? Visit our website for more information on any of these (NewnanFUMC.org) or give us a call (770.253.7400). On our website you can learn more about ALL of our many ministries and ways to get involved. You can also tour our campus, read our newsletter, listen to sermons via our podcast, watch past services, get in touch with us, sign up for events, and much more! We also have an app (Google Play or Apple App Store) that’s 100% free!

ou soon!

We hope to see y


COMMUNITY

“It’s great fellowship and brings about cohesiveness. It feels good to be loved and to know somebody sees your work and recognizes your call in a mighty way.” — Pastor Yolanda Jones-Colton Pastor Reginald Wade of Springfield Baptist Church in Hogansville speaks at this year’s pastorcelebration banquet sponsored by Smith Chapel United Methodist Church.

Photo by Al Yates

she said. “... Each year the desire is to enhance the celebration. It’s a community event, so it’s very important for us to receive feedback from the community. Changes have been made based upon suggestions,

opinions and recommendations from the community.” The banquet takes a lot of time and planning, but Jones-Colton enjoys it and knows that all the glory from it goes to Jesus Christ.

“Although time-consuming, the best part for me is seeing the joy and the excitement on the faces of the honorees,” she added. “It’s great fellowship and brings about cohesiveness. It feels good to be loved and to know somebody sees your work and recognizes your call in a mighty way. While we are not in the business of exalting ourselves or our own gifts, someone is doing it for us. We are to exalt Jesus Christ. He is the one who lifts us up when we are down, carries us when we are weak, shelters us from the storm, protects us from hurt, harm and danger and guides our footsteps along life’s journey. So, if any fame is to be gained, let it go to Calvary.” CL

The 2017 honorees include: • Rev. McCallister Hollins, Ousley United Methodist Church

• Rev. Shannon Karafanda,

Seeking to see and serve Christ in all people. Please join us for worship: Sundays at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. We are a community of faith committed to the worship and service of God. Whoever you are, and wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are welcome.

Cornerstone United Methodist Church

• Apostle Sarah Felix, Faith International Christian Center

• Rev. Anthony Melson, Bethel Heard Baptist Church

• Rev. Aaron Jones, Mount Calvary Baptist Church, Moreland

› Smith Chapel is predominantly African-American and has approximately 100 members. It is located on about 16 acres of land off Ga. Hwy 34.

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

576 Roscoe Road • Newnan, GA 30263 (770) 253-4264 • www.stpaulsnewnan.org 66 Coweta Living 2017-18

For more information, email yolanda.jones-colton@ngumc.net


Cowetans care about each other, and nowhere is that more evident than in the

Angie Whitlock with the Newnan-Coweta Humane Society snuggles a kitty at one of the society's adoption days.

Dr. David Gregory, formerly the homeless liaison for the Coweta County School System, is the new executive director at One Roof Outreach.

extensive number of charitable organizations that serve people — and animals. If you need help, they are there. And if you want to help, there are plenty of ways to give of your time and your donations — of money or items. Organizations that directly serve the needs of Cowetans who have fallen on hard times include the I-58 Mission based in Senoia, and Newnan’s Bridging the Gap, One Roof Outreach and Salvation Army. For health care, there are low-cost and — if you’re lucky enough to get on the patient list — no-cost options for those without insurance, a number of humane societies, and other organizations serving various needs. One of Coweta’s newest large nonprofits is the I-58 Mission. The organization opens its food pantry every Thursday, and is able to help with household needs such as furniture and appliances, as well as clothing, children’s items and toys. The food pantry is open to anyone who needs food. There are no income-verification requirements. Visitors to the pantry get a chance to go through the food items and choose what they need and want. The organization’s name comes from Isaiah 58: 6-11. It was formed by the merger of two previous groups, Project 586 and the Sow Good Center. “We try to meet physical needs and show the love of Christ,” said director Karma Novak. “We want to care for the marginalized in our society, and that looks like a lot of different things.” She recalled helping families with furniture and appliances who are homeless or who have lived in hotels, and families who have taken in the children of relatives. “We just want to love people. We want them to know that Jesus cares,” Novak said. “We care, and we just want to fill in those gaps. That’s what we do. It’s the best job in the whole world.” The mission is located at 2450 Hwy. 85, between Senoia and Haralson, at the former Senoia Vineyard Church. The church closed its doors last year, but the I-58 Mission stayed open. A new church is moving WRITTEN BY SARAH FAY CAMPBELL Coweta Living 2017-18 67

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Coweta cares: and it shows


COMMUNITY

into the building and plans to continue to support the ministry. The president of the I-58 Mission board of directors has recently bought some property with plans to use it for the mission as well, Novak said. For more information about the I-58 Mission, call 770-301-8369, visit www. thei58mission.org, or look for the organization’s Facebook page.

Bridging the Gap, located at 19 First Avenue in downtown Newnan, gives out food, toiletries and household items every Saturday. The distribution begins at 10 a.m., and soup is also served. The distribution is first-come-first-served, and those seeking items are asked to arrive at 9 a.m. Items are given “without condition to those who are willing to seek change in their circumstances.” The organization also works with individuals and families to find solutions to why they are hungry and identify the root causes of needs. On weekdays, BTG has laundry facilities and showers available for Newnan’s homeless, as well as hot meals served on an individual basis. Staff also help those coming for laundry and hot showers with job applications and guidance toward positive change. BTG also has a thrift store, The Storehouse. For more information on Bridging the Gap, call 770-683-9110 or visit www.btgcommunity.org

One Roof Outreach and the Coweta Community Food Pantry are located at 255 Temple Avenue, in the Westside Plaza shopping center. Though they are

two separate organizations, they function in partnership under the same director. The food pantry gives out food Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. Those seeking food must first receive a referral, either from One Roof or from various local organizations, including many churches. One Roof provides limited financial assistance, and helps with housing Coweta’s homeless. The organization has a new director, David Gregory, following the retirement of founding director Derenda Rowe. One Roof has a thrift store that serves the organization both in raising money to help others, and in providing items to those in need, such as clothing, dishes and cookware, and household items. For more information, call 770-683-7705 or visit www.oneroofoutreach.org

The Salvation Army provides financial assistance to Cowetans in need who meet certain requirements, such as rent and utility payments and help with affording prescription medicine. There is also a food pantry, and the organization’s thrift store. The Newnan Salvation Army Service Center is located at 670 Jefferson Street. For more information, call 770-251-8181. Local churches also offer food pantry days. Friendship Baptist Church, 194 Poplar Road, Newnan, provides a food pantry on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 11:30 a.m. and the second and last

Saturday of each month at 7 a.m. The church gives out over a million pounds of food annually. Weekday food distribution is produce, dairy and bread. On Saturdays the pantry gives canned and boxed food and meats. You must come during the week to get a time slot for the weekend distribution. For more information, call the church at 678-446-5883. To receive food, you must live in Coweta or Heard counties or in towns on the border.

Newnan First Baptist Church, 15 West Washington Street, partners with the Real Life Center in Fayette County to offer food distribution the fourth Friday of each month at 9 a.m. For more information, call 770-631-9334. Other local helping organizations include:

Coweta Samaritan Clinic The clinic provides free primary health care services for Cowetans earning less than 200 percent of the poverty level. Care includes free prescription medications and access to diagnostic tests and specialists. New patient availability is extremely limited, and the clinic only takes new patients for short times during the year. The best way to find out when new patients are being accepted is to follow the group’s Facebook page. There are volunteer opportunities available for doctors, nurses and medical assistants, as well as for office work. For more information, visit www.cowetasamaritanclinic.org

Your Town Health/Palmetto Health Council is a subsidized clinic that offers primary care, dental care, and mental health care, as well as deeply subsidized prescription drugs, for those without insurance. Services are available to patients of all income levels; charges are on a sliding scale based on income. You do not have to be a resident of any specific county to receive care. Your Town Health has its main office in Palmetto, with small offices offering various services in Senoia, Greenville, Manchester, Carrollton, Barnesville and Zebulon. For the main office in Palmetto, at 643 Main Street, call 770-463-4644. The

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The Coweta Community Foundation is a fundraising and grant-making organization for many of Coweta’s nonprofits. For more information, call 770-253-1833 or visit www.cowetafoundation.org. The HELP Spay/Neuter Clinic offers low-cost spay and neuter surgeries for dogs and cats, as well as frequent low-cost vaccine clinics. The clinic offers monthly specials and various programs to make spaying and neutering pets affordable. There is also financial assistance available for those who meet certain guidelines. The clinic is located at 12 The Crescent in the commercial section of the Avery Park subdivision in Newnan. For more information, call 770-304-7911 or visit www.helpspayneuter.org Community Welcome House provides services for women and children dealing with domestic violence. Community Welcome House no longer functions as a shelter, but provides many services to help victims get away from violence and get back on their feet. For more information visit www.communitywelcomehouse. org or call 770-304-0966. Humane Societies: Coweta County is home to several humane societies that work to rescue homeless pets. They include: Newnan-Coweta Humane Society, 770-253-4694 or www.nchsrescue.org; Georgia Heartland Humane Society, 770-830-2820 or www.GeorgiaHeartlandHumaneSociety.com; Shelter Rescue and Please Rescue Me, www.ShelterRescueInc. org; The Good Shepherd Humane Society, paws911rescue@yahoo.com or find The Good Shepherd on Facebook.

Goodwill Industries provides job-search assistance through career centers at its thrift stores, Newnan West (228 Bullsboro Drive) and Newnan East (3121 Hwy. 34 East). Call 770-254-8480 for Newnan West and 678-854-6839 for Newnan East, or visit www.goodwillsr.org for more information.

Backstreet Community Arts hosts open studio time to provide a safe, welcoming, creative environment for anyone who may benefit from the healing powers of art and community, at 19-B First Avenue. Backstreet Arts believes that art saves lives. Those who have experienced trauma, illness or grief, veterans, at-risk teenagers, disabled adults, homeless- and low-income individuals and anyone who wants to practice art in a comfortable, non-intimidating atmosphere are welcome to come and make all kinds of art - at no charge. For more information, call 706-940-ARTS (2787) or visit www.backstreetart.org

Prevent Child Abuse Coweta is the local chapter of Prevent Child Abuse Georgia. PCA Coweta works to raise awareness of child maltreatment in the community to encourage discussion about these issues that are

important but often difficult to address, said Susan Ebersbach of PCA Coweta. The organization is run entirely by volunteers. To volunteer or join the mailing list, email sebersbach@numail.org

Can’t Never Could helps individuals and groups facing adversity and personal battles. Through monetary donations, support, and faith in Jesus Christ, Can’t Never Could “wishes to instill determination and hope to those who are experiencing these challenges,” said co-founder Christi Estes. “Can’t Never Could makes these contributions with the desire to glorify Christ who provides strength in all circumstances.” For more information visit www.cantnevercouldinc.com Southeastern Assistance in Healthcare is a voluntary and charitable organization that helps cancer patients in treatment and their families with nonmedical financial burdens. “Such burdens are utilities, housing, transportation, child care, and other basic living expenses,” said Board Member Nancy Mader. “Our mission is to lessen the financial stress of patients so they can focus on healing.” For more information, call 770-400-6263 or visit www.aih.org/newnan

Healing4Heroes helps military personnel and veterans move forward after being wounded physically and/ or mentally with the assistance of service animals. Healing4Heroes also saves the lives of unwanted dogs from animal shelters by rescuing them and training them to be service animals. The dogs and training are provided free-of-charge to veterans; the cost to the organization is about $6,000. Each veteran is directly involved in the training of their service dogs. For more information, visit www.healing4heroes.org

The University of Georgia’s Cooperative Extension Service/4-H office provides researchbased education to youth and adults in three program areas: agriculture and natural resources, 4-H Youth Development, and Family and Consumer Science. Contact the Extension/4-H office at 770-254-2620 for soil, water, and forage sampling, landscape diagnostic services, landowner resources, youth-development programs, and much more.

CL

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

I believe in helping others as a hospice volunteer.

Volunteers give their time in two ways: • Patient Visit Volunteer • Administrative Volunteer For more information, contact Lynn Yeager

loretta.yeager@gentiva.com 770-502-1104

Formerly Gentiva Hospice Coweta Living 2017-18 69

COMMUNITY

Senoia clinic is at 48 Main Street and can be reached at 678-723-0400.


HEALTH & FITNESS

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Canongate I Golf Club, located in Sharpsburg, originally opened in 1965 with 18 holes designed by world-renowned architects Dick Wilson and Joe Lee.

Coweta County: a destination for golfers Very few communities are as fortunate as Coweta to have access to a variety of diverse golf courses within such a small radius. Regardless of your skill level or income, you don’t need to look far in order to find a golf course that’s right for you. Coweta County boasts five golf courses — each one showcasing its own unique designs and challenges. As many golfers can attest, such a high concentration of quality courses in a

small area is far from commonplace. Canongate I Golf Club, located in Sharpsburg, originally opened in 1965 with 18 holes designed by worldrenowned architects Dick Wilson and Joe Lee. Architects Rocky Roquemore and Jeff Burton designed the additional 18 holes added in 1999, creating the 36hole facility known today. In addition to the courses, the club offers a double-sided driving range

with both mat and grass hitting areas, targets, and premium range balls, as well as a short-game practice area. Canongate I is open seven days a week. Walking is permitted before 8 a.m. or after 12 p.m. on weekends and holidays.

Coweta Club in Arbor Springs Plantation is another popular destination for golfers, touting its course by design as being unlike most golf-course experiences.

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLAY NEELY

70 Coweta Living 2017-18


18-hole, par-72 golf course. Designed by Jeff Burton and Joe T. Jemsek, the course wanders through native dogwoods and pine trees, preserved wetlands, and wildlife habitats. With five sets of tees, SummerGrove can be played at a distance that matches the player’s game — appealing to a wide range of skill levels. The club also offers a 3-hole, par3 practice course, driving range, and putting and chipping greens. The driving range is open from 7 a.m. through dusk daily. White Oak Golf Club features panoramic views and challenging play for golfers at every skill level. The club offers two distinct layouts: The Old Course, with a traditional layout, and the Seminole Course, with a more modern layout. Designed by Joseph L. Lee and Rocky Roquemore, the 18-hole course features 6,850 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72. The course rating is 73.0, and it has a slope rating of 135 on Bermuda grass. CL

Experience the

Maintenance-free

Southern Hospitality at Wesley Woods of Newnan

Now is the time to build your maintenance-free dream home at Wesley Woods of Newnan. Designed for those aged 62 and above, these spacious new residences feature open floor plans, vaulted ceilings, state-of-the-art walk-in showers with tile surrounds, stainless steel appliances, and so much more! Select from a wide range of customizable interior options to suit your individual style, and let Wesley Woods take care of the housekeeping as well as the interior and exterior maintenance while you enjoy myriad on-site amenities and services, from dining to fitness to the new movie theatre. A senior living community on 54 acres offering independent apartments and cottages, personal care, memory care and nursing care, all on one campus.

770-683-6833 • wesleywoodsnewnan.org 2280 North Highway 29 | Newnan, GA 30265

Coweta Living 2017-18 71

HEALTH & FITNESS

Situated on 180 picturesque acres north of Newnan, the course aims to offer a fair and interesting challenge to golfers at every level. Coweta Club features five sets of golf tees, playing to a strong 7,056 yards “from the tips” but also offering multiple levels of challenge, including a friendly layout of less than 5,000 yards from the forward tees. Coweta Club offers chipping and putting areas and is also equipped with a lighted driving range and PGA staff available for lessons. Formed in 1919, Newnan Country Club is Coweta’s first golf course and has been a mainstay of the local golfing community for nearly a century. Designed by Denis Griffiths, NCC offers 6,966 yards of golf for a par of 72. The course offers Bermuda fairways and bentgrass greens. The club is open seven days a week and offers after-school programs for junior golfers. Spread over 250 acres of rolling hills, SummerGrove Golf Club offers an


HEALTH & FITNESS Coweta County boasts five golf courses — each one hosts their own driving range.

As many golfers can attest, such a high concentration of quality courses in a small area is far from commonplace.

CANONGATE I GOLF CLUB 924 Shaw Road, Sharpsburg, GA 30277 770-463-3342 • canongategolf.com 18 Holes | Private course | Par: 72 | 6,794 yds. Sat.  –  Thurs. 7:00 a.m. –  6:00 p.m. Fri. 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. COWETA CLUB 300 Arbor Springs Parkway, Newnan, GA 30265 770-683-4727 • cowetaclub.com 18 Holes | Public course | Par: 72 | 7,056 yds. Mon.  –  Fri. 8:00 a.m.  –  6:00 p.m. Sat.  –  Sun. 7:30 a.m.  –  6:00 p.m. NEWNAN COUNTRY CLUB 1356 N. Hwy. 29, Newnan, GA 30264 770-253-3675 • newnancc.org

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NEWNAN COUNTRY CLUB (cont’d) 18 Holes | Private course | Par: 72 | 6,966 yds. Tues. – Thurs. 8:00 a.m.  –  9:00 p.m. Fri. 8:00 a.m.  – 10:00 p.m. • Sat. 7:30 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Sun. 8:00 a.m.  –  9:00 p.m. • Closed Mon. SUMMER GROVE GOLF CLUB 335 SummerGrove Parkway, Newnan, GA 30265 770-251-1800 • summergrovegolf.com 18 Holes | Public course | Par: 72 | 6954 yds. 7 days a week, 7:00 a.m.  –  7:00 p.m. WHITE OAK GOLF CLUB 141 Clubview Drive, Newnan, GA 30265 770-251-6700 • canongategolf.com 18 Holes | Private course | Par: 72 | 6,850 yds. 7 days a week, 9:00 a.m.  –  5:00 p.m.


HEALTH & FITNESS

COWETA COUNTY RECREATION FACILITIES ANDREW BAILEY PARK 1011 Andrew Bailey Road, Sharpsburg

HUNTER COMPLEX 2970 E. Hwy. 16, Sharpsburg

SENOIA PARK 310 Hwy. 16 E., Howard Road & Andrew Parkway, Senoia

ARNCO PARK 50 Ball Street, Sargent

MORELAND PARK 80 School Street & Ball Street, Moreland

TEMPLE AVENUE COMPLEX Recreation department headquarters, 39 Hospital Road, Newnan

BROWN'S MILL BATTLEFIELD 155 Millard Farmer Road, Newnan C.J. SMITH PARK 5 Glenn Street, Newnan GRANTVILLE PARK 23 Colley Street, Grantville HARALSON CITY PARK 171 Magnolia Street, Haralson

PICKETT FIELD 77 Wesley Street & Richard Allen Drive, Newnan RIVERSIDE PARK 4013 Ga. Highway 16 West, Newnan SARGENT PARK 146 Kennan Street, Sargent

WESLEY STREET GYM 77 Wesley Street & Richard Allen Drive, Newnan WESTERN PARK 595 Dixon Road, Newnan WHITLOCK PARK 170 International Park, Newnan

Coweta Living 2017-18 73


Metro Creative Graphics

HEALTH & FITNESS

A

A sports league for everyone If you love sports, in Coweta

County there’s something for everyone regardless of age. Everything from traditional athletics such as baseball, T-ball, softball, soccer, basketball, football, and volleyball to the growing sport of pickleball can be played through the Coweta County Recreation Department.

Baseball

Baseball is one of the most popular sports offered through the Coweta County Recreation Department, and there are plenty of opportunities for youngsters to play the game. T-ball is offered for children ages 3-5 in both the spring and fall at the Hunter Complex. The NYAA (Newnan Youth Athletic

Association) also offers spring and fall baseball and T-ball at the field on Temple Avenue. Baseball leagues are also offered in Sharpsburg for ages 3-14 with games taking place at Andrew Bailey Field. For information, call 470-468-3261 or visit www. sharpsburgbaseball.com. The Senoia Area Athletic Association offers baseball and softball leagues at Leroy Johnson Park. For more information call 678-942-6868 or visit www. senoiaathletics.com. The South Coweta Little League plays its games in Grantville during the spring and offers leagues for boys and girls ages 3-16. For more information, visit the Grantville

Baseball Facebook page. The community of Sargent offers baseball games for 4-year-old T-ballers, coach-pitch for 5- to 6-year-olds, and baseball for 7- to 12-year-olds.

Basketball Boys and girls basketball is offered through the Coweta County Recreation Department at two locations for 7- to 14-year-olds. Games are played at two locations, with the Hunter Complex hosting 7- to 10-year-old boys and at the Clay-Wood complex in Newnan for older boys and girls players. Contact Kevin Carlisle at kcarlisle@ coweta.ga.us for boys ages 7-10 and Jay Walton at jwalton@coweta. gacoweta.us for the other leagues.

Football Both flag and tackle football are available through the Coweta County Recreation Department. Flag football is open to players aged 5 to 9 years old with games and practices taking place at the Hunter Complex. Tackle football is available for players aged 7-12 with games played at the Hunter Complex and Temple Avenue. The Hunter Complex hosts 7- to 8and 9- to 10-year-old games, while Temple Avenue hosts the other age groups.

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Cheerleading Cheerleading is offered for all the football leagues. Competitive cheerleading is also offered for girls ages 4-12. The Sharpsburg Youth Football Association offers football and cheerleading for ages 5-14. For more information, call or 678-561-5716 or visit www.sharpsburgfootball.com. Football and cheerleading are also offered through the Coweta Cobra Foundation. It offers flag football for 3- and 4-year-old children and tackle football for ages 5-12.

Soccer Soccer players from ages 4-19 can play the sport through the Southern Soccer Academy/Coweta Cannons. The SSA groups players based on their age, with players 13-19 playing in the select program. For more

information on the Southern Soccer Academy call 470-314-4899, or visit www.cannonssoccer.com. Younger soccer players ages 3-7 can also play spring soccer at the Hunter Complex. Information for this program can be obtained by contacting Lance Dennis at 770-254-3750, or by email at ldennis@coweta.ga.us.

coed leagues available in the fall. One-pitch tournaments are also held on Friday nights in the summer. For information on the spring leagues contact Jay Walton at 770-254-3745, or jwalton@coweta. ga.us. For information on the fall leagues, contact Melanie Gramling at 770-254-3750 or mgramling@ coweta.ga.us.

Softball

Volleyball

Girls can play softball through the Senoia Athletic Department at LeRoy Johnson Park. For more information, contact the www.senoiaathletics. com. The Sharpsburg Regional Softball Association offers girls ages 4-18 the chance to play fastpitch softball with games taking place at Whitlock Park. For more information, call 678-332-8995 or see www. cowetagirlssoftball.com Softball is also available for men and women ages 18 and up for both the spring and fall seasons. There are church and open leagues available in the spring, and church, open and

Spring and fall volleyball is offered through the Coweta County Recreation Department for boys and girls ages 11-16. Contact Lance Dennis at ldennis@coweta.ga.us for information on the spring leagues or Kevin Carlisle at kcarlisle@Coweta. ga.us for fall leagues, or call 770-254-3750 for any other questions.

Pickleball Pickleball games are currently held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. –  noon at the Temple Avenue Complex on Hospital Road. Call 770-254-3750 for more information.

CL

SCH U L T Z family

dental

Meet Dr. Anna Schultz Dr. Schultz and her team are proud to announce the opening of her dental office in Newnan, Georgia! She offers a comprehensive list of dental services including: preventive, restorative, and cosmetic treatments.

Schultz Family Dental is the place to go for a healthy, beautiful smile! Office Hours Monday: 7AM - 4PM Thursday: 9AM - 6PM Friday:

7AM - 2PM

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HEALTH & FITNESS

For information on the 7- to 10-year-old leagues, contact Kevin Carlisle at kcarlisle@Coweta.ga.us and Jay Walton at jwalton@coweta. gacoweta.us for the other leagues.


HEALTH & FITNESS

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Equestrian activities are increasingly popular in Coweta County. Paige Drury takes a horse through the paces at Shady Oaks Farm.

Local horse farm grew from riding lessons for sister What started as riding lessons for two young girls has evolved into a thriving Coweta County enterprise— Shady Oaks Farm, a full-service eventing barn that offers training and boarding to riders who compete in a sport often called a “triathlon for horses.” With all of the growth on the north side of metro Atlanta, Coweta County has become a thriving horse community as some breeders and owners have fled the increasing congestion. Many people have horses in their backyards, and horse farms that rival those in Kentucky can be found throughout the county. About five years ago, Bill Drury looked at his wife, Cheryl, and suggested that buying a farm might be the best way to manage the family’s growing interest in horses.

“My husband thought it would be more fun to own a farm than to pay board,” says Cheryl, who learned to ride as an adult. “Bill and I didn’t know anything about running a horse farm. We took a leap of faith.” Their daughters, Paige and Darcy, were taking lessons from Sandra Pulliam, a trainer who grew up in Palmetto. When the Drury family decided they wanted their own farm, they turned to Sandra and her husband, Terry, to manage it. As a girl, Sandra rode with the legendary Nancy Gosch, a woman who taught riding to dozens of Coweta kids and brought eventing to Coweta County. Eventing, described as a “triathlon” for horses, is a competition that consists of three phases:

Dressage, where a rider guides a horse through a predetermined pattern in a rectangular arena.

WRITTEN BY MARTHA A. WOODHAM AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMES JOHNSON

76 Coweta Living 2017-18


HEALTH & FITNESS

Stadium jumping, which is jumping over a course of fences that fall down when hit. The jumping phases are timed, and horses incur penalties not only for refusing a jump or knocking one down but also if they go too fast or too slow.

Cross-country jumping, which is a test of horse and rider over a course of fences in a field. The obstacles consist of banks, ditches, water complexes and solid jumps that don’t fall down if a horse hits one. Paige, now 15, competes at the novice level, and her sister, 13, rides beginner novice. Cheryl, who never rode as a child, competes in dressage on William, a thoroughbred “schoolmaster” who once competed at the upper levels. “I got interested in horses because of my daughters,” Cheryl says, recalling how Darcy, at age 4, would lie on the floor and cry because she wanted to take riding lessons like her big sister. And Sandra has been there to guide them. “I had my first pony when I was 2,” says Sandra, who has been teaching people to ride and training horses since 2005. “But I never had formal lessons until my late teens when I began riding with Mrs. Gosch. She was like a second mother to me.” Now Sandra passes on what she learned from her teacher to her own students, who range from 6 years old to adult. In addition to the Drurys’ daughters, Sandra has about 40 students, and her own grown daughters, Melissa and Carolina, ride as well. “The best part of our barn is our barn family,” says Sandra. “We’re pretty sure you won't find a friendlier and more encouraging group of riders anywhere. We love to cheer on our littlest riders, and our more advanced riders find just the right amount of challenge.” “There’s no drama,” Cheryl adds. “Everyone helps each other. My girls want to beat each other in competition, but outside the ring, they work together.” Today, Shady Oaks Farm has grown to 55 acres as the Drurys bought neighboring property that came up for sale. In addition to the 10-stall barn and the dressage arena on the original farm, they have installed a cross-country practice field and two more arenas — another dressage arena and a covered arena that can be used for lessons in all kinds of weather. Oak trees that give the farm its name line the drive that leads to the barn area, which overlooks the new covered arena. Recently, Laine Ashker, a top-ranked rider in eventing, gave a clinic at Shady Oaks Farm for riders who came from all over Georgia and from Tennessee. Sandra watched intently as riders took their turns jumping and Ashker gave them

Noe Rolands enjoys a morning of horseback riding at Shady Oaks Farm.

pointers on how to improve their riding. “This is my passion,” Sandra said with a smile. “I’m so glad to be able to follow my passion, to have the opportunity to teach kids. Horseback riding can teach you so many life lessons. I am so blessed. It’s not just a job — it’s a passion.” CL › Shady Oaks Farm is located at 5116 Lower Fayetteville Road in Sharpsburg. For more information, contact Sandra Pulliam at 678-294-3158 or Sandra@ShadyOaksEventing.com.

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EDUCATION

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High school students taking Georgia up on its offer of free college classes are driving enrollment swells at Coweta County’s college campuses.

Move on when ready High-schoolers increasingly studying at Coweta’s college campuses As Coweta schools continue to expand educational options, an

increasing number of local students are taking advantage of the state’s Move On When Ready initiative, which allows them to take college classes for free while earning their high school diplomas. In 2015, Georgia lawmakers merged the state’s multiple dual-enrollment programs, simplifying the process for administrators, counselors and students by passing the Move on When Ready legislation. It enables academically qualified high-schoolers to enroll in college classes to get a jump-start on their college and career educations at no cost to the students or their families. Locally, dual-enrollment numbers have been climbing steadily at the Newnan locations of both West Georgia Technical College and the

University of West Georgia since the Georgia lawmakers passed the legislation. West Georgia Tech offers classes at both its Coweta Campus and the Coweta County School System’s Central Educational Center, which for decades has provided work-study and other opportunities for high school students. It is one of 22 technical colleges in the Technical College System of Georgia, which has seen dual-enrollment population nearly double system-wide since 2015. “Move on When Ready has had a tremendous impact on our enrollment numbers,” said Mark Peevy, the system’s executive director of secondary education initiatives. “It’s had a tremendous impact on the options and opportunities we’ve been able to help students with across the state of Georgia.”

Growth is less dramatic locally, where the Coweta County School System’s Central Educational System has for decades been offering enhanced learning opportunities for high school students. West Georgia Tech offers classes at both CEC and its Coweta Campus, where 1,231 adult and high school students currently are enrolled. The University of West Georgia has not only seen a jump in dualenrollment numbers but an increase in opportunities for students from lowerincome families to pursue higher education, according to April Wood, UWG’s interim director of new student programs. “Dual enrollment numbers have skyrocketed,” Wood said. “(Move on When Ready) has allowed a larger population to do these courses online and on campus, enabling students

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78 Coweta Living 2017-18


— April Wood to finish high school and move on to college at a lower cost.” From fall 2014 to fall 2016, the University of West Georgia’s total dual-enrollment numbers increased from 156 students to 485. At the Newnan campus, the 37 dual-enrolled students in fall 2014 blossomed into 142 by spring semester of this year. Wood said UWG’s dual-enrolled students are taking an average of seven credit hours, typically one online class and one on-campus class. “It provides students some flexibility in their schedules,” she said. “It gives them time to travel back and forth from their high schools, and they can do the online courses at home, on campus or in a classroom.” Because Move on When Ready provides tuition-free college credit, Wood has seen an increase in enrollment by lower-income students. “Some of my students never thought they would actually get to

college,” she said. “It helps provide them confidence as well, once they get there and see that they can do this work.” Wood said that falls in line with Complete College Georgia, an initiative designed to help increase college and university graduation rates. According to Complete College Georgia’s website, more than 60 percent of the state’s jobs by 2025 will require some form of higher education credentials — a certificate, associate degree or bachelor’s degree. Only about 45 percent of Georgia’s emerging workforce qualifies. Programs available locally also help save students money, including eCore, a low-cost online option for core classes housed at UWG but available throughout the state. Another is allowing credits to transfer between the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia and the ability to take courses

at a university and a technical college concurrently. These initiatives have not only given students broader access to enrollment but also to completion of crucial workforce credentials. “Education is a buffet now,” Wood said. “There are options for every student.” The Move on When Ready Act smoothed the way for more high school students to take advantage of colleges’ academic and technical offerings. Partnering with K-12 institutions makes it easier to give students more options at crucial points, Peevy said, and puts them on the path to a successful career much earlier. “Move on When Ready not only is an important part of the system’s enrollment growth, but also is an opportunity to make sure more students are developing the skills they need sooner rather than later,” he said. CL

Go jump-start your college career. Want to earn college credits while you’re still in high school? The University of West Georgia’s dual enrollment program makes it possible. You can take classes at our Newnan location with traditional, online, and hybrid options. Core college classes in English, math, science, and more can be worked into your school schedule. Finish the first 2 years of your college degree before you graduate from high school. Go get the details at westga.edu/newnan.

Newnan Coweta Living 2017-18 79

EDUCATION

“Education is a buffet now. There are options for every student.”


EDUCATION

“Interdisciplinary studies is like concierge service for employers. That’s education for the 21st century.”

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— Kyle Marrero

Higher ed institutions provide programs tailored to local workforce needs

Several colleges and universities operate programs in Coweta County, offering a

variety of educational pathways at facilities ranging from centers to fullservice campuses. One of the newest facilities is the University of West Georgia at Newnan, which opened in 2015 in the historic Newnan Hospital building on Jackson Street in Newnan, near downtown. After operating out of its Newnan Center in Shenandoah Industrial Park for years, UWG committed to a new campus in collaboration with the city of Newnan, the Newnan hospital board and the University System of Georgia. Coweta County, the city of Newnan and the Newnan Hospital Foundation — the board that remained in place

after the former hospital closed — combined resources for the initial renovation phase of the UWG-Newnan campus, which opened in fall 2015. Former exam rooms morphed into nursing simulation suites; original tile and operating room lights remained, even as cavernous lecture halls and high-tech labs took shape. “Not many communities would come together and go into debt to actually create a facility of higher education and at the same time bring back to life a building that has such incredible history and connectivity with the citizens of Newnan,” UWG President Kyle Marrero said. “It’s such a testament to Newnan and the community and the leaders in place that made that happen. We’re honored

to be a partner in this.” Workforce needs demand focusing on graduating students in health care and education, and with those components firmly in place, the University of West Georgia is taking a new look at the Newnan space — particularly at the 24,000 square feet of already shelled-in space on the campus. The new space will be designated for programs that address workforce needs beyond what the institution already has established in Coweta County. A new, flexible degree program set to launch in 2018 is designed to help UWG-Newnan grow instant workforces for local employers by tailoring students’ final few classes to specifically prepare them for available

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY REBECCA LEFTWICH

The University of West Georgia at Newnan, located in the historic Newnan Hospital building, recently announced plans to “activate” nearly 24,000 square feet of shelledin space in a former nurse’s dormitory.

80 Coweta Living 2017-18


local jobs, according to university administrators. The proposed Bachelor of Science program in interdisciplinary studies could bring a concept into the state’s universities that has been successful in high school level college-and-career academies, technical colleges and charter schools. “Interdisciplinary studies is like concierge service for employers,” Marrero said. “That’s education for the 21st century.” A student in interdisciplinary studies would take the core curriculum required of all students and some other basic courses, then enroll in a mixture of existing courses designed to develop the skills local employers need. As employers’ needs change, the mix of courses for future students could easily change, too, offering greater adaptability than the establishment of traditional degree majors. Higher education is moving toward collaborative efforts as well. UWG and West Georgia Technical College recently announced a new articulation agreement that will allow students to transfer credits from one institution to the other with a goal of earning a bachelor’s degree in psychology. The agreement goes into effect in fall of 2018. West Georgia Tech and UWG already have articulation agreements in place for criminal justice, nursing and business degrees. Per a University System of Georgia agreement with the Technical College System of Georgia, many general education courses will transfer between the two institutions as well.

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EDUCATION

West Georgia Tech recently added cybersecurity courses to its offerings, also in response to workforce needs. When the full-service campus off Turkey Creek Road in Newnan opened its doors to students in August of 2013, WGTC had been a presence in Coweta County for more than a dozen years. A charter partner in the Central Educational Center, West Georgia Tech continues to offer classes at its CEC location. One key component of educational services offered through West Georgia Technical College is adult education. WGTC provides free support and instruction as well as opportunities for general equivalency diploma testing scholarships. Through a recent expansion of its GED-to-college program, West Georgia Tech offers students without a high school diploma an opportunity to become college students within a few months. The program allows students enrolled in adult education classes to apply to certificate and

diploma classes at the college in approximately 100 programs, which includes almost all of the college’s certificate and diploma classes. The only exceptions are West Georgia Tech’s competitive selection programs, according to Karen Kirchler, WGTC’s vice president of adult education. “We are so excited to be able to offer another opportunity for our students who are working to change their lives,” Kirchler said. “If they get started right away, they can embark on the next step of their lives much sooner than they probably anticipated.” To be eligible to apply, students must be enrolled in one of West Georgia Tech’s Adult Education classes, have passed two of the four GED subtests and have met the entrance (Accuplacer) requirements of the program to which they’re applying. “This is all about having complete and total faith in our students being college material and college-ready

once they complete our program,” Kirchler said. “Not only can they enroll in college, they will also be eligible for financial aid through the HOPE grant, and many of them may be eligible for other aid through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.” Once they’ve been accepted to West Georgia Tech, students can work on completing their final two GED subtests while attending college. Brewton-Parker College, a private Christian college based in Mt. Vernon, Ga. and affiliated with the Georgia Baptist Convention, offers educational programs — including Christian ministry degrees — from its satellite location on Smokey Road in Newnan. Mercer University’s Newnan center, which operates out of the Central Educational Center, provides educational degree programs through its Tift College of Education, among other courses of study. CL

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Coweta’s libraries offer resources, opportunities

The communities of Newnan and Coweta County are ripe with opportunities for their

residents to better themselves, and they need look no further than the Coweta County Public Library System and the Newnan Carnegie Library. The Coweta County Public Library System has four branches — Central Library, Powell, Senoia, and Grantville. Each branch has books and digital collections, computers, interlibrary loan services, wireless internet, reading programs for adults and children, as well as passes to partner services, including Center for Puppetry Arts, Georgia State Parks, Zoo Atlanta, and the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University. “I would like everyone to know we have four branches with professionally trained staff and can be found on the web at ​w ww.cowetapubliclibrary. org​,” said Jimmy E. Bass, library director. “We have over 90,000 library cardholders but would like everyone to join us.” First open in 1904, the Newnan Carnegie Library at 1 LaGrange Street in downtown Newnan is the result of one of the first Carnegie Library grants given in the state of Georgia. Andrew Carnegie gave the grant in

1901, and the facility served as the city’s sole public library from 1904 to 1987 before being renovated recently. Now it serves as a community gathering place that offers librarytype services, according to its director, Amy D. Mapel. Its services include: computer and Wi-Fi access; fax, copy, and scanning services, as well as a Notary Public. There are also programs for children and adults, meeting rooms for rent and an honor system for checking out books without a library card. In 2016, the library had almost 30,000 visitors and 13,000 books borrowed by honor checkout. “We are continually expanding our program offerings,” Mapel said. “New this year is a diabetes education series; young-adult programs including graphic novels, ‘life hacks,’ Blackout Poetry and creative writing; American military history with Professor Walter Todd; and art programs with various artistsin-residence (Newnan Art Rez) ... Projects include new adult series partnering with the University of West Georgia and Delta Community Credit Union; expanding the honor collection to include more large-print, children's books and adult fiction; and supporting the new summer

mayor's reading program facilitated by the Newnan Carnegie Library Foundation.” The Coweta Public Library Service is also constantly working to expand its services for patrons. One of those changes is E-Card, where people can sign up at home to use the library’s digital collection. “​T his collection features E-books, movies and graphic novels, and E-Card will allow access from the comfort of home,” said Bass. “We will continue to grow our popular ‘1000 Books Before Kindergarten’ program where children and their families can enjoy and grow from reading together.” Bass said the E-Card service is expected to be in place this summer. In addition, the internet speed of the public computers at the library branches will double. Children will also be able to sign up at Powell and Central branches for Crazy 8’s, a recreational, after-school math club. CL › For more information about the Coweta County Public Library System or the Newnan Carnegie Library, go to w ​ ww. cowetacountypubliclibrary.org and www.newnancarnegie.com.

WRITTEN BY CELIA GOODYEAR AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN BELLEW Coweta Living 2017-18 83

EDUCATION

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Amy Mapel, director of the Carnegie Library, left, and Elizabeth Wood, Carnegie reference assistant, are ready to greet another set of library patrons.


EDUCATION

C

Central Educational Center is the original model for the state of Georgia’s college and career academies.

Central Educational Center preparing students for real-world workplace Typical Coweta County high school graduates in the 1990s were unprepared for a

workplace increasingly shaped by global business, downsizing and automation, and when local business representatives approached the Coweta County School System for help, the Central Educational Center was born. A charter program developed by Chamber of Commerce leaders, the Coweta County School System and West Georgia Technical College, CEC was aimed at “seamless education.” Central was born from two years’

worth of work by a steering committee headed by the late Dr. Joe Harless, a behavioral psychologist whose ideas for educational change included educating students in an environment that simulated the real-life workplace as closely as possible. Because no educational model existed for the program, thenSuperintendent Richard Brooks engaged Harless to apply his principles with specific input from local business industry and local schools. “All the work they did was on target,” said Mark Whitlock, CEO of

the Central Educational Center. Whitlock had become involved with the school system in the mid-1990s, investigating the chartering laws and helping grow a local Montessori school. “It was disappointing that education was not more focused on careers,” Whitlock said. “There were a lot of good companies here, and it was a time period where everything pointed toward Coweta and Coweta was booming. They said, ‘Let’s develop something unique in Coweta.’” These days, all of Georgia’s College and Career Academies are modeled

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY REBECCA LEFTWICH

84 Coweta Living 2017-18


— Mark Whitlock on CEC, allowing high schools throughout the state to offer an everwidening range of accelerated, dualenrollment opportunities in technical education. Its beefed-up work-based learning strategy and alignment with West Georgia Technical College paved the way for local implementation of the first German-style apprenticeship program in the country. These and other accomplishments have brought it wide acclaim as a high school reform model. More than 500 groups from Georgia and across the U.S. as well as from 16 other nations have visited CEC to study its model, and Whitlock regularly travels to other communities to help them with replication efforts. Central was recently designated one of 30 replicable high school reform model

Caring, Teaching, Reaching

programs in the United States by the International Center for Leadership in Education. Dr. Anthony Chow conducted research on CEC for his book, “Systems Thinking and 21st Century Education: A Case Study of an American Model for High School Educational Reform.” “The sum total is that CEC is the model program for the state that connects business, school systems and technical colleges in an intentional effort to systematically impact economic development by ensuring competitive talent for current and future careers, with ‘talent’ becoming younger and younger ages,” said Whitlock. Whitlock credits Coweta County business and industry for guiding CEC’s work.

“The most engaged business community in Georgia is here in Coweta County,” he said. “The group has done more to engage with education than anywhere else in the nation that I have visited. We may have great examples of single large companies who engage in other communities, but no similar acrossthe-board effort like in Coweta.” Manufacturing is lively in Coweta County, and one manufacturer, Grenzebach Corporation, has done as much as any to push for innovation at CEC. The manufacturing company’s chief operating officer, Martin Pleyer, was a leader in the establishment of the country’s first German-style apprenticeship program and a firm supporter of the grow-your-own workforce movement. Pleyer also

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EDUCATION

“The most engaged business community in Georgia is here in Coweta County. The group has done more to engage with education than anywhere else in the nation that I have visited.”


EDUCATION

Coweta County Private/Charter School Contact Information Charter Schools Coweta Charter Academy 6675 Highway 16 Senoia, GA 30276 (770) 599-0228 Odyssey Charter School 14 St. John Circle Newnan, GA 30265 (770) 251-6111

Private Schools Ave Maria Academy 1250 Lora Smith Road Newnan, GA 30265 678-590-1868 Carolyn Barron Montessori School 195 Jackson Street Newnan, GA 30263 770-253-2135 Central Christian School 3613 Highway 34 East Sharpsburg, GA 30277 770-252-1234

serves on the CEC Board of Directors. “Over the last 30 to 40 years manufacturing has changed dramatically from what you hear from your grandparents,” Pleyer said. “(Our role) is to make sure that local businesses stay connected and to guide the school into the next frontier of industry.” Focusing on workforce development at a younger and younger age doesn’t just benefit companies. It’s important for entire communities, Whitlock said, and for hard-to-reach students who can become interested enough in a course of study to not only graduate, but pursue further education. “We just can’t afford to lose kids, because we’ve got to have skilled young people to drive our economy,” he said. It’s why Central keeps its finger on the pulse of the shifting business and industry trends, constantly taking stock of new and changing trends and expanding opportunities for the students who will soon join the workforce. For instance, the CEC board recently approved a diesel mechanics program after a presentation of economic data collected by West Georgia Technical College. A greater emphasis on real-world computer programming will be bolstered by new cybersecurity courses, with an eye toward new cybersecurity facilities in Augusta and Brookhaven. While CEC’s work is hailed as “reform,” a term often used in educational circles, supporters of industry-driven instruction prefer a more open-ended, business-oriented concept: continuous improvement. “Continuous improvement is a lot of new and different things, and that’s why it’s exciting,” Whitlock said. “You’re always working in a direction, never finished, so there’s always something to do. You’re always reanalyzing needs, redesigning what you need to do in the next iteration… It’s the intersection of education and business, and CEC is designed to be that.” CL

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Coweta County School System Contact Information Coweta County School System P.O. Box 280 Newnan, GA 30264 770-254-2800 www.cowetaschools.org @cowetaschools

L NOW2017 – 2018 L O R N E REASE

C ION IN T I U T NO

Coweta County Board of Education Frank Farmer (At-Large), Board Chairman (frank.farmer@cowetaschools.org) Larry Robertson (At-Large), Vice-Chairman (larry.robertson@cowetaschools.org) Amy Dees (1st District) (amy.dees@cowetaschools.org) Sue L. Brown (2nd District) (sue.brown@cowetaschools.org) Beth Barnett (3rd District) (beth.barnett@cowetaschools.org) Linda Menk (4th District) (linda.menk@cowetaschools.org) Winston Dowdell (5th District) (winston.dowdell@cowetaschools.org) Board of Education and Superintendent’s Office 770-254-2801 237 Jackson Street Newnan, GA 30263 Superintendent Steve Barker Assistant Superintendent Marc Guy Assistant Superintendent (Finance) Keith Chapman Public Information, School Nurses, After-School Program School System Central Office 770-254-2800 (School System Main Directory) 167 Werz Industrial Drive Newnan, GA 30263 Assistant Superintendent Vince Bass Central Registration Center 770-254-5551 Curriculum and Instruction, Special Education, Student Services, School Records, Instructional Technology, Business Services, Payroll and Benefits, Personnel School System Operations Office 770-254-2750 140 and 170 Werz Industrial Drive Newnan, GA 30263 Operations and School Safety Director Doug Moore Warehouse, Maintenance, School Nutrition, Construction

(continued)

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Why Brewton-Parker? • Christian Worldview • Classes Scheduled in Eight (8) Week Format • Caring, Christian Educators

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311 Smokey Road • Newnan, Georgia 30263

BREWTON-PARKER COLLEGE

(770) 683-3245

www.bpc.edu/newnan Tim Hammett thammett@bpc.edu Amanda Sexton asexton@bpc.edu Brewton-Parker College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate and baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Brewton-Parker College.


EDUCATION

The Donald W. Nixon Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 770-254-2787 1523 Lower Fayetteville Road Newnan, GA 30263 Transportation Office and Bus Garage 770-254-2820 105 Cofield Drive Newnan, GA 30263

Coweta County Elementary School Schools Arbor Springs Elementary School 770-463-5903 4840 N. Highway 29 Newnan, GA 30265 Arnco-Sargent Elementary School 770-254-2830 2449 W. Highway 16 Newnan, GA 30263 Atkinson Elementary School 770-254-2835 14 Nimmons Street Newnan, GA 30263 Brooks Elementary School 770-683-0013 35 Genesee Point Newnan, GA 30263 Canongate Elementary School 770-463-8010 200 Petes Road Sharpsburg 30277 Eastside Elementary School 770-599-6621 1225 Eastside School Road Senoia, GA 30276 Elm Street Elementary School 770-254-2865 46 Elm Street Newnan, GA 30263 Glanton Elementary School 770-583-2873 5725 Highway 29 Grantville, GA 30220 Jefferson Parkway Elementary School 770-254-2771 154 Farmer Industrial Blvd. Newnan, GA 30263

88 Coweta Living 2016-17 2017-18

Moreland Elementary School 770-254-2875 145 Railroad Street Moreland, GA 30259

Evans Middle School 770-254-2780 41 Evans Drive Newnan, GA 30263

Newnan Crossing Elementary School 770-254-2872 1267 Lower Fayetteville Road Newnan, GA 30265

Lee Middle School 770-251-1547 370 Willis Road Sharpsburg, GA 30277

Northside Elementary School 770-254-2890 720 Country Club Road Newnan, GA 30263 Poplar Road Elementary School 770-254-2740 2925 Poplar Road Sharpsburg, GA 30277 Ruth Hill Elementary School 770-254-2895 Sunset Lane Newnan, GA 30263 Thomas Crossroads Elementary School 770-254-2751 3530 E. Highway 34 Sharpsburg, GA 30277 Welch Elementary School 770-254-2597 240 Mary Freeman Road Newnan, GA 30265 Western Elementary School 770-254-2790 1730 Welcome Road Newnan, GA 30263 White Oak Elementary School 770-254-2860 770 Lora Smith Road Newnan, GA 30265 Willis Road Elementary School 770-304-7995 430 Willis Road Sharpsburg, GA 30277

Coweta County Middle Schools Arnall Middle School 770-254-2765 700 Lora Smith Road Newnan, GA 30265 East Coweta Middle School 770-599-6607 6291 E. Highway 16 Senoia, GA 30276

Madras Middle School 770-254-2744 240 Edgeworth Road Newnan, GA 30263 Smokey Road Middle School 770-254-2840 965 Smokey Road Newnan, GA 30263 Maggie Brown School 770-304-5930 32 Clark Street Newnan, GA 30263

Coweta County High Schools East Coweta High School 770-254-2850 400 Sharpsburg-McCollum Road Sharpsburg, GA 30277 Newnan High School 770-254-2880 190 LaGrange Street Newnan, GA 30263 Northgate High School 770-463-5585 3220 Fischer Road Newnan, GA 30265 Central Educational Center 678-423-2000 160 Martin Luther King Drive Newnan, GA 30263 Winston Dowdell Academy 770-254-2870 1 Dowdell Street Newnan, GA 30263 Westside/Burwell 770-254-2877 106 Westside School Road Newnan, GA 30263


A community is only as good as its schools. And great public schools are a big reason why Coweta County is a vibrant and enriching place to live. Coweta County Schools combine a small-town, community-based feel with big-city advantages and opportunities for our students.

“A passionate and caring school system dedicated to excellence, energized by the notion of family, and committed to the success of each student.” That is how the AdvancED Accreditation Review Committee described the Coweta County School System, following their review for five-year re-accreditation of our schools in 2016. According to the independent team’s evaluation, Coweta Schools performed at much higher levels than the average AdvancED-accredited learning institutions, in terms of teaching and learning, leadership capacity, and management of resources. During accreditation, school system stakeholders – including students and parents, teachers and community members – described Coweta Schools in several ways:

“Student-Centered” “Caring” “Amazing” “Exceptional” “Accountable” “Safe” “Nurturing” “Rigorous” “I would not want to be anywhere else.” “Committed” In the Coweta County School System, you will find schools among the top-performing in the state of Georgia and the nation: • On-time graduation rates and student performance on Georgia Milestones exams that well exceed state of Georgia averages. • Student SAT and ACT performance that exceeds state and national averages. • High rates of participation in Advanced Placement, college dual-enrollment and apprenticeships and workbased learning. • Distinctions such as a robust fine arts curriculum, outstanding athletics programs, a sophisticated technology environment including 1-to-1 pairing of students with Chromebook devices, and other advanced opportunities for students. • Honors that include a AP STEM and Humanities distinctions, state Reward schools, Georgia School Boards Association Exemplary School Board, state financial awards, and the Center for American Progress’ “Best Return on Educational Investment” distinction.

From academics to the arts to athletics – from college prep to career readiness – Coweta County Schools are committed to ensuring the success of every student. We invite you to visit our schools, tour the Central Educational Center College and Career Academy, or attend a performance at the Donald W. Nixon Centre for Performing and Visual Arts. See for yourself why Great Schools are at the Heart of our Coweta community.

To learn more, go to cowetaschools.net, or call 770-254-2800. To enroll a new student, call our Central Registration Center at 770-254-5551.

Coweta Living 2017-18 89


COUNTY/CITIES

C

Chattahoochee Hills — a city in southern Fulton County —  is known for its rural lifestyle,with nearly 60,000 acres of undeveloped land, one parcel located in Coweta.

Chattahoochee Hills to celebrate 10 years Nestled in southern Fulton County, Chattahoochee Hills is a city that encompasses

nearly 60,000 acres of land, most of which is still undeveloped. It officially became a city December 1, 2007, and the first elected officials took office shortly after, according to the Georgia.gov website. Known for its park-like scenery and rural lifestyle, Chattahoochee Hills is on the northwest border of the Chattahoochee River. City Manager Robbie Rokovitz said the city’s population is approximately 2,600, including Serenbe, an ecology-focused urban community. Most of the city is located in Fulton County, but one parcel of undeveloped land is in Coweta. Rokovitz said the city is Georgia’s fifth-largest city because of its geographic size. He said most

residents have at least three acres, and the city was incorporated as part of a countywide movement to create cities over public dissatisfaction with the county commission. Rokovitz said the city extends north up to Highway 92. “The city is very rural and really embraces agriculture,” Rokovitz said. “The founders made it that way on purpose.” Rokovitz said the city will more than likely remain rural because of restrictive zoning ordinances. “There are only two other places in the city that a place like Serenbe could be,” he said. “We have Smith’s Grocery Store, but all of the other stores are in Serenbe. You mainly have to go to Palmetto for other stores or restaurants that are close by.”

WRITTEN BY KANDICE BELL

90 Coweta Living 2017-18


COUNTY / CITIES

Although Serenbe is a gem of the city, Rokovitz said the city has three popular parks that are a hit for residents and visitors: Cochran Mill Park, Rico Park & Athletic Field and Hutcheson Ferry Park. Cochran Mill Park is the city’s largest park and is located on the west side of Cochran Mill Road. It has many amenities including: • Hiking, jogging and horse trails • Primitive camping sites • A playground • A picnic shelter • Wildlife habitat Rico Park & Athletic Field is located on the west side of Rico Road and is the site of the city’s youth sports activities. The athletic field is open for free play during park hours and may also be reserved for private or youth association events. Hutcheson Ferry Park is located on the south side of Hutcheson Ferry Road and features a walking trail and picnic tables. The park at Hutcheson Ferry is open to the public for passive park use. Coweta resident Chris Doane said he regularly visits Cochran Mill Park because of the size of the park and the close proximity to Coweta. “The city has really invested in the park’s amenities,” he said. “They have great scenery, such as the waterfalls, and it is well set up.” Doane said he frequents the park to ride his bike. CL

Cochran Mill Park is Chattahoochee Hills’ largest park.

Chattahoochee Hills has three popular parks for residents and visitors, including Cowetans: Cochran Mill Park, Rico Park & Athletic Field and Hutcheson Ferry Park.

WRITTEN BY KANDICE BELL


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One special photo has been chosen as the winning image in the first “Best of Dad” photography contest sponsored by The Newnan Times-Herald. The winning photo, along with several additional, outstanding pics, will be published on Father’s Day, June 18. The contest was open to photographers of all ages and skill levels and included

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a request for images that depicted “the best of” dads across the county. One entry, from Emily Madliak, shows a heartwarming image of a Newnan father, Aaron, and his son, Beckham. “These photos are by far my favorite pictures of my two guys,” Madliak wrote in an email with her contest submission. Madliak explained that she and her husband dis-

covered they were expecting just days after Aaron’s brother passed away in a tragic accident. The couple believes that their son, Beckham Parker, named for Aaron’s lost sibling, was a gift meant to ease the pain of the family’s loss. “Aaron is the world’s m o s t l o v i n g f a t h e r, ” Madliak said. “He makes sure we both know (mother and son) we are loved.” Look for the winning

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300 pounds of meth seized from north Coweta “superlab”

RESTAUR ANT INSPECTIONS ............ both on page 4B

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Estimated $2.8 million of methamphetamine marks largest bust in Coweta history BY CLAY NEELY

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Beyond the diamond Baseball 4 Christ ready to leave on annual mission trip.

....................... Page 7A

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June 16, 2017

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Local man sentenced 40 years

Inside the “superlab,” a large amount of methamphetamine was located on a cooling table, according to investigators. A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine within a production cycle, usually a 24-hour period.

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a request for images that maggie@newnan.com depicted “the best of” dads One special photo has across the county. One entry, from Emily been chosen as the winning image in the first “Best of Madliak, shows a heartDad” photography contest w a r m i n g i m a g e o f a sponsored by The Newnan Newnan father, Aaron, and Times-Herald. The win- his son, Beckham. “These photos are by far ning photo, along with several additional, outstanding my favorite pictures of my pics, will be published on two guys,” Madliak wrote in an email with her contest Father’s Day, June 18. The contest was open to submission. Madliak explained that photographers of all ages and skill levels and included she and her husband dis-

BY MAGGIE BOWERS

covered they were expecting just days after Aaron’s brother passed away in a tragic accident. The couple believes that their son, Beckham Parker, named for Aaron’s lost sibling, was a gift meant to ease the pain PHOTOS BY EMILY MADLIAK of the family’s loss. Aaron Madliak enjoys the company of his first son, Beckham Parker. “Aaron is the world’s m o s t l o v i n g f a t h e r, ” Madliak said. “He makes “Best of Dad” photo along and the latest in local news, sure we both know (mother with additional submissions visit The Newnan TimesSunday. For more informa- Herald online at w w w. and son) we are loved.” Look for the winning tion on upcoming contests times-herald.com

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Obituaries .............. 3A Opinion .................. 4A Sports.....................7-8A Comics ............... 2-3B Classifieds ............. 9A

............ both on page 4B

Baseball 4 Christ ready to leave on annual mission trip.

BY CLAY NEELY

clay@newnan.com

....................... Page 7A

WEATHER

In what authorities describe as the largest drug bust in Coweta history, investigators said an estimated $2.8 million worth of methamphetamine was seized from a home in north Coweta County Thursday. In a joint operation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta, members of the Coweta County Sheriff’s office entered the residence of 210 Shell Road, just off Tommy Lee Cook Road, on Thursday morning where 300 pounds of methamphetamine was found – allegedly a byproduct of a “superlab” operating on the property, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager. CCSO A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 Investigators with the Coweta pounds or more of methamphet- County Sheriff’s Office and U.S. amine within a production cycle, Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta discovered 300 pounds of usually a 24-hour period. methamphetamine at the residence “This is the largest operation of 210 Shell Road in north Coweta we’ve ever seen and possibly the County. The bust is the largest in

AND

............ both on page 4B

Charged with domestic violence against his wife.

....................... Page 2A WEATHER

88 70

BY CLAY NEELY

SATURDAY º º

87 71

Scattered thunderstorms

RAINFALL TOTALS Thursday: Trace Month: 4.83 in. Year: 28.19 in.

county history, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager.

UPDATE

clay@newnan.com

TODAY

88º 70º

Scattered thunderstorms

SUPERLAB • 2A

A man twice convicted of vehicular homicide in only four years is now heading to prison. Taylor Patr ick L on g pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide, hit and run, driving under the influence and reckless driving in a negotiated plea before Judge Emory Palmer. Long, 22, was sentenced to 20 years to serve 15 years in prison for his role in the CCSO fatal car crash that took the Taylor Patrick Long life of his girlfriend, Victoria “Tori” Clanton, last November. The fatal wreck marked Ashley Hurley described the second case of vehicu- the events of November la r homicide involv ing 6. After spending the day Long behind the wheel. In looking at potential houses 2013, Long was convicted to move into, Long and of misdemeanor vehicular Clanton attended a friend’s homicide for a 2012 crash cookout. that killed 9-year-old Abby A s the even i n g pro Bacho a nd injured her gressed, a small group left father. the cookout to drink at a Addressing the court, local bar. Long consumed Assistant District Attorney several more alcoholic bev-

a request for images that covered they were expectdepicted “the best of” dads ing just days after Aaron’s brother passed away in a One special photo has across the county. One entry, from Emily tragic accident. The coubeen chosen as the winning image in the first “Best of Madliak, shows a heart- ple believes that their son, Dad” photography contest w a r m i n g i m a g e o f a Beckham Parker, named sponsored by The Newnan Newnan father, Aaron, and for Aaron’s lost sibling, was a gift meant to ease the pain Times-Herald. The win- his son, Beckham. PHOTOS BY EMILY MADLIAK “These photos are by far of the family’s loss. ning photo, along with sevAaron Madliak enjoys the company of his first son, Beckham Parker. “Aaron is the world’s eral additional, outstanding my favorite pictures of my pics, will be published on two guys,” Madliak wrote m o s t l o v i n g f a t h e r, ” in an email with her contest Madliak said. “He makes “Best of Dad” photo along and the latest in local news, Father’s Day, June 18. sure we both know (mother with additional submissions visit The Newnan TimesThe contest was open to submission. Sunday. For more informa- Herald online at www. Madliak explained that and son) we are loved.” photographers of all ages Look for the winning tion on upcoming contests times-herald.com and skill levels and included she and her husband dis-

BY MAGGIE BOWERS

300 pounds of meth seized from north Coweta “superlab”

Charged with domestic violence against his wife.

....................... Page 2A WEATHER

CCSO

Inside the “superlab,” a large amount of methamphetamine was located on a cooling table, according to investigators. A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine within a production cycle, usually a 24-hour period.

Man pleads guilty, sentenced in vehicularhomicide case

BY CLAY NEELY

SATURDAY º º

87 71

Scattered thunderstorms

Thursday: Trace Month: 4.83 in. Year: 28.19 in.

SUPERLAB • 2A

county history, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager.

UPDATE

clay@newnan.com

TODAY

88º 70º

Scattered thunderstorms

RAINFALL TOTALS

In what authorities describe as the largest drug bust in Coweta history, investigators said an estimated $2.8 million worth of methamphetamine was seized from a home in north Coweta County Thursday. In a joint operation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta, members of the Coweta County Sheriff’s office entered the residence of 210 Shell Road, just off Tommy Lee Cook Road, on Thursday morning where 300 pounds of methamphetamine was found – allegedly a byproduct of a “superlab” operating on the property, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager. CCSO A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 Investigators with the Coweta pounds or more of methamphet- County Sheriff’s Office and U.S. amine within a production cycle, Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta discovered 300 pounds of usually a 24-hour period. methamphetamine at the residence “This is the largest operation of 210 Shell Road in north Coweta we’ve ever seen and possibly the County. The bust is the largest in

‘‘

Lives have been A man twice convicted of vehicular homicide in only lost, and it was all four years is now heading preventable in both to prison. cases. This conduct Taylor Patr ick L on g cannot go on any pleaded guilty to vehicular futher.” homicide, hit and run, driving under the influence and reckless driving in a negotiated plea before Judge erages before several friends Emory Palmer. watched the couple get into Long, 22, was sentenced Clanton’s car and leave for to 20 years to serve 15 years Long’s home, according to in prison for his role in the Hurley. CCSO fatal car crash that took the As Long approached 477 Taylor Patrick Long life of his girlfriend, VicHal Jones Road, the car toria “Tori” Clanton, last left the roadway, slid across November. a grassy area and struck The fatal wreck marked Ashley Hurley described a tree in a broadside fashthe second case of vehicu- the events of November ion on the passenger side of lar homicide involving 6. After spending the day the car. Clanton sustained Long behind the wheel. In looking at potential houses blunt-force injuries and 2013, Long was convicted to move into, Long and died on scene, according to of misdemeanor vehicular Clanton attended a friend’s Coweta County Coroner homicide for a 2012 crash cookout. Richard Hawk. that killed 9-year-old Abby A s the even i n g pro Homeowners allegedly Bacho and injured her gressed, a small group left heard the accident and witfather. the cookout to drink at a nessed a figure walk in front Addressing the court, local bar. Long consumed LONG • 3A Assistant District Attorney several more alcoholic bev-

METROCREATIVEGRAPHICS

$196 million budget for Coweta schools gets tentative approval

maintained an 18.59 mill property tax rate since The Coweta County setting it in the summer of 2004. Board of Education tenThe General Fund budtatively approved a 2018 get – primarily funded by General Fund budget of state and local property more than $196 million, tax revenues – anticipates which includes a 2 peran increase in state fundcent cost-of-living raise ing as well as 3 percent for school system employgrowth in the local tax ees, at its regular June digest. It funds instrucmeeting. tion and pupil services, A final vote will be held maintenance and operaat a called meeting on tion of schools, transporJune 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the tation, and other operaschool system offices, 237 tional costs. Jackson St. in Newnan. The tentatively The 2018 budget is approved budget also about 4 percent higher includes all federal fundthan the budget for the ing, including Title I, fedcurrent fiscal year, and no eral lunch programs and property tax increase is BUDGET • 2A expected. The board has

BY REBECCA LEFTWICH becky@newnan.com

‘‘

Lives have been lost, and it was all preventable in both cases. This conduct cannot go on any futher.”

BY REBECCA LEFTWICH becky@newnan.com

The Coweta County Board of Education tentatively approved a 2018 General Fund budget of more than $196 million, which includes a 2 percent cost-of-living raise for school system employees, at its regular June meeting. A final vote will be held at a called meeting on June 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the school system offices, 237 Jackson St. in Newnan. The 2 018 budget is about 4 percent higher than the budget for the current fiscal year, and no property tax increase is expected. The board has

maintained an 18.59 mill property tax rate since setting it in the summer of 2004. The General Fund budget – primarily funded by state and local property tax revenues – anticipates an increase in state funding as well as 3 percent growth in the local tax digest. It funds instruction and pupil services, maintenance and operation of schools, transportation, and other operational costs. The tentatively approved budget also includes all federal funding, including Title I, federal lunch programs and

BY MAGGIE BOWERS maggie@newnan.com

Estimated $2.8 million of methamphetamine marks largest bust in Coweta history

CCSO

Local man sentenced 40 years

One special photo has been chosen as the winning image in the first “Best of Dad” photography contest sponsored by The Newnan Times-Herald. The winning photo, along with several additional, outstanding pics, will be published on Father’s Day, June 18. The contest was open to photographers of all ages and skill levels and included

‘‘

AND

Lives have been RESTAUR ANT lost, and it was all INSPECTIONS preventable in both ............ both on page 4B cases. This conduct cannot go on any futher.”

a request for images that depicted “the best of” dads across the county. One entry, from Emily Madliak, shows a heartwarming image of a Newnan father, Aaron, and his son, Beckham. “These photos are by far my favorite pictures of my two guys,” Madliak wrote in an email with her contest submission. Madliak explained that she and her husband dis-

covered they were expecting just days after Aaron’s brother passed away in a tragic accident. The couple believes that their son, Beckham Parker, named for Aaron’s lost sibling, was METROCREATIVEGRAPHICS a gift meant to ease the pain PHOTOS BY EMILY MADLIAK of the family’s loss. Aaron Madliak enjoys the company of his first son, Beckham Parker. “Aaron is the world’s m o s t l o v i n g f a t h e r, ” Madliak said. “He makes “Best of Dad” photo along and the latest in local news, sure we both know (mother with additional submissions visit The Newnan TimesSunday. For more informa- Herald online at w w w. and son) we are loved.” Look for the winning tion on upcoming contests times-herald.com

budget for Coweta

300 pounds meth seized schoolsofgets from north Coweta “superlab” tentative approval

LONG • 3A

BUDGET • 2A

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Estimated $2.8 million of

an 18.59 mill BY REBECCA LEFTWICH maintained methamphetamine marks becky@newnan.com property tax rate since largest bust in Coweta history it in the summer The Coweta County settingBY CLAY NEELY erages before several friends clay@newnan.com Board of Education ten- of 2004. In what authorities describe as watched theBeyond couple get General budthe largest drugFund bust in Coweta theinto tatively approved a 2018 The history, investigators said an estiClanton’s car and leave for get – primarily by mated $2.8 millionfunded worth of methGeneral Fund budget of amphetamine was seized from a Long’s home,diamond according to property home inlocal north Coweta County more than $196 million, state and Baseball 4 Christ Thursday. Hurley. anticipates ready to leave on In a joint– operation with the which includes a 2 per- tax revenues annual mission 477 U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in As Long approached in state fundtrip. Atlanta, members of the Coweta cent cost-of-living raise an increase County Sheriff’s office entered Hal Jones Road, the car well asof 210 3 percent the residence Shell Road, ....................... Page 7A for school system employ- ing as just left the roadway, off Tommy Lee Cook Road, slid across in the local tax on Thursday morning where 300 ees, at its regular June growth a grassy area and struck pounds of methamphetamine was digest. It funds instrucfound – allegedly a byproduct of a meeting. a tree in a broadside fash“superlab” operating on the proption and pupil services, erty, according to Sheriff Mike A final vote will be held ion on the passenger side of Yeager. maintenance and operaA “superlab” is defined as a labat a called meeting on the car. Clanton sustained capable oftransporproducing 10 Investigators with the Coweta tion oforatory schools, pounds or more of methamphet- County Sheriff’s Office and U.S. June 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the blunt-force injuries and amine within a production cycle, Drug Enforcement Agency in tation,usually and other operaAtlanta discovered 300 pounds of a 24-hour period. school system offices, 237 died on scene, according to methamphetamine at the residence “This is the largest operation of 210 Shell Road in north Coweta costs. Inside the “superlab,” a large amount of methamphetamine was located ontional a cooling we’ve ever seen and possibly the County. The bust is the largest in Jackson St. in Newnan. according to investigators. A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable Coweta County LocalCoroner man oftable, history, according to Sheriff T h e t e n t a t i v e l ycounty producing 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine within a production cycle, SUPERLAB • 2A Mike Yeager. usually a 24-hour The period. 2 018 budget is Richard Hawk. approved budget also sentenced about 4 percent higher Homeowners allegedly includes all federal fund40 years heard the accident and wit-UPDATE than the budget for the ing, including Title I, fedcurrent fiscal year, and no nessed a figure walk Charged with in front eral lunch programs and domestic vioproperty tax increase is lence against his wife. LONG • 3A expected. The board has BUDGET • 2A

Web Edition 87 71

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clay@newnan.com

Baseball 4 Christ ready to leave on annual mission trip.

METROCREATIVEGRAPHICS

erages before several friends watched the couple get into Clanton’s car and leave for Long’s home, according to Hurley. As Long approached 477 Hal Jones Road, the car left the roadway, slid across a grassy area and struck a tree in a broadside fashion on the passenger side of the car. Clanton sustained blunt-force injuries and died on scene, according to Coweta County Coroner Richard Hawk. Homeowners allegedly heard the accident and witnessed a figure walk in front

ISSUE 110 | NEWNAN, GA | SINCE 1865

BY CLAY NEELY

BASEBALL FOR CHRIST

Beyond the diamond

A man twice convicted of vehicular homicide in only four years is now heading TODAY Man pleads guilty, to prison. sentenced inº vehicular- Taylor Patr ick L on g º homicide case pleaded guilty to vehicular $196 million Scattered budget for hit Coweta homicide, and run, drivthunderstorms schools gets ing underapproval the influence and tentative reckless driving in a negotiated plea before Judge Emory Palmer. Long, 22, was sentenced to 20 years to serve 15 years SATURDAY in prison for his role in the fatal car crash that took the º º life of his girlfriend, VicScattered toria “Tori” Clanton, last thunderstorms November. The fatal wreck marked RAINFALL TOTALS the second case of vehicula r homicide involv ing Thursday: Trace Long behind the wheel. In Month: 4.83 in. 2013, Long was convicted Year: 28.19 in. of misdemeanor vehicular homicide for a 2012 crash that killed 9-year-old Abby Bacho a nd injured her father. Addressing the court, Assistant District Attorney CCSO

Inside the “superlab,” a large amount of methamphetamine was located on a cooling table, according to investigators. A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine within a production cycle, usually a 24-hour period.

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Two escaped inmates caught

RESTAUR ANT INSPECTIONS

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CCSO

Local man sentenced 40 years

See & Do • 1B Weekend Edition county history, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager.

SUPERLAB • 2A

Weekend filled with outdoor festivities and more

Man pleads guilty, to be included Sunday Two sentenced in vehicularescaped homicide case inmates caught $196 million

methamphetamine marks largest bust in Coweta history

....................... Page 2A

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Beyond the diamond

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ISSUE 110 | NEWNAN, GA | SINCE 1865

Charged with domestic vio300 pounds of meth seized lence against from north Coweta “superlab” his wife. Estimated $2.8 million of

RESTAUR ANT INSPECTIONS

June 16, 2017

Church members share artistry and skill to create kneelers and cushions Faith & Religion • 5A

In what authorities describe as the largest drug bust in Coweta history, investigators said an estimated $2.8 million worth of methamphetamine was seized from a home in north Coweta County Thursday. In a joint operation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta, members of the Coweta County Sheriff’s office entered the residence of 210 Shell Road, just off Tommy Lee Cook Road, on Thursday morning where 300 pounds of methamphetamine was found – allegedly a byproduct of a “superlab” operating on the property, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager. A “superlab” is defined as a labCCSO oratory capable of producing 10 Investigators with the Coweta County pounds or more of methamphet- June Sheriff’s Office and U.S. 16, 2017 Agency in Needlework beautycycle, Drug EnforcementMusic showcase, amine within a production Atlanta discovered 300 pounds of usually a 24-hour period. at First Methodist madness methamphetaminemovie at the residence “This isChurch the largest members share artistryoperation and skill with outdoor of 210 Shell Road in Weekend northfilled Coweta to create kneelers cushions and more we’ve ever seen andandpossibly the County. The bust is thefestivities largest in

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CCSO

Taylor Patrick Long

Ashley Hurley described the events of November 6. After spending the day looking at potential houses to move into, Long and Clanton attended a friend’s cookout. A s the even i n g pro gressed, a small group left the cookout to drink at a local bar. Long consumed several more alcoholic bev-

CCSO

Our responsive online edition works on whatever device you use, Man pleads guilty,99¢ the first month and $6.75 each laptop, tablet or cellphone. Just sentenced in vehicularhomicide case month after. ‘‘ CCSO

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METROCREATIVEGRAPHICS

WEATHER

BY CLAY NEELY

clay@newnan.com

TODAY º º

88 70

Scattered thunderstorms

SATURDAY º º

87 71

Scattered thunderstorms

Lives have been lost, and it was all preventable in both cases. This conduct cannot go on any futher.”

$196 million budget for Coweta schools gets tentative approval

BY REBECCA LEFTWICH becky@newnan.com

CCSO

Taylor Patrick Long

erages before several friends watched the couple get into Clanton’s car and leave for Long’s home, according to Hurley. As Long approached 477 Hal Jones Road, the car left the roadway, slid across a grassy area and struck a tree in a broadside fashion on the passenger side of the car. Clanton sustained blunt-force injuries and died on scene, according to Coweta County Coroner Richard Hawk. Homeowners allegedly heard the accident and witnessed a figure walk in front

The Coweta County Board of Education tentatively approved a 2018 General Fund budget of more than $196 million, which includes a 2 percent cost-of-living raise for school system employees, at its regular June meeting. A final vote will be held at a called meeting on June 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the school system offices, 237 Jackson St. in Newnan. The 2 018 budget is about 4 percent higher than the budget for the current fiscal year, and no property tax increase is expected. The board has

maintained an 18.59 mill property tax rate since setting it in the summer of 2004. The General Fund budget – primarily funded by state and local property tax revenues – anticipates an increase in state funding as well as 3 percent growth in the local tax digest. It funds instruction and pupil services, maintenance and operation of schools, transportation, and other operational costs. The tentatively approved budget also includes all federal funding, including Title I, federal lunch programs and

E-Printed Edition RAINFALL TOTALS Thursday: Trace Month: 4.83 in. Year: 28.19 in.

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A man twice convicted of vehicular homicide in only four years is now heading to prison. Taylor Patr ick L on g pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide, hit and run, driving under the influence and reckless driving in a negotiated plea before Judge Emory Palmer. Long, 22, was sentenced to 20 years to serve 15 years in prison for his role in the fatal car crash that took the life of his girlfriend, Victoria “Tori” Clanton, last November. The fatal wreck marked the second case of vehicula r homicide involv ing Long behind the wheel. In 2013, Long was convicted of misdemeanor vehicular homicide for a 2012 crash that killed 9-year-old Abby Bacho a nd injured her father. Addressing the court, Assistant District Attorney

Ashley Hurley described the events of November 6. After spending the day looking at potential houses to move into, Long and Clanton attended a friend’s cookout. A s the even i n g pro gressed, a small group left the cookout to drink at a local bar. Long consumed several more alcoholic bev-

LONG • 3A

Needlework beauty at First Methodist

BUDGET • 2A

June 16, 2017

Music showcase, movie madness

Church members share artistry and skill to create kneelers and cushions Faith & Religion • 5A

Read a copy of the printed version of each day’s newspaper, laid out from the front page to the last want ad. Turn each page from any device as if you’d picked up what was delivered to your driveway.

See & Do • 1B

ISSUE 110 | NEWNAN, GA | SINCE 1865

INSIDE GUIDE

Obituaries .............. 3A Opinion .................. 4A Sports.....................7-8A Comics ............... 2-3B Classifieds ............. 9A

Two escaped inmates caught AND

RESTAUR ANT INSPECTIONS ............ both on page 4B

Easy Registration:

Weekend filled with outdoor festivities and more

Weekend Edition

| 75¢

‘Best of Dad’ photos to be included Sunday BY MAGGIE BOWERS maggie@newnan.com

One special photo has been chosen as the winning image in the first “Best of Dad” photography contest sponsored by The Newnan Times-Herald. The winning photo, along with several additional, outstanding pics, will be published on Father’s Day, June 18. The contest was open to photographers of all ages and skill levels and included

a request for images that depicted “the best of” dads across the county. One entry, from Emily Madliak, shows a heartwarming image of a Newnan father, Aaron, and his son, Beckham. “These photos are by far my favorite pictures of my two guys,” Madliak wrote in an email with her contest submission. Madliak explained that she and her husband dis-

covered they were expecting just days after Aaron’s brother passed away in a tragic accident. The couple believes that their son, Beckham Parker, named for Aaron’s lost sibling, was a gift meant to ease the pain PHOTOS BY EMILY MADLIAK of the family’s loss. Aaron Madliak enjoys the company of his first son, Beckham Parker. “Aaron is the world’s m o s t l o v i n g f a t h e r, ” Madliak said. “He makes “Best of Dad” photo along and the latest in local news, sure we both know (mother with additional submissions visit The Newnan TimesSunday. For more informa- Herald online at w w w. and son) we are loved.” Look for the winning tion on upcoming contests times-herald.com

300 pounds of meth seized from north Coweta “superlab” Estimated $2.8 million of methamphetamine marks largest bust in Coweta history BY CLAY NEELY

BASEBALL FOR CHRIST

clay@newnan.com

Beyond the diamond

In what authorities describe as the largest drug bust in Coweta history, investigators said an estimated $2.8 million worth of methamphetamine was seized from a home in north Coweta County Thursday. In a joint operation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta, members of the Coweta County Sheriff’s office entered the residence of 210 Shell Road, just off Tommy Lee Cook Road, on Thursday morning where 300 pounds of methamphetamine was found – allegedly a byproduct of a “superlab” operating on the property, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager. CCSO A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 Investigators with the Coweta pounds or more of methamphet- County Sheriff’s Office and U.S. amine within a production cycle, Drug Enforcement Agency in Atlanta discovered 300 pounds of usually a 24-hour period. methamphetamine at the residence “This is the largest operation of 210 Shell Road in north Coweta we’ve ever seen and possibly the County. The bust is the largest in

Go to times-herald.com and click on Subscriber Services, call 770-304-3373, or visit us at 16 Jefferson Street, Newnan. Baseball 4 Christ ready to leave on annual mission trip.

....................... Page 7A

CCSO

Local man sentenced 40 years

Charged with domestic violence against his wife.

....................... Page 2A WEATHER

CCSO

Inside the “superlab,” a large amount of methamphetamine was located on a cooling table, according to investigators. A “superlab” is defined as a laboratory capable of producing 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine within a production cycle, usually a 24-hour period.

Man pleads guilty, sentenced in vehicularhomicide case

‘‘

BY CLAY NEELY

clay@newnan.com

TODAY º º

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SATURDAY º º

87 71

Scattered thunderstorms

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the low monthly payment plan! Call today to sign up!

Thursday: Trace Month: 4.83 in. Year: 28.19 in.

770-304-3373

A man twice convicted of vehicular homicide in only four years is now heading to prison. Taylor Patr ick L on g pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide, hit and run, driving under the influence and reckless driving in a negotiated plea before Judge Emory Palmer. Long, 22, was sentenced to 20 years to serve 15 years in prison for his role in the fatal car crash that took the life of his girlfriend, Victoria “Tori” Clanton, last November. The fatal wreck marked the second case of vehicula r homicide involv ing Long behind the wheel. In 2013, Long was convicted of misdemeanor vehicular homicide for a 2012 crash that killed 9-year-old Abby Bacho a nd injured her father. Addressing the court, Assistant District Attorney

Lives have been lost, and it was all preventable in both cases. This conduct cannot go on any futher.”

• FOLLOW US ON

county history, according to Sheriff Mike Yeager.

METROCREATIVEGRAPHICS

$196 million budget for Coweta schools gets tentative approval BY REBECCA LEFTWICH becky@newnan.com

CCSO

Taylor Patrick Long

Ashley Hurley described the events of November 6. After spending the day looking at potential houses to move into, Long and Clanton attended a friend’s cookout. A s the even i n g pro gressed, a small group left the cookout to drink at a local bar. Long consumed several more alcoholic bev-

16 Jefferson Street • Newnan, GA 30263 times-herald.com LIKE US ON

SUPERLAB • 2A

UPDATE

erages before several friends watched the couple get into Clanton’s car and leave for Long’s home, according to Hurley. As Long approached 477 Hal Jones Road, the car left the roadway, slid across a grassy area and struck a tree in a broadside fashion on the passenger side of the car. Clanton sustained blunt-force injuries and died on scene, according to Coweta County Coroner Richard Hawk. Homeowners allegedly heard the accident and witnessed a figure walk in front

LONG • 3A

The Coweta County Board of Education tentatively approved a 2018 General Fund budget of more than $196 million, which includes a 2 percent cost-of-living raise for school system employees, at its regular June meeting. A final vote will be held at a called meeting on June 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the school system offices, 237 Jackson St. in Newnan. The 2 018 budget is about 4 percent higher than the budget for the current fiscal year, and no property tax increase is expected. The board has

maintained an 18.59 mill property tax rate since setting it in the summer of 2004. The General Fund budget – primarily funded by state and local property tax revenues – anticipates an increase in state funding as well as 3 percent growth in the local tax digest. It funds instruction and pupil services, maintenance and operation of schools, transportation, and other operational costs. The tentatively approved budget also includes all federal funding, including Title I, federal lunch programs and

BUDGET • 2A


Coweta 411: info you can use

If you’re new to Coweta, whether you live inside the city limits or in the unincorporated county, you’ll get most of your services from Coweta County. To register to vote or change your address, you can contact the Coweta County Board of Elections and Registration’s voter registration office. Or, you can register or make changes to your voter registration record online at www.registertovote.sos.ga.gov. Once you’re registered, you can find out what state and federal voting districts you are in, and find your polling place, at the Georgia Secretary of State’s My Voter Page site, www.mvp.sos.ga.gov. Every Coweta resident is eligible to vote for a county commissioner every four years. The county is divided into five commission districts. Generally, the 1st District is eastern Coweta, the 3rd District is northwestern Coweta, the 4th District is northeastern Coweta, the 5th District is central Coweta and the 2nd District is south and west Coweta. The districts come together in the city of Newnan. You can view an interactive map of the districts and check your address by visiting Coweta County’s website, www.coweta.ga.us, and clicking on “commissioners” under the County Government menu. Or, call the voter registration office at 770-254-2615 for more information. Early voting for most elections is held in two locations: at the voter registration office in the county administration building at 22 East Broad Street, and at the Central Community Center, 65 Literary Lane. Every Cowetan is also eligible to vote for three members of the Coweta County Board of Education. There are five districts, and two members who serve at-large. For more information, visit

www.cowetaschools.org or call the voter registration office. If you live in the city limits of Newnan, you get to vote for two city council members, as well as the mayor. There are three districts, which each have two council members. For more information, visit www.cityofnewnan.org or call voter registration. The council in the city of Chattahoochee Hills is also elected by district. See chatthillsga.us or call 770-463-8881 for more information. The councils in Senoia, Turin, Sharpsburg, Haralson, Grantville, Moreland and Palmetto are all elected at-large, with no districts. Speaking of Coweta’s smaller towns and communities, addresses can sometimes be confusing. As far as your GPS and the U.S. Postal Service are concerned, Haralson and Turin are Senoia, and Arnco and Sargent are Newnan. Even though Haralson, Turin and Sargent have their own post offices, there is no mail delivery from them, so Haralson and Turin residents get their mail delivered from Senoia, and Sargent and Arnco get their mail from Newnan. Coweta County offices are also where you obtain your vehicle tag and registration, birth and death certificates, marriage licenses and weaponscarry permits. The Coweta County tag office is located on the Perry Street side of the county administration building at 22 East Broad Street. The Coweta tax commissioner’s office is located next to the tag office, and the Coweta tax assessor’s office is adjacent to the other side of the tag office. Newcomers to Georgia should be aware that they will likely face a hefty tax bill when registering their vehicles in the state for the first time. Under Georgia’s Title Ad Valorem Tax, which

WRITTEN BY SARAH FAY CAMPBELL Coweta Living 2017-18 93

COUNTY / CITIES

C

Coweta County’s Tag Office is located in the Coweta Administration Building at 22 East Broad Street in downtown Newnan. The entrance is on the Perry Street side.


COUNTY/CITIES

Newnan Beautification/Parks 770-254-2354 Building 770-254-2362 Carnegie Library 770-683-1347 Cemetery 770-253-3744 City Clerk 770-254-2358 City Manager 770-254-2358 Code Enforcement 770-254-2362 Community Development 770-254-2354 Engineering 770-253-0327 Facilities Maintenance 678-673-5528 Finance/Business License 770-254-2351 Fire 770-253-1851 Garbage Pick up — Waste Industries 770-474-9273 Human Resources 770-254-2358 Information Technology 770-254-2358 Keep Newnan Beautiful 770-253-8283 Lynch Park 770-683-2377 Main Street Newnan 770-253-8283 Mayor 770-254-2358 Planning and Zoning 770-254-2354 Police 770-254-2355 Public Information 770-254-2358 Public Works 770-253-0327 Sanitation 770-253-0327 Street 770-253-0327

Department Heads Beautification Mike Furbush Building Bill Stephenson Cemetery Jimmy Hemmings City Clerk Della Hill City Manager Cleatus Phillips Engineering Michael Klahr Facilities Management Mark Johnston Finance Katrina Cline Fire David Whitley Human Resources Meg Blubaugh Information Technology Jim Chambers

94 Coweta Living 2017-18

Keep Newnan Beautiful Page Beckwith Business Development Director / Main Street Newnan Hasco W. Craver IV Mayor Keith Brady Planning and Zoning Tracy Dunnavant Police D. L. “Buster” Meadows Public Information Gina L. Snider Public Works Michael Klahr Streets/ Garage/ Sanitation Deputy Public Works Ray Norton

took effect in 2013, owners of vehicles being registered in Georgia for the first time must pay the TAVT, which is set at 7 percent of the vehicle’s value — as determined by the Georgia Department of Revenue. The condition, mileage, or upgraded equipment are not taken into account when the department determines the value. However, if you think that the statedetermined value is not accurate for your vehicle, you can appeal. Classic cars have a base value and are not taxed on their collectible value. New Georgians have the option of paying 50 percent of the tax at the time the vehicle is registered, with the remaining portion due within 12 months. After you pay your TAVT, you won’t have to pay annual ad valorem taxes on your vehicle, just a yearly tag fee. Tags expire on the vehicle owner’s birthday. Before you can register your vehicle or renew your tag, you must have a current passing emissions inspection — or be exempt — and proof of insurance. Vehicles that are 25 years old or older are exempt from emissions requirements. Once your vehicle is registered, you can renew your tag online or by phone, or at the office. You can renew online at mvd.dor.ga.gov/tags or by calling 877-496-0249. You can find more information at www.cowetataxcom.com. The tax commissioner’s office is in charge of property taxes, on both real estate and personal and business property. The tax assessor’s office determines the fair market value, for tax purposes, of all properties in Coweta. If you disagree with the value placed on your property, you can file an appeal through the tax assessor’s office, typically in the summer after receiving an assessment notice. You can also contest the value by filing a property tax return at the tax commissioner’s office. The Coweta County Board of Education, as well as most of the county’s cities and towns, levy property taxes. All property taxes are billed through the Coweta County tax commissioner’s office. The tax commissioner’s office is also where you apply for various property tax exemptions. Senior citizens are eligible for several exemptions to reduce the amount of school property taxes that are owed. For more information, visit the tax commissioner’s website, www.cowetataxcom.com and the tax assessor’s website, www.cowetatax.com. Georgia law requires drivers to change their address on their driver’s licenses when they move. The local Department of Driver’s Services office is located at 128 Bullsboro Drive, in the Food Depot shopping center. For more information, visit www.dds.ga.gov. Coweta County Probate Court is located in the 1904 Courthouse on the Court Square in downtown Newnan. Probate court is where you get copies of birth and death certificates, apply for a marriage license, and get a weaponscarry permit. Through the state of Georgia’s computerized vital records systems, most people who were born in Georgia can get a birth certificate from Coweta Probate Court, even if they weren’t born in Coweta. Many death certificates from Georgia are also available locally. In addition to keeping records and issuing licenses,


probate court deals with estates, wills, and trusts, as well as guardianships and involuntary committals. Across the hall from probate court is the Coweta County Visitor’s Center, where there is a wealth of information about Coweta and surrounding areas — and lots of brochures for activities and attractions around the state. The Coweta office of the Georgia Division of Family and Children’s Services is in charge of child protection and child welfare services, foster care, and Adult Protective Services, as well as Medicaid, food stamps, and Temporary Aid to Needy Families. The office is located at 533 U.S. Highway 29, Newnan. For more information, call 770-254-7234.

Coweta’s superior, state, magistrate and juvenile courts are located at the Coweta Justice Center complex at 72

Greenville Street. Juvenile Court has its own building. Superior court is usually where you’ll go if called for jury duty, and it has jurisdiction over divorces, child custody cases, adoptions, name changes, protective orders, and felonies. State court has jurisdiction over misdemeanors, and many traffic tickets issued in Coweta are paid through the state court clerk’s office. Civil suits can be heard in both state and superior court. The Coweta Superior Court Clerk’s Office is also where real estate transactions are recorded, and where you go to search real estate records. Magistrate court deals with landlord/tenant issues, small civil suits, and warrants. CL

Mayor Doug Jewell mayor@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 Mayor Pro-Tem Leonard Gomez leonard.gomez@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 Council Member William Kee willie.kee@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 Council Member Ruby Hines ruby.hines@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 Council Member Mark King mark.king@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 City Manager Al Grieshaber Jr. agrieshaber@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 ext. 215 City Attorney Mark Mitchell markmitchelllaw.com 770-800-2327 City Clerk Lynn Basham lbasham@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 ext. 202 Police Chief Steve Whitlock swhitlock@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 Emergencies Call 911 Public Works Superintendent Ron Owens rowens@grantvillega.org 770-583-2289 ext. 205 Post Office 88 Lagrange Street 770-583-2827 Grantville Library 100 Park Drive 770-683-0535 Senior Center Joann Byrom jbyrom@grantvillega.org 770-583-2706 Splash Park 770-583-8935

Senoia Senoia City Hall 80 Main Street, Senoia 770-599-3679 Senoia Police Department (non-emergency) 505 Howard Road, Senoia 770-599-3256 Senoia Downtown Development Authority/ Senoia Welcome Center www.enjoysenoia.com 68 Main Street, Senoia 770-727-9173

545 Corinth Road Newnan, GA 30263

770-254-3710 www.cowetawater.com

Senoia Post Office 68 Broad Street, Senoia 770-599-3251 Senoia Library 148 Pylant Street, Senoia 770-599-3537 Senoia Public Works Department Randy Padgett, director 770-599-3679

Coweta Living 2017-18 95

COUNTY / CITIES

Grantville


COUNTY/CITIES

Coweta County Here are Coweta County government departments and contact numbers for various county buildings and facilities: Coweta County Animal Control 91 Selt Road, Newnan 770-254-3725 Emergencies after 5 p.m. 770-254-3728 Coweta County Tag Office 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2631 Coweta County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency 560 Greison Trail, Newnan 770-253-1502 Coweta County Jail 560 Greison Trail, Newnan 770-253-1664 Coweta Sheriff’s Office Eastside Precinct 55 Literary Lane, Newnan 770-253-1502 Newnan-Coweta County Airport Whitlock Field 115 Airport Road, Newnan 770-254-8102 Coweta County Recreation Department • Main Office/Temple Avenue Complex 39 Hospital Road, Newnan 770-254-3750 • Hunter Complex 2970 East Hwy. 16, Sharpsburg 770-254-3740 • Clay-Wood Center 135 Heery Road, Newnan 770-254-3745

Coweta County Code Enforcement 4 Madison Street, Newnan 770-254-2669

Coweta Public Library System

Coweta County Human Resources 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2604

• Powell Library 25 Hospital Road, Newnan 770-253-3625

Coweta County Coroner 195 International Park, Newnan 770-683-0444 Coweta County Development Authority 100 International Park, Newnan 770-304-1777 Coweta County GIS Department 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 678-854-0029 crichmond@coweta.ga.us Coweta County Transportation and Engineering (includes stormwater and floodplain management) 21 East Washington Street, Newnan 770-254-3775 Coweta County Business Tax (business license) 22 East Broad Street 770-254-2626 Coweta County Environmental Health 28 East Washington Street, Newnan 770-683-7345

Coweta Voter Registration Office 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2615

Coweta County Tax Commissioner 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2670 www.cowetataxcom.com

Coweta Building Inspection Department 4 Madison Street, Newnan 770-254-2660

Coweta County Tax Assessor 37 Perry Street, Newnan 770-254-2680 www.cowetatax.com

Coweta Board of Elections 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 678-854-0015

Coweta County Commissioners Office 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2601

Coweta County Planning and Zoning Department 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2635

96 Coweta Living 2017-18

Coweta County Health Department 70 Hospital Road, Newnan 770-254-7400

• Central Library 85 Literary Lane, Newnan 770-683-2052

• Grantville Branch Library 100 Park Drive, Grantville 770-683-0535 • Senoia Branch 148 Pylant Street, Newnan 770-599-3537 Coweta County Probate Court birth/death certificates, marriage licenses, weapons licenses 200 Court Square, Newnan 770-254-2640 Coweta County Convention and Visitors Bureau 200 Court Square, Newnan 770-254-2627 Coweta County Fire Department non-emergency 483 Turkey Creek Road, Newnan 770-254-3900 Coweta 911 non-emergency 195 International Park, Newnan 770-254-3911 Coweta Emergency Management 195 International Park, Newnan 770-254-2650 Coweta County Road Department 101 Selt Road, Newnan 770-253-0794 Coweta County Environmental Management (trash/recycling/landfill) 101 Selt Road, Newnan 770-254-3785 Coweta County Prison and Work Release 101 Selt Road, Newnan 770-254-3723 Coweta County Superior Court Clerk 72 Greenville Street, Newnan 770-254-2698


Coweta County Juvenile Court 78 Greenville Street, Newnan 770-254-3730 Coweta County District Attorney’s Office 72 Greenville Street, Newnan 770-254-7300 Coweta County Magistrate Court 72 Greenville Street, Newnan 770-254-2610 Coweta State Court Public Defender 22 East Broad Street, Newnan 770-254-2658 Coweta Superior Court Public Defender 8B Madison Street, Newnan 770-254-2704

Coweta County State Court Probation 10 Olive Street, Newnan 770-252-6440 Coweta Felony Probation 51 Perry Street, Newnan 770-254-7204 Coweta County Event Services (Fairgrounds and community center rentals) 275 Pine Road, Newnan 770-254-2685

Georgia Department of Driver’s Services (drivers license) 128 Bullsboro Drive, Newnan 770-254-7203 Georgia Department of Family and Children’s Services 533 Hwy. 29 North, Newnan 770-254-7234 Georgia State Patrol 517 Turkey Creek Road, Newnan 770-254-7201

UGA Extension Service, Coweta County (4-H) 255 Pine Road, Newnan 770-254-2620

Veteran’s Services 22 East Broad Street, Room 119 Newnan 770-254-7260

Coweta Water and Sewerage Authority 545 Corinth Road, Newnan 770-254-3710 www.cowetawater.com

Social Security Administration Newnan Field Office 246 Bullsboro Drive, Newnan 1-800-772-1213

ust 30 minutes south of Atlanta is a place so charming, so historic, so embracing of the past, yet so welcoming to the future...Coweta County! Come see the treasures we have...Visit Newnan - the City of Homes and see where country music star Alan Jackson grew up...Shop or take driving tours in the county’s historic districts, visit Dunaway Gardens and plan to spend time at the 3,000 acre Chattahoochee Bend State Park. But before you set out to Explore Coweta, stop by the Coweta County Convention & Visitors Bureau in the historic courthouse in downtown Newnan and let us help plan your adventures!

627 • www.explorecoweta.com 200 Court Square • Newnan, GA 30263 • 800-826-9382 • 770-254-2 Coweta Living 2017-18 97

COUNTY / CITIES

Coweta County State Court Clerk 72 Greenville Street, Newnan 770-254-2699


COUNTY/CITIES

Chattahoochee Hills

6505 Rico Road, Chattahoochee Hills 770-463-8881 www.chatthillsga.us

Haralson

171 Magnolia Street, Haralson 770-599-3985 Haralson Post Office 770-599-3665 214 Ga. 85 Haralson, GA 30229

Moreland 7 Main Street, Moreland 770-251-3428 www.morelandgausa.com Moreland Post Office 678-423-6386 100 Ball Street, Moreland

Palmetto

509 Toombs Street, Palmetto 770-463-3377 www.citypalmetto.com

A

Advertiser INDEX Arbor Springs Realty.................. 33 Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates..................................31

Kemp's Dalton West Flooring.......................................29 Kindred Hospice.........................69

The Bedford School....................81

Lee-King Pharmacy...................21

Berkshire Hathaway Home Services.....................................100

Let Them Eat Toffee....................53

Bo Kersey – Berkshire Hathaway Home Services.......................... 33

McKoon Funeral Home..............21

Brewton-Parker College............87

Newnan First United Methodist Church........................................65

Carriage House..........................47 Charter Bank...............................20 Christian City...............................13 Coweta Charter Academy.........6

Main Street Newnan..................21 Musicology..................................82

Newnan Masterworks Chorale.......................................68 Newnan Theatre Company......53 The Newnan Times-Herald........92

Palmetto Post Office 770-463-3457 502 Walnut Way, Palmetto

Coweta Cities and County Employees Federal Credit Union...........................................27

Sargent

Coweta County Development Authority.....................................17

Sargent Post Office 770-253-9734 374 Henry Bryant Road, Sargent

Coweta County Convention & Visitors Bureau...........................97

Sharpsburg

Coweta County Health Department.................................8

Schultz Family Dental.................75

105 Main Street, Sharpsburg 770-251-4171 www.townofsharpsburg.com

Coweta County School System.........................................89

St. Paul's Episcopal Church.......66

Sharpsburg Post Office 770-252-3409 6545 Hwy. 54, Sharpsburg

Coweta County Water & Sewerage Authority..................95

Turin

47 Turin Road, Turin 770-599-07777 www.townofturin.com Turin Post Office 770-599-6585 14 Hunter Street, Turin, GA, 30289

98 Coweta Living 2017-18

Coweta-Fayette EMC................24 Cresswind Peachtree City...........9 Crossroads Church.......................2 Edward Jones..............................19 Fresh Vitamins.............................74

Newnan Utilities..........................23 Pain Care.......................................4 Pontoni Hair Design & Skin Care....................................77 Powers Heating & Air.................37 Progressive Heating & Air Conditioning................................5 Somerby Peachtree City...........61 Stephanie Fagerstrom State Farm..................................17 StoneBridge Early Learning Center........................................ 85 Town of Sharpsburg......................7 Treasures Old & New..................49 United Bank.................................31

Georgia Bone & Joint..................3

University of Georgia – Griffin Campus..........................81

The Heritage School...................86

University of West Georgia........79

Insignia of Newnan....................59

ValueMax Car Rental.................21

Jack Peek's Sales........................99

Wesley Woods of Newnan........71


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